compendium of translated poetry - poetry - doczz

Loading...

Search...

compendium of translated poetry compiled by Bilingual C. George Sandulescu and Lidia Vianu 700 pages for the express purpose of teaching the Theory of Translation to Romanian Students. Anthology Romanian English CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană Bucureşti 2011 compendium of translated poetry CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană ISBN: 978-606-92388-1-3 © C. George Sandulescu 2011 : Introduction and Appendices. Editors: C. George Sandulescu and Lidia Vianu. Technical editors: Lidia Vianu, Raluca Mizdrea, Diana Voicu, Anca Pavel, Carmen Dumitru. This book is issued online only. (Publication on paper of this particular book is never envisageab le.) The Contemporary Literature Press publishes this anthology of poetry of more than seven hundred pages for exclusively didactic purpo ses, and it cannot be enough emphasised that it is a totally non-profit operation. Copyright holders may at any time express a request to withdraw any of the items that they consider needing extra-special permission. We have indeed acknowledged proper origin on absolutely ALL item s here reproduced. Special thanks are perhaps due (in alphabetical order) to A. Bantaş, L. Blaga, T. Boşca, S.G. Dima, Şt.A. Doinaş, D. Duţescu, R. MacGregor-Hastie, I. Ieronim, P. Jay, L. Leviţchi, and G. Tartler. (Downloading is absolutely free, and the Editors hereby declare that they have not received any subsidies whatever from any quarters—institutional or individual—for the production of the present book.) 2 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry compendium of translated poetry compiled by C. George Sandulescu and Lidia Vianu for the express purpose of teaching the Theory of Translation to Romanian Students. 3 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry TABLE OF CONTENTS George Sandulescu: A Few Principles of Translation. p. 5 Lidia Vianu: The Spark of Translation. p. 13 The Bibliography. p. 19 Translated poetry. p. 22 APPENDICES: Research Lexicon: A Listing of Literary Devices discussed in Rhetoric. p. 520 English Literature along the Ages up to 1901. p. 554 Romanian Author Chronology. p. 558 The Thomas PERCY Glossary. p. 565 4 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry George Sandulescu A Few Principles of Translation. (Good, i.e. Great) Literature is news that stays news. Ezra Pound, in ABC of Reading (1934) chapter 8. a remarkable poet (1885-1972) 1. Lidia Vianu is right: You learn more language from Poetry than from Prose. Just because the Langua ge is more compact; it posits more unexpected problems too. I would add, in support of it all, that a fa r wider range of Literary Devices are there in poetry. 2. Translations are never good‘ or bad‘: they are merely subjectively (or goal-oriented) adequate, or , alternatively, subjectively (or goal-oriented) inadequate. That is all. 5 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 3. The QUESTION always carries a far greater number of (pragmatic?) Presuppositions than the average Assertion, or Statement. Be acutely aware of such underlying assumptions. Spectralise them in the greatest detail to the best of your ability; in plain language. Express them in as many words, clearly and precisely, and even put them in writing. It helps the thinking process. Noica knew that full well. And had seen Eminescu doing it in his Ca hiers. That is precisely why Noica was thinking so highly of Eminescu in his unseen‘ efforts. 4. Translation is a craft, a handicraft. Just like medicine, it needs time: time before, in the proce ss of learning, and then the lengthy period of preliminary experience. But there is also the time in doing it: no translation can be done at one go... Never translate a text unless you are more than sure you UNDERSTAND it! And t hen, after having achieved the language transfer, let it stew. Just like making bread, a translation grows of itself... It grows in your mind... imperceptibly... and it grows on paper: equally imperceptibly! A translation, any translation in my modest opinion, is a work of art: and in a work of art, time does not count. 6 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 5. InterDisciplinarity in translation work is of the essence. Ideally, the good translator must neces sarily know everything about everything. You want an example? OK, I‘ll give you one. Or two. There is a book b y one of the two Brownings—guess which?—entitled Sonnets from the Portuguese. Practically everybody in the Comm unist world believed the Moscow-emerging title of this book, which was Sonnets from the Portuguese Langu age! As British literary criticism was considered the Devil‘s capitalist work, nobody bothered to delve deeper, and see that Mrs Browning looked Portuguese‘, and had been nicknamed by her husband and friends The Portuguese (woman)... These were, quite simply, her sonnets. # Aldous Huxley fared even worse, soo n after the war, with one of his books translated into Romanian as Putregai‘ by Jul. Giurgea, and publishe d by Cugetarea around 1946. The original title of the book was Antic Hay. What was that? It takes some research to find out that: Antic Hay is the name of a most peculiar dance—nothing to do with hay... (to say nothing of the fact that antic is one thing and ancient is another...). Do not forget that we live in a world of specializations... so much so that in the early 1970‘s I published a book in Paris entitled Language for Special Purpose s (q.v.). 6. All translations are goal-oriented: if you are supposed to do one for the sole benefit of your mot her-inlaw, you are sure to do it badly! And on purpose so, too. But if you are supposed to do one for a Court of Justice, or for a Head of State, your neck is at risk, so, it goes without saying you will be doing your da mned best in 7 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry working it out, and a little more than that. A text of poetry gives you freedom: a text of medicin e, or, better, a text of law—just think of the Brussels mess—gives you no freedom at all. Absolutely ALL equivalenc es have to be one-to-one equivalences. Otherwise, heads may roll—figuratively, or literally. Paraphrase or Pr écis are totally out of the question. (Though I for one, treat mothers-in-law very well... never had one.) 7. It may gradually dawn on you that there are definite Types of Translation. There is, in other word s, a Translation Typology. Just like medical specialists. And specialisations do go to extremes: some d octors that I know specialize only in the left ear; others—the smarter ones—specialise in the right one... It is a matter of common knowledge that technical translations do require fairly high levels of professionalism. Nobody would be able to translate an advanced research paper on nuclear power, ex cept a fairly well-trained nuclear power linguist. And do not even try, amateur style, if you are asked t o: the reason is simple. Noam Chomsky‘s overmuch discussed Linguistic Intuition is not only totally paralysed, but downright non-existent in the realm of specialisms. Chomsky was very wrong in that respect, in that the area of what he calls Linguistic Intuition is a very narrowly operational concept; men are usually helpless with c ookery books, 8 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry women have similar difficulties with advanced weaponry. Even professional accountants are out of d epth on the Stock Exchange, and the other way round... To say nothing of the language of the Church, and the various labels bandied around between Cathol ics and Protestants. For the Greek Orthodox believers practically do not exist in Western Europe. And not many Jews do know the many details of their own religion. So, what is left for us to translate? Nothing. Except Poetry... and some moderately specialised Fi ction?! But certainly not the novel Saturday by Ian McEwan (for the author himself said he had studied neu rosurgery for seven years before writing that book). 8. Joseph Conrad—the famous one and only Joseph Conrad—is known to have said that, though he started learning English in Marseilles of all places, had never opened a Book of English Grammar at all, a t all, all his life. Shall we believe him? Personally, I do because I do know, deep down, that it is quite, quite possi ble. To be the first stylist in English only on the strength of your own brain. but how many can do that? Language Grammars are easily, and largely, misleading. And as to English, no genuine Englishman ev er wrote a grammar of their own Language. Who are they—the writers of English Grammars? First comes Jespersen, a Great Dane! Then Kruisinga, a Dutchman. And the latest Grammar of English which I mys elf 9 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry helped launch in Copenhagen in 1972 was written by four distinct Professors, only one of whom was English. Lord Randolph Quirk, by name. And what a name for a linguist... (his three other co-authors includ ed an American and a Swede). 9. Dictionaries? No good! Not the Internet ones at any rate: they are all very inaccurate. The soluti on is simple: you must write your own Dictionary... I have done so for half a dozen languages already... For myself of course. But that remains the best way of learning languages. So did Conrad, I am sure... 10. CONCLUSION. You want to be a good translator? Roll up your sleeves and call yourself the best craftsman in the world. And be so! Lock the door tight shut. Kill the telephones and the rest of t he family, together with the remaining electronics, and concentrate: there is only one relationship in the wo rld at that moment—the relation between your own mind, and the text in front of you. And that moment may last a long time. Even days and days. Remember Joyce‘s definition of life as as many days. And the little god called Destiny will alone decide when you are through with the translation. The supreme test is the deep and steady feeling of a job well done. Only when you get that feeling deep down in your stomach you can say y ou are at the end of the road! 10 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Forget Dictionaries, and Grammars, and friends, and Girl-friends: they will all prove to be obnoxi ous to the job under way. You should have solved all their problems before starting. Otherwise, you yours elf will become a non-starter. And we have seen ever so many students in that position. The position of rej ects. For translation is surgery: be omniscient, and all the doors will open. The magic of full success lies in the intensity of application of consummate craft. That is all. A bon entendeur, salut! ¤ Several years running I had been giving a Special Series of Lectures in the English Department of the University of TORINO / Turin, in Northern Italy, all of them coming under the General Heading of L inguistic Analysis of Difficult Texts (some of them may one day be published here...). They were all meant f or the benefit of students—both undergraduate and postgraduate together—as well as for the members of the departm ental staff who happened to be interested in a closer approach to the literary text. We landed discussin g William Blake most of the time, especially his Proverbs of Hell, which come as part of The Marriage of Heaven an d Hell... 11 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry But for the moment, let us switch the stress only slightly, and look at Translations of Poetry whi ch may not prove so easy of achievement. For a wide range of reasons... Especially in point of fixed and rigid metrics and fairly complex Versification. The Translations are commented. Some only sparsely so, others a little more extensively. One last word about the silly controversy MODERN versus CONTEMPORARY. We will start with Jan Kott‘s book symbolically entitled Shakespeare our Contemporary, whose Russian title is Nash So vremennik Viliam Shekspir! When Modern English begins by unanimous consent among linguists in the year 1500, I cannot possibly accept those who say that Modernism belongs to the 20th Century! And postModernism is—to me—as nonsensical as the pseudo-concept of postEnglish! Grammatici certant!, of course... But there are limits in the Humanities. And let us not forget th at in the History of Philosophy MODERN means quite something else... As the devoted interDisciplinarian that I am, I can only hope, against hope, to put some order in the terminological mess generated by the slips hod use of MODERN + CONTEMPORARY in the various disciplines of the Humanities... namely, the Study of Languag es, the Study of Philosophy, and the Study of Literatures—all three disciplines taken together. 12 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Lidia Vianu The Spark of Translation Une difficulté est une lumière. Une difficulté insurmontable est un soleil. Paul Valéry, Mauvaises pensées et autres, 1942, p. 25. Education is a paradox. We constantly try to teach more, without realizing that we preserve less a nd less. This Compendium of Translated Poetry is trying to open a way: an equally informing and forming one . It has one rule, and one rule alone: go by the TEXT. The craft of the text. And its craftsman – author, trans lator, and compiler, possibly... As the Senior Editor of this Compendium points out in his introduction, translation is a matter of opinion, craft and teaching. Probably in that order. But I will reverse the order here, mainly because I am trying to follow 13 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry the roots of our attempt, and then come up with its essential justification. Teaching literature is becoming, has already become what T.S. Eliot stated poetry was to him: a mu g‘s game. In Eliot‘s words, As things are, and as fundamentally they must always be, poetry is not a c areer, but a mug's game. No honest poet can ever feel quite sure of the permanent value of what he has written: He may have wasted his time and messed up his life for nothing. (Conclusion to The Use of Poetry and the Use of Criticism, 1933). Quite a number of countries teach English literary genres instead of chronological literary histor y, while most PhD dissertations focus on cultural studies. Which does not make those teachers or PhD studen ts less honourable men, of course. And which, on the other hand, has logically paved the way to this Compe ndium. Hopefully, though paved with good intentions, this will not be construed as the road to Hell... It would be ideal to have our students read all the works ever written by English writers, in the order in which they were initially published. If I speak for my – post-war – generation, it would be ideal for their teachers as well. The idea of this Compendium came while we were looking for a way of helping the MA graduate students of the Programme for the Translation of the Literary Text. While trying to help both contemporary students and their teachers to refresh their knowledge of English literature as a who le, we started from Eliot‘s assumption that, even though we may know now more than all individual dead writers‘, that 14 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry which we know is precisely‘ their work. Or, as he put it, Some one said: "The dead writers are remote from us because we know so much more than they did." Precisely, and they are that which we know. [Tradition and the Individual Talent.] Consequently, one reason why we relied mainly on Chronology has everything to do with the didactic intention of the compilers. But, as Einstein is rumoured to have stated, Education is what you rem ember after you forget everything you learned in school‘. There comes a time when one realizes that literature is in fact a succession of texts to be re-read, again and again; to be seen afresh and perceived in a deeper, m ore enlightened way. Revision is the mother of understanding. While coherent on the whole, our ages are never quit e the same. And the older we grow, the more we want to reinvent what education has provided us with. When the Contemporary Literature Press came into being, little idea did I have what it was heading for. Its aim became clearer when George Sandulescu joined us. He saw the future of the publishing house, th e directions it was to follow. Teaching Literary Translation is the main one. Beginning with Transla ted Poetry is what we are trying to do in this book. The structure of our Compendium of Translated Poetry is a c hronological succession of English titles translated – or waiting for a translation – into Romanian, and Romani an titles 15 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry translated – or not yet – into English. Why we mixed English and Romanian chronology, why we are listing poetical texts out of which some are translated while others are not, and why we choose to try and teach poetry via its translation, ca n all be answered briefly: we are looking for a revigorating guide to poetry, which will address all ages, all stages of education, and – mainly – which will show those who have not realized it yet, that poetry is a lif e-long job. This is, first and foremost, one way of teaching myself all the things I still ignore, all the texts I have never taken the proper time to discover. It is a confession of humility in front of this long history of poetry wh ich I have been teaching while progressively losing it. The result, didactically speaking, is the idea that great literature was there long before the his tory of literature claimed it. Was Shakespeare considered the absolute literary genius while he was writin g his Sonnets? Since – as you will notice – this is a book that thrives on questions, while postponing answers in favour of deeper consideration (see the FrageStellung boxes before each text, by our Senior Editor), I shall only say here that its compilers have been aiming at peeping at the text before its critics. They did so in a bo ok of over seven hundred pages, which probably beats the record of most anthologies on paper ever published by Buch arest University, and most certainly of all books published by CLP so far. Addressing