Legal pluralism, women's land rights and gender equality in

Loading...

  ISSN 2413‐807X

 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique

            

 

Harmonizing statutory and customary law

   

                   

            FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104

 

 

 

 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique

            

 

Harmonizing statutory and customary law

   

 

Marianna Bicchieri

Land Tenure Officer, FAO

 

Anabel Ayala Land Consultant, FAO

               

              FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS  Rome, 2017   

          The  designations  employed  and  the  presentation  of  material  in  this  information  product  do  not  imply  the  expression  of  any  opinion  whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the  United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal or development status of any  country,  territory,  city  or  area  or  of  its  authorities,  or  concerning  the  delimitation  of  its  frontiers  or  boundaries.  The  mention  of  specific  companies  or  products  of  manufacturers,  whether  or  not  these  have  been  patented,  does  not  imply  that  these  have  been  endorsed  or  recommended  by  FAO  in  preference  to  others  of  a  similar  nature  that  are not mentioned.  The  views  expressed  in  this  information  product  are  those  of  the  author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of FAO.  ISBN 978‐92‐5‐109936‐0  © FAO, 2017  FAO encourages the use, reproduction and dissemination of material in  this  information  product.  Except  where  otherwise  indicated,  material  may be copied, downloaded and printed for private study, research and  teaching  purposes,  or  for  use  in  non‐commercial  products  or  services,  provided that appropriate  acknowledgement of FAO as the source and  copyright  holder  is  given  and  that  FAO’s  endorsement  of  users’  views,  products or services is not implied in any way.  All  requests  for  translation  and  adaptation  rights,  and  for  resale  and  other commercial use rights should be made via www.fao.org/contact‐ us/licence‐request or addressed to [email protected]  FAO  information  products  are  available  on  the  FAO  website  (www.fao.org/publications) and can be purchased through publications‐ [email protected] 

       

CONTENTS     

  ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ................................................................................................... VI  ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS .................................................................................. VII  1.  INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................ 1  2.  MOZAMBIQUE: POPULATION AND AGRICULTURE ...................................................... 4  3.  GENDER ISSUES AND WOMEN’S LAND RIGHTS ........................................................... 6  3.1  Gender issues .......................................................................................................................... 6  3.2  Women’s Land rights ............................................................................................................... 8 

4.  MOZAMBICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM AND LEGAL PLURALISM ........................................ 12  5.  CUSTOMARY PRACTICES: PAST AND PRESENT .......................................................... 16  6.  CUSTOMARY LAW IN ACTION:   COMMUNITY COURTS, CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PARALEGALS ............... 21  6.1  Community courts as forums for conflict resolution ............................................................. 21  6.1.1  Community courts in urban areas .............................................................................. 22  6.1.2  Community courts in rural areas ................................................................................ 25  6.1.3  Common considerations to urban and rural community courts ................................ 26  6.1.4  Efforts to revitalize the CCs ........................................................................................ 32  6.2  Civil society organizations and their role on gender issues  and conflict resolution ............. 34  6.3  The role of paralegals on gender issues and conflict resolution ........................................... 36  7.   CONCLUSION .......................................................................................................... 39  8.  RECOMMENDATIONS:   ACTIONS TO ALIGN CUSTOMARY LAW WITH STATUTORY LAW ................................. 41  a)  Systematizing the information on the CCs and creating mechanisms to align customary with  statutory law .......................................................................................................................... 41  b)  Legal education of the judges of the community courts and of the community leaders ...... 42  c)  Training of paralegals ............................................................................................................ 42  d)  Awareness and dissemination of information on gender equality and women’s and  children’s rights ..................................................................................................................... 43  APPENDIX I ― METHODOLOGY ...................................................................................... 44  APPENDIX II ― LIST OF INTERVIEWEES ............................................................................ 45  BIBLIOGRAPHY ............................................................................................................... 49   

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



                  ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS      The  authors  of  this  publication  are  Marianna  Bicchieri,  Land  Tenure  Officer  and  Anabel  Ayala,  Land  Consultant,  who  contributed  to  the  Mozambican  land  programme  and  component  projects  between   2010  and  2014.  The  publication  was  developed  under  the  technical  supervision  of  Margret  Vidar,  Legal  Officer  in  the  Development  Law Branch.     The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is  grateful  to  all  the  people  and  institutions  who  supported  the  development  of  this  study:  in  particular,  the  Chairman  of  the  Committee of the Community Courts of the city of Maputo, His Honour  Bernardo  Deve,  who  organized  and  supported  the  visit  to  different  courts; the paralegals who actively collaborated in the organization of  the field work, especially Paciencia Inácio Tomás, Maria Angelina Sales  Conceição and Esmeralda E. Angalaze of the Associação de Paralegais  de  Inhambane  (API) –  Association of  Paralegals of  Inhambane,  Teresa  Pedro  Samuel  Boa  from  Associação  das  Mulheres  Desfavorecidas  da  Indústria  Açucareira  (AMUDEIA)  –  Association  of  Disadvantaged  Women  in  the  Sugar  Industry,  and  Samuel  Manuel  Guambe  and  Rogério  Jaime  Cumbane  from  the  district  of  Zavala,  Inhambane.  The  authors also wish to thank all the interviewees for their invaluable and  significant contributions.    Comments and suggestions were gratefully received from Christopher  Tanner, Naomi Kenney, Paolo Groppo and Rubén Villanueva, including  further  review  from  Clara  Park  and  Tina  Lorizzo,  all  to  whom  FAO  wishes to express its deep appreciation. FAO also wishes to thank the  Embassies of the Netherlands and Norway for their financial support to  the land programme in Mozambique.              

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

 

vi 

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS      AIDS 

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 

AMETRAMO 

Associação dos Médicos Tradicionais de Moçambique (Association of Traditional  Doctors of Mozambique) 

AMMCJ 

Associação Moçambicana das Mulheres de Carreira Jurídica (Association of  Mozambican Women in Legal Careers) 

AMUDEIA 

Associação das Mulheres Desfavorecidas da Indústria Açucareira (Association of  Disadvantaged Women in the Sugar Industry) 

API 

Associação de Paralegais de Inhambane (Association of Paralegals of Inhambane)  

CC 

Community Court 

CEDAW  

Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women  

CEPAJI 

Centro de Pesquisa e Apoio à Justiça Informal (Centre for Research and Support to  Informal Justice) 

CESAB 

Centro de Estudos Sociais Aquino de Bragança (Centre for Social Studies in Aquino  de Bragança)  

CFJJ 

Centro de Formação Jurídica e Judiciária (Centre for Juridical and Judicial Training) 

CRM 

Constitution of the Republic of Mozambique 

CSO 

Civil society organization 

CTV 

Centro Terra Viva (Living Earth Centre) 

DC 

District Judicial Court 

DNTF 

Direção Nacional de Terras e Florestas (National Land and Forestry Directorate) 

DUAT 

Direito de Uso e Aproveitamento da Terra (Land Use and Benefit Right) 

FAO 

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations  

FRELIMO 

Frente de Libertação de Moçambique (Mozambican Liberation Front) 

GAMC 

Gabinete de Atendimento à Família e Menores Vítimas de Violência (Office of  Family and Children’s Victim of Violence)  

GAMC‐AMUDEIA  Gabinete de Atendimento à Mulher e Criança Vítimas de Violência (Office of  Women and Children’s Services Victim of Violence at AMUDEIA)  GDP 

Gross Domestic Product 

HIV 

Human Immunodeficiency Virus  

IPAJ 

Instituto de Patrocínio e Assistência Jurídica (Institute of Legal Patronage and  Assistance) 

MCA 

Millennium Challenge Account 

MMAS 

Ministério do Género, Criança e Acção Social (Ministry of Gender, Children and  Social Action) 

MISAU 

Ministério da Saúde (Ministry of Health) 

MULEIDE 

Associação Mulher, Lei e Desenvolvimento (Association of Women, Law and  Development) 

NGO 

Non‐governmental organization 

PC 

Provincial Judicial Court 

PEDSA 

Plano Estratégico para o Desenvolvimento do Sector Agrário (Agricultural Sector  Development Strategic Plan) 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

vii 

PRM 

Police of the Republic of Mozambique 

RENAMO 

Resistência Nacional Moçambicana (Mozambican National Resistance) 

UNDP 

United Nations Development Programme 

VGGT 

Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries  and Forests in the Context of National Food Security 

WLSA 

Women and Law in Southern Africa 

     

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

 

viii 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

1. INTRODUCTION Throughout  history,  land  has  been  considered  a  main  source  of  wealth,  social  status  and  power. In many rural societies land is the basis for housing, food and economic activities, the  most  important  source  of  employment  opportunities  in  rural  areas,  and  an  increasingly  scarce  commodity  in  urban  centres.  Land  also  has  great  cultural,  religious  and  legal  significance.  In  many  societies,  there  is  a  close  relationship  between  a  person’s  decision‐ making power and the number and the quality of his/her rights to the land. In rural areas,  social integration or exclusion often depends solely on the status of the person in relation to  the land (FAO, 2003).     This definition of the importance of land in many societies over the course of history applies  well to Mozambique, where land provides both a home and the livelihood for most part of  the population: approximately 70 percent of Mozambicans live in rural areas and depend on  agriculture  for  their  livelihoods  (Census,  2007).  Agriculture  continues  to  be  a  fundamental  instrument to achieve sustainable development and poverty reduction (World Bank, 2008),  and  access  to  productive  resources,  such  as  a  land,  a  determining  factor  in  promoting  the  agricultural productivity and food security of rural populations (FAO, 2011).     In countries where women are the major work force on the land, the security of their rights  over  this  key  resource  is  a  fundamental  pre‐condition  of  household  food  security  and  equitable  economic  development.  Unfortunately,  in  many  such  countries,  including  Mozambique,  these  rights  are  in  fact  not  so  secure.    Rural  women  in  Mozambique  face  a  great deal of vulnerability – they are both the major producers of food and responsible for  the management of their households,  but  they  do  not  have  real  decision‐making  power  in  their  families,  or  real  rights  over  land,  as  will  be  further  explained  in  this  document.  Increasing mortality rates due to HIV/AIDS1 are leading to growing numbers of widows and  orphans and can amplify the challenges women and children already face in securing their  land and inheritance rights (Save the Children and FAO, 2009). The lack of decision‐making  power, generally attributed to the male relatives, and the lack of access to resources, force  women  to  remain  in  situations  of  disadvantage.  The  disadvantageous  situation  of  women  becomes even more acute due to the difficulties they face in protecting their right of access  to  land,  which  creates  a  vicious  circle  that  perpetuates  the  poverty  and  generates  greater  gender inequality (Budlender and Alma, 2011). Gender inequalities have a negative impact  not only on the lives of women, but also on that of their children, households, communities  and, ultimately, on society as a whole.    The  creation  of  policies,  programmes  and  laws  that  promote  gender  equality  is  often  mentioned  as  a  fundamental  aspect  of  strategies  to  achieve  food  security  and  sustainable  economic  development.  Mozambique  is  a  country  where  these  directives  were  duly  followed. The country is internationally recognised for its progressive legislation and policies  in  acknowledging  rural  communities’  land  rights,  and  in  promoting  gender  equality.  There  are  sound  policies  and  laws  currently  in  place  on  gender  equality.  Gender  equality  and  women’s  rights  over  land  are  well  established  principles  in  Mozambique’s  legal  and  policy  framework,  including  in  the  1995  National  Land Policy  principle of  “guaranteeing  women’s  access to and use of the land”. The Constitution of the Republic of Mozambique is strong on                                                             



  AIDS deaths in Mozambique increased by roughly 72 percent from 2001 to 2007 (UNAIDS, 2008). According  to UNAIDS, in 2014, an estimated 1.5 million people were living with HIV in the country and HIV prevalence  was estimated at 10.6 percent, the eighth highest in the world. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

women’s  rights,  and  Mozambique  has  signed  several  conventions  that  promote  gender  equality. The land law also guarantees women’s rights over land and ensures that customary  law takes second place to constitutional principles. Mozambican legislation is mostly aligned  and compliant with the internationally accepted standards of good practices provided by the  Voluntary  Guidelines  on  the  Responsible  Governance  of  Tenure  of  Land,  Fisheries  and  Forests  in  the  Context  of  National  Food  Security  (hereafter  ‘VGGT’).  In  fact,  the  VGGT  benefitted  considerably  from  field‐based  lessons  on  land  governance  from  Mozambique,  specifically on recognition of customary land rights and protection of the equal rights of men  and women, which preceded the VGGT by several years.    Even  so,  there  is  still  significant  gender  inequality  in  the  country,  both  in  urban  and  rural  areas,  and  particularly  in  terms  of  access  to  land  and  natural  resources.  Even  if  there  are  good laws, implementation of these laws has been difficult. It is also difficult to spread legal  information  to  the  population  due  to  still  high  illiteracy  rates,  particularly  among  women,  and  difficulties  in  accessing  remote  areas  where  the  State’s  presence  is  not  widely  felt.  Moreover,  discriminatory  customary  practices  are  deeply  entrenched  in  both  rural  and  urban areas, and so new ideas are resisted.    Customary  law  has  considerable  influence  in  Mozambican  society,  and  community  and  traditional  authorities2  are  in  fact  the  first  port  of  call  for  conflict  management  for  the  majority  of  the  population,  particularly  in  the  rural  areas.  The  Constitution  recognizes  customary systems for conflict management and resolution (legal pluralism) as long as these  systems do not contradict constitutional values and principles (Article 4).3 At the same time,  Mozambique's land law turned de facto customary rights into de jure tenure by recognizing  customary  norms  and  practices  as  one  way  of  acquiring  formally  recognized  land  rights  –  Direito  de  Uso  e  Aproveitamento  da  Terra  (DUAT),  the  right  for  land  use  and  benefit.  The  legislation  is  very  clear  in  affirming  that  customary  conflict  management  systems  are  accepted, as long as these do not contradict constitutional values and principles. However,  this is where the problem in promoting gender equality lies. Community lands are managed  under  customary  tenure  systems  and  there  is  much  empirical  evidence  suggesting  that  under some customary tenure systems and within families, women do not have equal rights  to hold, manage, transfer or inherit land (FAO, 2010). Widows’ and children’s dispossession  of their homes and lands after the death of their husbands/partners is quite common, not  only in rural areas but also in urban areas. Often, women are subjected to discrimination in  the  customary  systems  (and  even  in  formal  ones)  in  matters  of  land  tenure  (UN  Habitat,  2008). Because informal conflict management systems are strongly influenced by customary  practices  that  discriminate  against  women,  gender  equality,  though  enshrined  in  Mozambican legislation, becomes a distant and hard to achieve target.    In the framework of informal or customary‐based access to justice, recognizing and ensuring  women’s land rights is a matter of extreme complexity. There is growing concern about how  the two legal systems interact and more specifically, how women confront the recognition of  their  land  rights  in  the  context  of  informal  or  customary‐based  systems.  By  analysing  the  Mozambican legislation and the informal justice system, as well as how it operates, the aim                                                              2 

  According to the definition of decree 15/2000 (community authorities), which will be discussed in more detail  in this document, community authorities are traditional chiefs, neighbourhood or village secretaries and  other leaders legitimized by the communities.    3    Article 4 of the Constitution recognizes all the "different legal systems and customary norms that coexist in  Mozambican society as long as they do not contradict the fundamental principles and values of the  Constitution". 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

of this study is to analyse why and how legal pluralism can affect the women’s land rights in  Mozambique.  The  ultimate  objective  is  to  identify  paths  and  practices  to  achieve  harmonization  between  the  progressive  Mozambican  legislation  and  the  customary  justice  systems in order to promote social justice and equal rights for men and women, particularly  with regard to access to, and control over, land and natural resources.         

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

2. MOZAMBIQUE: POPULATION AND AGRICULTURE According  to  the  last  population  census  of  2007,  the  total  number  of  inhabitants  of  Mozambique is 20 632 434 million, of whom 51.9 percent are women. Around 69.6 percent  live in rural areas, and half the total urban population lives in Maputo (op. cit. Census, 2007).     Of  all  the  economically  active  women,  Figure 1: Mozambique  86.7 percent  are  involved  in  farming  activities,  compared  with  63.4 percent  of  men.  Overall  80 percent  of  the  active  population works in the agricultural sector  (PEDSA, 2011).     After  several  consecutive  years  of  strong  growth,  since  2009  Mozambique’s  economic  performance  has  decelerated  to  its  slowest  pace.  A  continued  decline  in  global  commodity  prices,  weak  growth  amongst  trading  partners  and  the  effects  of a regional drought have contributed to a  reduction  in  Gross  Domestic  Product  –  a  decline  from  7.4  to  6.3  percent  in  2015.  Agriculture,  which  employs  most  of  the  country’s  labour  force  and  represents  almost a quarter of total output, grew at 6  percent  and  increased  its  contribution  to  overall  output.  Yet,  although  the  agricultural  sector  remained  robust,  the  onset of El Niño caused a regional drought  in  late  2015  increasing  food  insecurity  Source: UN Geospatial Information Section  amongst  the  most  vulnerable  households.  Mozambique’s  rapid  economic  expansion  over  the  past  decades  has  had  only  a  moderate  impact  on  poverty  reduction,  and  the  geographical  distribution  of  poverty  remains  largely  unchanged  (World  Bank,  2016).  According  to  the  2016  Human  Development  Report,  68.7 percent of Mozambican  population  lives  below the  income  poverty  line  (UNDP,  2016)  and the country remains one of the poorest in the world.    Mozambique  ranked  181st  out  of  188  countries  in  the  Human  Development  Index  in  2016  (op.  cit.  UNDP,  2016),  a  prospect  that  may  very  well  be  considered  dire  in  terms  of  sustainable development. The adult literacy rate is 58.8 percent and average life expectancy  at birth is just 52 years. Mozambique faces other challenges such as increasing malnutrition  and  stunting.  HIV  prevalence  among  adults  shows  a  downward  trend,  stabilizing  at  a  relatively high rate of 10.58 percent (CIA, 2016).    The female illiteracy rate at 64.1 percent is much higher than the male one, at 34.5 percent.   Women are the most vulnerable  to  HIV,  particularly young  women aged 15 to 24,  with an  infection rate almost three times higher than that of the men (op. cit. Census, 2007).    Poverty rates in the rural areas are alarming and improving that situation is a fundamental  issue for the country’s development. Agriculture is the main source of food and income for  rural households and is characterized as subsistence farming. The family farming sector, with   FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

3.7 million small farms per average area of 1.1 ha/family, dominates the general agricultural  scene  (Ministry  of  Agriculture,  2008).  Agricultural  productivity  is  very  low,  in  spite  of  Mozambique’s  large  tracts  of  fertile  land.  Farmers  generally  make  enough  to  meet  their  households'  basic  food  requirements,  with  a small surplus  for  sale  in  some  cases.  Incomes  from  both  farming  and  fishing  are  meagre  and  most  of  the  rural  population  survives  at  subsistence level (IFAD, 2010).    Rural  communities  are  highly  vulnerable  to  natural  disasters  such  as  floods  and  droughts.  The production, storage and sales capability of products is limited due to a variety of factors,  such  as  lack  of  inputs  and  technical  assistance,  inadequate  financing  and  difficulties  in  accessing rural loans. Precarious infrastructures, non‐existent storage facilities and the high  costs  of  transportation  are  additional  difficulties  that  small  producers  must  face  (SIDA,  2007).  Rural  poverty  is  directly  related  to  the  limited  development  of  agriculture,  which  generates 80 percent of the income of rural families, thus making agricultural development a  priority area of intervention for the government (Ministry of Agriculture, 2002).       