now George Sandulescu‘s major assumption that a translation is never right or wrong, bu t 16 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry simply a matter of opinion – we must proceed by saying that, inextricably, the structure of this C ompendium is a matter of opinion, too. It reveals the compilers‘ opinion as to the training of the most recent three generations of poetry translators. It brings the proof of it, too: it leads to a clear idea why certain texts have so far been translated (some in more than one version), while others have not even been addressed yet. When English reached Romania – French-oriented at the time –, translators had to make the law as t hey were translating. What they learned in a random process, they would have passed on, had it not bee n for the communist hiatus. The second generation of Romanian translators from English poetry, to whom trans lators of Romanian poetry into English were added, struggled with cultural isolation and its disadvantages: lack of books, of communication, censorship, arduous publication, the need to survive intellectually while dangerously refusing to compromise. Intellectual integrity waged a bloody, often losing battle, with politics. Here we are now, twenty years after the fall of communism, trying to make a whole out of disparate stages and adverse memories. The training of the present generation, of our graduate students at MTTLC, partly relies on our ability to persuade them that there is a sense of coherence and a genuine European dimension to th e Romanian translation of poetry. We have also been trying to change something in Romanian standards, to assist Romanian teachers an d students of English poetry along the way of turning professional, and, last but not least, to prov e that not all 17 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry internet sites are unreliable. In this respect, the Contemporary Literature Press hopes to effect a significant change. It is a given fact that a 2011 student will resort to online information. Part of this reality is a miracle: you can have a whole library a click away. But you need to know how to use it. Like all education, in the realm of internet documentation, school only begins when it ends. Then you are alone with what you know, an d feel your way ahead, towards more knowledge, of your own choice, on your own. One has to know what to t ake for granted and what to reject. One has to have an opinion. This Compendium, therefore, follows in C. Noica‘s footsteps, and abides by his words: Invent your teachers. Which is as much as to say work on your own opinions till they lead you where you want to go. The last on the Senior Editor‘s list of elements defining the translation of literature was craft. This whole volume is proof of G. Sandulescu‘s obsession with excellence. When all is said and done, readers m ay understand the reason why a good translator wakes up in the middle of the night because he has fou nd the one word that was a blank in his previous day‘s translating work. As Paul Valéry once wrote, Une diffi culté est une lumière. Une difficulté insurmontable est un soleil. What this compendium offers is a lesson in di fficulty which can eventually lead to a spark. 18 April 2011 18 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Bibliography. Antologie de poezie engleză de la începuturi până azi. Editura Minerva. Bucureşti. 1980-1984. Bibl ioteca pentru toţi. Ediţie întocmită de Leon Leviţchi şi Tudor Dorin (vol. 1-3) şio Leon Leviţchi (vol. 4). Pref aţă şi tabel cronologic de Dan Grigorescu. paperback. Balade engleze. Traducere şi cuvânt înainte de Leon Leviţchi. Editura Univers. Bucharest 1970. 248 pages. Beowulf, translated by Seamus Heaney. Faber and Faber. London 1999. 106 pages. paperback. Geoffrey Chaucer, Troilus şi Cresida, Traducere, prefaţă, note şi comentarii de Dan Duţescu. Editu ra Univers 1978. 372 pages. hardback + Dust-jacket. Ion Pillat. Opere. Volumul 4 – Tălmăciri 1919-1944. Editura Du Style. Bucureşti. 2002. Cap. Din po ezia engleză, pp. 19 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 392-423. 823 pages. paperback. Lucian BLAGA. 1995. Opera poetică. Editura Humanitas 1995. ISBN 973 – 28 – 0589 – 7. Cuvânt înaint e de Eugen Simion. Prefaţă de George Gană. Ediţie îngrijită de George Gană şi Dorli Blaga. 665 pages. P rinted and bound in Germany. With dust-jacket. Lucian Blaga. Din lirica engleză. Tălmăciri. Editura Univers. Bucharest 1970. 134 pages. Robert Browning. Versuri alese. Traducere Leon D. Leviţchi. Editura Univers. Bucharest 1972. 165 p ages. Roots and Wings. An Anthology of Romanian Poetry. Vol. 1. Compiled by Veronica Focşeneanu. Cison Publishing House. Bucharest 2001. 165 pages. T. S. Eliot. The Waste Land. A Facsimile of the Original Drafts Including the Annotations of Ezra Pound. Edited by Valerie Eliot. Faber and Faber. London 1971. 149 pages. hardback + dust-jacket. The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats. Definitive Edition with the Author‘s Final Revisions. Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc. New York. 1956. 480 pages. hardback + Dust jacket. The Complete Poems and Plays of T. S. Eliot. Faber and Faber. London 1969. 608 pages. hardback + d ust-jacket. 20 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Complete Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, Edited from numerous manuscripts by Walter W. Skeat. Oxfor d University Press 1933. 732 + 149 pages. The Oxford Book of English Verse 1250 – 1918. New Edition. Chosen and Edited by Sir Arthur Quiller -Couch. Book Club Associates. London 1968 (by arrangement with Oxford University Press). 1166 pages. hardb ack + dustjacket. 21 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Translated poetry. 799?. 1380’s. 1400?. 1400?. 1400?. 1400?. 1400?. 1400?. 1508. 1595. 1596. 1600. 1604. 1609a. ? Beowulf. Lines 1-26. 26 lines. CHAUCER. Troilus and Criseyde. I. Line 1-105. Duţescu. 105 lines. [popular ballad]. Clerk Saunders. Leviţchi. 102 lines. [popular ballad]. Get Up and Bar the Door. Leviţchi. 44 lines. [popular ballad]. Gude Wallace. Leviţchi. 84 lines. [popular ballad]. Lady Isabel and the Elf-Knight. Leviţchi. 28 lines. [popular ballad]. Robin Hood and the Widow’s Three Sons. Leviţchi. 116 lines. [popular ballad]. Sweet William’s Ghost. Leviţchi. 64 lines. William DUNBAR. Lament for the Makaris. Tartler. 60 lines. SHAKESPEARE. Romeo and Juliet. 3. 5. Blaga # Iosif. 36 lines. Edmund SPENSER. The Fairie Queene. I. I. Lines 1-36. Duţescu. 36 lines. SHAKESPEARE. As You Like It. 2.7. Ieronim. 28 lines. SHAKESPEARE. Measure for Measure. 3.1. Ieronim. 39 lines. SHAKESPEARE. Sonnet 97. Pillat. 14 lines. 22 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1609b. SHAKESPEARE. Sonnet 66. 14 lines. Sonnet 18. Pruteanu # Frunzetti # Tomozei # Grigorescu # Rezuş # Pintilie. Tartler. 1609c. 1611. 1616. 1635a. 1635b. 1711 1717. 1730. 1745. 1747. 1751. 1783. 1786. 1782. 1789a. 1789b. 1794. ro1797a. SHAKESPEARE. SHAKESPEARE. The Tempest. 4. 1. Ieronim. 18 lines. Ben JONSON. To Celia. Blaga. 16 lines. John DONNE. A Lecture upon the Shadow. John DONNE. Ecstasy. Doinaş. 76 lines. Alexander POPE Essay on Criticism. Lines 1-184. Leviţchi. 184 lines. Alexander POPE. Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Boşca. James THOMSON. Winter. Boşca. 111 lines. Edward YOUNG. Invocation to Night. Boşca. 67 lines. William COLLINS. Ode to Evening. Boşca. 52 lines. Thomas GRAY. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard. Boşca. 128 lines. George CRABBE. The Pauper’s Funeral. Boşca. 29 lines. BURNS. My Father Was a Farmer. Boşca. 72 lines. BURNS. John Barleycorn. Leviţchi. 60 lines. BLAKE. The Little Black Boy. Blaga # Boşca. 28 lines. BLAKE. Reeds of Innocence. Boşca. 20 lines. BLAKE. The Garden of Love. Tartler. 12 lines. Ienăchiţă VCRESCU. ro1797b. Ienăchiţă VCRESCU. ro1797c. Ienăchiţă 14 lines. 26 lines. 82 lines. Testament literar. 4 lines. Amărâtă turturea. 28 lines. Într-o grădină. 6 lines. 23 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1797d. 1798. 1802. 1816a. 1816b. 1818a. 1818b. 1819a. 1819b. 1819c. 1819d. ro1827. 1829. 1835. ro1840. ro1841. 1842a. 1842b. ro1843. VCRESCU. Ienăchiţă VCRESCU. COLERIDGE. Spune, inimioară, spune. 12 lines. Leviţchi. 82 lines. WORDSWORTH. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. 1. Lines 182. My Heart Leaps Up. Blaga. 9 lines. BYRON. The Dream. Teodorescu. 206 lines. BYRON. Darkness. KEATS. Modern Love. Covaci. 17 lines. SHELLEY. Ozymandias. Tartler. 14 lines. KEATS. Ode on a Grecian Urn. Covaci. 50 lines. KEATS. Bright star. Tartler. 14 lines. KEATS. La Belle Dame Sans Merci. Blaga. 48 lines. KEATS. Ode to a Nightingale. Covaci. 80 lines. Vasile CÂRLOVA. Păstorul întristat. SHELLEY. The Aziola. Pillat. 21 lines. BROWNING. Song from Paracelsus. Tartler. 16 lines. Grigore ALEXANDRESCU. Anton PANN. Anul 1840. 76 lines. Despre vorbire. 309 lines. BROWNING. The Pied Piper of Hamelin. Banuş. 301 lines. TENNYSON. Ulysses. Leviţchi. 70 lines. Heliade RDULESCU. Sburătorul. 82 lines. 68 lines. 104 lines. 24 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Doinaş # Solomon # Dragomir # Lari # Săvescu. 1845. Edgar POE. The Raven. ro1845. 1846 1847. 1850. ALECSANDRI. Zburătorul. Edward LEAR. A Book of Nonsense. Lines 1-45. Abăluţă and Stoenescu. 45 lines. TENNYSON. Tears, Idle Tears. Tartler. 20 lines. Dante Gabriel ROSSETTI. ALECSANDRI. The Blessed Damozel. Leviţchi. 150 lines. Mioriţa. Snodgrass # popular version. 122 lines. BROWNING. A Grammarian’s Funeral. Leviţchi. 148 lines. BROWNING. Fra Lippo Lippi. Leviţchi. 392 lines. Christina ROSSETTI. Remember. Porsenna. 14 lines. HOPKINS. The Alchemist in the City. Dima. 44 lines. HOPKINS. Heaven-Haven. Dima. 8 lines. HOPKINS. Let Me Be to Thee as the Circling Bird. Dima. 14 lines. HOPKINS. The Habit of Perfection. Dima. 28 lines. Matthew ARNOLD. Dover Beach. Leviţchi. 37 lines. Lewis CARROLL. The Walrus and the Carpenter. Ieronim. 108 lines. EMINESCU. Lacul. Cuclin. 20 lines. HOPKINS. Pied Beauty. Dima. 11 lines. HOPKINS. God’s Grandeur. Tartler # Dima. 14 lines. HOPKINS. The Windhover. Dima. 14 lines. William COWPER. The Diverting History of John Gilpin. Leviţchi. 252 lines. EMINESCU. Singurătate. Grimm # Popescu. 40 lines. ro1853. 1855a. 1855b. 1862. 1863?. 1864. 1866?a. 1866b. 1867. 1872. ro1876. 1877a. 1877b. 1877c. 1878. ro1878. 108 lines. 40 lines. 25 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1879?a. 1879b. ro1879. 1881a. 1881b. ro1883a. ro1883b. ro1884a. ro1884b. 1885?. ro1885. 1889. ro1891. ro1892. 1893. ro1893. ro1894. 1895. ro1895. ro1896. 1898. 1899a. HOPKINS As Kingfishers Catch Fire. Dima. 14 lines. HOPKINS. Morning, Midday, and Evening Sacrifice. Dima. 21 lines. EMINESCU. Atât de fragedă. Grimm. 76 lines. Oscar WILDE. Impressions de Voyage. Tartler. 15 lines. HOPKINS. Inversnaid. Dima. 16 lines. EMINESCU. Glossă. Bantaş # Popescu # Săhlean. 80 lines. EMINESCU. Odă (în metru antic). Bantaş. 20 lines. EMINESCU. Cu mâine zilele-ţi adaogi. Leviţchi. 32 lines. EMINESCU. Din valurile vremii. Bantaş. 20 lines. HOPKINS. I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Not Day. Dima. 14 lines. EMINESCU. Sara pe deal. Grimm. 24 lines. YEATS. To an Isle in the Water. Pillat. 16 lines. COŞBUC. Trei, Doamne, şi toţi trei. Leviţchi. 80 lines. COŞBUC. Vestitorii primăverii. Leviţchi. 30 lines. YEATS. When You Are Old. Pillat. 12 lines. COŞBUC. El-Zorab. Leviţchi. 155 lines. COŞBUC. Noi vrem pământ. Leviţchi. 70 lines. KIPLING. If. Duţescu # Camilar # Coposu. 32 lines. MACEDONSKI. Noaptea de noiembrie. Lines 293-359. Leviţchi. 21 lines. COŞBUC. Iarna pe uliţă. Leviţchi. 115 lines. Oscar WILDE. The Ballad of Reading Goal. Porsenna. 714 lines. YEATS. He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven. Pillat. 8 lines. 26 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1899b. ro1900?. ro1902. 1907. ro1911. 1916. ro1916a. ro1916b. ro1916c. ro1916d. 1917. 1918a. 1918b. 1919. ro1919. 1922. ro1923a. ro1923b. ro1924a. ro1924b. YEATS. The Valley of the Black Pig. Pillat. 8 lines. MACEDONSKI. Sonetul nestematelor. Duţescu. 14 lines. BACOVIA. Plumb. Jay. 8 lines. JOYCE. I Hear an Army. Blaga. 12 lines. COŞBUC. Poetul. Leviţchi. 30 lines. YEATS. The Magi. Pillat. 8 lines. BACOVIA. Decembre. Jay. 24 lines. BACOVIA. Lacustră. Jay. 16 lines. BACOVIA. Plouă. Jay. 16 lines. BACOVIA. Poemă în oglindă. Jay. 31 lines. T.S. ELIOT. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. Doinaş. 131 lines. D.H. LAWRENCE. Piano. Tartler. 12 lines. Wilfred OWEN. Insensibility. Leviţchi. 59 lines. YEATS. The Wild Swans at Coole. Pillat. 30 lines. BLAGA. Eu nu strivesc corola de minuni a lumii. Hastie. 20 lines. T.S. ELIOT. The Waste Land. Pillat # Covaci. 433 lines. BLAGA. Semne. Hastie. 41 lines. BLAGA. În marea trecere. Hastie. 25 lines. BLAGA. Fiu al faptei nu sunt. Hastie. 22 lines. BLAGA. Psalm. Hastie. 30 lines. ro1924c. BLAGA. BACOVIA. Tristeţe metafizică. Ninge. Hastie. Jay. 32 lines. 8 lines. ro1926a. 27 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1926b. 1927. 1928. 1929. 1933. ro1933. 1935. 1937. 1938a. 1938b. ro1938c. ro1942. 1951. ro1960. ro1964. 1966. BACOVIA. Vals de toamnă. Jay. 12 lines. T.S. ELIOT. Journey of the Magi. Blaga # Pillat. 69 lines. T.S. ELIOT. Animula. Pillat. 37 lines. T.S. ELIOT. Marina. Pillat. 35 lines. YEATS. After Long Silence. Blaga. 8 lines. BLAGA. La cumpăna apelor. Hastie. 16 lines. Louis MacNEICE. Snow. Tartler. 12 lines. Robert GRAVES. At First Sight. Tartler. 6 lines. YEATS. Politics. Tartler. 12 lines. AUDEN. Musée des Beaux Arts. Tartler. 21 lines. BLAGA. La curţile dorului. Hastie. 18 lines. BLAGA. Poetul. Hastie. 53 lines. Dylan THOMAS. Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night. Abăluţă and Stoenescu. 19 lines. BLAGA. Mirabila sămânţă. Hastie. 52 lines. Nichita STNESCU. Poveste sentimentală. Carlson and Poenaru. 18 lines. Seamus HEANEY. The Barn. Tartler. 20 lines. 28 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 799?. Beowulf. Lines 1-26. Heaney. 26 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Faber and Faber 1999 for the one-page translation.) Author: ? Text: Beowulf. Translator: S. Heaney. FrageStellung: You have here a sample of Old English (q.v.) translated by a famous Irish (Nobel ‘9 5) poet. Use The Percy Glossary in the Appendix (q.v.) in the vain hope that you‘ll get a remote idea of the relation between Old and Mod ern English, with Middle English in between. This is the best I can do to help you get a bird‘s eye-view of ENGLISH as a whole, over time... Wh o was Beowulf anyhow? Poet or figment of the imagination? Even in chess you must work your way upwards from Square One... And Beowulf is Sq uare One much magnified. Beowulf. The Prologue: Beowulf. The Prologue: Hwæt wē Gār-Dena in gēardagum, þēodcyninga þrym gefrūnon, hū ðā æþelingas ellen fremedon! So. The Spear-Danes in days gone by and the kings who ruled them had courage and greatness. We have heard of those princes‘ heroic campaigns. Oft Scyld Scēfing sceaþena þrēatum, monegum mgþum meodosetla oftēah, egsode eorl[as], syððan rest wearð fēasceaft funden; hē þæs frōfre gebād, wēox under wolcnum weorðmyndum þāh, oð þæt him ghwylc þ[r] ymbsittendra There was Shield Sheafson, scourge of many tribes, a wrecker of mead-benches, rampaging among foes. This terror of the hall-troops had come far. A foundling to start with, he would flourish later on as his powers waxed and his worth was proved. In the end each clan on the outlying coasts 29 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ofer hronrāde h ran scolde, gomban gyldan. þæt wæs gōd cyning! Ðm eafera wæs æfter cenned geong in geardum, þone God sende folce tō frōfre; fyrenðearfe ongeat, beyond the whale-road had to yield to him and begin to pay tribute. That was one good king. Bēowulf wæs brēme – bld wīde sprang – Scyldes eafera Scedelandum in. Swā sceal [geong g]uma gōde gewyrcean, fromum feohgiftum on fæder [bea]rme, þæt hine on ylde eft gewunigen wilgesīþas, þonne wīg cume, lēode gelsten; lofddum sceal in mgþa gehwre man geþeon. Afterwards a boy-child was born to Shield, a cub in the yard, a comfort sent by God to that nation. He knew what they had tholed, the long times and troubles they‘d come through without a leader; so the Lord of Life, the glorious Almighty, made this man renowned. Shield had fathered a famous son: Beow‘s name was known through the north. And a young prince must be prudent like that, giving freely while his father lives so that afterwards in age when fighting starts steadfast companions will stand by him and hold the line. Behaviour that‘s admired is the path to power among people everywhere. Him ðā Scyld gewāt tō gescæphwīle felahrōr fēran on Frēan wre. Hī hyne þā ætbron tō brimes faroðe swse gesīþas, swā hē selfa bæd... Shield was still thriving when his time came and he crossed over into the Lord‘s keeping. His warrior band did what he bade them when he laid down the law among the Danes: þē hīe r drugon aldor[lē]ase lange hwīle. Him þæs Liffrea, wuldres Wealdend woroldāre forgeaf; Translated by S. Heaney. 30 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1380’s. CHAUCER. Troilus and Criseyde. Line 1-105. Duţescu. 105 lines. Author: Geoffrey CHAUCER (1343-1400). Text: Troilus and Criseyde. Book I. Lines 1-105. Translator: D. Duţescu. NB. (Translator’s Note). Versiunea românească redă integral textul englez, traducerea fiind în mod practic vers la vers, cu respectarea întocmai a formei de versificaţie a originalului. (The Editors point out that Troilus and Criseyde has just under one thousand two hundred stanzas.) FrageStellung: a. This is a most typical sample of Middle English: make the best of it. The Percy Glossary is most useful here. Go to it! b. What is the standard metric pattern of the stanzas above mentioned by the translator? Troilus and Criseyde. Book I: Troilus şi Cresida. Cartea întâia: 1. The double sorwe of Troilus to tellen, That was the king Priamus sone of Troye, In lovinge, how his aventures fellen Fro wo to wele, and after out of Ioye, My purpos is, er that I parte fro ye. Thesiphone, thou help me for tendyte Thise woful vers, that wepen as I wryte! De Troil, rigăi Priam fiu mezin – Cât încă sunt cu voi aici – agale Voi depăna: cum a sorbit din plin Iubirea cu amarurile sale Şi bucurii, şi-apoi cumplita-i jale. Ajută-mi, Tisiphona, să înstrun Trist viersul meu ce plânge cât îl spun. 1.2. Cât încă sunt cu voi aici: autorul se adresează unui auditoriu. Până către sfârşitul Evului Mediu, lucrările literare, şi mai ales versurile, erau comunicate în cea mai mare parte pe cale orală, şi prea puţin prin scris. 31 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 2. To thee clepe I, thou goddesse of torment, Thou cruel Furie, sorwing ever in peyne; Help me, that am the sorwful instrument That helpeth lovers, as I can, to pleyne! For wel sit it, the sothe for to seyne, A woful wight to han a drery fere, And, to a sorwful tale, a sory chere. La tine strig, zeiţă mult zbătută, Furie crudă stând sub greu blestem: Ajută-mi mie, tristă alăută Ce-îngân, cum ştiu, pe-ndrăgostiţi când gem. Căci se cuvine, după cum vedem, La om mâhnit, tovarăş negurat, La jalnică poveste, chip surpat. 3. For I, that god of Loves servaunts serve, Ne dar to Love, for myn unlyklinesse, Preyen for speed, al sholde I therfor sterve, So fer am I fro his help in derknesse; But nathelees, if this may doon gladnesse To any lover, and his cause avayle, Have he my thank, and myn be this travayle! Deşi robesc la robii lui Amor, Iubirii nu cutez cu vreun temei Să-i fac rugare pentru ajutor: Departe-n hău e ajutorul ei. Dar dacă doi îndrăgostiţi sau trei Găsi-vor în povestea mea vreun leac, Sunt volnic bucurie să le fac. 4. But ye loveres, that bathen in gladnesse, If any drope of pitee in yow be, Remembreth yow on passed hevinesse That ye han felt, and on the adversitee Of othere folk, and thenketh how that ye Han felt that Love dorste yow displese; Or ye han wonne hym with to greet an ese. Iar voi ce vă-mbăiaţi în bucurie, De-aveţi, vai, milă-n voi, un strop măcar, Aduceţi-vă aminte ce urgie Aţi pătimit cândva şi cât amar Au tras şi alţii; şi socoateţi, iar, Cum înşişi voi v-aţi pus Iubirii-n poartă Spre-a nu vă fi izbânda prea uşoară. 5. And preyeth for hem that ben in the cas Of Troilus, as ye may after here, That love hem bringe in hevene to solas, And eek for me preyeth to god so dere, That I have might to shewe, in som manere, Şi vă rugaţi cu cei ce-s în durere, Precum Troil – vedea-veţi mai târziu – Ca Amor să le aducă mângâiere, Şi vă rugaţi lui Dumnezeu-cel-viu Să-mi dea putere să v-arăt, cum ştiu, 32 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Swich peyne and wo as Loves folk endure, In Troilus unsely aventure. Ce chin şi-amar pat robii lui Amór În focul lui Troil, mistuitor. 6. And biddeth eek for hem that been despeyred In love, that never nil recovered be, And eek for hem that falsly been apeyred Thorugh wikked tonges, be it he or she; Thus biddeth god, for his benignitee, So graunte hem sone out of this world to pace, That been despeyred out of Loves grace. Vă mai rugaţi cu cei ce în iubire Nu mai găsesc nădejde nicăieri; Cu cei pe care sar a-i clevetire Limbi rele de bărbaţi au de muieri; Rugaţi pe Dumnezeu din răsputeri Degrab‘ să-i ierte de pe-acest pământ Pe cei pe care Dragostea i-a frânt. 7. And biddeth eek for hem that been at ese, That god hem graunte ay good perseveraunce, And sende hem might hir ladies so to plese, That it to Love be worship and plesaunce. For so hope I my soule best avaunce, To preye for hem that Loves servaunts be, And wryte hir wo, and live in charitee. Şi iar, cu cei întru huzur născuţi, Ca Domnul să le deie stăruinţă Şi har spre-a fi domniţelor plăcuţi, Într-a lui Amor cinste şi credinţă. Aşa găsi-voi inimii priinţă: Rugându-mă pentru acei ce-i ştiu Robi Dragostei, şi jalea să le-o scriu, 8. And for to have of hem compassioun As though I were hir owene brother dere. Now herkeneth with a gode entencioun, For now wol I gon streight to my matere, In whiche ye may the double sorwes here Of Troilus, in loving of Criseyde, And how that she forsook him er she deyde. Şi milă pentru ei să simt fierbinte În inima-mi cu dinţii înfrăţită. Ci ascultaţi acum cu luare-aminte, Căci cale va s-apuc neocolită Ca să vă spun de patima-îndoită A lui Troil, pe Cresida iubind, Şi cum, trădându-l ea, muri scrâşnind. 9. It is wel wist, how that the Grekes stronge In armes with a thousand shippes wente To Troyewardes, and the citee longe Ştim toţi cum Grecii, straşnic înarmaţi, Porniră cu o mie de catarge La Troia, şi ani zece-îndelungaţi 33 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Assegeden neigh ten yeer er they stente, And, in diverse wyse and oon entente, The ravisshing to wreken of Eleyne, By Paris doon, they wroughten al hir peyne. Bătură-n zidul ei cătând a-l sparge, Spre-a răzbuna în ochii lumii large Cea faptă a lui Paris ticăloasă, Răpind-o pe Elena lor frumoasă. 10. Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was Dwellinge a lord of greet auctoritee, A gret devyn that cleped was Calkas, That in science so expert was, that he Knew wel that Troye sholde destroyed be, By answere of his god, that highte thus, Daun Phebus or Apollo Delphicus. Şi s-a făcut că-n cel oraş era Trăind pe-atunci un om de mare vază, Greu prooroc, ce Calcas se numea; Şi el ştia, cu mintea lui cea trează Că pân‘ la urmă Troia va să cază În pulberi, precum zeul său i-a spus, Pheb, mai numit Apollo Delphicus. 11. So whan this Calkas knew by calculinge, And eek by answere of this Appollo, That Grekes sholden swich a peple bringe, Thorugh which that Troye moste been for-do, He caste anoon out of the toun to go; For wel wiste he, by sort, that Troye sholde Destroyed ben, ye, wolde who-so nolde. Deci când aflat-a Calcas prin socoate Şi prin răspunsul de la zeu primit Că vin cei Greci cu hoarde-înfricoşate Menindu-i Troiei groaznicul sfârşit, Să-şi lepede cetatea s-a gândit; Căci el ştia din făcături că-n scrum Avea să piară Troia, cum-necum. 12. For which, for to departen softely Took purpos ful this forknowinge wyse, And to the Grekes ost ful prively He stal anoon; and they, in curteys wyse, Hym deden bothe worship and servyse, In trust that he hath conning hem to rede In every peril which that is to drede. Drept care, sub al nopţii coperiş, Cest înţelept, departe văzător, La Greci în taberi a fugit pitiş; Iar dânşii l-au primit curtenitor Cu mare-închinăciune şi onor, La-înţelepciunea lui trăgând nădejde Să-i sfătuie în orişice primejde. 13. The noyse up roos, whan it was first aspyed, Şi vâlvă ce-a mai fost când s-a lăţit 34 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Thorugh al the toun, and generally was spoken, That Calkas traytor fled was, and allyed With hem of Grece; and casten to ben wroken On him that falsly hadde his feith so broken; And seyden, he and al his kin at ones Ben worthy for to brennen, fel and bones. Din gură-n gură zvonul prin cetate Cum Calcas de spre ei s-a hainit Fugind la Greci, şi-au strigat dreptate Prin plată grea credinţei lui călcate, Zicând că el şi neamu-i ticălos Preavrednici sunt să ardă pân‘ la os. 14. Now hadde Calkas left, in this meschaunce, Al unwist of this false and wikked dede, His doughter, which that was in gret penaunce, For of hir lyf she was ful sore in drede, As she that niste what was best to rede; For bothe a widowe was she, and allone Of any freend to whom she dorste hir mone. Lăsase-n Troia Calcas, de această Nemernicie-a lui neştiutoare, Pe fiică-sa ce sta sub grea năpastă, Căci viaţa şi-o temea cu teamă mare, Şi nicăieri să afle vreo-îndreptare, Căci văduvă era, şi ce stingheru-i Când n-ai prieten cărui să te jelui. 15. Criseyde was this lady name a-right; As to my dome, in al Troyes citee Nas noon so fair, for passing every wight So aungellyk was hir natyf beautee, That lyk a thing immortal semed she, As doth an hevenish parfit creature, That doun were sent in scorning of nature. Cresida o chema pe-acea domniţă, Iar după gândul meu, în Troia toată Mai gingaşă nu se afla fiinţă; Frumuseţe de pe alt tărâm, ciudată, Încât părea a fi din veci sculptată Întru desăvârşire îngerească, Şi pogorâtă să ne umilească. Traducere D. Duţescu. 35 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1400?. [popular ballad]. Clerk Saunders. Leviţchi. 102 lines. Author: Text: Clark Saunders. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Try to work out for yourself the Ballad Metre: its main function, in addition to ar tistry? Easy to learn by heart! Have a try! Clerk Saunders. Clerk Saunders. Clark Sanders and May Margret Walkt ower yon graveld green, And sad and heavy was the love, I wat, it fell this twa between. Clerk Saunders şi May Margret, trişti, Călcau al ierbii lin covor Căci urgisită şi amară Era multă iubirea lor. A bed, a bed,‘ Clark Sanders said, A bed, a bed for you and I;‘ Fye no, fye no,‘ the lady said, Until the day we married be. „Un pat, un pat spunea Clerk Saunders, „Un pat tovarăş să ne fie. „Vai! zise ea, „ nu – mai întâi Să ne legăm prin cununie; For in it will come my seven brothers, And a‘ their torches burning bright; They‘ll say, We hae but ae sister, And here her lying wi a knight.‘ Căci şapte fraţi ai mei cu torţe Ne vor afla de ne-am culcat; Vor zice: – Avem numai o soră Şi, iată, doarme cu-un bărbat. Ye‘l take the sourde fray my scabbord, „Din teacă sabia tu scoate-mi 36 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And lowly, lowly lift the gin, And you may say, your oth to save, You never let Clark Sanders in. Şi-i ţine vârful cât mai drept, Jurând de-adevărat că Saunders Aproape l-a simţit de piept. Yele take a napken in your hand, And ye‘l ty up baith your een, An ye may say, your oth to save, That ye saw na Sandy sen late yestreen. Să iei în mână un prosop Şi ochii să ţi-i legi cu el; Şi ai să poţi jura c-aseară Pe Clerk nu l-ai văzut de fel. Yele take me in your armes twa, Yele carrey me ben into your bed, And ye may say, your oth to save, In your bower-floor I never tread.‘ Şi, iarăşi, să mă iei în braţe, Şi să mă duci în patul tău, Şi ai să poţi jura pe urmă: Nu mi-a călcat iatacul, zău. She has taen the sourde fray his scabbord, And lowly, lowly lifted the gin; She was to swear, her oth to save, She never let Clerk Sanders in. Ea-i scoate sabia din teacă, Apoi, ţinându-i vârful drept, Jură de-adevăr că Saunders Aproape l-a simţit de piept. She has tain a napkin in her hand, And she ty‘d up baith her eeen; She was to swear, her oth to save, She saw na him sene late yestreen. Ea lua în mână un prosop Şi ochii şi-i lega cu el, Putând să jure că-n cea seară Pe Clerk nu l-a văzut de fel. She has taen him in her armes twa, And carried him ben into her bed; She was to swear, her oth to save, He never in her bower-floor tread. După aceea-l lua în braţe Şi-n cald culcuşu-i îl ducea, Putând să jure că-n iatac El n-a călcat pe duşumea. In and came her seven brothers, Cei şapte fraţi dădură buzna 37 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And all their torches burning bright; Says thay, We hae but ae sister, And see there her lying wi a knight. Cu torţele aprinse. „Iată, Au zis, „avem numai o soră Şi-i cu-un bărbat culcată. Out and speaks the first of them, A wat they hay been lovers dear;‘ Out and speaks the next of them, They hay been in love this many a year.‘ Şi zise-ntâiul: „Fiecărui Doar la celalt îi este gândul! Apoi al doilea: „Ştiu bine Că se iubiră ani de-a rândul. Out an speaks the third of them, It wear great sin this twa to twain;‘ Out an speaks the fourth of them, It wear a sin to kill a sleeping man.‘ Al treilea: „Să-i omorâm Ar fi păcat nelegiuit! Al patrulea: „Cum să ucizi Un om, când este adormit? Out an speaks the fifth of them, A wat they‘ll near be twaind by me;‘ Out an speaks the sixt of them, We‘l tak our leave an gae our way.‘ Al cincilea grăi: „Eu unul Nu-i pot ucide nicidecum. Al şaselea: „Nu pot nici eu – Mai bine ne vedem de drum. Out an speaks the seventh of them, Altho there wear no a man but me, ....................................................................................... I bear the brand, I‘le gar him die.‘ Vorbi al şaptelea şi zise: „Chiar dacă nu-mi daţi ajutor ........................................................................... Cu sabia am să-l omor. Out he has taen a bright long brand, And he has striped it throw the straw, And throw and throw Clarke Sanders‘ body A wat he has gard cold iron gae. El scoase-o spadă lunguiaţă, Cu sete o vârî-n saltea Şi-n trupul bietului Clerk Saunders Dibaci – că doar se pricepea. Sanders he started, an Margret she lapt, 38 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Intill his arms whare she lay, And well and wellsom was the night, A wat it was between these twa. Clerk se chirci și braţul lui Pe Margret se lăsă greoi; Ea suspină; și era noapte – În curte şi-ntre amândoi. And they lay still, and sleeped sound, Untill the day began to daw; And kindly till him she did say It‘s time, trew-love, ye wear awa.‘ Şi-au stat așa și au dormit Pân se iviră zorii reci, Când ea cu duioșie-i spuse: „E vremea, dragule, să pleci. They lay still, and sleeped sound, Untill the sun began to shine; She lookt between her and the wa, And dull and heavy was his eeen. Au stat așa și au dormit Pân ce luci iar mândrul soare; Iar May, privind la Clerk, văzu Că ochiu-i licăr nu mai are. She thought it had been a loathsome sweat, A wat it had fallen this twa between; But it was the blood of his fair body, A wat his life days wair na lang. Broboanele-i pe trup crezuse Că sunt broboane de asud; Dar nu era asud, sărmanul! De sânge-i era trupul ud. O Sanders, I‘le do for your sake What other ladys would na thoule; When seven years is come and gone, There‘s near a shoe go on my sole. „Am să îndur ce din femei Nu a-ndurat niciuna! Pân ce vor trece şapte ani, Desculţă am să umblu-ntr-una. O Sanders, I‘le do for your sake What other ladies would think mare; When seven years is come and gone, Ther‘s nere a comb go in my hair. Voi face, Clerk, de dragul tău, Ce alta s-ar codi să facă; Pân ce s-or scurge şapte ani, Prin păru-mi piepten n-o să treacă. 39 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry O Sanders, I‘le do for your sake What other ladies would think lack; When seven years is come an gone, I‘le wear nought but dowy black.‘ Voi face, Clerk, de dragul tău. Ce altei nu i-ar fi pe plac: Pân ce vor trece şapte ani Numai în negru-am să mă-mbrac. The bells gaed clinking throw the towne, To carry the dead corps to the clay, An sighing says her May Margret, A wat I bide a doulfou day.‘ Bat, grele, clopotele-n târg, Îl duc pe mort la cimitir; Oftează May, zicând: „Începe Al zilelor cernite șir. In an come her father dear, Stout steping on the floor; ....................................................................................... Se-arată și tăicuţul ei, Pășeşte greu pe scânduri... ................................................... Hold your toung, my doughter dear, Let all your mourning a bee; I‘le carry the dead corps to the clay, An I‘le come back an comfort thee.‘ „Taci, fata mea, taci, draga mea, Durere uită și suspin; Chiar eu am să-l îngrop și-n urmă Am să mă-ntorc ca să te-alin. Comfort well your seven sons, For comforted will I never bee; For it was neither lord nor loune That was in bower last night wi mee.‘ „Alină-ţi pe cei şapte fii, Pe fiica-ţi – n-are niciun rost; Acel ce s-a culcat cu mine, Nici lord, nici cerşetor n-a fost. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 40 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1400?. [popular ballad]. Get Up and Bar the Door. Leviţchi. 44 lines. Author: Text: Get Up and Bar the Door. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Try to work out for yourself the Ballad Metre: its main function, in addition to ar tistry? Easy to learn by heart! Have a try! Get Up and Bar the Door. Te du şi-nchide uşa. It fell about the Martinmas time, And a gay time it was then, When our goodwife got puddings to make, And she‘s boild them in the pan. De Sân Martin, cum este datul, În seara de ajun Cârnaţi pornise gospodina Să fiarbă în ceaun. The wind sae cauld blew south and north, And blew into the floor; Quoth our goodman to our goodwife, Gae out and bar the door.‘ Cum dinspre cele patru zări Bătea un vânt drăcește, Îi zise gospodarul: „Pasă Şi uşa zăvorăşte. My hand is in my hussyfskap, Goodman, as ye may see; An it shoud nae be barrd this hundred year, It‘s no be barrd for me.‘ „Bărbate, mâinile mi-s prinse Cu treaba, doar vezi bine; Şi n-am s-o zăvorăsc în veac Dacă te lași pe mine. They made a paction tween them twa, They made it firm and sure, Sub straşnic jurământ ei dară S-au înţeles ca acel 41 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That the first word whaeer shoud speak, Shoud rise and bar the door. Ce va vorbi dintâi să meargă Şi s-o închidă el. Then by there came two gentlemen, At twelve o clock at night, And they could neither see house nor hall, Nor coal nor candle-light. Prin preajmă, pe la miezul nopţii, Trecură doi drumeţi, Nedeslușind strop de lumină, Umblau ca doi orbeţi. Now whether is this a rich man‘s house, Or whether is it a poor?‘ But neer a word wad ane o them speak, For barring of the door. „Mira-m-aş: e palat de domn? Cocioabă de calic? Dar nu cumva să-nchidă uşa, Cei doi tăceau chitic. And first they ate the white puddings, And then they ate the black; Tho muckle thought the goodwife to hersel, Yet neer a word she spake. Mâncară oaspeţii cârnaţii, Din caltaboşi mâncară; Mocnea femeea-n sine-i, dar Nu scoase vorbuşoară. Then said the one unto the other, Here, man, tak ye my knife; Do ye tak aff the auld man‘s beard, And I‘ll kiss the goodwife.‘ Grăi un domn către cel‘lalt: „Vezi, tu, cu brişca asta Dă-i moşului jos barba – eu Am să-i sărut nevasta. But there‘s nae water in the house, And what shall we do than?‘ What ails ye at the pudding-broo, That boils into the pan?‘ „N-am apă caldă ca s-o răzui – Mă rog, ce fac acum? „Păi, frate, foloseşte zeama Ce fierbe în ceaun. Up then started our goodman, An angry man was he: Sări în sus bărbatul: „Cum? 42 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Will ye kiss my wife before my een, And scad me wi pudding-bree?‘ Then up and started our goodwife, Gied three skips on the floor: Goodman, you‘ve spoken the foremost word, Get up and bar the door.