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

3. GENDER ISSUES AND WOMEN’S LAND RIGHTS 3.1  Gender issues  Mozambique  has  several  ethnic  groups  and  different  sets  of  traditional  practices  and  customary tenure arrangements. In general, these fall into two groups: matrilineal systems  in  the  north  and  central  parts  of  the  country,  and  patrilineal  systems  in  the  south  of  the  country.  Under  matrilineal  systems,  land  rights  are  allocated  through  the  maternal  line;  under  patrilineal  systems,  they  are  allocated  through  the  paternal  line.  However,  during  recent years both systems have undergone a process of change due to migration flows, rapid  urban  concentration  and  population  growth.  Thus,  it  is  now  difficult  to  speak  about  pure  kinship  systems,  with  mixed  matrilineal  and  patrilineal  practices  becoming  the  norm  (Villanueva, 2011).     Nevertheless,  under  both  systems,  men  are  those  who  have  the  authority  to  allocate  land  rights and make decisions about land tenure. Whether in patrilineal or matrilineal areas, the  patriarchal system predominates and, in general, women live subordinate to men (Seuane,  2009).  Women  largely  gain  access  to  and  control  over  land  through  some  form  of  relationship with men in the community – their fathers, husbands, uncles or brothers. Before  the HIV‐AIDS epidemic, in a normal household reproduction cycle, women used the land and  the resources received through these relationships with men and even if they cultivated the  land and produced food for the family, they had no land rights or control over the land. Even  so, in the event of the death of their husbands, the older women and widows had a certain  degree  of security,  insofar  as  the  land  was  inherited  by  their  grown‐up  sons  who  afforded  them use rights and protection within the customary system.  However, with HIV‐AIDS, men  are dying earlier and their sons are still too young to inherit the land. At the same time, land  is becoming increasingly scarce due to increased population, climate change and large‐scale  investments which require large tracts of land – all factors which significantly decrease the  amount of available land. In this context, many families are seeking new ways to maintain or  make the most of the land and young widows with small children are dispossessed by their  in‐laws  of  their  homes  and  land  (machamba)4  after  the  death  of  their  husbands.  These  negative  recent  changes  in  customary  practices  not  only  affect  the  women,  but  also  the  children who end up losing their inheritance rights.     Deprived of a parent and residing in communities where little alternative care options and  support  exist,  children  are  increasingly  vulnerable  to  abuse  and  exploitation.  While  the  extended family is traditionally expected to support them, there is considerable evidence to  show  that  in  many  cases  the  opposite  occurs.  Wishing  to  further  their  own  economic  interests, some family members will seize the property and belongings that a widow and her  children  should  inherit.  Valuable  resources  such  as  land,  housing,  money,  household  furniture, cattle, agricultural implements, and clothing are taken away in the name of culture  and  tradition,  leaving  the  widow  and  children  in  even  greater  need.  Within  this  system,  daughters  do  not  have  inheritance  rights;  only  the  male  line  has  rights,  the  sons  of  the  deceased being the first in line to inherit, followed by male ascendants (father or uncles) and  male siblings and their descendants (Save the Children, 2007). Therefore, daughters who do  not have rights over their parent’s land are likely to not have access to any land in case of  eviction from their marital home. Very often, with nowhere to go, these young families end                                                              4 

  Machamba is the term used in Mozambique to define small plots of land for household agricultural activities.  

 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

up  in  poverty  and  vulnerability,  since  in  the  woman’s  family  there  is  no  land  available  to  them  and  are  forced  to  migrate  to  urban  and  peri‐urban  areas  in  search  of  their  survival.  Sometimes  young  women  end  up  resorting  to  high‐risk  means  of  subsistence  such  as  prostitution  and  other  exploratory  work;  there  is  evidence  linking  these  processes  of  marginalization  to  the  feminization  of  HIV/AIDS  in  Mozambique  (op.cit.  Seuane,  2009).  Furthermore,  in  cases  where  women  become  ill  due  to  HIV‐AIDS  infection,  they  are  abandoned  or  expelled  by  their  husband  or  his  family.  In  some  situations,  agreements  are  established in which the women have to pay by giving an asset or money in order to “earn”  the right to stay in the home (CFJJ, 2012).    In matrilineal families in the northern part of the country, control over resources is generally  also  in  the  hands  of  men  but  property  is  inherited  through  the  wife’s  lineage.  Cases  of  expropriation are less frequent compared to patrilineal areas and the degree of security over  land for women who divorce or are widowed is greater. Combined with matrilocal residence  patterns  where  new  families  live  with  or  near  the  wife’s  family,  matrilineal  practices  traditionally  give  women  increased  influence  over  access  to  lineage  property  and  land.  However,  there  has  been  a  progressive  change  or  negation  of  such  customary  rights  in  favour  of  men,  due  to  growing  pressure  on  land,  the  mass  dissemination  of  values  that  promote profit‐making and taking advantage “at any cost”, and to the high degree of social  mobility, among other reasons (FAO, 2013).     In  the  last  decades,  patrilineal  norms  have  begun  to  replace  customary  practice  in  matrilineal  societies  on  a  large  scale  and  women  have  lost  considerable  power  to  their  brothers, sons and uncles, who are nowadays commonly identified as the head of the family  and  owner  of the  land.  Indeed,  a  recent  field  study carried  out  in  Niassa  province  pointed  out that women do not take any decisions concerning their land and if a husband dies, the  wife  cannot  be  sure  that  she  will  be  allowed  to  continue  to  cultivate  their  land.  The  same  study  concluded  that  a  matrilineal  structured  community  does  not  ensure  women’s  unthreatened access to land. While women in matrilineal northern Mozambique may enjoy  better  rights  to  land  than  women  in  the  patrilineal  south,  men  still  have  the  final  say  in  decisions on how family land is utilized and accessed. Hence, the study concludes that the  matrilineal  structure  does  not  necessarily  guarantee  women’s  rights;  instead  it  places  greater societal and family responsibilities on women as they do the work but do not decide  over the agriculture (Lidström, 2014).    Furthermore, even if in matrilineal lineage systems women’s situation is slightly more stable,  the  patriarchal  system  continues  to  be  dominant  and  women  in  general  participate  very  little  in  decision‐making.  Power  and  authority  are  invested  in  men  and  in  the  cultural  and  economic position they occupy and women are, by definition, excluded from decisions that  affect their lives, their children and their families. Also, according to a research conducted by  Save the Children and FAO in 2009, most families now seem to choose the location of their  residence  either  according  to  patrilocal  patterns,  or  in  a  totally  new  area  such  as  the  provincial  capital  (neolocal).  This  alienates  women  from  their  relatives  and  diminishes  the  control  they  would  traditionally  have  had  over  assets  in  their  families’  land  and  other  property.  Where  a widow’s  male  family members  – her  brothers  and  uncles – would  have  normally decided on the division and management of assets, this role has been increasingly  taken over by the husband’s relatives, reflecting norms of a patrilineal society.     Therefore, in practical terms, the fieldwork of that study found little difference between the  patrilineal  communities  in  Gaza,  Manica  and  Zambézia  and  the  matrilineal  communities  in  Nampula  (op.  cit.  Save  the  Children  and  FAO,  2009).  Similar  results  were  also  found  in  a   FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

research  conducted  by  the  International  Development  Research  Centre  in  2011,  covering  several  countries  in  southern  Africa,  including  Mozambique.  According  to  the  research,  a  woman’s  supposed  tenured  security  in  matrilineal  societies  is  less  secure  than  it  might  be  expected. With increasing pressure on land due to commercialization, “the same uncles that  are  supposed  to  protect  women  are  now  the  ones  that  are  actually  abusers”  (op.  cit.  Budlender and Alma, 2011). Despite the facts, it is curious to note that there is popular belief  that  women’s  tenure  rights  in  matrilineal  areas  are  safe.  This  frequent  misconception  was  also evidenced by a study carried out by CARE in 2007:     “during interviews with national and international non‐governmental  organizations (NGOs) in Maputo we were repeatedly told that we would  find that property rights violations were not an issue in Nampula, as the  north was predominantly a matrilineal area. However, focus groups  interviews in the north revealed that property rights violations were  common and a real fear among the women. In fact one woman explained  that her husband had recently died and she was fighting with his family  as they tried to take her home and other property. A local judge we  spoke with in Nampula reinforced that property rights violations were  common in the north and that there was an inadequate understanding of  the laws regarding property and inheritance rights among local law  enforcement and judicial agencies”.   (CARE, 2007) 

3.2  Women’s Land rights  Overcoming these challenges is vital not only to create a more just and balanced society, but  for  the  socio‐economic  development  of  Mozambique.  Agriculture  plays  an  extremely  important  role,  both  in  social  and  socio‐economic  terms.  Since  land  is the  core  element  in  agriculture, guaranteeing the right to land for the majority of Mozambicans who depend on  that same land for their housing and livelihoods, is a critical issue. Considering the relevant  role  played  by  women,  both  in  agriculture  and  in  household  food  security,  guaranteeing  equitable access to land and to natural resources for men and women is indispensable. The  Mozambican legal framework has a set of articles throughout different pieces of legislation  that  provide  for  social  justice  and  gender  equality  between  men  and  women.  Even  if  this  legislation was passed before the endorsement of the VGGT, its provisions are aligned and  offered several examples of good practices, which were mainstreamed into selected sections  of the VGGT during its development.     The  Mozambican  Constitution  affirms  the  State’s  recognition  of  customary  systems  of  conflict  management  and  resolution  (legal  pluralism)  as  long  as  these  systems  do  not  contradict  constitutional  values  and  principles  (Article  4).5  Through  this  provision,  the  statutory law formally recognizes customary law as a source of law under the Constitution.    

                                                           



  Article 4 of the Constitution recognizes all the "different legal systems and customary norms that coexist in  Mozambican society as long as they do not contradict the fundamental principles and values of the  Constitution". 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Women's  equal  right  to  hold  land  use  and  VGGT and the Mozambican Law  benefit  rights  is  a  central  tenet  of  Articles 10, 12 and 13 of the Land Law, and  Mozambique's  land  law.  The  Land  Law  35  and  36  of  the  Constitution,  are  aligned  affirms  that  “National  individual  and  with  the  tenure  guidelines  or  VGGT,  which  corporate  persons, men  and  women,  as well  refers that ‘States should ensure that policy,  as  local  communities  may  be  holders  of  the  legal  and  organizational  frameworks  for  right  of  land  use  and  benefit”  (Article  10§1).  tenure  governance  recognize  and  respect,  Article 12 highlights that customary practices  in accordance with national laws, legitimate  are  only  accepted  if  they  do  not  contradict  tenure rights including legitimate customary  the Constitution. Therefore, there is no space  tenure  rights  that  are  not  currently  for any negative or discriminatory customary  protected  by  law;  and  facilitate,  promote  practice  towards  women,  and  men  and  and  protect  the  exercise  of  tenure  rights.  Frameworks  should  reflect  the  social,  women have the same rights of access to and  cultural,  economic  and  environmental  control  over  land  and  natural  resources.  significance  of  land,  fisheries  and  forests.  Article  13§5  states  that  “Individual  men  and  States  should  provide  frameworks  that  are  women  who  are  members  of  a  local  non‐discriminatory  and  promote  social  community  may  request  individual  titles,  equity and gender equality’   after  the  particular  plot  of  land  has  been  (VGGT, par. 5.3)  partitioned  from  the  relevant  community  land”.  In  addition  to  that,  the  Constitution  establishes  the  principles  of  universality  and  equality  of  all  people  (Article  35)  and  gender  equality  (Article  36),  recognizing  the  equality  of  rights,  duties  and  opportunities  for  all  citizens, and specifically among men and women.    The Land Law foresees that “The right of land  VGGT and the Mozambican Law  use  and  benefit  may  be  transferred  by  Articles 16 of the Land Law, and 83 and 111  inheritance,  without  distinction  by  gender”  of  the  Constitution,  are  aligned  with  the  (Article  16§1).  In  the  Constitution,  equal  VGGT,  which  specifies  that  ‘States  should  inheritance  rights  are  recognized  in  Article  ensure  equal  tenure  rights  for  women  and  83.  It  also  asserts  that  “In  the  formally  men,  including  the  right  to  inherit  and  recognition  of  the  right  for  land  use  and  bequeath these rights.’   benefit, the State recognizes and protects the  (VGGT, par. 4.6)  rights  acquired  through  inheritance  or  occupation, unless there is a legal reserve or  if  the  land  has  been  legally  attributed  to  other person or entity” (Article 111).     The Family Law, which regulates the division  VGGT and the Mozambican Law  of  property  between  spouses  within  marriage,  upon  separation  and  death,  Articles 202 and 203 of the Family Law, and  underlines these provisions. It recognizes not  29 of the Law on Domestic Violence against  Women, relate with the VGGT, which refers  only  civil  marriages  but  also  customary  and  that  ‘States  should  consider  the  particular  religious  marriages  and  informal  unions  obstacles  faced  by  women  and  girls  with  between  men  and  women  (Articles  202  and  regard  to  tenure  and  associated  tenure  203). In combination with the Civil Code, the  rights,  and  take  measures  to  ensure  that  Family  Law  provides  that  all  men  and  legal  and  policy  frameworks  provide  women,  who  have  lived  with  their  partners  adequate  protection  for  women  and  that  for more than one year are entitled to half of  laws  that  recognize  women’s  tenure  rights  the  property  built  during  the  relationship.  are implemented and enforced.’   The  Law  also  explicitly  gives  both  spouses  (VGGT, par. 5.4)  responsibility  over  the  family,  as  well  as   FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 



Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

equal  say  in  family  decisions  regarding  assets  and  property.  Together,  the  Land  Law  and  Family  Law  provide  strong  protections  for  women’s  land  and  property  rights,  both  during  marriage and in widowhood. Additionally, the Law on Domestic Violence against Women, in  Article 29, states that it is a crime to dispossess a widow after her partner dies; punishable  with  up to 6 months in prison.     Furthermore, the Land Law is carefully and consistently explicit about women's inclusion in  every step of community land‐related procedures; during community delimitations or every  time  community  inputs  are  deemed  necessary,  the  Law  mandates  that  women  and  vulnerable  groups  are  to  be  included.  For  example,  the  Technical  Annex  to  the  Law  establishes  that  all  steps  of  the  community  delimitation  process  must  include  women’s  presence,  active  participation  and  input.  The  working  group  guiding  the  delimitation  must  take care to “work with men and women and with different socio‐economic and age groups  within local communities” in all steps of the process (Technical Annex Article 5§2); women  must  take  part  in  the  participatory  community  map  drawing  process  –  drawing  their  own  separate “women’s map” (Technical Annex Article 2§8), and the forms completed during the  delimitation  process  must  be  signed  by  no  less  than  three  and  no  more  than  9  “men  and  women from the communities, chosen at a public meeting” (Technical Annex Article 6§3). In  addition,  as  described  above,  because  women  are  “co‐owners”  of  a  joint  community  land  right,  women  have  equal  rights  to  community  property  and  must  be  involved  in  land  and  natural resource management decisions (Article 10§3 of the Land Law; Article 12 of the Land  Law Regulations; Article 1403 of the Civil Code). Mozambique’s Land Law therefore not only  generally  establishes  women’s  right  to  hold  land  in  their  own  name,  but  also  encourages  communities to involve women at every step of community processes (op.cit. FAO, 2010).    This  longstanding  experience  has  been  inspirational  during  the  discussions  that  led  to  the  current text of the VGGT. In this respect, it can be argued that the VGGTs implementation  principle on gender inequality founds its roots in concrete cases like the Mozambican one.  The VGGT address gender inequality with the mandate to:   “ensure the equal right of women and men to the enjoyment of all  human rights, while acknowledging differences between women and  men and taking specific measures aimed at accelerating de facto equality  when necessary. States should ensure that women and girls have equal  tenure rights and access to land, fisheries and forests independent of  their civil and marital status.”  (VGGT, par. 3b.4) 

  Mozambican legislation is compliant with this precept.      However,  although  formal  legislation  is  very  clear  in  promoting  gender  equality  and  discouraging  discriminatory  practices  against  women,  in  practice,  these  discriminatory  practices still prevail in customary systems, as shown above.     The Land Law addresses this possible conflict between customary law and women's rights by  clearly  establishing  that  land  rights  may  be  acquired  only  "according  to  those  customary  rules and practices that do not contradict the constitution" (Article 12, referred above). Yet  the  lack  of  oversight  mechanisms  or  formal  checks  on  abuses  of  customary  power  means  that community members and leaders cannot be held accountable for the implementation  of  the  Law  or  breaches  of  women's  constitutional  rights.  Due  to  the  lack  of  enforcement  mechanisms within communities, women seeking justice must leave the community and file   FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

10 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

an  action  in  court.  In  this  respect,  the  Land  VGGT and the Mozambican Law  Law  lacks  in  oversight  and  enforcement  Although  Mozambican  Statutory  Law  mechanisms  and  relies  too  heavily  on  the  created  dispositions  to  protect  gender  supposed goodwill and efficacy of customary  equality in the recognition of local customs,  systems (op. cit. FAO, 2010).  more can be done to ensure that customary    systems  do  not  discriminate  against  The  Mozambican  experience  demonstrates  women. On this note, the VGGT states that  that  without  concrete  mechanisms,  “communities  with  customary  tenure  customary  practices  that  are  discriminatory  systems  that  exercise  self‐governance  of  towards  women  may  prevail  over  sound  land,  fisheries  and  forests  should  promote  statutory law. A practical way to address the  and  provide  equitable,  secure  and  divide  between  women’s  statutory  land  sustainable  rights  to  those  resources,  with  special  attention  to  the  provision  of  rights  and  community  practices  would  be  to  equitable  access  for  women.  Effective  establish  mechanisms  to  assess  and  amend  participation  of  all  members,  men,  women  customary  rules  during  the  delimitation  and  youth,  in  decisions  regarding  their  process,  when  government  officials  and  tenure  systems  should  be  promoted  development  agents  are  quite  frequently  through  their  local  or  traditional  working side by side with communities. Legal  institutions,  including  in  the  case  of  reform  could  be  considered  to  address  this  collective tenure systems. Where necessary,  issue.  In  particular,  the  Technical  Annex  of  communities should be assisted to increase  the  Land  Law  could  be  reviewed  to  include  the capacity of their members to participate  provisions in this sense.  fully  in  decision‐making  and  governance  of  their tenure systems”.    In  this  context,  it  is  important  to  balance  (VGGT, par. 9.2)  protections  for  customary  rights  with  provisions for gender equality and respect for human rights (FAO, 2016); not only in terms of  developing legislation but also in terms of designing and implementing practical measures to  translate  legal  principles  into  practice.  Therefore,  harmonizing  customary  practices  and  statutory law by transforming statutory law into practical tools to influence and modify the  negative  aspects  of  customary  practices,  is  a  key  issue.  Equally  important,  ensuring  that  checks  and  balance  mechanisms  are  in  place  to  monitor  and  address  inequality  within  customary systems.         

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

11 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

4. MOZAMBICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM AND LEGAL PLURALISM Legal  pluralism,  resulting  from  the  State’s  recognition  of  the  existence  of  two  systems  of  rules – the formal statutory system with the laws of the State and the informal system with  the customary laws – is not an isolated occurrence limited to Mozambique. Proof of this is  present  in  a  large  number  of  African  countries.  Some  of  these  countries  recognize  the  existence  of  different  systems  as  alternatives  to  access  to  justice  directly  in  their  constitutions6,  and  generally  under  the  principle  of  not  infringing  on  and  not  contradicting  the laws defined in these constitutions.     In this way, access to justice for the citizens of these countries is not limited to the formal  statutory channel, but rather, they have different systems of conflict resolution available to  them. These systems tend to be deeply entrenched in their given historical contexts.     In  Mozambique,  different  stages  of  history  have  had  an  influence  on  the  definition  of  the  legal and juridical framework up to the establishment of the most recent Constitution, which  has  been  in  force  since  2004.  During  the  colonial  period,  the  legal  code  enforced  by  the  Portuguese  was  known  as  a  dualist  system.  The  Europeans  and  the  “assimilados”  (assimilated)7  had  particular  rights  engraved  in the official  legal  system.  Some  examples  of  these rights include the right to register different assets, such as land, and to appeal to the  state courts for the settlement of legal conflicts (Meneses, 2005).     In  contrast,  the  African  population  in  general  was  governed  by  a  system  subject  mainly  to  traditional laws regulated by People’s Courts. The use in these courts of customary law for  conflict resolution guaranteed the continuity of a legal system closely linked to the history of  its peoples and to the observance of its traditions.     It was not until 1975 that Mozambique managed to establish the first Constitution, following  the achievement of independence from Portugal. In it, the bases of a socialist state, led by a  single party, the Frente de Libertação de Moçambique (FRELIMO) – Mozambican Liberation  Front, were defined. There was no separation of powers between the executive branch and  the judiciary, which gave this party total control over all aspects of public life (Open Society  Foundation, 2006).     The Judicial Organization Act 12/78, dated 2 December 1978, established the following court  hierarchy: Supreme Court in Maputo; Provincial Courts (a total of 11, one in each of the 10  provinces  and  one  in  the  capital,  Maputo);  District  Courts  (for  the  localities  and  municipalities); and Town and Neighbourhood Courts.    The judges who presided over these Town and Neighbourhood Courts were elected by the  local  communities  by  means  of  public  consultation  and  received  no  remuneration  whatsoever  for  the  activities  they  performed.  These  courts  operated  on  the  fringes  of  the  statutory  law  and  gave  priority  to  public  participation  in  the  resolution  of  conflicts.  The  consultations tended to be carried out in a simple manner and in the local dialect, and the  conflicts were mainly concerned with family disputes and smaller criminal offences to which  jail sentences did not apply. In cases where crimes were more severe, entailing the need to                                                              6 

  Some examples of these countries are Angola, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Rwanda and Liberia.     Status acquired by some Africans, Asians and mulattos of mixed race as of 1929, upon demonstrating their  knowledge of the Portuguese language, renouncing their ties to tribal customs, and justifying their category  as employees (Meneses, 2004).  