‘ În faţa mea o sărutaţi? Şi vreţi să-mi opăriţi obrazul Cu zeamă de cârnaţi? La aceste, gospodina noastră Se repezi acuşa: „Bărbate, iacă, ai vorbit – Te du și-nchide uşa. Traducere L.Leviţchi. 43 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1400?. [popular ballad]. Gude Wallace. Leviţchi. 84 lines. Author: Text: Gude Wallace. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Try to work out for yourself the Ballad Metre: its main function, in addition to ar tistry? Easy to learn by heart! Have a try! Gude Wallace. Bunul Wallace. Had we a king,‘ said Wallace then, That our kind Scots might live by their own! But betwixt me and the English blood I think there is an ill seed sown.‘ „Cu un rege, spuse Wallace, „scoţii Ar fi stăpâni pe soarta lor! Dar între mine şi englezi E vrăjmăşie şi omor! Wallace him over a river lap, He lookd low down to a linn; He was war of a gay lady Was even at the well washing. Zicând acestea el sări Pârâul – când – la o fântână Zări că-şi spală-ntr-însa faţa O fată mândră ca o zână. Well mot ye fare, fair madam,‘ he said, And ay well mot ye fare and see! Have ye any tidings me to tell, I pray you‘ll show them unto me.‘ „Frumoasă doamnă, zise el, „Dorescu-ţi multă sănătate! De ai cumva ştiri pentru mine, Te rog să mi le spui pe toate. RR‘rri have no tidings you to tell, Nor yet no tidings you to ken; „Eu ştiri pentru domnia ta Nu am; dar, dacă vrei să crezi, 44 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry But into that hostler‘s house There‘s fifteen of your Englishmen. În hanul de la drumul mare Sunt ca la douăzeci englezi. And they are seeking Wallace there, For they‘ve ordained him to be slain:‘ O God forbid!‘ said Wallace then, For he‘s oer good a kind Scotsman. Îl caută pe Wallace – vor Să-i curme viaţa negreşit. „Feri-l-ar Sfântul! spuse Wallace, „Eu ştiu că-i scoţian cinstit. RR‘Brrut had I money me upon, And evn this day, as I have none, Then would I to that hostler‘s house, And evn as fast as I could gang.‘ Dar astăzi chiar, dac-aş avea Asupra mea măcar un ban, Fără să preget o clipită, M-aş repezi până la han. She put her hand in her pocket, She told him twenty shillings oer her knee; Then he took off both hat and hood, And thankd the lady most reverently. Ea scoase douăzeci de şilingi Din buzunarul hainei; el Îşi scoase gluga, se plecă Şi-i mulţumi, grăind astfel: If eer I come this way again, Well paid [your] money it shall be;‘ Then he took off both hat and hood, And he thankd the lady most reverently. „De-am să mai trec pe-aici cumva, N-am să rămân dator – şi iar În faţa-i se plecă adânc Prea mulţumindu-i pentru dar. He leand him twofold oer a staff, So did he threefold oer a tree, And he‘s away to the hostler‘s house, Even as fast as he might dree. Apoi rotindu-şi bâta-n aer, Porni degrabă către han, Oprindu-se din când în când În spatele unui tufan; When he came to the hostler‘s house, He said, Good-ben be here! quoth he: Iar când intră în han, grăi: „Primiţi un oaspe de pripas? 45 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry An English captain, being deep load, He asked him right cankerdly, Şi capul poterei engleze ‘L întâmpină cu vinu-n nas: Where was you born, thou crooked carle, And in what place, and what country? Tis I was born in fair Scotland, A crooked carle although I be.‘ „Ghebosule! de unde vii? Din ce ţinuturi depărtate? „De felul meu sunt scoţian, – Chiar dacă port un gheb în spate. The English captain swore by th‘ rood, We are Scotsmen as well as thee, And we are seeking Wallace; then To have him merry we should be.‘ Englezul se jură pe cruce: „Noi suntem scoţieni, ca tine; Şi dacă l-am găsi pe Wallace, Grozav ne-ar mai părea de bine. The man,‘ said Wallace, ye‘re looking for, I seed him within these days three; And he has slain an English captain, And ay the fearder the rest may be.‘ „Nu-s nici trei zile, spuse Wallace, „De când cu dânsul faţă-am dat; A căsăpit pe un englez Şi-ntreg ţinutu-i spăimântat. I‘d give twenty shillings,‘ said the captain, To such a crooked carle as thee, If you would take me to the place Where that I might proud Wallace see.‘ „Ghebosule, grăi englezul, „Aş ţine mult să ştiu pe unde-i; Ai douăzeci de şilingi dacă Mi-arăţi în ce cotlon se-ascunde. Hold out your hand,‘ said Wallace then, And show your money and be free, For tho you‘d bid an hundred pound, I never bade a better bode‘, said he. „Întinde mâna, spuse Wallace „Să facem rămăşag curat; Chiar dacă scoţi un sac de lire, Eu tot mă ţin c-am câştigat. He struck the captain oer the chafts, Till that he never chewed more; Şi-i trase una peste fălci încât Nu i-au mai fost de vreun folos, 46 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry He stickd the rest about the board, And left them all a sprawling there. Iar pe ceilalţi îi risipi, Fără suflare-n ei, pe jos. Rise up, goodwife,‘ said Wallace then, And give me something for to eat; For it‘s near two days to an end Since I tasted one bit of meat.‘ „Hangiţo, spuse-apoi haiducul, „Ia‘ dă-mi şi mie-un mizilic; Sunt două zile încheiate De când n-am mai mâncat nimic. His board was scarce well covered, Nor yet his dine well scantly dight, Till fifteen other Englishmen Down all about the door did light. Dar nici nu apucă femeea Tacâm s-aducă pentru masă, Că alţi englezi, vreo cincisprezece, Intrară, val-vârtej, în casă. Come out, come out,‘ said they, Wallace!‘ then, For the day is come that ye must die;‘ And they thought so little of his might, But ay the fearder they might be. „Ia‘ te mai dă încoace, Wallace! Sorocul ţi-a venit să mori! Grăiră ei, de-a sa putere, Şi braţ cumplit, neştiutori. The wife ran but, the gudeman ran ben, It put them all into a fever; Then five he sticked where they stood, And five he trampled in the gutter. Hangiţa o zbughi; hangiul Intră, fără să vrea, în danţ; Vreo cinci i-a spintecat pe loc, Pe-alţi cinci i-a azvârlit în şanţ; And five he chased to yon green wood, He hanged them all out-oer a grain; And gainst the morn at twelve o‘clock, He dined with his kind Scottish men. Pe cei ce-au mai rămas, în codru I-a spânzurat de crăci pe toţi, Iar de amiazi s-a ospătat Cu bunii săi tovarăşi scoţi. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 47 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1400?. [popular ballad]. Lady Isabel and the Elf-Knight. Leviţchi. 28 lines. Author: Text: Lady Isabel and the Elf-Knight. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Try to work out for yourself the Ballad Metre: its main function, in addition to ar tistry? Easy to learn by heart! Have a try! Lady Isabel and the Elf-Knight. Isabel și cavalerul năzdrăvan. Fair lady Isabel sits in her bower sewing, Aye as the gowans grow gay There she heard an elf-knight blawing his horn. The first morning in May Frumoasa Isabel șade-n iatac şi coase Şi-n timp ce altiţele prind grai, Aude-un cavaler suflând din corn În prima dimineaţă-a lunii mai. If I had yon horn that I hear blawing, And you elf-knight to sleep in my bosom.‘ This maiden had scarcely these words spoken, Till in at her window the elf-knight has luppen. „Ah!, dac-aş fi pe cornu-acest stăpână! Dac-ar voi stăpânul lui la pieptu-mi să rămână! De-abia rosti aceste vorbe ea Că dânsul pe fereastră şi sărea. It‘s a very strange matter, fair maiden,‘ said he, I canna blaw my horn but ye call on me. But will ye go to yon greenwood side? If ye canna gang, I will cause you to ride.‘ „Frumoasă fată, lucru de minune! Mă chemi şi cornul nu mai vrea să sune. Ce-ar fi să mergem până în zăvoi? De-ţi este greu să mergi, îţi dau un cal de soi. He leapt on a horse, and she on another, And they rode on to the greenwood together. Săltă pe-un roib şi-alăturea de el Îl însoţi, pe-un altul, Isabel. 48 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Light down, light down, lady Isabel,‘ said he, We are come to the place where ye are to die. „Descalecă, frumoasa mea, aci – Acesta-i locul unde vei muri. Hae mercy, hae mercy, kind sir, on me, Till ance my dear father and mother I see.‘ Seven king‘s-daughers here hae I slain, And ye shall be the eight o them.‘ „Vai, vai îngăduie-mi încă pe scumpu-mi tată Şi pe măicuţa să-i mai văd o dată! „Şapte-am ucis aici de regi copile; A opta vei fi tu să mori cu zile. O sit down a while, lay your head on my knee, That we may hae some rest before that I die.‘ She stroakd him sae fast, the nearer he did creep, Wi a sma charm she lulld him fast asleep. „Stai jos şi capu-n poala mea ţi-l pune – Să ne-odihnim pân‘ ce mă vei răpune. Ea păru-i mângâié gingáş şi fără pripă, Dar cu un farmec l-adormi-ntr-o clipă. Wi his ain sword-belt sae fast as she ban him, Wi his ain dag-durk sae sair as she dang him. If seven king‘s-daughters here ye hae slain, Lye ye here, a husband to them a‘.‘ Legându-l strâns cu-a săbiei curea Prin fier îl petrecu de grabă ea. „Ai omorât şapte domniţe, zici? Fii tuturor bărbat și culcă-te aici. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 49 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1400?. [popular ballad]. Robin Hood and the Widow’s Three Sons. Leviţchi. 116 lines. Author: Text: Robin Hood and the Widow‘s Three Sons. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Try to work out for yourself the Ballad Metre: its main function, in addition to ar tistry? Easy to learn by heart! Have a try! Robin Hood and the Widow’s Three Sons. Robin Hood îi scapă pe cei trei feciori ai văduvei. There are twelve months in all the year, As I hear many men say, But the merriest month in all the year Is the merry month of may. În an sunt două – ori şase luni – Aşa se povesteşte – Dar cea mai mândră dintre toate E luna mai, fireşte! Now Robin Hood is to Nottingham gone, With a link a down and a day, And there he met a silly old woman, Was weeping on the way. Spre Nottingham plecând el Robin, Tra la la la la la, O babă ce-ntâlni în cale Plângea şi se văita. What news? what news, thou silly old woman? What news hast thou for me? Said she, There‘s three squires in Nottingham town Today is condemn‘d to die. „Ce veşti ai, babo, spuse Robin, „De grabă mi le-mparte. „Trei oameni colo-n Nottingham Sunt osândiţi la moarte. O what have they done? said bold Robin Hood, I pray thee tell to me. – „Dar ce-au făcut? îi spuse Robin. „Te rog să-mi povesteşti. 50 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry It‘s for slaying of the King‘s fallow deer, Bearing their long bows with thee. – „Arcaşi sunt dintr-ai tăi şi-au tras În cerbi împărăteşti.1 Dost thou not mind, old woman, he said, Since thou made me sup and dine? By the truth of my body, quoth bold Robin Hood, You could tell it in no better time. „Poate că-ţi aminteşti, băbuţo – Cândva m-ai omenit; Nici că puteai să spui acestea La ceas mai potrivit. Now Robin Hood is to Nottingham gone, With a link a down and a day, And there he met with a silly old palmer, Was walking along the highway. La Nottingham plecă, deci, Robin, Tra la la la, bum, bum, Şi c-un călugăr pelerin Se întâlni în drum. What news? What news, thou silly old man? What news, I do thee pray? – Said he, three squires in Nottingham town Are condemned to die this day. – „Ce veşti se mai aud, moşnege? Tra la la la, zdrang, zdrang, „Trei oameni colo-n Nottingham Sunt osândiţi la ştreang. Come change thy apparel with me, old man, Come change thy apparel for mine; Here is forty shillings in good silver, Go drink it in beer or wine. – ..................................................... „Îmbracă-mi hainele şi-a tale Mi le-mprumută mie; Te-aşteaptă patruzeci de-arginţi, Îneacă-i în rachie. .................................................. Now Robin Hood is to Nottingham gone, With a link a down and a down, And there he met with the proud sheriff, La Nottingham se duse Robin, Tra la la la la la, Şi-acolo vajnicul şerif 1 Vânarea căprioarelor şi cerbilor din pădurile regale era pedepsită prin lege. 51 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Was walking along the town. Pe uliţi se plimba. O save, O save, O Sheriff, he said, O save, and you may see! And what will you give to a silly old man Today will your hangman be? „Şerifule, ia, fă-ţi pomană Şi n-o să-ţi pară rău! Ce poţi să-i dai unui moşneag Ca să-l tocmeşti călău? Some suits, some suits, the Sheriff he said, Some suits I‘ll give to thee; Some suits, some suits, and pence thirteen Today‘s a hangman‘s fee. „O jalbă pot să-i împlinesc, O jalbă, una-două; Îi dau şi treisprezece bani – Atât vi-i plata vouă. Then Robin he turns him round about, And jumps from stock to stone; By the truth of my body, the Sheriff he said, That‘s well jumpt, thou nimble old man. O dată se întoarnă Robin Din piatră-n piatră sare... „Moşnege, aflu că eşti sprinten Şi zvelt nevoie mare. I was ne‘er a hangman in all my life, Nor yet intends to trade; But curst be he, said bold Robin, That first a hangman was made! ........................................................... „Călău în viaţa mea n-am fost Nici nu mă fac, să ştii; Şi blestemat să fie omul Ce-a fost călău dintâi. ............................................................ I have a horn in my pocket, I got it from Robin hood, And still when I set it to my mouth, For thee it blows little good. Am de la Robin Hood un corn Şi când dintr-însul sun, Şerifule, nu-ţi prevesteşte, Îţi jur, nimica bun. .............................................. .................................................. 52 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The first loud blast that he did blow, He blew both loud and shrill; A hundred and fifty of Robin Hood‘s men Came riding over the hill. Sună o dată şi îndată, Pe-a dealului poteci, Arcaşi călări se arătară O sută şi cincizeci. The next blast that he did give, He blew both loud and amain; And quickly sixty of Robin Hood‘s men Came shining over the plain. Când, cu putere şi tărie, Sună a doua oară, Şaizeci dintr-ai lui Robin oameni Pe şes se arătară. O who are yon, the Sheriff he said, Come tripping over the lee? They‘re my attendants, brave Robin did say, They‘ll pay a visit to thee. „Ce oameni, întreba şeriful, „Aleargă pe câmpie? „Sunt slujitorii mei – socot Că-ţi vin în ospeţie. They took the gallows from the slack, They set it in the glen, They hang‘d the proud Sheriff on that, And releas‘d their own three men. Au scos din deal spânzurătoarea, Au dus-o-n câmp de zor, Au atârnat în furci şeriful Şi-au slobozit pe-ai lor. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 53 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1400?. [popular ballad]. Sweet William’s Ghost. Leviţchi. 64 lines. Author: Text: Sweet William‘s Ghost. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Try to work out for yourself the Ballad Metre: its main function, in addition to ar tistry? Easy to learn by heart! Have a try! Sweet William’s Ghost. Duhul neasemuitului William. There came a ghost to Margret‘s door, With many a grievous groan, And ay he tirled at the pin, But answer made she none. Gemea un duh fără-ncetare La-al nopţii ceas ascuns Şi-n darn clintea din ivăr – Margret Nu vrea să-i dea răspuns. Is that my father Philip, Or is‘t my brother John? Or is‘t my true-love, Willy, From Scotland new come home?‘ „Eşti oare Philip, tatăl meu? John, tu eşti, frăţioare? Sau Willy, dragul meu, întors Din Scoţia, peste mare? T is not thy father Philip, Nor yet thy brother John; But tis thy true-love, Willy, From Scotland new come home. „Nu sunt nici Philip, tatăl tău, Nici Johnnie, al tău frate; Sunt Willie, dragul tău, întors Din Scoţia, de departe. O sweet Margret, o dear Margret, I pray thee speak to me; O, scumpă Margret, dulce Margret, Spune-mi, te rog fierbinte: 54 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Give me my faith and troth, Margret, As I gave it to thee.‘ Credinţă vrei să-mi juri, cum eu Ţi-am fost jurat nainte? Thy faith and troth thou‘s never get, Nor yet will I thee lend, Till that thou come within my bower, And kiss my cheek and chin.‘ „Credinţă n-am să-ţi jur nicicând Şi-ntr-una am să tac Cât nu m-oi săruta pe-obraz În ăst al meu iatac. If I shoud come within thy bower, I am no earthly man; And shoud I kiss thy rosy lips, Thy days will not be lang. „Eu nu sunt pământean şi, iată, De-ar fi să viu la tine Şi-a gurii fragă să-ţi ating, Zile-ai avea puţine. O sweet Margret, o dear Margret, I pray thee speak to me; Give me my faith and troth, Margret, As I gave it to thee.‘ O, scumpă Margret, dulce Margret, Spune-mi, te rog fierbinte: Credinţă vrei să-mi juri, cum eu Ţi-am fost jurat nainte? Thy faith and troth thou‘s never get, Nor yet will I thee lend, Till you take me to yon kirk, And wed me with a ring.‘ „Credinţă, Willie, nicidecum Nu am să-ţi jur eu ţie, Cât în biserică nu-mi pui Inel de cununie. My bones are buried in yon kirk-yard, Afar beyond the sea, And it is but my spirit, Margret, That s now speaking to thee.‘ „Cel ce-ţi vorbeşte-i duhul meu; Pe-un ţărm îndepărtat În groapa unui cimitir, Mi-e trupul îngropat. She stretchd out her lilly-white hand, And, for to do her best, Ea mâna albă ca de crin I-o-ntinde feciorească. 55 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Hae, there s your faith and troth, Willy, God send your soul good rest.‘ „A ta sunt pe vecie, Willie, Şi Domnul te-odihnească! Now she has kilted her robes of green A piece below her knee, And a‘ the live-lang winter night The dead corp followed she. Se-mbracă iute; sub genunchi Îşi strânge fusta verde, Şi dimpreună cu năluca În noaptea grea se pierde. Is there any room at your head, Willy? Or any room at your feet? Or any room at your side, Willy, Wherein that I may creep?‘ „Ai lângă creştet un locşor Un loc lângă picioare? Alături? ca şi draga ta Cumva să se strecoare? There‘s no room at my head, Margret, There‘s no room at my feet; There‘s no room at my side, Margret, My coffin‘s made so meet.‘ „N-am un locşor nici lângă creştet, Nici la picioare, nici Alături, Margret, draga mea, E tare strâmt aici. Then up and crew the red, red cock, And up then crew the gray: Tis time, tis time, my dear Margret, That you were going away.