 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

12 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

impose  a  jail  sentence, or if  an  agreement  could  not  be  reached  in  the  conflict  resolution,  the Town and Neighbourhood Courts would refer them to the District Courts (Penal Reform  International, 2000).     In the framework of the peace negotiations that put an end to 15 years of civil war between  FRELIMO and the Resistência Nacional Moçambicana (RENAMO), the 1990 Constitution was  established.  In  it,  the  recognition  of  citizens’  rights  was  expanded  and  the  bases  of  a  democratic Rule of Law are now defined through the consolidation of a multi‐party system  along with the independence of the judiciary (Women and Law in Southern Africa ‐ WLSA,  2008).  In  1992,  with  the  new  Courts  of  Law  Act  (Law  Nº  10/92,  dated  6  May)  the  justice  system  in  Mozambique  was  reorganized,  with  one  of  the  main  changes  being  the  disappearance of the Town and Neighbourhood Courts as grassroots structures.8    At the same time, the Community Court (CC)   “States  should  respect  and  promote  Act was enacted (Law Nº 4/92, dated 6 May),  customary  approaches  used  (…)  along  with  the  legal  framework  for  its  communities  with  customary  tenure  recognition  as  a  legal  forum  for  minor  civil  systems to resolving tenure conflicts within  and  criminal  conflict  resolution.  The  CCs  are  communities  consistent  with  their  existing  the  legacy  of  the  former  Town  and  obligations under national and international  Neighbourhood  Courts  that  were  operating  law,  and  with  due  regard  to  voluntary  commitments under applicable regional and  during  the  FRELIMO  government  after  international instruments (…).”   independence  and  until  the  peace  accord  was signed in Rome in 1992. The CCs provide  (VGGT, par. 9.11)  the  most  common  form  of  access  to  justice  for the majority of the people in Mozambique (op. cit. WLSA, 2008). Its Article 3 outlines the  jurisdiction  corresponding  to  the  CCs  as:  “dealing  with  those  small  conflicts  of  civil  nature  and  with  any matters  that  arise  from family  relations  resulting  from  unions  constituted on  the basis of habits and customs, trying whenever possible for a reconciliation between the  parties”.    A  few years  later,  in  support of  the  differentiation  of  duties  and  powers  developed  by the  CCs and other authorities, Decree Nº 15/2000 of 20 June was promulgated, establishing the  coordination  between  the  local  governing  bodies  of  the  State  and  the  community  authorities. In Article 1.1., ‘community authorities’ are defined as “the traditional heads, the  neighbourhood and village officials and other leaders legitimized as such by the respective  local communities”. Article 5 (general duties of the community authorities), subparagraph b,   states that “the community authorities must coordinate with the CCs, where they exist, for  the resolution of minor conflicts of a civil nature, taking into consideration the local habits  and  customs,  within  the  limits  of  the  law”.  Section  5  of  Judicial  Organization  Law  Nº  24/2007,  dated  20  August,  defines  the  CCs  as  “independent,  institutionalized,  non‐judicial,  conflict‐resolution  authorities  who  judge  according  to  common  sense  and  fairness,  informally  and  in  a  non‐professional  capacity,  favouring  the  spoken word  and meeting  the  existing social and cultural values in Mozambican society, while observing the Constitution”.  Article  29  (categories  of  courts),  determines  that  the  judicial  function  (formal  justice)  is  carried  out  by:  i)  the  Supreme  Court;  ii)  the  Superior  Courts  of  Appeal;  and  iii)  Provincial  Judicial Courts (PC) and District Judicial Courts (DC).                                                                8 

  Information obtained from the interview with Samuel Salimo, Advisor to the Minister of Justice and to  Parliamentary Affairs. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

13 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

It is difficult to determine the exact number of CCs that are active at present and how many  community judges form part of them. Government sources state that, at present there are  some  2 015  CCs  distributed  throughout  the  country,  with  approximately  10 000  elected  judges. However, the latest officially recorded figures date from 2011, with a total number  of 2 201 CCs.9     Figure 2: Evolution of the Number of Community Courts                       

10

Source: Author notes  

  In  2004,  the  new  Constitution  of  the  Republic  of  Mozambique,  which  is  still  in  force,  was  adopted. Its most significant difference vis à vis the previous versions is the strengthening of  individual  rights.  The  Constitution  includes  a  principle  considered  to  be  innovative  in  the  establishment  of  the  fundamental  principle  of  legal  pluralism  (Article  4).  This  principle,  mentioned  earlier  in  this  document,  enshrines  in  the  Constitution  the  recognition  of  the  important role played by the different systems of justice (i.e. customary and statutory), and  the  validity  of  the  regulatory  practices  that  these  entail  in  the  management  of  diverse  aspects of life in the local communities.     The percentage of conflict resolution cases handled by customary systems, whether through  the Community Courts or Community Authorities, is high in Mozambique (Serra, 2010). This  principle recognizes and legitimizes the important duties carried out by these systems in the  administration  of  justice  in  the  country,  as  long  as  principles  of  non‐discrimination  are  applied with respect to the rights established in the Constitution.     Any traditional practice that violates human rights and contradicts any of the rights set down  in the Constitution will automatically be considered invalid and overall illegal. For example,  in the specific case of women’s rights, many traditional practices such as the case of widows  who are evicted from their houses by the deceased husband’s relatives are considered to be  a violation of the statutory laws. In this context, evicting widows under the current formal  statutory system is in fact a crime (FAO, 2013). Many other traditional practices, which will  be analysed in more detail later in this document, are identified as customs that violate the  human rights of women and are considered to be unacceptable in the current legislation of  Mozambique.                                                                



  Information obtained from the interview with Samuel Salimo, Advisor to the Minister of Justice and to  Parliamentary Affairs.  10    Information obtained from the interview with Samuel Salimo, Advisor to the Minister of Justice and to  Parliamentary Affairs. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

14 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Marriage,  family,  inheritance,  and  the  rights  of  access  to,  use  and  control  of  the  land,  are  some  of  the  matters  that  are  generally  regulated  by  customs  and  tradition.  Statutory  law  guarantees the principles of equality but that does not prevent a high percentage of women  from continuing to be subject to practices that are discriminatory in practice (in particular,  for women who are widowed, separated or single) (World Bank, 2011).    The  different  pieces  of  legislation  mentioned  above  recognize  legal  pluralism,  create  and  regulate the way CCs operate, and establish the means of articulation between the State and  community  authorities.  They  all  emphasise  that  the  decisions  made  by  these  entities  shall  not  contradict  or  affect  the  principles  of  formal  legislation,  but  do  not  establish  any  mechanism to control or facilitate this. Likewise, there is no system to guarantee that judges  and community authorities know the principles of the formal justice that should be observed  in their decisions.     Thus, it is not surprising that the decisions of  “States  should  ensure  that  people  whose  the  CC  and  the  community  authorities  very  tenure  rights  are  recognized  or  who  are  often  contradict  formal  legislation.  In  this  allocated  new  tenure  rights  have  full  context,  the  duty  to  not  contradict  knowledge  of  their  rights  and  also  their  constitutional  principles  is  only  a  statement  duties.  Where  necessary,  States  should  of good intentions, particularly when dealing  provide support to such people so that they  can enjoy their tenure rights and fulfil their  with  issues  relating  to  gender  and  women’s  duties."   rights.  To  address  these  discrepancies,   good  governance  mechanisms  should  be   (VGGT, par. 7.5)  established  by  creating  appropriate  checks  and  balances  between  customary/local  leadership  and  state  officials  and  setting  up  appropriate mechanisms to ensure the law's enforcement (op. cit. FAO, 2010). As suggested  earlier, this could be achieved by legal reform of pertinent legislation, to ensure that checks  and  balances  between  customary  and  statutory  law  become  part  of  formal  legislation.  Equally  important  is  providing  training  to  community  leaders  and  judges,  religious  leaders  and traditional healers (‘curandeiros’) to ensure that their customary decisions respect, and  are aligned with, statutory law (this will be further discussed later in the document).         

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

15 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

5. CUSTOMARY PRACTICES: PAST AND PRESENT Structural  transformation  of  agrarian  and  tenure  systems  are  affecting  communities  and  contributing  to  land  scarcity.  Climate  change,  environmental  degradation  and  land  speculation  by  investors  are  decreasing  the  amount  of  fertile,  arable  land  available  and  accessed  by  rural  communities.  As  a  result,  in  many  regions  fertile  land  is  no  longer  abundant, particularly in peri‐urban areas closer to main roads, markets, schools, hospitals  and  other  infrastructure.  At  the  same  time,  population  growth  is  increasing  demands  on  arable  and  productive  land.  This  has  led  to  overcrowding  and  over‐use  of  family  and  communal  holdings,  increasing  degradation  of  land  and  fostering  a  breakdown  in  the  customary rules that govern sustainable community use of common resources. These trends  are  impacting  how  individuals  and  families  allocate,  use  and  manage  their  land.  In  this  process,  certain  groups  lose  out  as  other  groups  gain.  As  land  becomes  scarcer,  existing  customary  safeguards  of  women’s  land  rights  erode:  men  are  reinterpreting  and  “rediscovering” customary rules that undermine women’s land rights (op. cit. FAO, 2010).    In  this  context,  customary  practices  need  to  “States  should  strengthen  and  develop  be  carefully  analysed  to  understand  that  in  alternative  forms  of  dispute  resolution,  many  of  the  rights  violations  seen  nowadays  especially  at  the  local  level.  Where  –  particularly  those  linked  to  women  and  customary  or  other  established  forms  of  children being dispossessed of their land and  dispute  settlement  exist  they  should  belongings  and  being  justified  as  ‘customs  provide for fair, reliable, accessible and non‐ and traditions’ – in reality have nothing to do  discriminatory  ways  of  promptly  resolving  disputes over tenure rights.”   with  customs  and  traditions.  In  both  matrilineal  and  patrilineal  areas,  the   (VGGT, par. 21.3)  customary  practices  and  rules  of  the  past  always aimed at keeping the land and assets built by the family/couple within the extended  family or clan, including after the death of a spouse. This was a “customary/traditional social  protection system”, where widows and their small children were supported by the extended  family when needed. The assets were managed by the extended family who had a duty to  provide support and solidarity.    In patrilineal areas specifically, although men have traditionally held property in the name of  the  family,  wives,  daughters  and  under‐age  sons  used  to  be  allowed  to  benefit  from  this  property. As women were not allowed to own or inherit property themselves, this implied  an  obligation  on  the  part  of  male  members  of  the  family  to  ensure  their  survival  and  wellbeing. Sons who inherited from their parents were supposed to take care of their sisters  and  allow  them  to  use  some  of  the  land  to  secure  their  livelihood  until  marriage.  Widows  who were still of child‐bearing age would remain in the family through the practice of widow  inheritance (see Box 1 below). Elderly widows who were not expected to marry again were  allowed  life‐time  usage of the  land,  which  was  passed  on  to male  heirs  so  that  they  could  stay in their marital homes. Relatives would take care of a widow so that she in turn would  be able to take care of her children. The traditional norm of taking care of widows and their  children  was  a  duty  intrinsically  related  to  the  right  to  inherit  property.  Property  grabbing  from  widows  and  orphaned  children  clearly  breaks  the  tradition  of  solidarity  within  the  extended family (op. cit. Save the Children and FAO, 2009).       

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

16 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Box 1: Widow inheritance    According to tradition, after her husband’s death, a widow would be married to another man from  her  deceased  husband’s  family  (usually  one  of  his  brothers)  to  ensure  she  still  belonged  to  that  family. This practice is related to the payment of lobolo (bride wealth) by the family of the groom  to the family of the bride, which marks her passage to her husband’s family as well as the fruits of  her labour and her offspring. One could argue that this practice prevents a woman from becoming  destitute  and  her  needing  to  inherit  property,  and  indeed,  not  all  women  oppose  it.  Many  Mozambicans, men as well as women, consider marriage a social contract that is agreed to after  careful  consideration  of  the  advantages  and  disadvantages  it  offers  –  quite  different  to  the  romantic  act  of  love  it  now  represents  in  some  Western  cultures.  Many  widows  have  therefore  happily  accepted  this  chance  of  securing  their  and  their  children’s  livelihoods,  rather  than  considering it an obligation forced upon them.     Women’s  rights  organizations  in  Mozambique  have  actively  opposed  the  practice  because  it  is  considered a violation of the rights of both men and women. It denies them the free choice of a  life partner. It can relegate a widow to the status of second wife in a polygamous marriage. It also  implies a serious health risk for both the widow and the brother‐in‐law in the era of HIV. Where  these  practices  are  still  followed,  widows  are  more  likely  to  give  up  their  home  and  property  ‘voluntarily’ to prevent being ‘inherited’. In addition, her deceased husband’s family can use her  refusal to be inherited as a reason to evict her from her home and land. Support for this practice is  declining  slowly,  both  because  widows  refuse  to  be  inherited  and  because  brothers  of  the  deceased refuse to accept his widow as their wife (…).  Source: op. cit. Save the Children and FAO, 2009. 

  Although  the  practices  reported  above  are  questionable  in  many  respects  constituting,  violations  of  human  rights,  their  objectives  of  providing  social  protection  for  widows  and  orphans are clear. However, nowadays these social protection practices within the extended  family have become a distant memory of the past. What is currently seen in both matrilineal  and  patrilineal  areas  is  that  old  time  customs  and  practices  are  used  as  a  justification  to  dispossess  widows  and  children  of  their  land  and  belongings,  both  by  the  deceased  husband’s family and, in some cases, by the woman’s uncles and brothers. However, instead  of providing support, the extended family simply sells, leases or uses the assets taken as if  they were their own, without any concern for the future of the widow and orphans.     At the same time, the changes in gender roles and relationships over the last decades have  drastically  changed  women’s  position  in  society,  not  only  in  the  West,  but  also  in  Africa.  Their  contribution  to  the  welfare  of  the  household  –  which  can  be  a  full  time  and  considerably  demanding  job  –  finally  started  being  recognized  after  decades  overlooked.  Apart from reproductive roles in which women tended to depend on their husbands, women  increased  their  adoption  of  productive  roles:  they  study,  work,  produce  and  contribute  economically to support the household. Furthermore, they have become more independent  and  have  acquired  new  rights  (at  least  according  to  statutory  law),  which  previously  were  only  granted  to  men  (such  as  the  right  to  vote).  Customary  solutions  of  the  past  are  no  longer valid for many women – even in a rural context. A modern woman who has had only  slight contact with new models of gender equality and contributes to household livelihoods  through her productive and reproductive work, will not easily accept being “inherited” by a  brother‐in‐law, or want to abandon all of her belongings, built up with her husband after a  life of working together.   

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

17 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Within  this  framework  of  significant  asymmetries  of  power  and  profound  socio‐cultural  changes, the rights of the past are demanded by families wishing to take advantage of the  death of a family member, sometimes in a threatening and distorted manner. They demand  the right to keep all household belongings but forget their duty of providing support to the  wife and children of their deceased kin, using “culture and tradition” as an excuse, which is  nothing more than opportunism. However, many women no longer accept the solutions and  customs of the past, including those that now constitute violations of human rights, such as  “ widow inheritance”.      Box 2: Culture and tradition versus opportunism: Good practices from Manica Province     Maria  P.  R.  is  the  head  of  an  Administrative  Post  in  one  of  the  districts  of  Manica  Province.  In  11 2012, she received training in a paralegal course  offered  by the Centro de Formação Jurídica e  Judiciária (CFJJ) – Centre for Juridical and Judicial Training – of the Ministry of Justice, held under  FAO’s  Land  and  Gender  Project  (GCP/MOZ/086/NOR),  and  strengthened  her  knowledge  on  legislation pertaining to inheritance, land and gender issues.     Since  then,  she  has  been  doing  all  she  can  to  prevent  tradition  from  becoming  twisted  and  customary  practices  used  as  an  excuse  by  some  opportunistic  individuals  acting  in  bad  faith  to  grab  property  from  widows  and  orphans  and  earning  ‘easy  money’,  in  her  own  words.  “The  problem here is that some people suffer from ‘mental laziness’, says Maria. “They do not think of  the  best  ways  to  improve  their  living  conditions;  they  do  not  care  about  working  hard  to  build  something  for  their  families.  They  just  watch  their  relatives  work  hard  and  progress  in  life,  but  they  do  not  think  about  doing  the  same.  They  just  wait  for  their  brothers  to  die  and  then  grab  their property, and finally have something of their own in life. That is not our culture; that is not  our tradition. Our tradition is taking care of each other, taking care of our extended family when  someone  is  in  need”,  Maria  states.  She  says  that  very  often  cases  of  widows’  and  orphans’  evictions are brought to her attention in the Administrative Post. “As I always do in these cases, I  explain to the family that according to the law, the children and the widow are those who have  12 rights  over  the  property  left  by  the  deceased.  And  according  to  the  Domestic  Violence  Law,   anyone  who  evicts  a  widow  can  be  arrested  and  spend  up  to  6  months  in  jail.  Maybe  they  can  challenge a scared widow, but they cannot challenge the law, not without being punished.”     Maria explains that she always tries to raise awareness among the families, reminding them that  the  African  tradition  is  to  keep  the  property  and  the  land  for  the  next  generations,  and  to  take  care of the orphans and their property until they are old enough to claim their inheritance. Maria  recalls  that  when  her  brother  died  a  few  years  ago,  she  and  her  family  set  a  good  example  of  solidarity,  reminding  their  community  how  ‘their  tradition’  really  works.  “After  the  burial  my  sister‐in‐law decided to move to Sofala Province to attend University. She wanted to improve her  skills to get a better job and take better care of my niece. She leased out the house she built with  my brother using half of the money to cover my niece’s expenses and the other half to cover her  expenses in Beira (accommodation, study materials, university fees). I am taking care of my niece,  she is staying with me and this arrangement was blessed by the entire family. In a few years her  mother  will  be  back;  they  will  still  have  a  house,  and  my  sister‐in‐law  will  be  able  to  provide  a  better life for  my niece. One  day, if I or my children are in need, or if anyone in our family is in  need,  we  know  we  will  be  able  to  count  on  my  sister‐in‐law’s  support.  That  is  our  culture,  our  tradition; solidarity for those in need and not opportunism”, concludes Maria.   

 

                                                            11 

  Additional information on the training and work of paralegals will be provided in Chapter 6 of this document.     Law no. 29/2009, 29 September, 2009 (Law on Domestic Violence against Women). 

12 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

18 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

In addition to all the difficulties linked to inheritance, there are other issues such as the lack  of participation in decision‐making and gender‐based violence, where past traditions conflict  with the reality and needs of the present, and with the statutory laws.    Historically,  women  were subordinate  to  and  dependent  on  men.  During  the  fieldwork  for  this  study,  some  women,  especially  the  older  ones,  refused  to  express  their  opinions,  arguing  that  “the  men  are  the  ones  who  know”.  In  other  words,  implying  that  having  an  opinion  and  expressing  it  publicly  is  the  man’s  role.  This  attitude,  which  is  entrenched  in  traditional norms and patriarchal gender relations, keeps women out of the decision‐making  fora, relegating them to a secondary role. Authority and power are invested in men, and the  power  asymmetries  between  men  and  women,  and  women’s  dependency  on  men  are  compounded.     Box 3: The economic power goes to the men in the province of Zambezia13    The  total  number  of  women  who  lived  in  a  given  community  was  higher  than  that  of  men,  but  there  was  a  lower  rate  of  participation  recorded  for  women  when  the  DUAT  allocation  process  was  initiated.  Upon  asking  the  women  directly  why  they  had  participated  less  and  what  had  happened to make them get less involved, it was determined that, when it came to matters that  entailed some economic gain, or simply matters linked to money, the men did everything possible  to exclude the women from such activities.  

  Box 4: The subordination of women to their male relatives in decision‐making14    When  asked  if  she  wanted  to  initiate  land‐registration  procedures  during  the  Millennium  Challenge Account (MCA) Acesso Seguro a Terra project, a married woman in Marracuene stated  that  she  first  had  to  call  her  brother‐in‐law  to  ask  his  opinion,  as  her  husband  was  working  in  South Africa at the time. This woman was the one who worked on the machamba (land), but even  so, she demonstrated hesitation and lack of ability to make decisions and referred this task to the  closest  male  relative.  Single,  divorced  and  widowed  women  have  greater  independence  in  their  decision‐making and display less fear at the time of initiating the registration of their land.  