‘ Deodat‘ cântă cocoşul roşu, Cocoşul sur – şi el. „Târziu, târziu e, dragă Margret, Nu zăbovi de fel. No more the ghost to Margret said, But, with a grievous groan, Evanishd in a cloud of mist, And left her all alone. Atâta-i spuse duhul fetei Şi cu-un oftat de jale, Se spulberă-ntr-un nor de ceaţă Lăsând-o-ntr-ale sale O stay, my only true-love, stay,‘ The constant Margret cry‘d; „Stai, dragul meu, strigă ea, stai! Şi se albi la faţă 56 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Wan grew her cheeks, she closd her een, Stretchd her soft limbs, and dy‘d. Şi trupu-i se chirci şi ochii-i Luciră fără viaţă. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 57 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1508. William DUNBAR. Lament for the Makaris. Tartler. 60 lines. Author: William DUNBAR (1460-1520). Text: Lament for the Makaris. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: The Percy Glossary in the Appendix here (q.v.) will be of very great help in collat ing this text. Can you manage that? Lament for the Makaris / Lament for the Makers. Lamento pentru creatori. I that in heill wes and gladnes, Am trublit now with gret seiknes, And feblit with infermite; Timor mortis conturbat me. Eu care-am fostu sănătos, De beteşuguri azi sunt ros, Pierit, slăbit din ce în ce: Timor mortis conturbat me. Our plesance heir is all vane glory, This fals warld is bot transitory, The flesche is brukle, the Fend is sle; Timor mortis conturbat me. Ne-aflăm aici în vane glorii, În strâmbe lumi şi tranzitorii, Se sfarmă carnea, dúşman e: Timor mortis conturbat me. The stait of man dois change and vary, Now sound, now seik, now blith, now sary, Now dansand mery, now like to dee; Timor mortis conturbat me. Se schimbă-al omului destin, Ba-i zdravăn, ba-n nevolnic chin , Ba-n danţ şi ba sub secere, Timor mortis conturbat me. No stait in erd heir standis sickir; Nu-i pe pământ sigură stare, 58 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry As with the wynd wavis the wickir, Wavis this warldis vanite. Timor mortis conturbat me. Ca salca-n vânt legănătoare, A lumii fală pleacă-se: Timor mortis conturbat me. On to the ded gois all estatis, Princis, prelotis, and potestatis, Baith riche and pur of al degre; Timor mortis conturbat me. În lume pier împărăţii, Prinţi, potentaţi şi preoţi, şi Bogaţi, sărmani, oricine, – orice… Timor mortis conturbat me. He takis the knychtis in to feild, Anarmit under helme and scheild; Victour he is at all mellie; Timor mortis conturbat me. Pe cavaleri îi vezi ţărână Cu scut şi coiful într-o mână Victoriei jertfelnice: Timor mortis conturbat me. That strang unmercifull tyrand Takis, on the moderis breist sowkand, The bab full of benignite; Timor mortis conturbat me. Acest tiran ce-i crud, nedrept, Îi smulge maicii de la piept Nevinovatul prunc, de ce... Timor mortis conturbat me. He takis the campion in the stour, The capitane closit in the tour, The lady in bour full of bewte; Timor mortis conturbat me. Îl ia pe-n jocuri campion, Pe căpitan ce-n turn dă zvon, Pe doamnele fiorelnice… Timor mortis conturbat me. He sparis no lord for his piscence, Na clerk for his intelligence; His awfull strak may no man fle; Timor mortis conturbat me. Nu cruţă lordul cel gătit, Slujbaş mintos şi pregătit, Loveşte cu poprelişte, Timor mortis conturbat me. Art-magicianis, and astrologgis, Artişti şi vraci şi astrologi, 59 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Rethoris, logicianis, and theologgis, Thame helpis no conclusionis sle; Timor mortis conturbat me. Sofişti şi retori, teologi, Cu toţi conchid ce zice-se: Timor mortis conturbat me. In medicyne the most practicianis, Lechis, surrigianis, and phisicianis, Thame self fra ded may not supple; Timor mortis conturbat me. În medicină cei astuţi, Chirurgi şi doctori pricepuţi Nu pot decât să fugă de… Timor mortis conturbat me. I se that makaris amang the laif Playis heir ther pageant, syne gois to graif; Sparit is nocht ther faculte; Timor mortis conturbat me. Nu văd că scapă creatori, Şi mari poeţi aşişderi mor, Iertat nu-i har de pacoste, Timor mortis conturbat me. He hes done petuously devour, The noble Chaucer, of makaris flour, The Monk of Bery, and Gower, all thre; Timor mortis conturbat me. I-a devorat fără cruţare Pe Chaucer, poeziei floare, Bery şi Gower, trei, toţi tre, Timor mortis conturbat me. Sen he hes all my brether tane (…), He will nocht lat me lif alane, On forse I man his nyxt pray be; Timor mortis conturbat me. Şi-atâţia alţi poeţi şi fraţi (…) 2 Nici eu n-oi fi printre scăpaţi , Să cad drept pradă rândul mi-e... Timor mortis conturbat me. 2 În afară de Chaucer, călugărul de Bery (John Lydgate of Bury 1370 – 1451) şi poetul John Gower (13 30 – 1408), sunt citaţi, în strofe de sine stătătoare, următorii autori medievali: Sir Hugh of Eglinton, poet şi conte scoţian (sec. XIV), Andrew of Wyntoun (1350 – 1423) , Heryot, James Afflek, Johne Clerk (poeţi neidentificaţi), Richard Holland (sec. XV), John Barbour (1320 – 1395), Sir Mungo Lokart of the Le (m. 1489), Clerk of Tran ent, Gilbert Hay (1403, ultima oară menţionat în 1456), menestrelul Blind Harry (1440–1492), poeţii Sandy Traill, Patrik Johnestoun, Merseir, Roull of Aberdene, Roull of Corstorphin (neidentificaţi), maestrul Robert Henryson (1460– 1500), Schir Johne the Ros, Stobo (preotul John Reid), satiricul Quintyne Schaw, poetul Walter Ken nedy (ca. 1455 – 1518?). 60 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sen for the deid remeid is none, Best is that we for dede dispone, Eftir our deid that lif may we; Timor mortis conturbat me. Şi dacă nu-i, şi dacă nu-i Un mijloc moartea s-o supui, Măcar apoi scăpa-vom de Timor mortis conturbat me. Traducere G. Tartler. 61 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1595. SHAKESPEARE. Romeo and Juliet. 3, 5. Blaga # Iosif. 36 lines. Author: William SHAKESPEARE (1564-1616). Text: Romeo and Juliet. 3, 5. Translator: L. Blaga # St. O Iosif. FrageStellung: Why is it that Juliet becomes IULIA in Romanian? Expand on it. (20 words). Any othe r comments? Enter ROMEO and JULIET aloft. În zorii zilei. JULIET Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near day: It was the nightingale, and not the lark, That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear; Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate-tree: Believe me, love, it was the nightingale. IULIA Cum? Vrei să pleci? Departe-i încă ziua. Privighetoare-a fost, nu ciocârlia, ce ţi-a străpuns urechea speriată. Ea cântă noaptea-acolo printre rodii. Iubitul meu, privighetoare-a fost. ROMEO It was the lark, the herald of the morn, No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east. Night‘s candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops. I must be gone and live, or stay and die. ROMEO E ciocârlia, vestea dimineţii. Nu, nu-i privighetoarea, draga mea, un roşu tiv au norii-n răsărit. Noaptea şi-a ars feştilele cu totul. De plec, voi mai trăi; mor, dacă-ntârziu. JULIET Yon light is not daylight, I know it, I: IULIA Lumina-aceasta nu-i lumina zilei. 62 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry It is some meteor that the sun exhal‘d, To be to thee this night a torch-bearer, And light thee on thy way to Mantua. Therefore stay yet; thou need‘st not to be gone. Dar soarele un făt asemenea luminii a născut, făclie-n noapte să-ţi lumineze-n drum spre Mantova. Rămâi, n-ai nicio grabă ca să pleci. ROMEO Let me be ta‘en, let me be put to death; I am content, so thou wilt have it so. I‘ll say yon grey is not the morning‘s eye, ‘Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia‘s brow; Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat The vaulty heaven so high above our heads. I have more care to stay than will to go: Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so. How is‘t, my soul? let‘s talk; it is not day. ROMEO Atunci jertfa gonacilor să fiu! Sunt mulţumit că vrei să fie-aşa. Nu-i ochiul dimineţii, numai un reflex ca de pe fruntea Cynthiei. Ce bolta cerului a nimerit nu este-al ciocârliei cântec, nu. Plăcerea-i rămânerea, chin plecarea. Binevenită, dacă Iulia te vrea, fii moarte! Inimă, ce este? Încă-i ziuă! Să mai povestim! JULIET It is, it is: hie hence, be gone, away! It is the lark that sings so out of tune, Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps. Some say the lark makes sweet division; This doth not so, for she divideth us. Some say the lark and loathed toad change eyes, O, now I would they had changed voices too! Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray, Hunting thee hence with hunt‘s-up to the day. O, now be gone; more light and light it grows. IULIA E zi! E zi! Ridică-te şi pleacă! E ciocârlia – pasărea ce cântă. Şi-i răguşită. A potrivnicie ea îşi întinde glasul. Da, se spune că ar cânta prea-dulce ciocârlia, nu asta însă care ne desparte. Se spune despre ciocârlii că şi-ar schimba cu broaştele din baltă ochii. De şi-ar schimba şi glasul, căci acesta din braţe unul altuia ne smulge, şi te goneşte ca-ntr-o vânătoare. Lumină e, tot mai lumină! Pleacă! 63 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ROMEO More light and light; more dark and dark our woes! ROMEO Lumină e? Tot mai întunecoasă-i durerea noastră, mai întunecoasă Traducere L. Blaga. 64 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Enter ROMEO and JULIET aloft. Scena a V-a. Iatacul Julietei. Romeo şi Julieta la fereastră. JULIET Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near day: It was the nightingale, and not the lark, That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear; Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate-tree: Believe me, love, it was the nightingale. JULIETA Vrei să şi pleci? Departe-i ziua încă! Privighetoarea fu, nu ciocârlia Ce-ţi săgeta auzul sperios. Ea cântă noaptea colea, între rodii... O, crede-mă, iubitul meu, a fost Privighetoarea... ROMEO It was the lark, the herald of the morn, No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east. Night‘s candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops. I must be gone and live, or stay and die. ROMEO Ciocârlia fu... Ea, care-i solul dimineţii, nu Privighetoarea... Vezi, iubita mea, Lumina cea pizmaşă ce tiveşte Şi norii îi desparte-n răsărit. Şi-a mistuit opaiţele noaptea, Pe culmile ce fumegă răsare Voioasa zi... Atârnă de plecare Viaţa mea. Întârzierea-i moarte! JULIET Yon light is not daylight, I know it, I: It is some meteor that the sun exhal‘d, To be to thee this night a torch-bearer, And light thee on thy way to Mantua. Therefore stay yet; thou need‘st not to be gone. JULIETA O, nu-i lumina zilei, nu-i, iubite, E-un meteor ce soarele-l trimite Ca purtător de torţă-n noaptea-aceasta, Să-ţi lumineze-n drum spre Mantaua!.. Rămâi dar: nu-i nevoie să pleci încă... 65 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ROMEO Let me be ta‘en, let me be put to death; I am content, so thou wilt have it so. I‘ll say yon grey is not the morning‘s eye, ‘Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia‘s brow; Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat The vaulty heaven so high above our heads. I have more care to stay than will to go: Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so. How is‘t, my soul? let‘s talk; it is not day. ROMEO Da, lasă-i să mă prindă şi să mor! Mor împăcat, fiindcă tu mi-o ceri! Nu-i ochiul dimineţii-n zarea sură, E-un pal reflex al frumuseţii Cynthiei; Nu-i ciocârlia ale cărei triluri Departe peste capetele noastre Fac să răsune bolţile albastre! Plecarea-i cea mai groaznică durere, Zăbava-i fericire... Vino, moarte, O, vino, dacă Julieta cere... Iubito, nu-i aşa? Hai să vorbim, Să povestim, – că ziua e departe. JULIET It is, it is: hie hence, be gone, away! It is the lark that sings so out of tune, Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps. Some say the lark makes sweet division; This doth not so, for she divideth us. Some say the lark and loathed toad change eyes, O, now I would they had changed voices too! Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray, Hunting thee hence with hunt‘s-up to the day. O, now be gone; more light and light it grows. JULIETA E zi, e zi! Fugi! Du-te. Pleacă-n pripă E glasul ciocârliei care ţipă Aşa strident în note ascuţite... Spuneai că-n glasul ei e armonie?.. Dar nu-i, deoarece el ne dezbină... Şi se mai spune despre ciocârlie Că ea cu hâda broască-şi schimbă ochii ? De ce nu ar schimba mai bine glasul! Că ea te smulge, vai, de lângă mine... Şi chiotele ei, când ziua vine, Te-alungă ca un corn de vânătoare... O, du-te!... S-a făcut lumină mare, Tot mai lumină... 66 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ROMEO More light and light; more dark and dark our woes! ROMEO Cum? Tot mai lumină! Tot mai pustiu şi tot mai întuneric!... Traducere Şt. O. Iosif. 67 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1596. Edmund SPENSER. The Fairie Queene. I. I. Lines 1-36. Duţescu. 36 lines. Author: Edmund SPENSER (1552-1599). Text: The Fairie Queene. Lines 1-36. Translator: D. Duţescu. FrageStellung: Do not forget The Percy Glossary: without it you‘ll be unable to collate. And COLLA TING is all-important in publishing! The Faerie Queene. First Booke. Canto I. Crăiasa zânelor. Cartea întâia. Cântul I. 1. A gentle Knight was pricking on the plaine, Ycladd in mightie armes and silver shielde, Wherein old dints of deepe woundes did remaine, The cruell markes of many' a bloody fielde; Yet armes till that time did he never wield. His angry steede did chide his foming bitt, As much disdayning to the curbe to yield: Full jolly knight he seemed, and faire did sitt, As one for knightly giusts and fierce encounters fitt. Un mândru Făt da pinteni peste plai, Înveştmântat în fier, cu scut de-arghir Pe care zimţi de răni adânci vedeai Tot semn de-ncrâncenate-mpotriviri; Fier nu purtase încă în turnir; Sirep fugaci, muşca zăbala grea Ne-nduplecat să rabde frâul-zbir; Frumosul Făt, ce falnic se ţinea Ca unul vrednic de-ncleştări, înfiorate prea. 2. And on his brest a bloodie Crosse he bore, The deare remembrance of his dying Lord, For whose sweete sake that glorious badge he wore, And dead, as living, ever him ador'd: Purta pe pieptu-i cruce sângerie, Drag suvenir murindului Domn sfânt, Şi-n dragul Lui purta el crucea vie. Drag sus în cer, precum şi pe pământ. 68 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Upon his shield the like was also scor'd, For soveraine hope which in his helpe he had. Right faithfull true he was in deede and word, But of his cheere did seeme too solemne sad; Yet nothing did he dread, but ever was ydrad. Pe scut acelaşi semn şi-a fost săpând, Nădejde-naltă-n naltul ajutor; Cinstit era în faptă şi-n cuvânt, Dar chipu-i prea înnegurat de-un nor; El cel mereu temut, ci nicicând temător. 3 Upon a great adventure he was bond, That greatest Gloriana to him gave, (That greatest Glorious Queene of Faery lond) To winne him worshippe, and her grace to have, Which of all earthly thinges he most did crave: And ever as he rode his hart did earne To prove his puissance in battell brave Upon his foe, and his new force to learne, Upon his foe, a Dragon horrible and stearne. Cu mare faptă se ştia dator Domniţei Gloriana cea crăiasă, Regina-n glorii-a Ţării Zânelor Lui slavă, şi-al ei har să-şi dobândească, Cea mai râvnită-avere pământească; Şi tot gonind, gonind, simţea ardoare Mult să străluce-n luptă voinicească Frângând vrăjmaş, ca braţul să-şi măsoare, Frângând vrăjmaş, Balaur, fiară-ngrozitoare. Traducere D. Duţescu. 69 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1600. SHAKESPEARE. As You Like It. 2.7. Ieronim. 28 lines. Author: William Shakespeare (1564-1616). Text: As You Like It. 2.7. Translator: I. Ieronim. FrageStellung: How do you pronounce JAQUES in English? Please write it in IPA phonetic transcripti on. What is I.P.A.? Expand on it! As You Like It. 2. 7. Cum vă place. 2. 7. JAQUES JAQUES All the world‘s a stage, And all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse‘s arms. And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress‘ eyebrow. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon‘s mouth. And then the justice, Lumea întreagă e o scenă, Toţi bărbaţii şi femeile doar nişte actori: Au intrările şi ieşirile lor; Iar un singur om joacă multe roluri în viaţă, Actele lui fiind cele şapte vârste. Copil mai întâi, Scânceşte şi varsă în braţele doicii. Apoi şcolar plângându-se, cu ghiozdanul lui Şi faţa proaspătă dimineaţa, târându-se ca melcul Fără nici un chef la şcoală. Apoi îndrăgostitul, Oftând ca foalele nişte balade pline de suspin Pentru chipul iubitei. Soldat după aceea, Cu înjurături nemaipomenite, bărbos ca leopardul, Plin de ambiţie pentru gloria lui, iute, Deodată se-ncaieră, cătând balonul faimei Chiar şi în gură de tun. Pe urmă judecător, 70 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper‘d pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything. Cu burta rotundă, căptuşită de claponi din cei buni Cu ochii severi şi barba tunsă domneşte, Plin de zicale înţelepte şi pilde moderne; Astfel îşi joacă rolul. Cea de-a şasea vârstă se schimbă În nişte nădragi slăbănogi şi papuci, Ochelarii pe nas şi chimirul într-o parte, Pantalonii din tinereţe, păstraţi, sunt largi cât hăul Pe coapsele micşorate; vocea puternică, bărbătească, I s-a-ntors la glasul piţigăiat de copil, ţiuie Şi fluieră în auz. Ultima scenă din toate, Care încheie ciudata istorie plină de evenimente Este a doua copilărie şi totala uitare, Fără dinţi, fără ochi, fără gust, fără nimic. Traducere I. Ieronim. 71 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1604. SHAKESPEARE. Measure for Measure. 3. 1. Ieronim. 39 lines. Author: William Shakespeare (1564-1616). Text: Measure for Measure. 3. 1. Translator: I. Ieronim. FrageStellung: Do you know this play? If not, why not? How long would it take to have it at your f inger tips? It is far easier than Hamlet! Measure for Measure. 3.1. Măsură pentru măsură. 3. 1. DUKE VINCENTIO DUCELE Be absolute for death; either death or life Shall thereby be the sweeter. Reason thus with life: If I do lose thee, I do lose a thing That none but fools would keep: a breath thou art, Servile to all the skyey influences, That dost this habitation, where thou keep‘st, Hourly afflict: merely, thou art death‘s fool; For him thou labour‘st by thy flight to shun And yet runn‘st toward him still. Thou art not noble; For all the accommodations that thou bear‘st Are nursed by baseness. Thou‘rt by no means valiant; For thou dost fear the soft and tender fork Of a poor worm. Thy best of rest is sleep, And that thou oft provokest; yet grossly fear‘st Thy death, which is no more. Thou art not thyself; De moarte fii sigur; aşa îţi vor fi mai dulci Şi viaţa şi moartea. Tu spune vieţii: Dacă te pierd, eu pierd un lucru pe care Doar nebunii şi l-ar dori: o respirare eşti, Supus puterilor stelare pe care le-nduri În orice loc al hălăduirii tale Oră de oră: eşti măscăriciul morţii; Îţi dai şi sufletul fugind de moarte Dar mereu către ea alergi. Nobil nu eşti, Când bunurile vieţii tale în lume Se hrănesc din josnicie. Nu eşti viteaz, Când ţi-e frică de furca moale, fragedă A unui biet vierme. Somnul e odihnitor, Şi-l cauţi de-atâtea ori; dar te sperie Moartea care este acelaşi lucru. 72 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry For thou exist‘st on many a thousand grains That issue out of dust. Happy thou art not; For what thou hast not, still thou strivest to get, And what thou hast, forget‘st. Thou art not certain; For thy complexion shifts to strange effects, After the moon. If thou art rich, thou‘rt poor; For, like an ass whose back with ingots bows, Thou bear‘s thy heavy riches but a journey, And death unloads thee. Friend hast thou none; For thine own bowels, which do call thee sire, The mere effusion of thy proper loins, Do curse the gout, serpigo, and the rheum, For ending thee no sooner. Thou hast nor youth nor age, But, as it were, an after-dinner‘s sleep, Dreaming on both; for all thy blessed youth Becomes as aged, and doth beg the alms Of palsied eld; and when thou art old and rich, Thou hast neither heat, affection, limb, nor beauty, To make thy riches pleasant. What‘s yet in this That bears the name of life? Yet in this life Lie hid moe thousand deaths: yet death we fear, That makes these odds all even. Nu eşti tu însuţi; mii de boabe ale ţărânii Te-au alcătuit. Fericit nu eşti; tânjind După ceea ce nu ai, tu mereu dai uitării Cele ce ai. Statornic nu eşti; Starea ta se schimbă curios după lună, Când eşti bogat de fapt eşti sărac; Ca un măgar cocoşat sub lingouri Duci bogăţia cea grea un singur drum Şi te descarcă moartea. Nu ai apropiaţi; Progeniturile care te recunosc, Cele ieşite din vintrele tale, Blestemă guta, scărpinarea pielii şi ruptoarea Că nu mai mori o dată. Nu ai tinereţe, Nici bătrâneţe, ci un fel de somn al după-amiezii Când visezi la amândouă; sfânta tinereţe Tu o-mbătrâneşti tânjind la darurile Bătrânilor ţepeni; o dată ajuns bătrân şi bogat Unde-ţi sunt patima, căldura, muşchii, frumuseţea, Unde-i plăcerea bogăţiei. Viaţa ce mai este Pentru tine? De mii de ori moartea se-ascunde În viaţă: şi totuşi de moarte ne este frică, Ea care toate relele nivelează. Traducere I. Ieronim. 73 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1609a. SHAKESPEARE. Sonnet 97. Pillat. 14 lines. Author: William Shakespeare (1564-1616). Text: Sonnet 97. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: Shakespeare was a great one for Sonnets. Do not dismiss them easily... Some are wor th learning by heart: look at Sonnet 66. The number of translations is more than imposing... Why have so many bothered to translate it? Compare S 97 with S 66. Where do you get? Sonnet 97. Sonetul 97. How like a winter hath my absence been From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year! What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen! What old December‘s bareness everywhere! And yet this time removed was summer‘s time; The teeming autumn, big with rich increase, Bearing the wanton burden of the prime, Like widow‘d wombs after their lords‘ decease: Yet this abundant issue seemed to me But hope of orphans, and unfathered fruit; For summer and his pleasures wait on thee, And, thou away, the very birds are mute: Or, if they sing, tis with so dull a cheer, That leaves look pale, dreading the winter‘s near. La fel ca iarna mi-a fost lipsa ta, O, tu plăcerea omului ce piere! Ce îngheţat eram, cum vremuia! Ce ger pustiu pe toate sta-n putere! Şi totuşi adia văratic soare Şi toamna ne sporea bogată-n tort. Purtând o caldă binecuvântare Ca trup de văduvă când soţu-i mort – Dar tot belşugul îmi părea nedreaptă Nădejde fără floare, rod sărac. Când bucuria verii te aşteaptă Şi tu ai plecat, chiar păsările tac. Ori de mai cântă, e cu-atâta jale Că frunzele pălesc pe-a iernii cale. Traducere I. Pillat. 74 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1609b. SHAKESPEARE. Sonnet 66. Pruteanu # Frunzetti # Tomozei # Grigorescu # Rezuş # Pintilie. 14 lines. Author: William Shakespeare (1564-1616). Text: Sonnet 66. Translator: G. Pruteanu # I. Frunzetti # Gh. Tomozei # D. Grigorescu # P. Rezuş # N. Pintilie. FrageStellung: This sounds so much like (Nobel 2009) Herta Müller hitting hard the Romanian half-c entury-long Communist Establishment! Was Shakespeare the Poet a born dissident? Were all these translators inveterate and vituperating dissidents too? Or was Shakespeare above Censorship? This is no joke. And has Post-Communism much changed the picture? Or am I all wrong as king all these silly questions? Sonnet 66. Sonetul 66. Tir‘d with all these, for restful death I cry: As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm‘d in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forworn, Lehămetit de tot, aş vrea să mor: Să nu mai văd netrebnici îmbuibaţi, Pe cei cinstiţi, în cerşetori schimbaţi, Credinţa, marfă ieftină-n obor, And gilded honour shamefully misplac‘d, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgrac‘d, And strength by limping sway disabled, Fecioara pură – scoasă la mezat, Onoarea – aur fals, înşelător, Cel drept, de forţa strâmbă-nfrânt uşor Desăvârşirea luată drept păcat, And folly (doctor-like) controlling skill, And simple truth miscall‘d simplicity, And captive good attending captain ill. Frumosul – zugrumat de-un zbir mârşav, Cuminţii – bănuiţi de nebunie, Curatul adevăr – numit prostie, 75 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And art made tongue-tied by authority, Şi Binele – dat Răului ca sclav… Tir‘d with all these, from these would I be gone Save that, to die, I leave my love alone. De toate scap, de fac ultimul pas, Dar, dacă mor – iubirea-mi cui o las? Traducere G. Pruteanu. 76 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sonnet 66. Sonetul 66. Tir‘d with all these, for restful death I cry: As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm‘d in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forworn, Scârbit de toate, tihna morţii chem; Sătul să-l văd cerşind pe omul pur, Nemernicia-n purpuri şi-n huzur, Credinţa – marfă, legea sub blestem. And gilded honour shamefully misplac‘d, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgrac‘d, And strength by limping sway disabled, Onoarea – aur calp, falsificat, Virtutea fecioriei târguită, Desăvârşirea jalnic umilită, Cel drept, de forţa şchioapă dezarmat, And folly (doctor-like) controlling skill, And simple truth miscall‘d simplicity, And captive good attending captain ill. And art made tongue-tied by authority, Şi arta sub căluşe amuţind; Să văd prostia – dascăl la cuminţi Şi adevărul – semn al „slabei minţi, Şi Binele slujind ca rob la rele... Tir‘d with all these, from these would I be gone Save that, to die, I leave my love alone. Scârbit de tot, de toate mă desprind, Doar că, murind, fac rău iubirii mele. Traducere I. Frunzetti. 77 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sonnet 66. Sonetul 66. Tir‘d with all these, for restful death I cry: As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm‘d in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forworn, Scârbit de tot, izbava morţii chem, cel drept cerşeşte, laşul îşi arogă, nevolnic, a magnificenţii togă şi gândul pur se stinge sub blestem. And gilded honour shamefully misplac‘d, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgrac‘d, And strength by limping sway disabled, Cinstirea-i împărţită grosolan, e pângărită casta feciorie, perfecţiunea-i frântă de urgie şi-ngenuncheat, orice sublim elan. And folly (doctor-like) controlling skill, And simple truth miscall‘d simplicity, And captive good attending captain ill. And art made tongue-tied by authority, A artei gură trândavu-o astupă, nerodul, iscusinţii-i porunceşte şi adevărul singur se smereşte robit mişelului ce stă să-l rupă. Tir‘d with all these, from these would I be gone Save that, to die, I leave my love alone. Scârbit de tot, m-aş stinge fără glas, dar dragostea, murind, cui să o las? Traducere Gh. Tomozei. 78 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sonnet 66. Sonetul 66. Tir‘d with all these, for restful death I cry: As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm‘d in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forworn, Sătul de toate, caut tihna morţii, Să nu mai văd slăvit pe cel nemernic, Şi pe sărac cerşind în faţa porţii, Şi pe cel rău hulind pe cel cucernic, And gilded honour shamefully misplac‘d, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgrac‘d, And strength by limping sway disabled, Şi pe cinstit de cinste având teamă Şi fecioria pradă umilinţei, Şi împlinirea neluată-n seamă, Şi forţa la cheremul neputinţei, And folly (doctor-like) controlling skill, And simple truth miscall‘d simplicity, And captive good attending captain ill. And art made tongue-tied by authority, Şi artele de pumn încăluşate, Şi doctor raţiunii, nebunia, Şi adevărul simplu, simplitate, Şi binele slujind neomenia! Tir‘d with all these, from these would I be gone Save that, to die, I leave my love alone. Sătul de toate, toate le-aş lăsa, Dar dacă mor cui las iubirea mea? Traducere D. Grigorescu şi N.Chirică. 79 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sonnet 66. Sonetul 66. Tir‘d with all these, for restful death I cry: As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm‘d in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forworn, De toate dezgustat, strig după moarte, când văd cerşind pe omul drept şi pur, pe sec şi ticălos ajuns departe, credinţa dalbă stinsă de sperjur, And gilded honour shamefully misplac‘d, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgrac‘d, And strength by limping sway disabled, onoarea scumpă – lucru de ocară şi fecioria – marfă de vândut, desăvârşirea stând umil la scară, puterea oarbă zăngănind din scut, And folly (doctor-like) controlling skill, And simple truth miscall‘d simplicity, And captive good attending captain ill. And art made tongue-tied by authority, iar arta la sătui netrebnici roabă ştiinţa – ucenică a prostiei, spunând minuni pe cel cu mintea slabă şi binele slujindu-i mişeliei. Tir‘d with all these, from these would I be gone Save that, to die, I leave my love alone. Scârbit de toate, ca să mor aş vrea, dar, mort, ar ispăşi iubirea mea. Traducere P. Rezuş 80 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sonnet 66. Sonetul 66. Tir‘d with all these, for restful death I cry: As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm‘d in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forworn, Sătul de tot spre-a morţii tihnă ţip – Să nu-l mai văd pe vrednic cerşetor, Pe mărginit gătit în falnic chip, Credinţa dată relei sorţi de zor And gilded honour shamefully misplac‘d, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgrac‘d, And strength by limping sway disabled, Şi cinstea-mpodobită ruşinos Şi fecioria pângărită-oricând Şi chiar desăvârşirea dată jos Şi dreptul sub puterea şchioapă stând And folly (doctor-like) controlling skill, And simple truth miscall‘d simplicity, And captive good attending captain ill. And art made tongue-tied by authority, Şi graiul artei sub căluş închis Şi nebunia doctor pe dibaci Şi adevărul nerozie zis Şi bunul pe cel rău având cârmaci. Tir‘d with all these, from these would I be gone Save that, to die, I leave my love alone. Sătul de tot, să scap de tot aş vrea, Ci, mort, stingheră-mi las iubirea mea. Traducere N. Pintilie. 81 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1609c. SHAKESPEARE. Sonnet 18. Tartler. 14 lines. Author: William Shakespeare (1564-1616). Text: Sonnet 18. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: Quite different in tone this Sonnet, if compared with S 66! And as famous, for this is the one everybody knows by heart. How about you learning it too? ### Would you agree with the translation of the last two lines? What is the meaning of this? Sonnet 18. Sonetul 18. Shall I compare thee to a summer‘s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer‘s lease hath all too short a date. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm‘d; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature‘s changing course untrimm‘d; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow‘st; Nor shall Death brag thou wander‘st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow‘st: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. Să te asemăn cu o zi de vară? Frumseţe şi balanţă ai mai mult. În mai, ades furtuni muguri doboară, Iar verile-s prea scurte, şi-n tumult. De multe ori cerescul ochi prea arde, Sau ceţuri auriul chip l-au şters, Şi ce-i frumos din frumuseţe scade Întâmplător, sau de-al naturii mers. Dar veşnica ta vară nu se duce, Minunea chipului tu n-o să-ţi schimbi, Nu te umbreşte moartea-ntre năluce Când în eterne versuri creşti în timp. Cât mai respiră-n lume om, cât ochiu-nvaţă, Trăi-va şi acest poem şi-ţi va da viaţă. Traducere G. Tartler. 82 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1611. SHAKESPEARE. The Tempest. 4.1. Ieronim. 18 lines. Author: William Shakespeare (1564-1616). Text: The Tempest. 4. 1. Translator: I. Ieronim. FrageStellung: Can this play, as a whole, be interpreted as a PARABLE ? (Bearing in mind that PARA BLE is a rhetorical device...) The Tempest. 4. 1. Furtuna. 4. 1. PROSPERO PROSPERO You do look, my son, in a moved sort, As if you were dismay‘d: be cheerful, sir. Our revels now are ended. These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp‘d towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Ye all which it inherit, shall dissolve And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep. Sir, I am vex‘d; Bear with my weakness; my, brain is troubled: Se vede că eşti impresionat, fiule, Te-ai întristat: înseninează-te. Petrecerea s-a sfârşit. Actorii noştri, Cum ţi-am spus, au fost doar nişte spirite, S-au topit în aer, în aerul subţire: Asemenea ţeserii imateriale a unei iluzii, Turlele ce mângâie norii, palatele strălucite, Solemnele temple, globul pe de-a-ntregul, Şi voi toţi care sunteţi vă veţi topi Aşa cum a pălit acest cortegiu de umbreRTU1/20/2008 2 Şi nici fir de ceaţă nu va rămâne în urmă. Suntem făcuţi din substanţa Viselor, iar mărunta noastră viaţă E încojurată de somn. Sunt necăjit. Iartă-mi slăbiciunea. Sunt tulburat în suflet. 83 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Be not disturb‘d with my infirmity: If you be pleased, retire into my cell And there repose: a turn or two I‘ll walk, To still my beating mind. Nu te nelinişti de suferinţa mea: Te rog, retrage-te în colibă Şi te odihneşte: eu mă plimb puţin, Să-mi aşez mintea răscolită. Traducere I. Ieronim. 84 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1616. Ben JONSON. To Celia. Blaga. 16 lines. Author: Ben JONSON (1572-1637). Text: To Celia. Translator: L. Blaga. FrageStellung: With the help of The List of Figures of Speech in The Appendix, discuss five or six Literary Devices found in this poem! No easy job, if you are not familiar with Rhetoric... But if you do want to write in this life of you rs, you better make up for this vacuum... Remember that nowadays All Western Politicians take secret lessons of Rhetoric; the most notorious among th em was British Prime Minister Tony Blair... To Celia. Către Celia. Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup And I‘ll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove‘s nectar sup, I would not change for thine. Închină pentru mine doar cu ochii. Cu ochii mei eu pentru tine-nchin. Sau lasă numai un sărut în cupă, din gol să-l beau în loc de orice vin. Sete ce din suflet se ridică cere dumnezeiască băutură; Nectar ceresc de mi-ar întinde Joe, pe-al tău eu l-aş lua, dulce făptură. I sent thee late a rosy wreath, Not so much honouring thee As giving it a hope that there It could not wither‘d be; But thou thereon didst only breathe, And sent‘st it back to me; Cunună ţi-am trimis mai ieri, de roze, nu preamărire pentru a-ţi aduce, ci doar speranţă dându-i că la tine nu poate niciodată să se-usuce. Parfumul tu l-ai inspirat o dată, mi-ai retrimis cununa, semn de bine. 85 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Since when it grows, and smells, I swear, Not of itself but thee! De-atunci, miresmele desfăşurându-şi, ea creşte, nu prin sine, ci prin tine. Traducere L. Blaga. 86 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1635a. John DONNE. A Lecture upon the Shadow. 26 lines. Author: John DONNE (1572-1631). Text: A Lecture Upon the Shadow. Translator: FrageStellung: a. What do you know about John Donne? (20 words). b. Can you find a place where T.S. Eliot almost quotes the extended metaphor in this poem (the con ceit‘) in The Waste Land? A Lecture Upon the Shadow Stand still, and I will read to thee A lecture, Love, in Love‘s philosophy. These three hours that we have spent, Walking here, two shadows went Along with us, which we ourselves produced. But, now the sun is just above our head, We do those shadows tread, And to brave clearness all things are reduced. So whilst our infant loves did grow, Disguises did, and shadows, flow From us and our cares ; but now tis not so. That love hath not attain‘d the highest degree, Which is still diligent lest others see. Except our loves at this noon stay, 87 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry We shall new shadows make the other way. As the first were made to blind Others, these which come behind Will work upon ourselves, and blind our eyes. If our loves faint, and westerwardly decline, To me thou, falsely, thine And I to thee mine actions shall disguise. The morning shadows wear away, But these grow longer all the day ; But O ! love‘s day is short, if love decay. Love is a growing, or full constant light, And his short minute, after noon, is night. 