  While  the  older  generation  tend  to  present  more  rigid  and  traditional  points  of  view,  younger generations with more access to education, information and new paradigms, seem  more  open  to  equality  and  changes  in  gender  relations.  However,  this  search  for  participation, equality and rights is sometimes badly interpreted and frowned upon by the  older and more conservative generation.       In  addition  to  the  problems  linked  to  the  division  of property,  inheritance,  participation  in  decision‐making, and access to information, gender‐based violence is another huge problem  faced  by  Mozambican  women.  Gender‐based  violence,  which  leads  to  the  death  of  many  women, and has a high socio‐economic cost for the State, is very often considered a private  issue  that  has  to  be  resolved  within  the  family  (Universidade  Eduardo  Mondlane,  2011).  Violence  against  women  is  widespread:  from  all  domestic  violence  cases  reported  to  authorities  in  2015,  76  percent  were  perpetrated  against  women  and  girls  (INE,  2015).  In                                                             

13 

  Information obtained from the interview of Halima Selemane, Gender Focal Point of the National Land and  Forestry Directorate (DNTF) and Catarina Chidiamassamba, Gender Focal Point of the MCA project.  14    Information obtained from the interview of Halima Selemane, Gender Focal Point of the National Land and  Forestry Directorate (DNTF) and Catarina Chidiamassamba, Gender Focal Point of the MCA project. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

19 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

some  rural  communities,  violence  against  women  is  seen  as  a  normal  phenomenon  that  women  are  taught  to  accept.  There  are  reports of  young  women  who  seek  the  support of  their  families  after  being  beaten  by  their  husbands,  being  advised  by  their  mothers  and  aunts  to  accept  the  physical  abuse  –  “of  course,  we  have  all  been  through  the  same  situation”. This shows that violence against women has been legitimized over the course of  history  through  the  different  socially constructed  roles  for men  and women  (Cossa  José  et  all, 2011). Other serious problems are not unknown, like forced marriages or sexual abuse of  children, and underwritten by customary practices, which do not inhibit sexual involvement  between adults and minors, even of a very young age. What used to be  accepted customary  practices in the past, are today a series of crimes and violations of human rights.    It  is  in  this  context  of  clashes  between  the  customs  of  the  past  and  the  challenges  of  a  modern  society  that  the  community  and  traditional  authorities  act.  The  lack  of  awareness  and knowledge of key gender issues and of the legal framework – addressing not only the  promotion of equality between men and women, but also inheritance, division of property  upon separation, gender‐based violence, human rights and women’s and children’s rights –  negatively  affect  the  outcome  of  the  decisions  made  by  the  community  authorities.  In  the  specific case of widows, very frequently the practices of the past prevail and the widow loses  everything upon the death of her husband; at the same time, the traditional duty to support  her  and  the  orphans  is  ignored,  not  only  by  the  extended  families,  but  also  by  the  community authorities themselves.     Trainings,  like  the  one  reported  in  Box  2,  are  essential  to  guarantee  that  traditional  authorities  apply  customary  practices  without  contradicting  the  principles  of  formal  legislation.  Without  training  and  specific  knowledge  of  the  Mozambican  law  and  human  rights principles, community authorities will continue to be caught between the traditions of  the  past  and  the  needs  of  the  present,  with  the  risk  of  perpetuating  injustice  that  disproportionately affects women, widows and children. Moreover, it is not enough to state  that the decisions based on customs should not contradict formal legislation; it is necessary  to  guarantee  that  there  are  mechanisms  to  ensure  that  community  authorities,  including  judges and community leaders, traditional chiefs and neighbourhood and village secretaries,  are  aware  of  and  have  access  to  formal  legislation.  Furthermore,  cases  of  malpractice  or  contradiction  of  the  law  need  to  be  reported.  Legislation  is  of  little  effect  without  the  necessary resources for implementation, without informing and educating all relevant actors  on the provisions of the legislation, without monitoring the reforms, and without effective  sanctions on failure to implement (op. cit. Budlender and Alma, 2011).       

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

20 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

6. CUSTOMARY LAW IN ACTION: COMMUNITY COURTS, CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PARALEGALS The different laws mentioned earlier recognise legal pluralism, and create and regulate the  operation  of  CCs.  Legal  pluralism,  established  in  Article  4  of  the  Constitution,  validates  access  to  justice,  both  through  the  formal  statutory  system  of  justice  based  on  statutory  laws, and through the customary law based on customs and traditions (as long as it does not  contradict the values and principles set out in the Constitution). However, the constitutional  principle  of  not  allowing  decisions  that  contradict  formal  legislation,  remains  only  a  declaration of good intentions in many cases, particularly when addressing issues related to  gender and women’s rights, as noted in the previous chapters.     In Mozambique, customary law and community authorities play an extremely important role  in the resolution of conflicts at the community level, based on informal justice systems and  local  customs.  While  it  is  true  that  community  authorities  act  as  regulators  of  social  order  and facilitate access to justice for most of the population, cautious analysis must be carried  out  to  determine  whether  they  are  respecting  human  rights  in  the  resolution  of  conflicts,  and in particular, women’s rights.     Due  to  the  complexity  of  the  subject  under  study,  in  which  various  issues  come  into  play,  and  in  order  to  better  understand  the  role  and  potential  negative  implications  of  the  customary law in effect in Mozambique for gender equality and women’s rights, the role of  the  different  civil  society  organizations  (CSOs)  and  of  the  paralegals  in  conflict  resolution,  will also be analysed in depth as it relates to the operation of the CCs.     Concrete  examples  of  different  situations  entailing  the  participation  of  both  the  CCs,  the  CSOs  and  paralegals  in  conflict  resolution  around  women’s  and/or  children’s  rights,  are  presented below. 

6.1  Community courts as forums for conflict resolution  In the words of Kaelina P. Z., Chief Justice of the 23 CCs of the city of Inhambane, some of  the main tasks carried out by the CCs are:   “Harmonizing social coexistence through community participation and  recognition of the ethnic and cultural diversity of Mozambican society.  The CCs defend equal rights in the communities and reinforce social  stability. In the CCs, minor conflicts of a civil nature are dealt with based  on the habits and customs, traditions, and social and cultural values,  always trying, where possible, to bring about a reconciliation between  the parties”.15     As  this  quote  highlights,  CCs  are  increasingly  important  in  the  promotion  of  human  rights  and  must  include  mechanisms  that  enable  women’s  rights  and  gender  equality  to  be  guaranteed.    However, the operation of the CCs is uncoordinated, lacks definition and their legal scope is  vague;  there  is  no  single  standard  course of  action  and  conflict  resolution  varies  markedly  from  province  to  province,  and  substantial  differences  can  be  seen  even  in  the  same                                                             

15 

  Interview held in Inhambane. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

21 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

province.16 However, within this high degree of variability, some general tendencies can be  identified.  It  is  common  for  the  first  source  of  conflict  resolution  to  be  carried  out  in  the  family  itself.  If  an  agreement  is  not  reached  between  the  parties,  they  can  turn  to  the  community leaders (‘chefe das 10 casas’ ‐ leader of 10 houses, ‘chefe de quarterão’ ‐ leader  of  the  block,  ‘chefe  do  Bairro’  ‐  leader  of  the  neighbourhood  and  ‘Régulo’‐  traditional  authority). The process that is followed, to go from some leaders to others, is not precise. If  one of the parties involved does not agree with the solution offered, then they turn to the  CC; and once all these options have been exhausted, they can bring the case before the DC.     The different stages in the resolution of a conflict may vary according to the case, as already  stated.  At  the  same  time,  this  complex  process  is  also  influenced  by  several  variables  of  a  social‐cultural origin. For example, in many communities, wives who are victims of violence  are afraid to bring their cases before the formal authorities for fear that their husbands will  be  thrown  in  jail.  Another  important  aspect  is  the  difference  in  the  symbolic  elements  associated  with  the  formal  courts,  where  Portuguese  is  used  to  the  detriment  of  the  local  languages, and the clothing worn and practices used appear strange to the people from the  rural communities.17 This indicates that the strengths of informal systems of justice vis‐à‐vis  the rural populations, male and female, should also be assessed in terms of cost, proximity,  language, culture and shared values. The statutory law and formal justice system may often  be perceived by the women and the community itself to be a distant and strange system of  social regulation (op. cit. World Bank, 2011).    The dichotomy that exists between the operation of the CCs in the city of Maputo and the  rest  of  the  country,  i.e.  between  urban  and  rural  areas,  displays  a  significant  difference  in  terms  of  organization,  availability  of  infrastructures,  and  the  use  of  materials  in  the  performance of their tasks. The CCs in urban areas focus predominantly on the settlement of  disputes  about  land  demarcations.  By  contrast,  the  expropriation  of  land  and  eviction  of  widows, along with problems of DUAT sales and renting, are the main land‐related conflicts  which women take to the rural CCs. In general, it was difficult to obtain information about  land  conflicts  in  both  areas.  An  in‐depth  inquiry  reveals  that  they  are  included  in  the  category of “social cases” when the people involved see the situation as a family or domestic  matter  (for  example,  disputes  between  widows,  their  children  and  the  families  of  the  deceased husband, domestic violence, divorces, issues faced by single mothers, etc.).  6.1.1  Community courts in urban areas  The CCs located in the city and the province of Maputo have their own physical space, which  is generally shared with other administrative authorities such as the Neighbourhood Office  and/or  premises  belonging  to  the  FRELIMO  political  party.  These  courts  are  open  to  the  citizens from Monday to Friday, from 08:00 to 13:00, and Friday or Saturday is the day set  aside  for  holding  trials.  Some  courts  have  their  own  typewriter  to  record  the  cases  and  official documents provided by the Ministry of Justice. The availability of manuals on laws is  minimal. The courts make a general record of the cases with no subsequent cataloguing. The  parties  involved  in  the  claims  should  each  pay  a  standard  fee  of  200  meticais  (around  USD 2.7).18                                                               

16 

  Information obtained from the interview of João Carlos Trindade, Deputy Director of Centro de Estudos  Sociais Aquino de Bragança (CESAB) – Centre for Social Studies in Aquino de Bragança.  17    Interview with Sergio Baleira, researcher and instructor at the CFJJ.  18    Exchange rate USD 1 = MZN 72,4  (August 2016).  

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

22 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

In order to understand how the cases involving women’s rights are tried in the CCs, several  practical cases recorded throughout the study are presented in the next boxes. These cases  are  useful  examples of  different  situations  involving  the  participation of  the  CCs,  the  CSOs  and the paralegals.     Box 5: Trial 1 – The Regret of Felisberto G. J. N.19    Felisberto filed a complaint with the CC of Zimpeto accusing his wife of wanting to sell their house,  under  the  influence  and  manipulation  of  their  son  Belgencio.  Felisberto  explained  that  the  problems with his wife began in 2007. Because his wife was not taking care of him, he decided to  leave  her  and  go  to  live  with  his  “friend”  (who  is  now  his  new  wife/partner).  While  at  the  trial,  Felisberto  completely  changed  his  mind  and  agreed  that  his  wife  may  sell  the  house  to  get  the  20 money she needed to treat her “disease”.  At the same time, he accused his son of having already  started  procedures  to  sell  the  house  without  his  consent;  he  also  stated  that  Belgencio  was  inciting his mother “to make trouble for him”. He requested half the proceeds from the sale of the  house. The CC did not authorize the sale of the house by the son, not trusting the statements he  made  throughout  the  trial  and  for  replying  in  a  confused  and  contradictory  manner  to  certain  concrete questions. The CC considered that it was important for the wife to be able to live in her  house  and  furthermore  ruled  that  she  would  receive  a  monthly  sum  from  Felisberto,  who  was  required to provide her with part of the pension that he received from the Government. Felisberto  had  tried  to  conceal  the  fact  that  he  was  receiving  that  payment;  for  this  reason  the  CC  summoned the family again the following Saturday to inform them of the final decision (once the  CC  had  verified  the  sum  that  Felisberto  received  and  set  the  amount  that  his  first  wife  would  receive). Although Felisberto  displayed regret  for his actions, this did not affect the judges’ final  decision. The CC completely mistrusted the son and chose to defend the rights of the wife. 

  In the case above, the woman intended to sell the house she had built with her ex‐husband,  in which she resided, in order to get the cash she needed. However, the CC did not authorize  the sale anticipating that she would probably not have anywhere to live if she proceeded to  sell the house. Looking after the broader welfare of the family, the decisions of the CCs allow  for this type of situation, which would not be acceptable in a formal court. A formal court  could  not  prohibit  an  individual  from  selling  his/her  property,  even  if  this  were  to  lead  to  future problems, since this would go beyond the competencies of a formal court in terms of  applying the law. Contrary to formal courts, this type of situation is seen in the CCs. In this  specific  case,  the  CC  not  only  decided  what  would  be  better  for  the  woman  (to  keep  the  house),  but  also  introduced  other  aspects  (right  to  alimony  from  her  ex‐husband)  to  guarantee her livelihood.      

                                                            19 

  Information obtained from attending the trial at the Zimpeto Neighbourhood CC (city of Maputo).    The real disease, which is HIV/AIDS, is not mentioned during the entire trial. Both the CC judges and the  people in the trial choose by default to use the word ‘doença’, which means ‘disease’ in English. This  peculiarity highlights the taboo that still exists around HIV/AIDS in present‐day Mozambique.  

20 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

23 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Box 6: Trial 2 – The Mafalala Neighbourhood CC limits the   entrepreneurial actions of Carolina T.21    Carolina T. is the  mother of  8 children, the youngest of  which was  conceived  with another man  other than her husband. Her husband, Orlando M., migrated to South Africa and left her without  any  economic  support.  Since  her  husband  abandoned  her  and  all  their  underaged  children,  Carolina decided to present her case to the Mafalala’s Neighbour CC, requesting child support. In  the  previous  year,  the  CC  decided  that  Carolina  should  leave  her  house  and  move  in  with  her  husband’s family, who should look after her and her children. Carolina never complied with the CC  decision. Then, a cousin of Orlando, Antonio T., filed a new case with the CC alleging that Carolina  was not living in her house and was currently living with another man. Antonio T. reported that  Carolina was receiving an income from the rental of her house without the prior authorization of  the family. He also claimed that the family instead should be the receiving the rent.    The presiding judge reproached all the people in the trial because the directions issued by the CC  the  previous  year  had  not  been  followed,  saying  that  this  attitude  showed  a  lack  of  respect  for  authority.  Carolina  should  have  informed  the  CC  that  the  living  conditions  with  her  husband’s  family  were  not  acceptable,  if  she  was  intending  not  to  follow  the  CC  order.  The  CC  could  have  verified this information by going directly to the dwelling. The CC also reproached Carolina for not  having  informed  the  court  of  her  intention  of  living  with  a  new  man  and  having  rented  out  the  house  without  first  consulting  the  CC.  In  her  defence,  Carolina  argued  that  she  had  no  financial  means for supporting her children and that neither her ex‐husband nor his family gave her money  for that. The husband’s family insisted that she was obtaining some very high benefits. Carolina,  who had some knowledge of the law, presented the written lease agreement, which amounted to  3,500 meticais (approx. USD 49) per month.     During the course of the trial, the judge questioned all the people present and tried to verify the  information  that  conflicted  with  what  was  recorded  in  writing  during  the  previous  trial.  Subsequently, the CC deliberated behind closed doors and raised doubts about the truthfulness of  the  facts  presented  by  the  cousin.  Even  so,  their  final  decision  was  that,  from  now  on,  the  Machaba family would receive the money from the rental of the house, but in exchange must pay  in  full,  the  alimony  for  the  7  children  Carolina  and  Orlando  had  together.  Carolina  would  thus  receive a higher income, but her entrepreneurial action to solve the problem had been punished.  The  question  remained  as  to  whether  the  husband’s  family  would  actually  give  any  money  to  Carolina or not. 

  The  case  above  mixes  elements  from  statutory  law  and  customary  law.  According  to  statutory  law,  in  the  absence  of  her  husband,  Carolina  would  be  entitled  to  manage  the  couple’s  assets,  to  which  the  husband’s  family  have no  right.  In  the  case  of  her  husband’s  death  or  absence,  these  assets  would  be  left  to  Carolina  and  to  the  couple’s  children.  However,  customary  practices  determine  that  in  the  absence  of  the  husband,  his  assets  “belong”  to  his  family  (fathers,  uncles,  brothers,  male  cousins).  This  practice  contradicts  statutory law, which recognizes only the rights of the spouse and the children. The CC states  that  Carolina  should  have  informed  it  of  her  intention  to  live  with  another  man.  This  presents another violation of the statutory law, since this is a private decision that does not  require  authorization  from  anyone  whatsoever.  At  the  same  time,  customary  practice  determines  that  the  husband’s  family  must  support  the  wife  and  children.  Nowadays,  this  rarely happens. Even so, following customary rules and contradicting the Mozambican law,  the CC determined that the income from the rental of the house, which Carolina had been                                                              21 

  Information obtained from attending the trial in the Mafalala Neighbourhood CC, Minkadeuine (city of  Maputo). 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

24 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

using  to  support  her  7  children,  must  be  handed  over  to  the  husband’s  family.  The  CC  determined  that  it  was  the  family’s  responsibility  to  pay  maintenance  for  the  7  children.  However, it is unlikely that maintenance will be paid. Furthermore, the CCs do not have any  mechanism to guarantee that their decisions are complied with and implemented. Different  cases  reported  in  studies  and  empirical  evidence  show  that,  in  general,  the  families  dispossess the women and children of their assets and fail to provide any kind of support to  them.  Faced  with  the  decision  of  the  CC,  Carolina  will  be  left  without  the  rent  money.  Considering  current  practices  in  Mozambique,  it  is  unlikely  that  she  will  receive  anything  from  her  husband’s  family;  therefore,  she  will  probably  have  to  support  the  7  children  on  her own. In this specific case, if statutory laws had been followed, Carolina would have been  considered the legitimate party to receive the rental fee, which would have allowed her to  have  an  income  to  continue  supporting  her  children  after  having  been  abandoned  by  her  husband.  6.1.2  Community courts in rural areas  Rural CCs suffer from lack of adequate infrastructure and a marked lack of human resources  to carry out their activities. They also do not have the materials to make a written record of  the conflicts presented nor access to information on laws or the Constitution itself. In many  cases,  they  do  not  have  a  physical  space  where  they  can  meet.  As  an  alternative,  these  courts use an open space to discuss the different cases, generally in the shade of trees, and  the meetings are cancelled when it rains. The CCs tend to establish two set days a week to  take in cases and the judges will go to the court if there is a conflict to resolve.    Article  7  of  the  Community  Court  Act  defines  the  composition  of  the  CCs,  which  must  be  made  up  of  eight  members  (five  active  judges  and  three  in  reserve).  Direct  observation22  confirmed  that only  one of  the  rural  CCs  visited was  composed  by  all  five  judges.  Many of  the  elected  judges  had  died  and  were  never  replaced  or  do  not  carry  out  their  duties  because  they  clash  with  other  economic  activities  they  engage  in  (such  as  working  on  the  machamba). Moreover, some of these judges have overlapping roles, also being community  leaders or neighbourhood officers.    

                                                           

22 

  During this research, 32 judges from 16 CCs had been interviewed. Detailed information is provided under  Annex II below.  

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

25 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Box 7: Community leaders, paralegals and traditional authorities are judges at the  Gondo CC, in Muane (Zavala, Inhambane)23    This  CC  was  set  up  in  2008  and  is  made  up  of  eight  people,  comprising  community  leaders,  representatives of civil society and traditional authorities. Mr. Samuel M. G. received recognition  from the government as a community leader in 2001 and was subsequently elected judge of the  CC  by  the  people  themselves.  Samuel  was  also  trained  as  a  paralegal  within  the  CFJJ/FAO  paralegals  training  programme.  In  the  CC,  everyone  works  together  to  resolve  conflicts  and  no  fees are charged for the services offered except in cases where it is necessary to travel. The court  dealt with two cases involving widows in 2012, and with a further two cases in 2013. Community  Court  Judge  Samuel  explained  that  widows’  rights  are  being  violated  after  the  death  of  their  husbands and one of the awareness‐raising activities carried out by the courts consists of showing  that the law defends these women. The Judge highlighted that after taking the paralegal course,  the court rejects discriminatory practices against widows, thereby protecting and recognizing their  rights. 