88 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1635b. John DONNE. Ecstasy. Doinaş. 76 lines. Author: John DONNE (1572-1631). Text: The Ecstasy. Translator: St. A. Doinaş. FrageStellung: a. What do you know about John Donne? (20 words) b. Can you figure out for yourself how John Donne improved upon the use of metaphor in his poems? The Ecsatsy. Extazul. Where, like a pillow on a bed, A pregnant bank swell‘d up, to rest The violet‘s reclining head, Sat we two, one another‘s best. Acolo unde, ca o pernă-n pat, Poiana se umfla pentru-a susţine Al purei violete cap plecat, Unul comoară celuilalt, cu tine Our hands were firmly cemented By a fast balm, which thence did spring ; Our eye-beams twisted, and did thread Our eyes upon one double string. Eram întins. Unite-ntr-un balsam Curgând din ele, mâinile în pace Și ochii, împreună, ni-i lăsam Pe-un fir unic pe care fusu-l toarce, So to engraft our hands, as yet Was all the means to make us one ; And pictures in our eyes to get Was all our propagation. Acest altoi de mâini era, acum, Singurul mod al nostru de-a fi una, Iar chipurile-n ochi, născând ca-n fum, Unicul mod de a procrea într-una. As, twixt two equal armies, Fate Cum Soarta, între două mari oștiri, 89 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Suspends uncertain victory, Our souls—which to advance their state, Were gone out—hung twixt her and me. Întârzie nesigura izbândă, (Ieșind din trupuri, pentru convorbiri) Stăteau a noastre suflete la pândă. And whilst our souls negotiate there, We like sepulchral statues lay ; All day, the same our postures were, And we said nothing, all the day. Și-n timp ce ele discutau, noi doi Zăceam ca niște statui pe morminte; O zi am stat așa, iar între noi N-au fluturat, cât a fost zi, cuvinte. If any, so by love refined, That he soul‘s language understood, And by good love were grown all mind, Within convenient distance stood, Iar dacă cineva, deprins de-Amor A sufletelor limbă a-nţelege, Și, transformat de dragoste-n ușor, Pur spirit, ar fi dat pe-acolo-a trece, He—though he knew not which soul spake, Because both meant, both spake the same— Might thence a new concoction take, And part far purer than he came. (Chiar neștiind ce suflet a vorbit, Căci ele-n gând și grai la fel arată) Mai împlinit în sine-ar fi pornit Și mult mai pur decât a fost vreodată. This ecstasy doth unperplex (We said) and tell us what we love ; We see by this, it was not sex ; We see, we saw not, what did move : Acest extaz (ziceam) ne-a arătat Tot ce iubim, ne-a scos din neștiinţă; Vedeam că sexul nu era chemat, Vedeam că n-am văzut ce ia fiinţă: But as all several souls contain Mixture of things they know not what, Love these mix‘d souls doth mix again, And makes both one, each this, and that. Ci, precum știm de-un singur suflet că I-amestec de puteri ascunse nouă, Iubirea sufletele-amestecă, Din două face unul, dar sunt două. 90 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry A single violet transplant, The strength, the colour, and the size— All which before was poor and scant— Redoubles still, and multiplies. Mutaţi o violetă-n alt pământ: Culoare, forţă, talie (ah, câte Boleau, până acum, sărace-n vânt) Ţâșnesc și se-nmulţesc, mai hotărâte. When love with one another so Interanimates two souls, That abler soul, which thence doth flow, Defects of loneliness controls. Când dragostea însufleţește-așa Un suflet cu-altul, sufletul cel mare, Născut din ele, va împlătoșa Cusururile vechi din fiecare. We then, who are this new soul, know, Of what we are composed, and made, For th‘ atomies of which we grow Are souls, whom no change can invade. Noi deci, un suflet nou acum fiind, Știm ce suntem și știm ce ne compune, Căci elementele ce-n noi se prind Sunt suflete, și nu au stricăciune. But, O alas ! so long, so far, Our bodies why do we forbear? They are ours, though not we ; we are Th‘ intelligences, they the spheres. Dar vai! de ce uitarăm amândoi De trupurile noastre, în tăcere? Sunt ale noastre, chiar de nu sunt noi; Noi suntem duhuri, ele ne sunt sfere. We owe them thanks, because they thus Did us, to us, at first convey, Yielded their senses‘ force to us, Nor are dross to us, but allay. Datornici le suntem, căci ele-ntâi Nouă pe noi ne-au deșteptat, ca straje; Ne-au dat puteri și simţuri – căpătâi; Nu drojdie ne sunt, ci aliaje. On man heaven‘s influence works not so, But that it first imprints the air ; For soul into the soul may flow, Though it to body first repair. Numai lăsându-și urma-n aer blând Ne ţese Cerul soartă și răsuflet: Așa și sufletul, numai trecând Pe calea trupului, se varsă-n suflet. 91 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry As our blood labours to beget Spirits, as like souls as it can ; Because such fingers need to knit That subtle knot, which makes us man ; Cum sângele-ar vrea spirite să dea Asemeni sufletelor de curate, Căci nodul omenesc, a se-nnoda, Numai cu-atare degete se poate, So must pure lovers‘ souls descend To affections, and to faculties, Which sense may reach and apprehend, Else a great prince in prison lies. Așa un suflet pur de-ndrăgostiţi Coboară la pasiuni, la calde danţuri, De simţurile lor înlănţuiţi. Altfel, un mare Prinţ rămâne-n lanţuri. To our bodies turn we then, that so Weak men on love reveal‘d may look ; Love‘s mysteries in souls do grow, But yet the body is his book. Deci, înapoi la trupuri, biet norod, Numai așa de dragoste ai parte. Taina iubirii-n suflete dă rod, Dar totuși trupu-i poartă marea carte. And if some lover, such as we, Have heard this dialogue of one, Let him still mark us, he shall see Small change when we‘re to bodies gone. Dacă-un iubit, ca noi, va asculta Acest cuvânt al unuia, sub astre, Să fie-atent: abia ne vom schimba, Când vom ajunge-n trupurile noastre. Traducere Șt. A. Doinaș. 92 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1711. Alexander POPE. Essay on Criticism. Lines 1-184. Leviţchi. 184 lines. Author: Alexander POPE (1688-1744). Text: Essay on Criticism. Lines 1-184. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: a. Learn the very first two lines by heart and throw them in the face of any Romani an that does not know English! b. Do these ideas sound familiar to you? Is the Romanian language in which the poem is translated as familiar to you as the ideas? Essay on Criticism. Eseu despre critică. Tis hard to say, if greater Want of Skill Appear in Writing or in Judging ill, But, of the two, less dang‘rous is th‘ Offence, To tire our Patience, than mis-lead our Sense: Some few in that, but Numbers err in this, Ten Censure wrong for one who Writes amiss; A Fool might once himself alone expose, Now One in Verse makes many more in Prose. Tis with our Judgments as our Watches, none Go just alike, yet each believes his own. In Poets as true Genius is but rare, True Taste as seldom is the Critick‘s Share; Both must alike from Heav‘n derive their Light, These born to Judge, as well as those to Write. Let such teach others who themselves excell, E greu de spus ce-i mai lipsit de har: Poemul prost sau prostul comentar. Mai rău e însă să nu ne plictisim, Ci buna judecată s-o smintim. Prost scriu câţiva, dar critică-un sobor – Cam zece la un slab stihuitor. Un tont dă singur seamă, ci prin rime El odrăsleşte-n proză o mulţime. Ca ornicul ni-e mintea – bine, rău, Merg altfel toate, dar tu-l crezi pe-al tău. La critici gustul e la fel de rar Precum e la poeţi cerescul dar, De eşti născut să critici sau să scrii, Să te îndrume-a cerului făclii. Pe alţii să-i înveţe negreşit 93 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And censure freely who have written well. Authors are partial to their Wit, tis true, But are not Criticks to their Judgment too? Yet if we look more closely, we shall find Most have the Seeds of Judgment in their Mind; Nature affords at least a glimm‘ring Light; The Lines, tho‘ touch‘d but faintly, are drawn right. But as the slightest Sketch, if justly trac‘d, Is by ill Colouring but the more disgrac‘d, So by false Learning is good Sense defac‘d. Some are bewilder‘d in the Maze of Schools, And some made Coxcombs Nature meant but Fools. In search of Wit these lose their common Sense, And then turn Criticks in their own Defence. Each burns alike, who can, or cannot write, Or with a Rival‘s or an Eunuch‘s spite. All Fools have still an Itching to deride, And fain wou‘d be upon the Laughing Side; If Maevius Scribble in Apollo‘s spight, There are, who judge still worse than he can write Some have at first for Wits, then Poets past, Turn‘d Criticks next, and prov‘d plain Fools at last; Some neither can for Wits nor Criticks pass, As heavy Mules are neither Horse or Ass. Those half-learn‘d Witlings, num‘rous in our Isle, As half-form‘d Insects on the Banks of Nile: Unfinish‘d Things, one knows now what to call, Their Generation‘s so equivocal: To tell em, wou‘d a hundred Tongues require, Or one vain Wit‘s, that might a hundred tire. Doar cei aleşi, ce-au scris desăvârşit. Autorul prea se-ncrede-n har, e drept, Ci-un critic n-ar jura că-i prea-nţelept? Sămânţa judecăţii de temei Nu le lipseşte multora din ei: Un strop de soare tot le-a fost menit, Conturul, şters cum e, nu e greşit; Cum însă orice a culorii pată Îl face slut, şi dreapta judecată De-nvăţătura proastă e strâmbată. Pe mulţi îi strică şcolile, iar mulţi, Din fire tâmpi, devin fudui inculţi; Râvnind talentul, pierd a minţii stea Şi se fac critici... spre a se apăra! Toţi „ard nespus, de sunt sau nu chemaţi, Cu ură de emuli sau de castraţi. Netotul află veşnic un cusur Spre-a fi în ton cu-acei ce râd şi-njur‘. Când Mevius pe-Apolo-l dă-n tărbacă, Se află critici şui cari să-l întreacă. Mulţi trec drept oameni culţi, apoi rapsozi, Pe urmă critici, şi-n sfârşit nerozi. Mulţi nu-s nici critici, dar nici scribi încai, Precum catârii – nici măgari, nici cai. Avem duium de semidocţi fudui, Muşiţă de pe malul Nilului, Neisprăviţi fără un nume-anume, Din îndoielnic neam veniţi pe lume; Doar mii de limbi sau una doar – sadea, A fantelui! Îi poate număra. 94 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry But you who seek to give and merit Fame, And justly bear a Critick‘s noble Name, Be sure your self and your own Reach to know. How far your Genius, Taste, and Learning go; Launch not beyond your Depth, but be discreet, And mark that Point where Sense and Dulness meet. Nature to all things fix‘d the Limits fit, And wisely curb‘d proud Man‘s pretending Wit: As on the Land while here the Ocean gains, In other Parts it leaves wide sandy Plains; Thus in the Soul while Memory prevails, The solid Pow‘r of Understanding fails; Where Beams of warm Imagination play, The Memory‘s soft Figures melt away. One Science only will one Genius fit; So vast is Art, so narrow Human Wit; Not only bounded to peculiar Arts, But oft in those, confin‘d to single Parts. Like Kings we lose the Conquests gain‘d before, By vain Ambition still to make them more: Each might his sev‘ral Province well command, Wou‘d all but stoop to what they understand. First follow NATURE, and your Judgment frame By her just Standard, which is still the same: Unerring Nature, still divinely bright, One clear, unchang‘d and Universal Light, Life, Force, and Beauty, must to all impart, At once the Source, and End, and Test of Art Art from that Fund each just Supply provides, Works without Show, and without Pomp presides: Tu, ce-mparţi slava şi-o râvneşti şi vrei Să ţi se spună Critic cu temei, Să ştii ce caţi şi de ce eşti în stare Ca-nvăţătură, gust şi înzestrare. Te-ntinde cât ţi-e plapoma şi pune Hotar între absurd şi-nţelepciune. Natura toate le-a-ngrădit cu rost, Deci şi pe om, înfumurat şi prost. Cum, colo, mările-n uscat se-mplânt, Iar colo dezvelesc întins pământ, Şi-n suflet, cât memoria domneşte, Solida raţiune se-ofileşte. A-nchipuirii flacără omoară Memoria cu-a ei figuri de ceară Doar un tărâm i-e geniului menit; E vastă arta, omul mărginit, Restrâns la anumite arte, ori La părţi ale acestor – deseori. Ca regii pierdem tot ce-am cucerit, În vana râvnă de-a avea-ndoit. Oricine ar putea fi domn în lege De s-ar opri la ceea ce-nţelege. Întâi urmaţi Natura, judecând Cu-al ei tipar, acelaşi orişicând. Ea nu dă greş – magnifică, divină, Universală, veşnică lumină, Al artei ţel, măsură şi izvor, Dă viaţă, forţă, farmec tuturor. Din astă visterie arta-mparte, Lucrând tăcut, fără serbări deşarte; 95 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry In some fair Body thus th‘ informing Soul With Spirits feeds, with Vigour fills the whole, Each Motion guides, and ev‘ry Nerve sustains; It self unseen, but in th‘ Effects, remains. Some, to whom Heav‘n in Wit has been profuse. Want as much more, to turn it to its use, For Wit and Judgment often are at strife, Tho‘ meant each other‘s Aid, like Man and Wife. Tis more to guide than spur the Muse‘s Steed; Restrain his Fury, than provoke his Speed; The winged Courser, like a gen‘rous Horse, Shows most true Mettle when you check his Course. Those RULES of old discover‘d, not devis‘d, Are Nature still, but Nature Methodiz‘d; Nature, like Liberty, is but restrain‘d By the same Laws which first herself ordain‘d. Hear how learn‘d Greece her useful Rules indites, When to repress, and when indulge our Flights: High on Parnassus‘ Top her Sons she show‘d, And pointed out those arduous Paths they trod, Held from afar, aloft, th‘ Immortal Prize, And urg‘d the rest by equal Steps to rise; Just Precepts thus from great Examples giv‘n, She drew from them what they deriv‘d from Heav‘n The gen‘rous Critick fann‘d the Poet‘s Fire, And taught the World, with Reason to Admire. Then Criticism the Muse‘s Handmaid prov‘d, To dress her Charms, and make her more belov‘d; But following Wits from that Intention stray‘d; Who cou‘d not win the Mistress, woo‘d the Maid; Iar sufletul, vestire cu prisos, De duh şi vlagă umple-un trup frumos, Mişcarea-ndrumă, nervii susţine Şi, nevăzut, doar prin urmări rămâne. Mulţi, plini de fantezie, nu-s în stare S-o folosească – sunt lipsiţi de sare. În loc de-a fi cum soţul şi soţia, Des, bunul simţ luptă cu fantezia. Condu pe-al muzei roib, nu-l îndemna, Şi mai curând astâmpără-l din şa. Pegas-ul e un cal mărinimos, Atunci când e strunit e mai focos! Ce legi au fost descoperite-alt‘dată Natură sunt – dar sistematizată. Ca libertatea, firea ştie doar De legea ce şi-a pus chiar ea hotar. Căci spune Grecia cea ştiutoare Când bardul va să stea şi când să zboare; Pe fiii săi ca în Parnas i-arată, În vale, calea lor împovărată, Iar sus, răsplata cea fără de moarte Ce doar egalii lor pot să o poarte! Ei au primit din cer, ca de la ei, Iar pilda lor a devenit temei. Un critic bun, stârnind văpăi divine, Arată lumii unde să se-nchine Ca slugă-a muzei, Critica găsea Strai rar, cu gând de-a o-nfrumuseţa Trişti epigoni, văzând cum că stăpâna Nu-i rabdă, i-au cerut subretei mâna 96 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Against the Poets their own Arms they turn‘d, Sure to hate most the Men from whom they learn‘d. So modern Pothecaries, taught the Art By Doctor‘s Bills to play the Doctor‘s Part, Bold in the Practice of mistaken Rules, Prescribe, apply, and call their Masters Fools. Some on the Leaves of ancient Authors prey, Nor Time nor Moths e‘er spoil‘d so much as they: Some dryly plain, without Invention‘s Aid, Write dull Receits how Poems may be made: These leave the Sense, their Learning to display, And theme explain the Meaning quite away. You then whose Judgment the right Course wou‘d steer, Know well each ANCIENT‘s proper Character, His Fable, Subject, Scope in ev‘ry Page, Religion, Country, Genius of his Age: Without all these at once before your Eyes, Cavil you may, but never Criticize. Be Homer‘s Works your Study, and Delight, Read them by Day, and meditate by Night, Thence form your Judgment, thence your Maxims bring, And trace the Muses upward to their Spring; Still with It self compar‘d, his Text peruse; And let your Comment be the Mantuan Muse. When first young Maro in his boundless Mind A Work t‘ outlast Immortal Rome design‘d, Perhaps he seem‘d above the Critick‘s Law, And but from Nature‘s Fountains scorn‘d to draw: But when t‘examine ev‘ry Part he came, Nature and Homer were, he found, the same: Şi-au atacat poeţii, plini de ură, Deoarece le-au dat învăţătură. Atunci când doctorii prescriu un leac, Spiţerii azi în doctori se prefac; Împart reţetele de capul lor Şi-l fac de basm pe omul ştiutor. Mulţi peste file-antice-au tăbărât; Nici viermii vremii nu distrug atât. Mulţi, iar, neajutoraţi de fantezie, Scriu seci reţete pentru poezie; Nătângi, ei vor s-arate câte ştiu; Ceilalţi explică – însă fistichiu. De vrei să judeci fără părtinire, Pătrunde-a fiecărui antic fire, Aprofundează temă şi subiect, Crez, ţară, duh al vremii, intelect. Fără acestea toate-n faţa ta, Poţi cleveti, dar nu şi critica. Homer să-ţi fie studiu şi-ncântare, Lectură ziua, noaptea – cugetare. El te învaţă-a fi judecător, Căci îţi arată-al muzelor izvor. Citeşte-l pentru sine iar şi iar, Luând muza mantuană comentar. Când Maro s-a gândit printr-o lucrare Să-ntreacă Roma cea nemuritoare, Credea că e deasupra criticei, Râvnind doar firea şi izvorul ei; La urmă a-nţeles din amănunt Că firea şi Homér tot una sunt 97 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Convinc‘d, amaz‘d, he checks the bold Design, And Rules as strict his labour‘d Work confine, As if the Stagyrite o‘er looked each Line. Learn hence for Ancient Rules a just Esteem; To copy Nature is to copy Them. Some Beauties yet, no Precepts can declare, For there‘s a Happiness as well as Care. Musick resembles Poetry, in each Are nameless Graces which no Methods teach, And which a Master-Hand alone can reach. If, where the Rules not far enough extend, (Since Rules were made but to promote their End) Some Lucky LICENCE answers to the full Th‘ Intent propos‘d, that Licence is a Rule. Thus Pegasus, a nearer way to take, May boldly deviate from the common Track. Great Wits sometimes may gloriously offend, And rise to Faults true Criticks dare not mend; From vulgar Bounds with brave Disorder part, And snatch a Grace beyond the Reach of Art, Which, without passing thro‘ the Judgment, gains The Heart, and all its End at once attains. In Prospects, thus, some Objects please our Eyes, Which out of Nature‘s common Order rise, The shapeless Rock, or hanging Precipice. But tho' the Ancients thus their Rules invade, (As Kings dispense with Laws Themselves have made) Moderns, beware! Or if you must offend Against the Precept, ne'er transgress its End, Let it be seldom, and compell'd by Need, Convins, uimit, se-opreşte din avânt Şi-aplică reguli stricte, ca şi când Aristotel veghează orice rând. Cinstirea celor vechi e , deci, temei – Imiţi natura, îi imiţi pe ei. Mai sunt şi frumuseţi ce nu apar Prin trudă şi precepte, ci prin har. Cu poezia, muzica-i de-o fire; În amândouă pot să-şi dea de ştire Splendori ce nu le-nvaţă nicio lege, Pe care numai maestrul le alege. Când câmpul regulii e prea îngust (Ea-i doar un mijloc pentru bunul gust) Iar o abatere e-n unison Cu-naltul ţel, abaterea-i canon. Astfel Pegasul, spre-a scurta din drum, Se poate-abate din făgaş oricum. Un critic bun nu-ncearcă să repare Superba vină-a unui spirit mare; Acesta din rutină se desparte Şi-atinge culmea-adevăratei arte, Ascunsă-n inimă, nu-n judecată, Şi ţelul şi-l ajunge dintr-odată. Într-un peisaj pot place ochilor Tablouri parcă rupte din decor, Aplică legea şi te ia la zor. ................................................................. 