  As  regards  to  the  charging  of  fees  for  services  rendered  in  the  CCs,  the  amount  varies  according to each court and no standard sum can be identified. According to the information  collected at all the visited courts, the sum may range from 120 meticais (approx. USD 2) as a  basic cost, to 500 meticais (USD 7) for more complicated cases requiring an additional cost  for transportation. This sum may be covered by and shared between the parties involved or,  as  happens  more  generally,  both  parties  must  pay  that  amount.  There  are  also  some  CCs  that claim that their services are rendered completely free of charge (basically, this occurs in  CCs that receive support from a CSO), or that they do not charge a fee to people who have  no  financial  resources.  These  people  may  pay  in  kind  with  animals  (hens  or  goats)  or  by  performing social services for the community (like clearing the community machamba).24  6.1.3  Common considerations to urban and rural community courts  Most of  the Mozambican population  living  in  the  rural  areas  resort to  CCs  and  community  authorities as their first recourse for conflict management. People have immense respect for  community  authorities  and  so  the  CCs  and  its  members  are  perceived  as  being  highly  legitimate  and  have  significant  influence over  the  populations,  both  urban  and  particularly  rural ones.     The judges in general do not receive any kind of financial subsidy or support from the State  in  either  the  urban  or  rural  CCs;  as  result,  they  engage  simultaneously  in  other  activities  (generally  activities  directed  at  subsistence,  as  farming  tends  to  be).  Many  interviewed  judges  mentioned  that  it would  be  important  to  receive  some  type of  financial  aid  for  the  performance  of  their  activities.  The  CC  judges  stated  that  they  charge  the  court  fees  to  maintain the system itself, using the incomes to buy paper and pens to record the cases.     The  perception  of  having  been  abandoned  by  the  State  is  widespread  among  CC  court  members. Most of the judges interviewed emphasized that there is an imperative need for  training, the lack of which may negatively impact on the effectiveness of these forums. Some  judges  have  a  little  knowledge  of  statutory  laws,  which  they  have  acquired  through                                                              23 

  Information obtained from the interview of Samuel M. G., customary judge of the Gondo CC, community  leader and paralegal in Muane (Province of Inhambane).  24    Information obtained from the interview of Joaquim Bata, Chief Justice of the CC of Chamane (Inhambane  Province). 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

26 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

awareness‐raising  actions  or  their  own  experience.  However,  knowledge  is  very  limited.  In  general, the CCs do not have printed copies of the laws or information materials on formal  legislation.  Regarding  gender  issues  and  women’s  rights  specifically,  it  was  noted  that  the  CCs  with  judges  who  participated  in  some  form  of  awareness‐raising  or  capacity‐building  tended to issue sentences that are in compliance with the principles of equality and with the  right to inherit, established in formal legislation. This was shown in Boxes 2 and 7 above, and  is also illustrated in Box 8 below.     Box 8: Women’s rights and social justice in Customary Courts     Samuel M. G. is a community leader and customary judge in Zavala District, Inhambane Province.  In November 2010, he participated in a paralegal training course promoted by CFJJ and the FAO  Land  and  Gender  Project.  Through  the  training,  Samuel  gained  knowledge  regarding  the  most  relevant legislation on land and natural resources rights. He was also sensitized on the importance  of  gender  equality  for  social  and  economic  development  and  learned  about  gender  issues  and  women's rights. In 2012, Samuel received a not uncommon case in his local customary court.     A widow and her children had been evicted after the death of her husband. A few days after the  funeral, some of the deceased’s relatives tried to evict the widow and her small children, claiming  that,  according  to  tradition  the  property  left  by  the  deceased  should  be  given  to  his  relatives.  Samuel  recalls  that  he  called  a  meeting  with  the  husband´s  family  and  explained  to  them  that,  according to Mozambican statutory law – especially the Constitution, the Land Law and the Family  Law – the widow and her children were the ones who had legal rights to the land and the house  jointly  built  during  that  marriage.  “When  they  saw  the  books  (legislation)  they  finally  accepted  that  these  are  the  only  rules  now;  and  these  rules  are  good  for  everyone  in  the  community.  Otherwise, what would have happened to that widow with her small children? They would have  been  left  with  nothing.  And without  land,  without  shelter,  how  could  they  have  survived?  From  then  on,  everybody  in  our  community  knows  that  widows  are  no  longer  evicted",  concludes  Samuel.  Source: FAO, 2014. 

  The exact process for electing judges and the mechanisms in place for their re‐election are  not  known.  Article  13  (elections)  of  the  Community  Court  Act  states  that  “it  is  the  Government’s  responsibility  to establish  the mechanisms  and  deadlines  for  the  election  of  community  court  members”,  while  Article  14  (monitoring  of  elections)  does  not  go  into  detail  on  the  procedure  to  be  followed,  and  limits  itself  to  awarding  the  general  responsibility for monitoring to the DCs. Most of the people interviewed indicated that the  election  of  the  judges  is  always  done  through  the  people.  The  election  methods  vary  minimally from one court to another; in some cases, a pre‐selected group of judges is chosen  and  put  forward  for  the  people  to  make  the  final  election.  In  other  cases,  it  is  the  people  themselves who appoint the judges, with the entire population participating in the election  of these offices. It is important to note that as part of the process of social self‐regulation,  the role of a judge is associated with emblematic people who have a good reputation and  who  possess  certain  leadership  qualities,  and  who  have  knowledge  of  their  own  community.25    

                                                            25 

  Many of the judges fulfil the duties of community leaders and neighbourhood officers at the same time, and  may also be ‘régulos’ ‐ Chiefs of petty states (and in the historical context some Chiefs of petty states can be  associated with their political‐party membership).  

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

27 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Some  of  the  general  directions  followed  in  the  CCs  are:  no  one  involved  is  allowed  to  be  unreasonable, to be rude to or confront the judges, and everyone must display an attitude  of  respect  towards  them.  If  one  of  the  parties  involved  does  not  agree  with  the  CC’s  decision,  the  CC  gives  them  full  freedom  to  refer  to  the  DC  or  even  courts  of  higher  instance.26     Similarly,  on  those  occasions  when  the  community  judges  feel  that  the  cases  are  beyond  their  scope,  they  coordinate  their  proceedings  with  other  authorities,  such  as  the  police,  DCs,  the  prosecution  office,  Associação  dos  Médicos  Tradicionais  de  Moçambique  (AMETRAMO)  –  Association  of  Traditional  Doctors  of  Mozambique  and  the  Gabinete  de  Atendimento  à  Família  e  Menores  Vítimas  de  Violência  –  Office  of  Family  and  Children’s  Victim  of  Violence.27  They  stay  in  close  contact  with  AMETRAMO  when  settling  cases  involving  witchcraft.28  At  the  same  time,  situations  are  identified  in  which  the  communications  go  in  the  opposite  direction,  that  is  to  say,  in  which  the  police  or  DC  themselves ask what the decisions handed down by the CC have been; or they refer the case  to this forum (especially in cases involving the petty theft of ducks or hens). The CSOs also  tend  to  receive  a  high  number  of  cases  brought  by  parties  who  do  not  agree  with  the  CC  decision and who are looking for alternative ways to deal with their cases.     Box 9: Women as judges in the CCs: Some limitations to their participation29    In the Chamane CC, in Inhambane, one of the women elected as active judge was forced to step  down from office by her husband. The husband requested her to step down alleging that she was  not fulfilling her domestic duties of cleaning the house, preparing the meals and looking after their  children. More specifically, she was not heating the water for his bath when he came home tired  from  work.  From  his  perspective,  his  wife  was  being  distracted  from  her  main  tasks.  When  the  woman explained her reasons for stepping down to the members of the CC, they decided to talk  to the husband to negotiate a possible part‐time position for her in the CC, reducing the number  of days that she would put in. They also explained to him that his wife had been elected by the  community  and  that  it  was  important  to  respect  that  decision.  However,  the  husband  directly  forbade his wife to take part in the CC and threatened to restrict her freedom even further, to the  point of locking her up at home, if the pressure did not stop. Finally, the CC decided not to press  the  matter  any  further  and  replace  that  judge  (in  this  case,  she  was  replaced  by  a  female  paralegal, whose experience is described in detail in another of the cases).  

                                                              26 

  Information obtained from the focus group interview held in Inhambane. Detailed information is provided  under Appendix II.  27    The Gabinete de Atendimento à Família e Menores Vítimas de Violência (Office of Family and Children’s  Victim of Violence) aim to provide a safe space where women and children victims of violence, abuse and  exploitation can report these situations and receive the necessary care. The Offices are coordinated by the  Department for Women and Child Care of the General Command of the Republic of Mozambique Police  (PRM), and is a mutli‐sector intervention involving also the Ministries of Health (MISAU), Women and Social  Action (MMAS) and Justice.  28    ‘Feitiçaria’ (witchcraft) is the Portuguese term that refers to traditional practices that involve attributing a  magical dimension to a given phenomenon. They are frequently recurring practices and are deeply  embedded in the culture of Mozambique. An illness, a death, an accident, the loss of property or any other  misfortune is considered to be an unforeseeable event in science‐based or Western thinking, whereas in  Mozambique, it is associated with the result of feitiçaria practices. These practices vary from province to  province and from community to community, with their unforeseeable and uncontrollable nature being the  common denominator (Meneses, 2008).   29    Information obtained from the focus group held in Inhambane. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

28 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

The  case  above  shows  the  strength  of  the  patriarchal  system  and  male’s  dominance  in  Mozambique,  particularly  in  rural  areas,  but  also  in  some  urban  areas.  While  formal  legislation, particularly the Constitution, recognizes gender equality and women’s rights, the  reality is different. The customary system, in which the husband, as “head of the family” has  total power over his wife, remains in force. The husband determines which activities his wife  can  carry  out,  where  she  can  go  and  with  whom  she  can  interact.  In  the  case  above,  the  husband  even  threatened  to  “lock  his  wife  in  the  house”,  if  she  continued  to  insist  on  participating  as  a  community  judge.  According  to  statutory  law,  this  practice  is  a  crime  (forced confinement), punishable with a prison sentence. Unfortunately, cases such as this  one are very common, and they show the imbalance between customary practices and the  Mozambican legislation. The crystallization of gender roles, whereby women subordinate to  the “head of the family” are responsible for domestic chores and caring for the husband and  family,  and  for  anything  else  the  husband  may  decide,  is  very  closely  linked  to  social  problems  faced  by  women.  These  problems  include  low  levels  of  schooling  and  illiteracy,  poor  socio‐economic  development  and,  ultimately,  complete  dependence  on  their  husbands, among others. These issues need to be considered in the context of the relative  isolation  and  distance,  both  physical  and  in  terms  of  values,  in  which  certain  rural  communities are immersed.        Box 10: Actively listening to the various people involved to detect possible alliances   or liars in a feitiçaria case from the Gungulo CC30    In the community court of Gungulo, a case was brought forward in which a group of 12 children  reported their widowed mother for practising feitiçaria inside the home, with the aim of evicting  her  from  it.  The  procedure  called  for  listening  to  all  the  parties  involved,  particularly  each  child  separately.  In  this  way,  the  court  was  attempting  to  ensure  the  truthfulness  of  the  information  provided,  discarding  possible  alliances  between  the  children  and  detecting  potential  lies.  Subsequently,  a  meeting  was  held  with  the  witch  doctors,  who  vigorously  asserted  that  this  widowed  mother  was  engaging  in  various  feitiçaria  practices  at  home.  Permission  was  obtained  from all the parties involved to enter the house and make a detailed examination to see whether  there  was  evidence  of  the  feitiçaria  practices  reported  by  the  children  and  corroborated  by  the  group of witch doctors. Once the house had been examined, no evidence was found that justified  the accusations. The court ruled that the children, joined with the interests of the witch doctors,  were  lying  in  order  to  evict  the  mother  and  subsequently  sell  the  house  and  make  money  that  way.  There  was  no  credible  basis  to  prove  the  feitiçaria  practices  and  the  mother  was  able  to  remain in her home without being evicted.   

  Active  listening  and  talking  with  the  various  parties  involved  are  the  main  tools  of  information‐gathering and case analysis used by the judges. They try to reach a consensus  and bring about mutual understanding between the parties, in line whenever possible, with  the strategies of coexistence deeply rooted in the community itself, which largely guide the  conflict resolution, based on the application of common sense.       

                                                           

30 

  Case reported by Alfredo Q. M., Chief Justice of the Muane CC (Zavala, Inhambane). 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

29 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Box 11: Women are being accused of causing their husbands’ deaths31    In  the  face  of  the  chronic  illness  of  a  husband  (in  many  cases,  infected  by  HIV),  it  is  a  recurring  practice for the family members to accuse his wife of being responsible for the origin of his disease  and, eventually, his death.     Olinda C. was  married to Jacinto M. and they shared a house along with their  children, aged 18  and 21, and a 15‐year old son who was the offspring of a relationship that the husband had with  another woman. Jacinto, who used to engage in extramarital sexual relations, was suffering from  HIV/AIDS, which in turn he transmitted to his wife Olinda. Olinda accepted this condition and even  raised the child Jacinto had with the other woman, as though he was her own (his mother died of  HIV/AIDS  shortly  after  his  birth).  When  Jacinto  got  worse  because  of  the  HIV/AIDS,  his  brother  accused Olinda of having engaged in feitiçaria practices to bring about her husband’s death. The  brother‐in‐law decided to evict Olinda and she was forced to leave her home and her children and  return to her parents’ house. During the terminal stage of the disease, Jacinto asked for Olinda to  return home to look after him. When her husband died, the brother‐in‐law again accused Olivia of  feitiçaria and forced her to hand over the keys to him and leave the house along with the children.  The sale of the house had been previously agreed to in the event of his brother’s death. Olivia had  some knowledge of the law and knew that upon the death of her husband, the house should be  inherited by his children, so she went straight to the Head of Neighbourhood in search for help to  resolve her case. The Head referred the case directly to the CC of Zimpeto, as that was a matter  that went beyond his jurisdiction.     The case was brought before the CC of Zimpeto, and the  judges of the  court, in the  face of the  reiterated accusations of feitiçaria practices, decided to consult AMETRAMO on how to approach  this conflict. AMETRAMO concluded that the wife was not responsible for her husband’s death, as  he  had  contracted  HIV/AIDS  through  the  extramarital  relationship  he  had  for  years  with  the  mother  of  his  last  son.  Therefore,  Olivia  had  not  engaged  in  any  feitiçaria  practices.  With  that  information,  the  CC  concluded  that  the  wife  should  remain  in  the  house  to  take  care  of  her  children and that the brother‐in‐law could not proceed to sell the property. The decision‐making  process took approximately three weeks from the time the case was brought before the CC.    

  These  practical  cases  serve  as  an  illustration  of  the  interactions  that  occur  between  the  various  informal  forums  of  justice  and  the  exchange  of  experiences  that  was  generated  between the CC of the Zimpeto Neighbourhood and AMETRAMO.     Accusations  of  witchcraft  are  frequent  in  Mozambique.  Generally,  they  result  in  widows,  children and the elderly being dispossessed of their property. With the increased prevalence  of HIV/AIDS and early deaths, combined with growing pressures on land, these cases have  been on the rise. In the examples provided above, the CCs showed a good understanding of  the  basic  principles  enshrined  in  Mozambican  legislation,  and  statutory  law  prevailed  over  customary  practices.  Unfortunately,  this  is  not  always  the  case.  There  is  great  fear  of  witchcraft and violence, and sometimes widows prefer to leave their homes and property,  instead of running the risk of being lynched after being accused of witchcraft, or even falling  victim to witchcraft. According to the former Attorney General Augusto Paulino, “lynching in  rural  areas  became  real  homicides,  in  which  small  groups  murder  their  relatives  or  neighbours for alleged reasons of ‘witchcraft’” (Paulino quoted in Open Society Initiative for  Southern Africa, 2012). Serra (2009) and Granjo (2012) noted that, lynching cases of people  accused of witchcraft are normally targeted to vulnerable and socially weakened individuals  (mostly  women  and  elders),  and  strongly  gendered.  While  the  most  feared  and  famous                                                              31 

  Case reported by the judges of the CC of the Zimpeto Neighbourhood (Maputo). 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

30 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

sorcerers  are  usually  men,  the  overwhelming  majority  of  people  accused  of  witchcraft  are  women.  The  kin  resulting  from  marriage  have  a  privileged  structural  position  as  primary  suspects, particularly women living with the husband’s family. If these women demonstrate  behaviours deemed undesirable by their in‐laws they will automatically become suspects of  witchcraft. This could for instance, include situations where the women, according to their in  laws,  are  argumentative  or  defiant  of  their  mother‐in‐law  and  sisters‐in‐law,  allegedly  insufficiently respectful of or zealous toward their husbands and his elders, or envious of the  assets  or  children  of  other  women.  Widows  are  also  in  a  weak  position  with  regard  to  possible accusation, particularly if they own locally significant assets and started to behave  in a more independent way after widowhood. These women are affected by a convergence  of  factors,  including:  limited  defence  capacity,  the  economic  expectations  of  the  possible  beneficiaries  of  the  accusation,  a  life  experience  that  might  have  supposedly  given  them  access to magic secrets, and gender power imbalances. These are factors which, in turn, will  add to the already existing and common suspicion about the widow’s likely responsibility for  her  husband’s  death,  which  may  be  revived  and  work  as complementary  ‘evidence’  in  the  presence  of  new  suspicions.  Furthermore,  behaviours  that  diverge  from  the  local  role  models  of  femininity  and  gender  power  may  become  sufficient  reason  for  suspicion  and  consequent accusation (op. cit. Granjo, 2012).    While  the  cases  presented  in  Boxes  10  and  11  are  positive  examples  where  reason  and  statutory  law  prevailed  over  accusations  based  on  subjective  and  questionable  means  of  proof,  in  most  cases  especially  at  rural  level,  procedures  follow  a  reasoning  diverse  and  distant from the fairness and logic entailed in statutory law, as reported in Box 12 below.     Box 12: ‘A woman who defended herself from gender‐based violence ‘was a sorcerer’!    The case started at a Community Court. The complainant was a married woman who applied for  divorce due to repeated aggression by her husband over the years they had spent together. The  last time she was beaten she was able to run away and seek refuge with her family of origin, when  she filed the claim. The detailed description of the events showed that, on this last occasion, the  woman stood up to the husband and hit him on the head with a frying pan in order to escape. The  mood changed instantly as soon as this was disclosed at the trial. The ‘judge’ was astonished, and  both he and the people representing the husband set about questioning whether such an unusual  reaction  from  the  woman  would  not  be  explainable  solely  by  the  fact  that  she  had  become  a  sorcerer. The judge, feeling incompetent to try such matters, immediately summoned a ‘Sorcery  Court’ against the woman who had arrived there as a complainant. The new trial, albeit an ad hoc  one, started in accordance with the usual procedures. However, given that the woman insisted on  not admitting her guilt, one of the judges gave her a mirror and asked her what she saw in it. As  expected,  the  woman  said  she  saw  her  image  reflected  in  it.  ‘That  is  the  proof‘,  someone  answered  her,  adding  that:  ‘This  is  a  magical  mirror  and  only  shows  sorcerers!’.  It  is  not  known  what  happened  to  this  woman,  who  continued  to  deny  the  accusation,  though  ‘such  an  extraordinary piece of evidence’ convinced most of those present.  Source: op. cit. Granjo, 2012.    

  In addition to the fear of being accused of witchcraft, the fear of being victim of witchcraft is  powerful  and  widespread  in  Mozambique.  A  study  carried  out  by  the  Eduardo  Mondlane  University  pointed  out  that  some  of  the  interviewees  alleged  to  be  victims  of  ‘spiritual  violence’. According to them, they were victims of the violence caused by evil spirits acting  on the request of their antagonists. It was reported that in some cases of husband’s deaths,  mothers‐in‐law  and  brothers‐in‐law  have  used  the  powers  of  evil  spirits  (and  also  death 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

31 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

threats) to scare widows and their children out of their homes, who escape leaving behind  all their property and belongings (op. cit. Cossa José et al, 2011).     This delicate subject has been the root cause  “In  providing  dispute  resolution  of  diverse  human  rights  violations.  The  mechanisms, States should strive to provide  abuses  suffered  from  women  due  to  legal  assistance  to  vulnerable  and  accusations of witchcraft have been immense  marginalized  persons  to  ensure  safe  access  in  recent  years.  In  this  context,  it  is  relevant  for  all  to  justice  without  discrimination.  that  traditional  authorities  are  trained  and  Judicial authorities and other bodies should  technically  prepared  to  properly  deal  with  ensure  that  their  staff  have  the  necessary  skills  and  competencies  to  provide  such  these cases in accordance with statutory law  services.”  and  human  rights  principles.  As  a  reminder,  the  VGGT  recommend  that  states  provide  (VGGT, par. 21.6)  timely,  affordable  and  effective  means  of  resolving  disputes  over  tenure  rights  (VGGT,  par.  21.1).  The  principles  of  rule  of  law  and  gender  equality  should  guarantee  that  the  law  and  custom  be  equally  enforced  between  men and women and that the challenges that women face in exercising their tenure rights  be  addressed  through  specific  measures  aimed  at  accelerating  de  facto  gender  equality  (VGGT, Principles 3B.4 and 3B.7).     This  reference  to  special  measures  comes  from  the  realization  that  gender‐neutral  legislation does not automatically translate into gender equality in practice. In fact, not even  legislation  that  clearly  supports  women’s  rights  –  such  as  the  Mozambican  one  –  will  necessarily translate in gender equality. In some cases, to achieve de facto gender equality it  may  be  useful  and  needed  to  support  the  adoption  of  temporary  special  measures  to  address the imbalances caused by legal and traditional culture and systems that cater to the  needs of a patriarchal society. Temporary special measures find their legal basis in Article 4  of  the  Convention  on  the  Elimination  of  all  Forms  of  Discrimination  Against  Women  (CEDAW),  that  Mozambique  ratified  in  1997  without  reservation.  Discussions  around  affirmative action however, can be divisive and generate strong objections. They should take  place within an inclusive policy‐making exercise to build adherence to reform. The nature of  these  temporary  special  measures  should  be  determined  on  the  basis  of  expert  consultations  and  tailored  to  the  country’s  needs.  They  could  for  instance  require  that  women  make  up  a  certain  share  of  the  composition  of  community  courts,  or  mandate  or  facilitate women’s access to justice by creating special time slots to hear cases brought by  women. Implementation decrees could make training in gender equality a compulsory part  of a lawyer’s curriculum.  6.1.4  Efforts to revitalize the CCs  Many of the CCs were made official by the Government between 2008 and 2015. That was  part  of  the  Government’s  effort  to  strengthen  the  systems  that  regulated  order  at  the  community  level  and  as  a  way  to  reduce  the  workload  of  the  official  district  authorities.32  Various Government representatives consulted during this study mentioned that there is a  very scattered approach to CCs and stated that the work carried out by these courts should  be  somehow  validated  or  legally  recognized.33  Faced  with  the  challenge  of  revitalizing  the                                                              32 

  Information obtained from the interview of Samuel Salimo, Advisor to the Minister of Justice and to  Parliamentary Affairs.  33    Information obtained from the interview of Gaspar Moniquele, the Director of the National Office of Justice  Administration. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

32 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

CCs  and  establishing  a  new  regulatory  legal  framework,  several  positive  government  initiatives emerged:   









In November of 2012, the National Office of Justice Administration was created  as  the  organic  unit  in  charge  of  developing  and  defining  strategic  policies,  and  coordinating and implementing actions.   The  Integrated  Strategic  Plan  of  Justice  2009‐2014  defined  the  efforts  that  the  sector  will  invest  into  the  CCs,  as  these  courts  are  one  of  the  mechanisms  of  conflict  resolution  closest  to  most  of  the  Mozambican  citizens.  The  sector  will  monitor the CC’s mechanisms and evaluate the performance of informal justice  through coordination between the judicial system and the CCs. In this sense, the  Courts of Law must render the necessary assistance to the CCs with the aim of  promoting,  supporting  and  adopting  the  necessary  measures  to  make  these  courts more independent and impartial. This should also guide CCs that have not  been  observing  the  statutory  law,  as  is  the  case  with  some  discriminatory  practices against women that end up being recognized as lawful in the CCs.  In terms of planning and socio‐political impact, the Economic and Social Plan for  2013 targeted the CCs aiming at developing capacities of 900 community judges;  in the Economic and Social Plan for 2014 that number was raised to 1400.34   The  Instituto  de  Patrocínio  e  Assistência  Jurídica  (IPAJ)  –  Institute  of  Legal  Patronage  and  Assistance,  a  Government  institution  under  the  Ministry  of  Justice,  is  an  important  state  institution  which  guarantees  access  to  justice  to  people with limited financial means in the form of free legal assistance. In 2012,  in collaboration with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the  institute  prepared  a  study  about  the  current  situation  of  the  CCs.  One  of  the  objectives of this study was to bring the work carried out by the IPAJ closer to  community judges in the CCs, possibly creating space for synergies. The IPAJ has  a  written  record  in  which  it  details  the  typology  of  its  cases.  During  2012,  204  cases  about  the  division  of  assets,  which  indirectly  include  conflicts  linked  to  access  to  land,  were  dealt  with  by  the  IPAJ  at  its  regional  office  in  the  city  of  Maputo.  These  cases  represented  52.58  percent  of  the  total  number  of  cases  dealt  with35;  of  which,  174  cases  were  brought  by  women  (85  percent  of  the  total number of these cases). During the first quarter of 2013, 59 cases relating  to  the  division  of  assets  were  recorded  (48.36  percent  of  the  general  total  of  cases),  of  which,  42  were  brought  by  women  (71  percent  of  the  cases)  (IPAJ,  2012).  The  high  number  of  women  who  access  the  services  of  the  IPAJ  demonstrates  the  change  in  women’s  attitudes,  as  they  now  seek  to  defend  their rights and no longer passively accept negative or discriminatory traditional  practices.  The central office organized four regional seminars in which 35 CC judges took  part (140 CC judges trained per year). The main objective of these seminars was  to  provide  legal  training  for  the  customary  judges,  who  in  turn  will  train  other  judges  at  the  provincial  and  district  levels  (the  exact  mechanisms  followed  to  reach  this  objective  is  not  clear).  The  seminars  were  meant  to  sensitize  the  community  judges  to  the  need  to  observe  statutory  laws  and  human  rights  in 

                                                           

34 

  These efforts were not kept in the Economic and Social Plan for following years 2015 and 2016;    The classification made by the IPAJ includes cases of divorce, alimony and maintenance, division of assets,  regulation of parental authority, physical violence, psychological violence and separation. 

35 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

33 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

their  decision‐making  and  to  facilitate  dialogue  between  the  different  parties  that make up the formal and informal justice systems.  The  Government  has  drawn  up  a  proposal  for  a  new  CC  Act.36  The  proposal  introduces  a  series  of  innovations  that  are  expected  to  improve  the  quality  of  the  services  provided  by  the CCs, such as the directive to record all sentences in writing. This will allow the quality of  the  CC’s  decisions  to  be  monitored,  particularly  in  relation  to  compliance  with  statutory  laws. Furthermore, mechanisms have been suggested to guarantee enforcement of the CCs  decisions.  For  example,  in  the  case  of  defaulting  on  a  CC  decision,  the  affected  party  can  request the CC to take measures to guarantee enforcement, and a fine is stipulated for those  who fail to comply without justification.    There  is  growing  effort  by  the  Government  and  its  development  partners  to  improve  the  conditions  of  the  CCs  and  as  a  result,  improve  the  quality  of  their  decisions.  The  training  courses for community judges are an important measure in this direction. The examples in  Boxes  7  and  8  show  that  with  appropriate  training,  the  CC  judges  start  to  implement  decisions  that  are  in  line  with  statutory  law,  particularly  in  relation  to  issues  addressing  gender  and  women’s  rights,  avoiding  situations  of extreme  injustice  that cause  constraints  and further vulnerabilities for widows and orphans. At the same time, the current lack of a  precise mapping of CCs, with the exact number of judges and their location, makes this task  difficult.  It  is  important  for  a  data  survey  to  be  conducted,  if  periodic  training  is  to  be  organized covering a significant number of CC judges countrywide. 

6.2  Civil society organizations and their role on gender issues   and conflict resolution   Interviews have been conducted with the main organizations working on land‐related issues  and to advance gender equality and women’s and children’s rights in Mozambique. All these  CSOs  run  important  awareness‐raising  campaigns  with  rural  communities  and  broader  society  in  general.  The  majority  of  people  interviewed  say  that  some  of  the  factors  that  influence the dynamics of women’s access, use, and control of land, are related to gendered  roles and relations, traditional socio‐cultural norms and women’s marital status. Patriarchal  systems and values restrict women’s rights of access, use, and control over land and natural  resources, as well as to other productive resources at community and household level.    Most of the cases that reach these CSOs do so through word of mouth of previous users and  generally, the parties who do not agree with the CC’s decision turn to the CSOs in search of  alternatives for resolving their conflicts. The emergence of networks of connections between  the  various  organizations  can  be  observed  when  the  same  case  is  dealt  with  at  the  same  time  by  different  CSOs  and/or  in  the  CCs.  From  among  the  organizations  interviewed,  information  and  communication  sharing  was  noted  between  the  Associação  Mulher  Lei  e  Desenvolvimento  (MULEIDE),  the  Associação  Moçambicana  das  Mulheres  de  Carreira  Jurídica (AMMCJ) and the Mozambican Human Rights League, for instance when confirming  whether  a  case  has  ever  been  brought  in  to  any  of  the  other  organizations  and  checking  which  process  was  followed.  This  search  for  synergies  between  these  organizations  avoids  overlaps in conflict management, thereby increasing their effectiveness.    

                                                           

36 

  To date of publishing, this Act had not yet been passed. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

34 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Some  practical  cases  set  out  below  serve  to  illustrate  the  interactions  that  occur  in  the  different  informal  forums  of  justice  and  between  the  CSOs.  At  present,  these  CSOs  enjoy  great prestige in the community, and on occasion, communities’ members would rather go  straight  to  these  civil‐society  forums  instead  of  bringing  their  cases  to  the  DCs.  A  clear  example of this occurred in the province of Manhiça, where the CC of Palmeira received very  few  cases  (a  total  of  eight  cases  in  201037)  compared  to  the  31  cases38  received  by  the  Gabinete  de  Atendimento  à  Mulher  e  Criança  Vítimas  de  Violência  of  the  Associação  das  Mulheres  Desfavorecidas  da  Indústria  Açucareira  (GAMC‐AMUDEIA)  during  the  same  year.  Most  of  the  cases  were  related  to  land  conflicts  and  issues  regarding  alimony  for  minors.  Knowledge  about the CSO’s  role in dispute resolution is also increasingly spreading among  communities and the general public by word of mouth and the media.    Box 13: The case of the widow Carmen in the CC of Hulene B Neighbourhood  and the coordination between the various forums of informal justice39    Carmen, a 55‐year‐old widow, was accused of feitiçaria practices by her youngest son who wanted  to  evict  his  mother  from  her  own  home.  Carmen  was  also  the  victim  of  abuse  by  her  now  deceased husband and initiated several complaints  with the AMMCJ.  Carmen learned  about the  existence of the AMMCJ from a radio programme on civic education, aired by the association until  2003.     When her husband was still alive, he evicted her from their house, leaving her with no alternative  but to live outdoors on the same plot of land that they had acquired together during the marriage.  When her husband died, she was able to return to her own house. She had six children, all sons,  who had moved out on their own, except for the youngest, aged 30, who still lived in the house.  This  son  did  not  work  and  displayed  a  violent  attitude.  He  was  also  involved  in  illegal  activities  such as selling drugs and threatened to evict his mother from her house. Carmen went to the CC  of the Hulene B Municipal Neighbourhood to report her son who was attacking her violently and  threatening to evict her. The CC moved the case straight to the police station, saying that they do  not have the jurisdiction over it. The police did not reply to the case filed by Carmen and it was at  that point that she turned to the AMMCJ for help.     One of the AMMCJ officers went to the police in order to obtain further details and understand  why Carmen was not receiving due and proper protection. The reply from the police was that the  son reported his own mother for witchcraft and wanted her to leave the house for that reason.  According to the police, if a case involves feitiçaria, it falls outside their jurisdiction and must be  referred to the AMETRAMO. In her attempt to mediate with the police, the AMMCJ officer tried to  learn the causes that led the son to accuse his mother of feitiçaria, and concluded that there were  no  grounds  to  that  accusation.  The  police  maintained  their  stand  that  it  was  AMETRAMO  who  must resolve the conflict.     The  AMMCJ  thus  decided  to  present  the  case  directly  to  the  criminal  investigations  police  authorities, requesting an investigation into the son (who was accusing his mother for no apparent  reason,  merely  for  the  purpose  of  evicting  her  from  her  house  and  thereby  appropriating  that  space) and likewise with the police station, as they were not capable to effectively provide support  in the conflict resolution. To date, this case has still not been resolved, and the woman continues  to live in her house with her son, being subjected to constant threats of violence by him. 

                                                              37 

  Information obtained from the interview of João Carlos Trindade, Deputy Director of the CESAB.    Information obtained from the visit paid directly to the GAMC of AMUDEIA.   39    Information obtained from the interview of Latifa Rijal Ibraimo, a founding member of AMMCJ.  38 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

35 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

The case in Box 13 illustrates the extent to which the formal justice system is influenced by  the  customary  system.  Even  though  threats  and  violence  are  crimes  that  should  be  addressed  by  the  police,  the  police  refuse  to  take  action,  saying  that  “because  it  is  witchcraft”,  AMETRAMO  should  intervene.  Accusations  of  witchcraft  against  widows  are  fairly  frequent,  as  mentioned  previously,  particularly  when  there  is  property  involved.  Widows do not always benefit from the rights enshrined in Mozambican legislation, nor are  they protected by the system. In the case in question, in spite of the lack of any evidence of  witchcraft,  and  the  son’s  criminal  record  (unlawful  acts  and  involvement  with  drugs),  the  police preferred not get involved.      

6.3  The role of paralegals on gender issues and conflict resolution   From  2006  to  2014,  FAO  worked  in  partnership  with  the  Centre  for  Juridical  and  Judicial  Training  of  the  Ministry  of  Justice  in  the  training  of  paralegals.  The  training  programmes  aimed to promote capacity building and legal training for local populations and to raise their  awareness  of  their  legal  rights.  These  courses  were  offered  to  members  of  NGOs,  CSOs,  development agents, community leaders and base level government institution employees,  covering  the  most  relevant  laws  on  access  to  land  and  natural  resources,  gender  equality  and  women’s  and  children’s  rights,  among  others.  Paralegals  also  received  training  on  alternative conflict management methods, such as mediation and arbitration. Approximately  60  percent  of  the  participants  were  from  CSOs  and  40  percent  were  from  government  institutions. In this way, the training served two purposes – to educate the participants and  to  bridge  the  gap  between  civil  society  and  state  actors,  by  providing  them  with  similar  information on  controversial  issues  and  by  discussing  and  seeking  solutions jointly  (op.  cit.  FAO, 2014).     After  the  training,  selected  paralegals  received  support  to  organize  community  meetings,  where  they  would  transmit  the  knowledge  acquired  during  the  course  to  the  rural  communities where they were active. Assessments and impact studies revealed the success  of the paralegals’ actions on harmonizing customary practices and statutory law. In addition  to  supporting  the  dissemination  of  legislation  related  to  land  and  natural  resources  issues  and promoting awareness‐raising in the communities on the importance and advantages of  gender  equality,  some  paralegals  began  to  support  the  CCs,  either  as  judges  or  through  providing technical support. Some cases involving these paralegals are reported below.   

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

36 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Box 14: Women with fertility problems who cannot have children   are not valid as wives40    Géma  C.  C.  is  a  29‐year‐old  woman  living  in  the  Mulebja  Neighbourhood,  in  Manhiça.  She  had  been married for 9 years but had encountered fertility problems within the marriage, which her  husband alleges lie with Géma, because he had a son with his first wife 12 years ago. This was the  only evidence presented by the husband to insist that his wife was not able to have children and,  as  a  consequence,  did  not  deserve  to  be  his  wife.  Throughout,  Géma  has  taken  care  of  the  son  that her husband had in his previous relationship and has brought him up. By mutual agreement,  and since she did not manage to get pregnant, the couple decided to separate. A week after the  separation, her husband started a new relationship with another woman and left the home. Géma  was  the  only  one  taking  responsibility  for  paying  back  the  bank  loan  they  got  together  for  the  house and continued to look after her husband’s 12‐year‐old son, as if he was her own.     The two families agreed that neither of the parties involved could live in the marital home until an  agreement had been reached. In the meantime, Géma and the boy returned to her parents’ house  but her husband moved back into the marital home with his new wife. Now, the husband wants to  sell the house and keep all the money for himself. Géma is the only one who continues to make  the loan payments, as her husband is unemployed. She also wants to sell the house, but according  to her, the profit should be shared equally between them both. Both parties first tried to resolve  the  conflict  at  the  family  level,  with  several  written  statements  drafted  assuring  that  the  house  would not be sold. Different witnesses stated that the husband has already started negotiations to  sell the house. Géma brought her case directly to the AMUDEIA’s paralegals at the advice of one  her aunts, who was acquainted with someone who had already turned to them.     AMUDEIA  activists  were  trained  as  paralegals  in  2010  and  they  have  good  knowledge  of  the  legislation and women’s rights. They have been supporting women victims of violence for a long  time and try to raise awareness in communities in the area on gender equality and women’s and  children’s rights. For this case, the actions initiated by the paralegals consisted of summoning the  family  members  to  hear  their  testimony.  At  the  same  time,  the  AMUDEIA’s  paralegal  was  considering  filing  an  application  with  the  DC  and  making  a  request  for  maintenance  for  the  son  who is still being taken care of by Géma (stepmother), without any support from his father.  

  The  case  mentioned  in  Box  14  is  extremely  complex,  because  it  involves  customs  and  traditions that are deeply rooted in Mozambican society. Even though the reported situation  is  extremely  unfair  contradicting  formal  legislation,  it  is  entrenched  in  the  way  in  which  things have traditionally worked in Mozambique. Change and transition to more socially fair  practices  is  a  lengthy  and  complicated  task.  Through  the  intervention  of  paralegals,  who  know the legislation and who to refer the case to if there is no amicable resolution between  the parties, violations of rights and many injustices are avoided or at least mitigated. More  importantly,  the  interventions  and  support  of  paralegals  provide  new  paradigms  in  this  patriarchal culture where the lack of social justice and gender inequalities have become part  of the fabric of the society.    The  paralegals  receive  extensive  training  on  Mozambican  and  international  legislation  related  to  land  and  natural  resources,  gender  equality  and  women’s  and  children’s  rights.  The  paralegals  have  also  been  providing  support  to  the  CCs,  which  in  different  occasions  turned to the paralegals for guidance on legal matters. They have been resolving questions  and doubts raised by the CCs, or even becoming customary judges.                                                              

40 

  Information obtained from the visit to the GAMC of AMUDEIA. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

37 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

  Box 15: The paralegals in action: Some successful experiences of collaboration   with Community Courts    41

Paralegal Angelina S.C. and the CC of Chamane (Inhambane)    Angelina was one of the paralegals trained by the CFJJ in collaboration with the Gender and Land  project implemented by FAO in Mozambique. She was initially trained in May 2012, in Inhambane;  subsequently in November 2012, she took part in an advanced level paralegal training organized  by the Centro Terra Viva (CTV), in collaboration with the Land and Gender project. Following the  trainings, Angelina began her activities as a paralegal raising awareness about gender equality and  women’s land rights in different neighbourhoods. She had an initial meeting with the judges of the  CC of Chamane Neighbourhood and they agreed to start activities in spreading information about  the laws and raising community awareness on the Land Law and gender issues. As a result, the CC  suggested  paralegal  Angelina  to  be  a  member  of  their  court,  as  two  positions  were  open  at  the  time. One of these vacancies was due to the fact that the husband of one of the elected female  judges would not allow her to take part in the CC, alleging that the woman was not carrying out  her mandatory domestic tasks (see case in Box 9). The paralegal accepted this offer and became a  member  of  the  CC  of  Chamane,  where  she  actively  collaborates  in  conflict  resolution  using  the  knowledge  she  acquired  during  her  legal  training  as  a  paralegal  –  the  paralegal  also  organizes,  along with the CC, awareness raising activities in the community.     42 Paralegal Paciencia I.T. and the CC of the Muele 3 Neighbourhood   Paralegal  Paciencia  received  the  same  training  as  Angelina.  What  is  different  in  respect  to  the  conditions of participation with the CC, is that this paralegal went directly to various CCs to fulfil  her wish to take part in conflict‐resolution trials.  This paralegal asserts that it is necessary to go  directly  to  the  CCs  because  they  lack  knowledge  of  the  work  that  the  paralegals  do.  Paralegal  Paciencia is present on the days when people meet and present cases to the CC of Muele 3. Her  contribution consists of clarifying issues related to the laws of which the CC is often unaware. This  paralegal  also  donated  different  written  materials,  such  as  manuals  on  the  Land  Law  and  the  Constitution, thereby providing the CC with easy access to legal materials and information.  

  The practices presented above are considered as good experiences in terms of collaboration  between the CCs and paralegals.       

                                                           

41 

  Information obtained from the visit paid to the CC of Chamane (Inhambane).    Information obtained from the visit paid to the CC of the Muele 3 Neighbourhood (Inhambane). 

42 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

38 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

7. CONCLUSION As demonstrated throughout this document, there is a clear gap and imbalance between the  comprehensive  Mozambican  legal  framework  on  access  to  land  and  promotion  of  gender  equality, and the reality in the field. While statutory legislation created provisions to protect  women’s  land  rights  in  the  recognition  of  customary  systems,  mechanisms  to  ensure  that  customary  rules  are  compliant  with  statutory  law  are  still  absent.  Furthermore,  CCs  and  community authorities are the first port of call for conflict resolution for the large majority of  Mozambicans, and they are highly respected by the local population. These informal conflict  management mechanisms have the autonomy to resolve conflicts, but their decisions must  not contradict the principles of formal legislation. However, particularly with regard to the  cases  involving  women’s  and  children’s  rights,  the  CCs  tend  to  pass  sentences  based  on  customary  practices,  even  if  these  contradict  formal  legislation.  Instead  of  abiding  by  the  principles of gender equality, the CC rulings are likely to follow traditional rules, which are  often unfair and discriminatory against women. Furthermore, there seems to be a distortion  of  customary  rules  and  practices.  Pressure  on  the  natural  resource  base,  processes  of  commodification  of  land,  and  the  changes  within  society  and  in  its  values,  have  created  a  series of new dynamics which have had a negative impact on the gender‐sensitive provisions  of  customary  land  management  systems;  more  specifically  in  terms  of  the  protection  of  widows’  and  children’s  rights.  Even  in  the  context  of  increased  cases  of  extended  families  selling  widows’  and  children’s  assets,  the  traditional  authorities  continue  to  allow  this  usurpation of assets, instead of supporting them as used to be the case in the past.     The  discrepancies  between  statutory  and  customary  law  and  the  prevalence  of  local  traditions  and  power  imbalances  between  men  and  women  have  been  detrimental  to  women  and  children.  Some  of  the  cultural  practices  discussed  throughout  this  study  discriminate against women, jeopardizing their access to and control over land and natural  resources.    As  a  result,  many  women  have  been  suffering  serious  violations  of  their  rights.  These  violations,  regrettably,  are  considered  “facts  of  life”:  violence  becomes  a  private  issue;  restrictions to education, information and opportunities, with total dependence on men, is  considered “normal”; the loss of land and property after the death or separation from the  husband  becomes  a  family  matter.  These  injustices  have  a  negative  impact  not  only  on  women,  but  also  on  children,  who  are  ultimately  affected  by  the  vulnerability  of  their  mothers.  These  situations  have  been  leading  to  several  issues,  from  low  agricultural  productivity and poor socio‐economic development, to the feminization of HIV/AIDS.     The  results  of  this  study  have  also  shown  disparities  in  the  way  the  CCs  and  community  authorities  operate.  While  some  decisions  are  more  just  and  equitable  in  terms  of  gender  and  women’s  rights,  others  have  been  given  primacy  to  custom  and  its  distortions.  The  legislation  that  establishes  and  regulates  the  operation  of  the  CCs  decrees  a  series  of  directives on their operation, and reiterates that the courts’ decisions cannot contradict the  principles of the constitution. However, there is no provision on how community judges can  access the formal legislation which they are supposed to follow. Without a knowledge base  and nowhere to turn for information, many CCs have absolutely no knowledge of statutory  law, and obviously grant decisions that are incompatible with it. As illustrated, trainings and  awareness‐raising  for  CC  judges  and  community  authorities  have  a  significant  positive  impact  on  their  decisions.  Moreover,  the  accessibility  and  legitimacy,  both  social  and  cultural, that the CCs enjoy must be considered a useful mechanism for promoting not only  women’s  rights  but  also  human  rights.  Because  of  their  importance  in  the  resolution  of   FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

39 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

minor conflicts through fostering dialogue and understanding between the parties involved,  the CCs also become key actors in grassroots structures and promote a society where rights  and duties are more equally distributed between men and women.     In  this  context,  it  is  crucial  to  harmonize  and  adapt  customary  law  to  statutory  law,  particularly in rural areas but also in urban areas. Legal education and awareness‐raising of  CC  judges  and  community  authorities  is  an  essential  part  of  strategies  to  promote  gender  equality and offset the negative aspects of customary practices.    However, the work with community authorities cannot be done in isolation. It is necessary  to adopt a systematic approach, training community authorities and at the same time raising  awareness  at  community  level  with  both  men  and  women.  In  this  way,  while  citizens  are  aware  of  their  rights  and  able  to  exercise  them,  the  community  authorities  are  given  the  skills  to  respect  women’s  rights  and  promote  gender  equality,  finally  aligning  customary  rules to the progressive Mozambican statutory law.     There  is  a  slow  but  steady  rise  of  awareness  on  gender  equality  and  women’s  rights  in  Mozambique.  This  process  of  change  is  occurring  thanks  to  the  increasing  number  of  trainings  given  by  the  Government,  its  counterparts,  international  development  agencies  and various CSOs. Progressively, this work is curtailing the negative aspects of local customs  and  traditions.  It  is  important  to  highlight  the  fundamental  role  of  the  CSOs  and  the  paralegals in this transformation. They are key actors in land‐related conflict resolution and  awareness‐raising about statutory law in rural areas. While it is true that cultural practices  have been relegating women to a subordinated role in relation to men and restricting their  decision‐making ability, new movements are emerging in defence of the rights of the most  vulnerable women – as in the example of the GAMC AMUDEIA in Manhiça and the influence  that it wields in the resolution of conflicts, thanks to the high degree of recognition it enjoys.     Although  Mozambican  legislation  is  compliant  with  the  principles  and  good  practices  established  by  the  VGGT,  this  study  has  demonstrated  that  legislation  per  se  does  not  translate  into  gender  equality  in  practice.  The  implementation  of  principles  of  the  VGGT  need  to  be  complemented  with  specific  measures  aimed  at  accelerating  de  facto  equality  (paragraph  3B.4).  For  that  purpose,  developing  capacities  of  Government  and  CSOs,  and  continuing to work on the legal empowerment of local populations is fundamental to change  norms and traditions that violate human rights, and in particular, women’s rights.       

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

40 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

8. RECOMMENDATIONS: ACTIONS TO ALIGN CUSTOMARY LAW WITH STATUTORY LAW  

“Assuming that men and women are born equal and should remain  equal, the entire gender issue has to be looked at not only as an issue of  women. Unfortunately, many people associate the term gender with  women; when we talk of gender issues, they immediately think of  women, and not of issues regarding the relationship between men and  women. Customary laws often give supremacy to men, in terms of rights,  to the detriment of women. But we know that women are equally  valued, and even according to fundamental law have the same rights as  men. So we have to create the bases at both rural and urban levels so  that men and women can enjoy the same rights and duties.”  (Maria Benvinda Delfina Levi, Mozambican’s President Legal Advisor) 

  Based  on  the  results  of  this  study,  this  session  specifies  concrete  actions  to:  i)  harmonize  customary  and  statutory  law,  thereby  converting  formal  legislation  into  a  source  for  customary law; and ii) use improved customary rules as a practical instrument to promote  social justice and gender equitable access to land and natural resources, which are essential  to socio‐economic development in Mozambique.     The proposed actions are divided into four specific areas: i) systematization of information  on CCs; ii) legal education of CCs and community leaders; iii) training of paralegals; and iv)  awareness‐raising  and  dissemination  of  information  on  gender  equality  and  women’s  and  children’s  rights,  and  the  advantages  that  these  bring  for  society  as  a  whole.  With  greater  knowledge  of  the  CCs,  their  judges  and  decisions,  it  will  be  possible  to  organize  training  actions  targeting  judges  and  traditional  community  authorities,  to  educate  them  on  the  formal  legislation  and  make  them  aware  of  the  importance  and  advantages  of  gender  equality.  Through  systematic  work  at  grassroots  level,  based  on  advocacy  campaigns  and  awareness‐raising  actions,  women  will  be  prepared  to  exercise  their  rights,  men  will  be  aware about the existence of these rights, and the communities will be prepared to respect  them. The CCs and community authorities will be prepared to carry out their activities and to  resolve any possible conflict, based on the formal legislation and towards the common good,  moving away from any type of discriminatory practice.  

a)  Systematizing the information on the CCs and creating mechanisms to align  customary with statutory law   Data needs to be gathered and systematized consistently to generate a solid database that  includes  detailed  information  on:  the  actual  number  of  CCs,  their  exact  location  and  the  number  of  active  judges,  broken  down  by  gender.  This  information  will  also  facilitate  the  design  of  policies  and  evaluation.  It  is  also  important  to  have  written  records  of  the  CCs’  decisions,  in  order  to  monitor  and  assess  the  decisions,  and  guarantee  that  these  do  not  contradict the formal legislation.    It  is  important  to  encourage  studies  that  facilitate  an  understanding  of  CCs  structure,  decision‐making  mechanisms,  and  their  effect  on  the  promotion  of  human  rights,  particularly  those  related  to  women,  children  and  other  vulnerable  groups’  access  to  and  control over land. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

41 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

Furthermore,  a  revision  of  the  Technical  Annex  on  the  Land  Law  could  be  considered,  to  create  mechanisms  to  assess  and  amend  communities’  customary  rules  during  the  delimitation process. During that process, government officials and development agents can  raise  awareness  and  inform  communities  about  statutory  law,  and  assess  customary  rules  against  it.  Discriminatory  practices  can  be  analysed  and  replaced  by  new  and  equitable  customary  rules.  A  participatory  process  in  which  all  community  members  actively  participate  in  the  discussion  can  create  a  sense  of  ownership  by  all  community  members,  men  and  women,  which  is  a  fundamental  step  for  the  future  enforcement  of  new  and  equitable customary rules.  

b)  Legal education of the judges of the community courts and of the community  leaders  The CCs and the community authorities are the first port of call for conflict resolution for the  majority  of  the  Mozambican  population.  It  is  important  to  organize  training  courses  on  formal  legislation  and  gender  equality  and  women’s  and  children’s  rights,  targeting  CC  judges and community authorities. Gender equality could be made a compulsory part of any  law curriculum.  

c)  Training of paralegals   The  actions of  paralegals have  proved  effective  in  harmonizing  issues  in  the  field  between  customary  practices  and  formal  legislation.  Through  awareness‐raising  activities  in  the  communities and providing assistance in cases of conflict, paralegals have been promoting a  new and more balanced way of resolving the problems affecting the local populations, both  in terms of land issues and gender equality.      The  Centro  de  Formação  Jurídica  e  Judiciária  (CFJJ)  –  Centre  for  Juridical  and  Judicial  Training,  in  partnership  with  FAO  and  MCA,  “States  and  other  parties  should  consider  has  held  38  training  courses  countrywide,  additional  measures  to  support  vulnerable  training  approximately  899  paralegals  from  or  marginalized  groups  who  could  not  2006 to 2013 (op. cit. FAO, 2014). From 2012  otherwise access administrative and judicial   to 2014, 545 community meetings were held  services.  These  measures  should  include  under  the  Land  and  Gender  Project  in  legal  support,  such  as  affordable  legal  aid,  partnership with CTV and AMUDEIA, in which  and  may  also  include  the  provision  of  paralegals  transmitted  the  knowledge  services of paralegals or parasurveyors (…).”   learned  during  the  training  activities  to  the  (VGGT, par. 6.6)  rural  communities  in  the  remotest  areas  of  the  country  (FAO,  2014).  Reducing  power  asymmetries in the rural landscape and promoting a more gender equitable access to land  and  natural  resources  is  a  “work  in  progress”.  This  “work  in  progress”  is  far  from  being  concluded – both worldwide and particularly in the developing world. However, through the  work  of  paralegals,  and  as  illustrated  in  this  document,  some  rural  communities,  have  changed discriminatory practices towards women; traditional courts started recognizing and  fostering  widow’s  and  children’s  rights;  women  have  been  appointed  as  customary  judges  (in  general  just  elderly  men  used  to  be  appointed  as  traditional  judges);  and  paralegals  managed to obtain land titles in favour of vulnerable women.     Considering the success and the importance of the paralegals’ actions, continuing with the  training  sessions  and  increasing  the  number  of  community meetings  should  be  considered  one  of  the  priorities  in  promoting  more  gender  equitable  access  to  land  and  natural 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

42 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

resources. It is important to stress that training should target both men and women. Training  and  sensitization  on  gender  and  land  would  be  much  more  productive  than  training  on  women’s  land  issues  alone,  and  will  help  to  avoid  marginalization  and  misconception  of  gender issues as being only about women (FAO, 2013b).  

d)  Awareness and dissemination of information on gender equality and women’s  and children’s rights  It is also necessary to continue raising awareness and disseminating information on gender  equality  and  on  women’s  and  children’s  rights  more  broadly,  especially  pointing  out  the  advantages  that  these  bring  to  society.  At  rural  and  community  level,  it  is  important  to  promote  new  ways  of  looking  at  the  world,  leaving  behind  discriminatory  practices  and  showing  the  advantages  of  social  justice  and  equality  between  all  citizens.  It  is  crucial  to  work with the entire community, both men and women. Men should always be involved so  they  understand  what  gender  equality  means,  and  all  the  advantages  it  brings  to  society.  Women  should  also  receive  the  same  information  and  know  their  rights.  Through  awareness‐raising,  legal  literacy  and  support,  women  can  begin  to  exercise  their  rights;  having  been  sensitized,  men  will  hopefully  be  prepared  for  the  change  and  willing  to  give  women space, as they begin to slowly appreciate the benefits of gender equality.     The laws, combined with awareness‐raising of gender issues, are a valuable instrument not  only  for  conflict  resolution  but  also  to  influence  people’s  behaviour.  When  a  person  recognizes  that  a  certain  conduct  is  a  crime,  and  that  he/she  will  likely  be  punished  if  the  crime is committed, he/she will think before conducting that crime again. For example, the  practice of ‘widow eviction’ is now considered a crime and those who perpetrate it may be  sentenced  to  prison.  With  knowledge  of  the  laws,  traditional  authorities  can  promote  increased  awareness  among  people,  thereby  encouraging  social  change.  Furthermore,  due  to  the  simple  fact  that  people  would  know  their  rights  and  exercise  them,  they  would  be  able to avoid or to correct situations of injustice. For instance, knowing their rights, widows  can  refuse  to  leave their  houses  and  land,  and  turn  to  the  State  for  help  if  their  rights  are  violated, or community authorities fail to protect them. Equally, those breaking the law may  give up for fear of the consequences (FAO, 2013a).    Several CSOs have been working for many years at community level providing legal training,  even  in  the  most  remote  parts  of  Mozambique.  It  is  important  these  organizations  are  supported to continue and increase the number of awareness‐raising meetings to promote  behavioural change at community level. People can only exercise and defend their rights, if  they are aware. It is necessary to guarantee that the Mozambican people know their rights.  This  will  facilitate  change  processes  within  communities,  which  can  lead  to  a  more  just  society,  with  gender  equitable  distribution  of  resources  and,  in  the  long  term,  to  truly  sustainable socio‐economic development in Mozambique.       

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

43 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

APPENDIX I ― METHODOLOGY   The  methodology  used  in this  study  has  been  based  on  participatory  action  investigation43  and  bibliographical  review.  The  study  adopted  mostly  qualitative  data  collect  methods  rather  than  quantitative  approaches  because  of  its  aim  to  look  deeply  into  a  societal  structure and not to generalize in the statistical sense.     The  main  instruments  used  were  in‐depth  interviews44  with  various  key  informers,  who  contribute an informed opinion and/or experience to the subject under analysis (identified  for the most part through the waterfall strategy, which allows new contacts to be obtained  from the previous interviewees), and a focus group.45    A total of five CCs in rural areas were visited (located in the province of Inhambane) and a  focus  group  was  conducted  in  which  a  total  of  15  community  judges  took  part  (city  of  Inhambane).  At  the  urban  level,  two  CCs  were  visited  (Mafalala–Minkadeuine  Neighbourhood and Zimpeto Neighbourhood), and a total of seven trials was attended, four  of which specifically involved women and land conflicts.     In  addition,  interviews  were  held  with  various  government  representatives  and  with  the  main CSOs, whose work is linked to legal issues and to the defence of women’s rights (please  refer to the list of interviewees below).       

                                                           

43 

  Method of research and collective learning of real‐life situations, based on a critical analysis with the active  participation of the groups involved, which is aimed at stimulating the practice of transformation and social  change. Please refer to it at:  http://www.dicc.hegoa.ehu.es/listar/mostrar/132  44    The interviews were conducted in person and most of them were open in order to obtain the maximum  amount of information possible, with the exception of a few cases in which it was decided to use a brief list of  semi‐structured questions to guide certain issues in particular (which were applied in the final stage of the  study) (Basagoiti et al, 2001).   45    The use of the focus group method provides a detailed view and a deep understanding of how a given group  perceives the phenomenon under study. Some of its main advantages with respect to the use of one‐on‐one  interviews are the various interactions that emerge between the participants, and non‐verbal communication  (Greenbaum, 1997). 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

44 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

APPENDIX II ― LIST OF INTERVIEWEES   1.  From the Government  – Halima  Selemane  –  Gender  Focal  Point  of  the  Direcção  Nacional  de  Terras  e 

Florestas(DNTF)(National Land and Forestry Directorate) – 12/06/2013, in Maputo.   – Catarina  Chidiamassamba  –  Gender  Focal  Point  of  the  Millennium  Challenge  Account  – – –

– – – – – – – –

(MCA) Project – 12/06/2013, in Maputo.  Sergio Baleira – Sociologist, researcher and instructor at the Centro de Formação Jurídica  e Judiciária (CFJJ) (Centre for Juridical and Judicial Training)– 18/06/2013, in Matola.  Carlos  Serra  –  Deputy  Director  of  the  Centro  de  Formação  Jurídica  e  Judiciária  (CFJJ)(Centre for Juridical and Judicial Training) – 18/06/2013, in Matola.  Ribeiro  Cuna  –  Judge  of  the  Republic  of  Mozambique  and  instructor  at  the  Centro  de  Formação  Jurídica  e  Judiciária  (CFJJ)  (Centre  for  Juridical  and  Judicial  Training)  –  18/06/2013, in Matola.  Albachir Macassar – National Director of Human Rights and Citizenship of the Ministry of  Justice – 02/07/2013, in Maputo.  Samuel  Salimo  –  Advisor  to  the  Minister  of  Justice  and  to  Parliamentary  Affairs  of  the  Ministry of Justice– 02/07/2013, in Maputo.  Gaspar Moniquele – National Director of Justice Administration – 15/07/2013, in Maputo.  Raufo  Rufino  Bilole  Lasquinho  –  Assistant  to  the  National  Director  of  Justice  Administration– 15/07/2013, in Maputo.  Virginia Telma A. Guambe – Justice Administration Officer – 15/07/2013, in Maputo.  Adelino de Assis Laice – Coordinator of the Instituto do Patrocínio e Assistência Jurídica  (IPAJ) (Institute of Legal Patronage and Assistance) – 16/07/2013, in Maputo.  Amilcar  Andela  –  Vice‐president  of  the  Liga  Moçambicana  dos  Direitos  Humanos  (Mozambican Human Rights League) – 16/07/2013, in Maputo.  João  Carlos  Trindade  –  Deputy  Director  of  the  Centro  de  Estudos  Sociais  Aquino  de  Bragança  (CESAB)  (Aquino  de  Bragança  Centre  for  Social  Studies)    –  19/07/2013,  in  Maputo. 

2.  From Community Courts  – Samuel Manuel Guambe – Judge of the CC of Gondo, community leader and paralegal in  – – – – – – – – – –

Muane (Province of Inhambane) – 26/06/2013, in Zavala.  Alfredo  Quimisse  Muanguambe  –Chief  Justice  of  the  CC  of  Muane  (Province  of  Zavala,  Inhambane) – 26/06/2013, in Zavala.  Alberto  Naene  Bamze  –  Judge  of  the  CC  of  the  Muele  3  Neighbourhood  and  Neighbourhood Officer – 27/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Domingos  Rubi  José  –  Chief  Justice  of  the  CC  of  the  Muele  3  Neighbourhood  –  27/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Maria Izais –Judge of the CC of the Muele 3 Neighbourhood – 27/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Albertina Wetimane – Judge of the CC of the Muele 3 Neighbourhood – 27/06/2013, in  Inhambane.  Joaquim Bata – Chief Justice of the CC of Chamane – 27/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Ricardo Bata – Judge of the CC of Chamane – 27/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Joana Vitorino – Judge of the CC of Chamane – 27/06/2013. in Inhambane.  Isabel Tamela – Judge of the CC of Chamane – 27/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Bernardo Deve – Chief Justice of the Community Courts of the City of  Maputo and Judge  of the Mafalala / Minkadjuine Neighbourhood – from 05 to13/07/2013, in Maputo.  

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

45 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

– Joana  Abilio  Banze  –  Judge  of  the  CC  of  the  Zimpeto  Neighbourhood  –  12/07/2013,   – – – – – – – – –

in Maputo.  Fátima  Cussal  –  Judge  of  the  CC  of  the  Zimpeto  Neighbourhood  –  12/07/2013,   in Maputo.  Maria  Sagenta  Paulo  –  Judge  of  the  CC  of  the  Zimpeto  Neighbourhood  –  12/07/2013,   in Maputo.  Maria  das  Assuncas  F.  Simbine  –  Judge  of  the  CC  of  the  Zimpeto  Neighbourhood  –  12/07/2013, in Maputo.  Gabriel  João  Tamele  –  Judge  of  the  CC  of  the  Zimpeto  Neighbourhood  –  12/07/2013,   in Maputo.  Joana  Abilio  Banze  ‐‐  Judge  of  the  CC  of  the  Zimpeto  Neighbourhood  –  12/07/2013,   in Maputo.  Barbosa  Jacinto  –  Judge  of  the  CC  of  the  Inhagoia  “B”  Neighbourhood  –  12/07/2013,   in Maputo.  Felisberto Gabriel Jossias Nhantumbo – User of the CC of the Zimpeto Neighbourhood –  12/07/2013, in Maputo.  Carolina  Tembe  –  User  of  the  CC  of  the  Mafalala  /  Minkadjuine  Neighbourhood  –  13/07/2013, in Maputo.  Antonio  Timane  –  User  of  the  CC  of  the  Mafalala  /  Minkadjuine  Neighbourhood  –  13/07/2013, in Maputo. 

3.  From the Grassroots Social Organizations  – Terezinha  da  Silva  –  Coordinator  of  Women  and  Law  in  Southern  Africa  (WLSA)  – 

17/06/2013, in Maputo.  – Latifa Rijal Ibramo – Founding Member of the Associação Moçambicana das Mulheres de 



– – –





– –

Carreira  Jurídica  (AMMCJ)  (Association  of  Mozambican  Women  in  Legal  Careers)  –  17/06/2013, in Maputo.  Teresa  Pedro  Samuel  Boa  –  Paralegal  of  the  Associação  das  Mulheres  Despedidas  da  Indústria  Açucareira  (AMUDEIA)  (Association  of  Disadvantaged  Women  in  the  Sugar  Industry) – 19/06/2013, in Manhiça.  Loúcia  Estrela  Munjuambe  –  Paralegal  and  Ministry  Head  Gabinete  de  Atendimento  à  Mulher e Criança Vítimas de Violência (GAMC) of AMUDEIA – 19/06/2013, in Manhiça.  Géma  Carlota  Grngsto  Chimene  –  User  of  the  Gabinete  de  Atendimento  à  Mulher  e  Criança Vítimas de Violência (GAMC) of AMUDEIA – 19/06/2013, in Manhiça.  Celeste N. Muchanga – User of the Gabinete de Atendimento à Mulher e Criança Vítimas  de  Violência  (GAMC)  of  AMUDEIA  (Office  of  Women  and  Children’s  Services  Victim  of  Domestic Violence) – 19/06/2013, in Manhiça.  Paciencia Inácio Tomás – Paralegal of the Associação de Paralegales de Inhambane (API)  (Association  of  Paralegals  of  Inhambane)  and  Collaborator  of  the  CC  of  the  Muele  3  Neighbourhood– from 27 to 29/06/2013, in Inhambane.   Maria  Angelina  Sales  Conceição  –  Paralegal  of  the  Associação  de  Paralegales  de  Inhambane  (API)  (Association  of  Paralegals  of  Inhambane)  and  Judge  of  the  CC  of  Chamane – from 27 to 29/06/2013, in Inhambane.   Esmeralda E. Angalaze – Paralegal of the Associação de Paralegales de Inhambane (API)  (Association of Paralegals of Inhambane)  – from 27 to 29/06/2013, in Inhambane.   Deolinda Mário J. Barros – Chairwoman of the Associação de Paralegales de Inhambane  (API)  (Association  of  Paralegals  of  Inhambane)    and  paralegal  –  28/06/2013,   in Inhambane. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

46 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

– Benilolo  Malope  ‐  Vice‐president  of  the  Associação  de  Paralegales  de  Inhambane  (API)  –

– – – – –



– –

– – – – – –



– –



(Association of Paralegals of Inhambane) and paralegal – 28/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Alda das Neves Quiliboi – Chairwoman of the Board of the Associação de Paralegales de  Inhambane  (API)  (Association  of  Paralegals  of  Inhambane)  and  paralegal  –  28/06/2013,   in Inhambane.  Joaquina Macuácua – Coordinator of the Associação de Paralegales de Inhambane (API)  (Association of Paralegals of Inhambane) and paralegal – 28/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Maria  Alberto  Somissone  –  Paralegal  of  the  Associação  de  Paralegales  de  Inhambane  (API) (Association of Paralegals of Inhambane) – 28/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Nilsa da Graça Horácio Buque – Paralegal of the Associação de Paralegales de Inhambane  (API) (Association of Paralegals of Inhambane) – 28/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Avelino  J.S.  David  –  Paralegal  of  the  Associação  de  Paralegales  de  Inhambane  (API)  (Association of Paralegals of Inhambane) – 28/06/2013, in Inhambane.  Casimiro  Brigido  Maoco  –  Project‐planning  Officer  of  the  Centro  de  Pesquisa  e  Apoio  à  Justiça  Informal  (CEPAJI)  Centre  for  Research  and  Support  to  Informal  Justice  –  03/07/2013, in Maputo.  Franciso  Assis  –General  Administration  Officer  of  Justa  Paz  Centro  de  Estudo  e  Transformação  de  Conflitos  (Study  Centre  Fair  Peace  and  Conflict  Transformation)  –  04/07/2013, in Matola.   Filomena David – Research coordinator at Justa Paz Centro de Estudo e Transformação de  Conflitos (Study Centre Fair Peace and Conflict Transformation) – 04/07/2013, in Matola.   Adelaida  Sebastian  Moiane  –  Officer  in  Charge  of  the  Associação  dos  Médicos  Tradicionais  de  Moçambique  (AMETRAMO)  (Association  of  Traditional  Doctors  of  Mozambique) of the Mafalala Neighbourhood – 08/07/2013, in Maputo.  Nilza  Chipe  –  Coordinator  of  the  Economy  and  Gender  Program  of  Forum  Mulher  (Woman Forum) –  10/07/2013, in Maputo.   Issufo Tankar – Coordinator of the Land, Forests and Biodiversity Program of the  Centro  Terra Viva (CTV) (Terra Viva Centre) – 10/07/2013, in Maputo.  Regina dos Santos – Gender Officer of the Centro Terra Viva (CTV) (Terra Viva Centre) –  10/07/2013.  Tânia Marisa Pedro Jossias – Research Assistant of the Centro Terra Viva (CTV) (Terra Viva  Centre) – 10/07/2013, in Maputo.  Dulce Maria Novela Mavone – Coordinator of the Secretariat of the Organização Rural de  ajuda mútua (ORAM) (Rural Mutual Support Organisation) – 11/07/2013, in Maputo.   Rafa  Valente  Machava  –  Executive  Director  of  the  Associação  Mulher  Lei  e  Desenvolvimento  (MULEIDE)  (Association  of  Women,  Law  and  Development)  –  15/07/2003, in Maputo.   Maria  Luisa  de  Castro  Vitorino  –  Paralegal  at  the  Associação  Mulher  Lei  e  Desenvolvimento  (MULEIDE)  (Association  of  Women,  Law  and  Development)  –  15/07/2003, in Maputo.   Amilcar  Andela  –  Vice‐president  of  the  Liga  Moçambicana  dos  Direitos  Humanos  (Mozambican Human Rights League) – 16/07/2013, in Maputo.  João  Carlos  Trindade  –  Deputy  Director  of  the  Centro  de  Estudos  Sociais  Aquino  de  Bragança  (CESAB)  (Aquino  de  Bragança  Centre  for  Social  Studies)  –  19/07/2013,   in Maputo.  Rogério  Jaime  Cumbane  –  Paralegal  at  the  Associacão  para  o  Desenvolvimento  de  Macomane  (Macomane  Association  for  Development)  –  Telephone  contacts  were  maintained throughout the entire study, as Rogério was in South Africa.  

 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

 

47 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

4.  List of the Judges Who Took Part in the Focus Group on 20/06/2013 in Inhambane  – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Alberto Maribelane – Judge of the CC of Chalambe 1.  Feliciano Gueifãe Mendoves – Judge of the CC of Muencume.  Ricardo Bata – Judge of the CC of Chamane.  Joaquim Bata – Judge of the CC of Chamane.  Filipo Hernando – Judge of the CC of Gonguiana.  Ricardo Guninvosse – Judge of the CC of Chambe 2.  Elias Alfonso – Judge of the CC of Chalambe 2.  Salvador Dafilaum – Judge of the CC of Bibalane 2.  António Alberto – Judge of the CC of Menauisse.  João Manuel – Judge of the CC of Siquiriva.  Maria Helena João – Judge of the CC of Chalambe 1.  Carlos José Maria Januáivo – Judge of the CC of Liberdade 3.  Mauricio Wads – Judge of the CC of Chalambe 1.  Kaelina  Pedro  Zango  –  Chief  Justice  of  the  23  Neighbourhood  CCs  of  the  city  of  Inhambane. 

   

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

 

48 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

BIBLIOGRAPHY      Almeida, I. Azevedo, J.P. Baleira, S. Bicchieri, M. Calengo, A. Moisés, A. Mutondo, R. Serra,  C. Samo, S. Tanner, C. (2012). Paralegals Manual in Natural Resources, Environment and  Development. Centre for Juridical and Judicial Training (CFJJ) of the Ministry of Justice.  Maputo.   Andrade, X. et al. 2009. Empowering women through access to and control over land in  context of gender‐based green‐revolution policies: action research project in Manhiça  District. International Development Research Centre, Otawa, Canada.  Andrade, X. et al. Families in a context of change. Women and Law in Southern Africa WLSA.  1998. Maputo: Mozambique.  Bagnol, B. 2008. ‘Lobolo e espíritos no Sul de Moçambique’. Análise Social vol. XLIII (2).  Maputo.  Basagoiti, Manuel et al. 2001. Participatory Action Investigation as a Methodology of Socio‐ community Mediation and Integration. ACSUR Las Segovias. Madrid.   Bicchieri, M. 2013. ‘Rafforzare i diritti sulla terra (di uomini e donne) in Mozambico:  l’esperienza della FAO con i paralegali’. in Donne, terre, e mercati: Ripensare lo sviluppo  rurale in Africa sub‐sahriana. Istituto Agronomico per l’Oltremare (IAO). Firenze.  Budlender, D. and Alma, E. 2011. Women and land: securing rights for better lives.  International Development Research Centre (IDRC). Ottawa.  CEPAJI – Centro de Pesquisa e Apoio à Justiça Informal (Centre for Research and Support to  Informal Justice). Compliance with human rights in the administration of informal justice,  more specifically in the community courts (to be implemented in the provinces of Niassa,  Manica, Gaza, City of Maputo and Province of Maputo).  Central Intelligence Agency/US. 2016. World Factbook Mozambique (available at:  http://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the‐world‐factbook/geos/mz.html)   Cossa José, G., Mutaveia, G., Mucambe, M., Tchamo, S., Cossa, A., Januário, F.,  Mutemba, L. 2011. Socio‐Economic Costs of Violence Against Women in Mozambique.  Eduardo Mondlane University. Maputo.   Cruzeiro do Sul, IDD, CFJJ, FAO. 2002. The role of Community Courts in preventing and  resolving land and other conflicts. Cruzeiro do Sul IDD, CFJJ, FAO. Maputo.   Cunguara, B., Garrett, J. 2011. O Sector Agrário em Moçambique: Análise situacional,  constrangimentos e oportunidades para o crescimento agrário: 57. International Food Policy  Research Institute (IFPRI). Maputo.    FAO. 2002. Law‐making in an African context: the 1997 Mozambican Land Law by C. Tanner.  FAO Legal Papers Online #26. Rome.  FAO. 2003. Studies on Land Tenure. Land Tenure and Rural Development. Rome.  FAO. 2006. The State of Food Insecurity in the World (SOFI). Rome.  FAO. 2010. Statutory recognition of customary land rights in Africa: An investigation into  best practices for lawmaking and implementation by R. Knight. FAO Legislative Study 105.  Rome.   FAO. 2011. The State of Food and Agriculture. Women in Agriculture: Closing the Gender Gap  for Development. Rome. 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

49 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

FAO. 2012. Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries  and Forests in the Context of National Food Security. CFS/FAO, Rome.   FAO. 2013a. Gender Equality and Right to Land and Natural Resources: Technical guidelines  for development agents by M. Bicchieri. Maputo.   FAO. 2013b. Governing Land for Women and Men: A Technical Guide to Support the  Achievement of Responsible Gender‐Equitable Governance of Land Tenure. Rome.  FAO. 2014. Terminal report project GCP/MOZ/086/NOR. Maputo.  FAO. 2014. When the law is not enough: Paralegals and Natural Resources Governance in  Mozambique by C. Tanner and M. Bicchieri. FAO Legislative Study 110, Rome.  FAO. 2016. Responsible Governance of Tenure and the Law: A Guide for Lawyers and other  Legal Service Providers. Rome.  Granjo, P. 2012. Julgamentos de Feitiçaria, Relativismo Cultural e Hegemonias Locais in  Kyed, H., Coelho, J. P. B., Souto, A. N., Araújo, S. 2012. A Dinâmica do Pluralismo Jurídico em  Moçambique. Centro de Estudos Sociais Aquino Bragança. Maputo.  Greenbaum, T. L. 1997. The Handbook for Focus Group Research. Sage Publications Inc.  Hatcher, J., Meggiolaro, L. and Santonico, C. 2005. Cultivating women’s rights for access to  land. Country analysis and recommendations for Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso,  Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Malawi, Mozambique, Uganda and Viet Nam. ActionAid  International. Rome.  Hendricks, L., Meagher, P. 2007. Women’s Property Rights and Inheritance in Mozambique:  Report of Research and Fieldwork. CARE USA.  IFAD – International Fund for Agricultural Development. 2010. Enabling poor rural people  to overcome poverty in Mozambique: Rural poverty in Mozambique. Rome.  IDLO – International Development Law Organization. 2012. Protecting Community Lands  and Resources: Evidence from Liberia, Mozambique and Uganda. Rome.   Justa Paz – Centro de Estudo e Transformação de Conflitos. 2013. Community Courts and  Conflict Resolution and Prevention in the Community. The case of the Maputo Community  Courts. Maputo.   Kapur, A. 2010. Enhancing Legal Empowerment through engagement with Customary Justice  Systems. International Development Law Organization (IDLO). Rome.  Lidström, K. 2014. “The Matrilineal Puzzle” Women’s Land Rights in Mozambique – Case  Study: Niassa Province. Uppsala University. Uppsala.  Meneses, M. P. 2004. ‘Traditional Authorities in the Context of Legal pluralism’. in The Other  Law. Bogotá.  Meneses, M. P. 2005. Traditional Authorities in Mozambique: Between Legitimisation and  Legitimacy. Working Paper 231. Centre for Social Studies. Coimbra.   Meneses, M. P. 2008. ‘Bodies of violence, languages of resistance: The complex webs of  knowledge in contemporary Mozambique: 7’. Social Sciences Critical Journal (Online).  Maputo.  Norfolk, S. 2013. Land Delimitation & Demarcation: Preparing communities for investment.  Care. Maputo.  GAMC – Gabinete de Atendimento à Mulher e Criança Vítimas de Violência Doméstica  (Office of Women and Children’s Victim of Domestic Violence). 2012. Report on activities 

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

50 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

carried out from January to December 2012.Institute of Legal Patronage and Assistance  (IPAJ). Ministry of Justice. Maputo.  Open Society Foundation for Southern Africa. 2006. Mozambique – Justice Sector and the  Rule of Law. South Africa.  Open Society Foundation for Southern Africa. 2012. Avaliação do Crime e Violência em  Moçambique e Recomendações para a Redução da Violência. Maputo.  OXFAM Belgica. 2011. Study on Community Courts: The Case of Marracuene and Manhiça.  Maputo.   Penal Reform International. 2000. Access to justice in sub‐Saharan Africa: the role of  traditional and informal systems. London.   Republic of Mozambique. 2002. Agricultural Research Paper (ARP). Ministry of Agriculture.  Maputo.  Republic of Mozambique. 2005. Agricultural Sector Gender Strategy. Ministry of Agriculture.  Maputo.  Republic of Mozambique. 2007. Population Census. National Institute of Statistics (INE).  Maputo.  Republic of Mozambique. 2008. Agricultural Research Paper (ARP). Ministry of Agriculture.  Maputo.  Republic of Mozambique. 2011a. Integrated Strategic Plan (ISP) of Justice 2009‐2014.  Ministry of Justice. Maputo.  Republic of Mozambique. 2011b. Agricultual Sector Strategic Development Plan (PEDSA)  2011‐2020. Ministry of Agriculture. Maputo.  Republic of Mozambique. 2012. Economic and Social Plan (PES) for 2013. Ministry of  Finance and Economy. Maputo.  Republic of Mozambique. 2013. Economic and Social Plan (PES) for 2014. Ministry of  Finance and Economy. Maputo.  Republic of Mozambique. 2015. Mulheres e homens em Moçambique. National Institute of  Statistics (INE). Maputo.  Save the Children. 2007. Denied our Rights: Children, Women and Inheritance in  Mozambique.  Maputo.  Save the Children & FAO. 2009. Children and women’s rights to property and inheritance in  Mozambique: Elements for an effective intervention strategy. Maputo.  Seuane, S. 2009. Gender Aspects and HIV/AIDS impact on Women and Children’s Rights to  Land and Natural Resources.  Centre for Juridical and Judicial Training (CFJJ) of the Ministry  of Justice of Mozambique. Maputo.  Serra, C. 2009. Linchamentos em Moçambique II (okhwiri que apela `a purificação). Imprensa  Universitária. Maputo.   Serra, C. 2010. Women’s Rights in the Constitution of Mozambique. Centre for Juridical and  Judicial Training (CFJJ) of the Ministry of Justice of Mozambique. Maputo.  Sousa Santos, B. et al. 2006. Law and Justice in a Multicultural Society: The Case of  Mozambique. Codesria. Dakar.   Sousa Santos, B., Trindade, J. C. 2003. Conflict and social transformation: a landscape of  justices in Mozambique. Edições Afrontamento. Maputo.  

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

51 

Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

SIDA – Swedish International Develoment Agency. 2007. A Profile of Gender Relations: for  Gender Equality in Mozambique.   UN Habitat. 2008. Secure land rights for all.   UNAIDS. 2008. 2008 Report on the global AIDS epidemic. Geneva.  UNDP – United Nations Development Programme. 2007. Mozambique national human  development report 2007: Challenges and opportunities – The response to HIV and AIDS.  Maputo.  UNDP. 2016. Human Development Report. New York.  Villanueva, R. 2011. The Big Picture: Land and Gender Issues in Matrilineal Mozambique.  Oxfam. Maputo.  World Bank. 2008. Report on World Development.  World Bank, FAO & IFAD. 2012. Agriculture and Rural Development. Manual on Gender in  Agriculture.  World Bank. 2011. World Development Report: Gender Equity and Development.  Washington D.C.  World Bank. 2016. Mozambique Economic Update, Navegating Low Prices. Washington D.C.  WLSA – Women and Law in Southern Africa. 2008. The illusion of transparency in the  administration of justice. Maputo.    Legislations cited  Constitution of the Republic of Mozambique  Civil Code  Law 4/92, of the 6 May, 1992 (Community Court Act)  Law 19/97, of the 1 October, 1997 (Land Law)  Decree 66/98, of the 8 December, 1998 (Land Law Regulations)  Ministerial Decree 29‐ A/2000, of the 17 March, 2000 (Land Law Technical Annexure)   Law 10/2004, of the 25 August, 2004 (Family Law)  Law 7/2008, of the 9 July, 2008 (Law on Protection and Promotion of Children’s Rights)  Law 29/2009, of the 29 September, 2009 (Domestic Violence Law)    

 FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104 

 

52 

  Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique:   Harmonizing statutory and customary law  

 

FAO Legal Office  Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations  Viale delle Terme di Caracalla   FAO LEGAL PAPERS No. 104  00153 Rome, Italy 

53 

Loading...

Legal pluralism, women's land rights and gender equality in

  ISSN 2413‐807X   Legal pluralism, women’s land rights and gender equality in Mozambique                Harmonizing statutory and customary law...

792KB Sizes 0 Downloads 0 Views

Recommend Documents

legal pluralism, customary law and human rights in francophone
presence of conflicts between some of its members. In Africa, traditional conflict resolution mechanisms allowed differe

LEGAL PLURALISM IN.tif - Commission on Legal Pluralism
negotiations over the meanings and circulation (and sometimes circulability) of money, credit and other forms of wealth.

Gender, Sexuality and Race in Popular Culture - Womens Gender and
gender and sexuality and their intersections with race and class. We will study a .... summaries or descriptions; your p

GENDER EQUALITY AND HEALTH
Jun 13, 2011 - Goals (MDGs). While important efforts have been made to increase women's access to health services, more

Gender Equality in Education, Employment and - OECD.org
May 24, 2012 - towards these subjects will children form? But changing gender stereotypes in school is only part of the

Women's Human Rights and Gender Equality | Global Fund for Women
These rights include the right to live free from violence, slavery, and discrimination; to be educated; to own property;

Women's Rights and Gender Equality Within the Animation
Nov 27, 2010 - practices throughout human history have favored men over women, in the past century and a half the possib

Gender Equality, Islam, and Law
been advocated in Islam based on principles of equity and universal justice. Equality, or its Arabic equivalent ..... (M

Agrarian Change, Gender and Land Rights: A Brazilian Case Study
Conselho Nacional dos Direitos da Mulher (National Council for the Rights of Women). CONCRAB ... Programa de Crédito Es

Agrarian Change, Gender and Land Rights: A Brazilian Case Study
Conselho Nacional dos Direitos da Mulher (National Council for the Rights of Women). CONCRAB ... Programa de Crédito Es

Meal Prep – Gesunde Mahlzeiten vorbereiten, mitnehmen und Zeit sparen | Chapter 78 | [西西里的美丽传说]