98 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And have, at least, Their Precedent to plead. The Critick else proceeds without Remorse, Seizes your Fame, and puts his Laws in force. I know there are, to whose presumptuous Thoughts Those Freer Beauties, ev‘n in Them, seem Faults: Some Figures monstrous and mis-shap‘d appear, Consider‘d singly, or beheld too near, Which, but proportion‘d to their Light, or Place, Due Distance reconciles to Form and Grace. A prudent Chief not always must display His Pow‘rs in equal Ranks, and fair Array, But with th‘ Occasion and the Place comply, Conceal his Force, nay seem sometimes to Fly. Those oft are Stratagems which Errors seem, Nor is it Homer Nods, but We that Dream. Still green with Bays each ancient Altar stands, Above the reach of Sacrilegious Hands, Secure from Flames, from Envy‘s fiercer Rage, Destructive War, and all-involving Age. See, from each Clime the Learn‘d their Incense bring; Hear, in all Tongues consenting Paeans ring! In Praise so just, let ev‘ry Voice be join‘d, And fill the Gen‘ral Chorus of Mankind! Hail Bards Triumphant! born in happier Days; Immortal Heirs of Universal Praise! Whose Honours with Increase of Ages grow, As streams roll down, enlarging as they flow! Nations unborn your mighty Names shall sound, And Worlds applaud that must not yet be found! Oh may some Spark of your Coelestial Fire Ştiu, unii chiar pe-autori de mare clasă Îi judec pentru-o abatere frumoasă. Privite prea de-aproape sau în sine, Sunt forme ce par slute şi meschine; Acestor, cuvenita depărtare Le dă şi frumuseţe şi culoare. Un cap de oaste bun n-o să-şi arate Mereu aceleaşi oşti şi nici pe toate; Şi-n locul sau la timpul potrivit Se-ascunde spre-a se crede c-a fugit. Un truc nu e-un eres neapărat; Nu moţăie Homer – noi am visat. Altarul vechi e pururi viu şi-ntreg. Căci nu-l atinge braţul sacrileg; Ferit de foc, de pizma fără leac, De crunt război sau de-un bicisnic veac. Ai lumii cărturari le-nchin odoare Şi-n zeci de limbi, cântări proslăvitoare! Prinos le-aducă toţi prin glasul lor, Ca să-plinească-al omenirii cor. Salut, rapsozi din zile mai senine, Fii fără moarte-ai laudei depline! Cinstirea vă sporeşte an de an, Ca râul care curge-n văi avan; Popoare noi şi-o nenăscută lume Vor preamări al vostru falnic nume! Din focul vostru sfânt o rază doar 99 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The last, the meanest of your Sons inspire, (That on weak Wings, from far, pursues your Flights; Glows while he reads, but trembles as he writes) To teach vain Wits a Science little known, T‘ admire Superior Sense, and doubt their own! De-ar inspira umilul vost‘ vlăstar (Cu aripi noi, la zboru-vă se-mbie, Citeşte-aprins dar şovăie când scrie) Pe fanţi să-nveţe legea legilor; S-admire geniul, dar nu geniul lor! Traducere L. Leviţchi. 100 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1717. Alexander POPE. Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Boşca. 82 lines. Author: Alexander POPE (1688-1744). Text: Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: What was the English poet Alexander Pope most famous for, in your opinion (if you h ave one!)? (50 words) Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Elegie în amintirea unei nefericite doamne. What beck‘ning ghost, along the moonlight shade Invites my steps, and points to yonder glade? This she! – but why that bleeding bosom gored, Why dimly gleams the visionary sword? O, ever beauteous, ever friendly! tell, Is it, in Heav‘n, a crime to love too well, To bear too tender or too firm a heart, To act a lover‘s or a Roman part? Is there no bright reversion in the sky For those who greatly think, or bravely die? Why bade ye else, ye Pow‘rs! her soul aspire Above the vulgar flight of low desire? Ambition first sprung from your blest abodes; The glorious fault of angels and of gods; Thence to their images on earth it flows, And in the breasts of kings and heroes glows. Ce duh, sub lună, semn îmi dă şi cată Spre-acea poiană paşii să-mi abată? E ea! Dar rana-n piept de unde-o are? Pumnal sclipind de ce mi se năzare? O, spune-mi, pururi dulce şi zglobie, E-o crimă-n Cer amorul să te-mbie? Să ai un suflet gingaş sau avan? Să joci un rol de-amant sau de Roman? Nu-i sus vreo plată pentru-acela care Gândeşte larg sau vitejeşte moare? Voi, Slăvi, de ce-o făcurăţi să aspire Mai sus de-a cărnii ieftină pornire? Ambiţia, dintâi, la voi a stat: În zei şi-n îngeri glorios păcat; După-al lor chip în lume-acum se-ntinde, Şi-n piept de regi şi de eroi se-aprinde. 101 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Most souls, tis true, but peep out once an age, Dull sullen pris‘ners in the body‘s cage: Dim lights of life, that burn a length of years, Useless, unseen, as lamps in sepulchres; Like Eastern kings a lazy state they keep, And close confined to their own palace, sleep. From these perhaps (ere Nature bade her die) Fate snatch‘d her early to the pitying sky. As into air the purer spirits flow, And sep‘rate from their kindred dregs below, So flew the soul to its congenial place, Nor left one virtue to redeem her race. But thou, false guardian of a charge too good! Thou, mean deserter of thy brother‘s blood! See on these ruby lips the trembling breath, These cheeks now fading at the blast of Death: Cold is that breast which warm‘d the world before, And those love-darting eyes must roll no more. Thus, if eternal Justice rules the ball, Thus shall your wives, and thus your children fall; On all the line a sudden vengeance waits, And frequent herses shall besiege your gates. There passengers shall stand, and pointing say (While the long fun‘rals blacken all the way), Lo! these were they whose souls the Furies steel‘d And cursed with hearts unknowing how to yield.‘ Thus unlamented pass the proud away, The gaze of fools, and pageant of a day! So perish all whose breast ne‘er learn‘d to glow For others‘ good, or melt at others‘ woe! E drept, mulţi oameni rar privesc afară, Robi lâncezi în a trupului cămară: Reci lumânări, ce ard ani lungi, cuminte Şi de prisos, ca lămpile-n morminte; Au lenea unor regi din Răsărit, Ce-şi ţin palatul doar pentru dormit. De lângă-aceştia, poate, (încă-n floare) Spre cer o smulse soarta-ndurătoare. Cum pure duhuri prin văzduh plutesc, Desprinse de-nvelişul lor lumesc, Aşa pluti şi sufletu-i, şi nu-s Virtuţi ca ale ei de când s-a dus. Dar tu, ce aperi strâmb înalte legi, Şi-al fratelui tău sânge îl renegi, Vezi suflul gurii de rubin cum piere, Şi obrazu-i pal de-a Morţii adiere! E rece pieptul plin de foc odată, Iar ochii galeşi nu ne mai îmbată. Dacă Dreptatea globul ni-l conduce, Soţii şi prunci la fel vi se vor duce; Pe rând v-aşteaptă cruntă răzbunare, Şi casa dolii au să v-o-mpresoare. S-or strânge trecători şi-aprins vor spune, Când drumul l-o-nnegri vreo-ngropăciune: „Priviţi! Şi-acesta fu-mpietrit de Fúrii, Şi-l însoţesc blesteme ale urii! Aşa trec cei semeţi, neplânşi de nime‘: Bâlci pentru-o zi, ospăţ pentru prostime. Aşa pier cei cărora nu le pasă Că alţii râd sau jalea îi apasă. 102 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry What can atone (O, ever injured shade!) Thy fate unpitied, and thy rites unpaid? No friend‘s complaint, no kind domestic tear Pleased thy pale ghost, or graced thy mournful bier. By foreign hands thy dying eyes were closed, By foreign hands thy decent limbs composed, By foreign hands thy humble grave adorn‘d, By strangers honour‘d, and by strangers mourn‘d! What tho‘ no friends in sable weeds appear, Grieve for an hour, perhaps, then mourn a year, And bear about the mockery of woe, To midnight dances, and the public show? What tho‘ no weeping Loves thy ashes grace, Nor polish‘d marble emulate thy face? What tho‘ no sacred earth allow thee room, Nor hallow‘d dirge be mutter‘d o‘er thy tomb? Yet shall thy grave with rising flow‘rs be drest, And the green turf lie lightly on thy breast: There shall the morn her earlist tears bestow, There the first roses of the year shall blow; While angels with their silver wings o‘ershade The ground now sacred by thy reliques made. So peaceful rests, without a stone, a name, What once had beauty, titles, wealth, and fame. How loved, how honour‘d once, avails thee not, To whom related, or by whom begot; A heap of dust alone remains of thee, Tis all thy art, and all the proud shall be! Poets themselves must fall, like those they sung, Deaf the praised ear, and mute the tuneful tongue. Ce va-ndrepta, o, duh pe veci jignit, Destinu-ţi crud, prohodul nejelit? Nici trist prieten şi nici plâns de rude N-au fost, obraz şi raclă ca să-ţi ude. Străine mâini îţi încuiară ochii, Străine mâini te-au pus în alte rochii; Străine mâini pe groapă flori ţi-au strâns, Străini te-au lăudat, străini te-au plâns. Ce-i, când cei dragi în doliu n-au venit, Un ceas de bocet fals şi-un an cernit, În care vezi mâhnirea-mprumutată Pe la serbări şi baluri cum se-arată? Ce-i, când pe colbul tău n-a plâns Iubirea Şi-o marmură nu-ţi poartă amintirea? Sau ce-i, când loc tu n-ai în lutul sfânt, Şi-un sacru imn nu-ţi sună pe mormânt? Şi totuşi groapa flori au să ţi-o-mbrace, Şi iarba pe-al tău sân va creşte-n pace; Şi zorii ţi-or da lacrima dintâi, Cu fragezi trandafiri la căpătâi; Din albe aripi îngeri au să bată Pe huma de-al tău trup înnobilată. Deci fără cruce dormi şi fără nume, Tu, care-aveai rang, farmec, bani, renume. Tot una-i astăzi cât ai fost iubită, Cu cine rudă, unde zămislită; Un muşuroi din tine va rămâne: E tot ce eşti, e fala ta de mâne. Cad şi poeţii, ca şi ce slăviră: Pier cei cântaţi, apune cântu-n liră. 103 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ev‘n he, whose soul now melts in mournful lays, Shall shortly want the gen‘rous tear he pays; Then from his closing eyes thy form shall part, And the last pang shall tear thee from his heart; Life‘s idle business at one gasp be o‘er, The Muse forgot, and thou beloved no more! Chiar cel ce-a scris ăst plânset de durere, Curând aceleaşi lacrimi le va cere. Din ochiu-i stins s-a şterge-a ta făptură, Şi-un ultim spasm din inimă-i te fură; Al vieţii lucru van c-un icnet moare: Uitat poetul, cazi şi tu-n uitare. Traducere T. Boşca. 104 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1730. James THOMSON. Winter. Boşca. 111 lines. Author: James THOMSON (1700-1748). Text: Winter. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: Compare Thomson with Pope, and try to pinpoint a few fundamental differences. (50 w ords) Winter. Iarna. Mean while, the Leaves, That, late, the Forest clad with lively Green, Nipt by the drizzly Night, and Sallow-hu‘d, Fall, wavering, thro‘ the Air; or shower amain, Urg‘d by the Breeze, that sobs amid the Boughs. Then list‘ning Hares foesake the rusling Woods, And, starting at the frequent Noise, escape To the rough Stubble, and the rushy Fen. Then Woodcocks, o‘er the fluctuating Main, That glimmers to the Glimpses of the Moon, Stretch their long Voyage to the woodland Glade: Where, wheeling with uncertain Flight, they mock The nimble Fowler‘s Aim. - Now Nature droops; Languish the living Herbs, with pale Decay: And all the various Family of Flowers Their sunny Robes resign. The falling Fruits, Iar frunzele-ntre timp, Ce-n verde viu pădurea le-mbrăcase, De-ai nopţii stropi pişcate, şi livide, Cad rar şi-ncet, sau ca o ploaie iute, Când vântul, suspinând prin crengi, le smulge. Apoi fricoşii iepuri lasă crângul Şi, tresărind la zgomote, aleargă Spre mirişti aspre sau spre bălţi cu trestii; Sitari, peste întinderi mişcătoare, Ce scânteiază la lumina lunii, Mai vin o dată spre poieni de codri, Şi, dând ocol, îşi râd de pădurarul Cu arcu-ntins. Natura-ngenunchează, Şi ierburile lâncezesc, bolnave, Şi-a florilor familii felurite Îşi pierd vestmântul însorit. Iar noaptea, 105 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Thro‘ the still Night, forsake the Parent-Bough, That, in the first, grey, Glences of the Dawn, Looks wild, and wonders at the wintry Waste. Cad poame şi se rup de creanga mamă, Ce-n zori, la primul licăr sur, arată Pustie, şi se miră de ruină-i. Late, in the louring Sky, red, fiery, Streaks Begin to flush about; the reeling Clouds Stagger with dizzy Aim, as doubting yet Which Master to obey: while rising, slow, Sad, in the Leaden-colour‘d East, the Moon Wears a bleak circle round her sully‘d Orb. Then issues forth the Storm, with loud Control, And in the thin Fabrick of the pillar‘d Air O‘erturns, at once. Prone, on th‘uncertain Main Descends th‘Etherial Force, and plows its Waves, With dreadful Rift: from the mid-Deep, appears, Surge after Surge, the rising, wat‘ry, War. Whitening, the angry Billows rowl immense, And roar their Terrors, thro‘ the shuddering Soul Of feeble Man, amidst their Fury caught, And, dash‘d upon his Fate. Then o‘er the Cliff, Where dwells the Sea-Mew, unconfin‘d, they fly, And, hurrying, swallow up the steril Shore. Târziu, pe cerul negru, pete roşii Prind a ieşi, iar nori în rotocoale Se-nvălmăşesc pierduţi, de parcă n-ar şti Cui să se-nchine; şi, suind alene Şi trist, pe-al bolţii plumb se vede luna, Purtând un palid cerc pe globu-i sumbru. Năvalnic, se porneşte-apoi furtuna, Şi, slabă, a văzduhului stihie Se surpă. Peste mare se coboară Eterul cu puterea lui, şi-o ară Şi-o spintecă, iar din adânc se-nalţă, Tălăzuind, a apei bătălie. Imense, albe valuri îşi dau pinteni, Vuind cumplit în speriatul suflet Al omului plăpând, prins între fúrii, Bătut de sorţi; şi peste stânci, pe care Stă pescăruşul, vin nestăvilite Şi-n grabă înghit uscatul de pe ţărmuri. The Mountain growls; and all its sturdy Sons Stoop to the Bottom of the Rocks they shade: Lone, on its Midnight-Side, and all aghast, The dark, way-faring, Stranger, breathless, toils, And climbs against the Blast Low, waves the rooted Forest, vex‘d, and sheds What of its leafy Honours yet remains. Chiar munţii gem, iar fiii lor cei zdraveni Spre poala stâncii de sub ei se-ndoaie; Din miază-noapte, gâfâind şi singur, Drumeţul urcă greu prin vijelie... Pădurea, vânzolindu-se, îşi pierde Ce mai avea din slava ei de frunze. Astfel, luptând prin crâng şi zgâlţâindu-l, 106 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Thus, struggling thro‘ the dissipated Grove, The whirling Tempest raves along the Plain; And, on the Cottage thacht, or lordly Dome, Keen-fastening, shakes em to the solid Base. Sleep, frighted, flies; the hollow Chimney howls, The Windows rattle, and the Hinges creak. Furtuna trece-n muget spre câmpie. Bordei cu paie sau conac domnesc, Le scutură vârtos, din temelie; Se-ascunde somnul; hornuri urlă, goale; Troznesc ferestre, joacă balamale. Lo! from the livid East, or piercing North, Thick Clouds ascend, in whose capacious Womb, A vapoury Deluge lies, to Snow congeal‘d: Heavy, they roll their fleecy World along; And the Sky saddens with th‘impending Storm. Thro‘ the hush‘d Air, the whitening Shower descends, At first, thin-wavering; till, at last, the Flakes Fall broad, and wide, and fast, dimming the Day, With a continual Flow. See! sudden, hoar‘d, The Woods beneath the stainless Burden bow, Blackning, along the mazy Stream it melts; Earth‘s universal Face, deep-hid, and chill, Is all one, dazzling, Waste. The Labourer-Ox Stands cover‘d o‘er with Snow, and then demands The Fruit of all his Toil. The Fowls of Heaven, Tam‘d by the cruel Season, croud around The winnowing Store, and claim the little Boon, That Providence allows. The foodless Wilds Pour forth their brown Inhabitants; the Hare, Tho‘ timorous of Heart, and hard beset By Death, in various Forms, dark Snares, and Dogs, And more unpitying Men, the Garden seeks, Urg‘d on by fearless Want. The bleating Kind Din răsăritul pal, din nordul crâncen, Nori groşi apar, şi-n sânul lor cu toane Ei poartă abur, devenit zăpadă; Grei, îşi rostogolesc miţoasa lume, Şi ceru-i trist, căci se presimte viscol. Prin aer, calm, coboară grindini albe; Întâi, doar stropi mărunţi, pe urmă fulgii: Cad iute, larg; iar ziua-i cenuşie De ninsul ne-ntrerupt. Cărunte crânguri Se-apleacă sub povara-i pură, care, Topindu-se-n pâraie, se-nnegreşte; Pământul, cu ascunsa-i faţă rece, E-un orbitor deşert. Stă boul trudnic Sub învelişul de omăt, şi-şi cere Răsplata muncii. Păsările bolţii, De iarnă îmblânzite, se strâng roată, Bătând din aripi, şi cerşesc tainul De ceruri dat. Pădurea, fără hrană, Şi-a scos locuitorii. Bieţii iepuri, Deşi fricoşi şi-ameninţaţi de-a pururi De moarte-n fel şi chip: dulăi, capcane Şi omul aprig, caută grădina, Siliţi de foame. Cele care pasc 107 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Eye the bleak Heavens, and next, the glistening Earth, With Looks of dumb Despair; then sad, dispers‘d, Dig, for the withr‘d Herb, thro‘ Heaps of Snow. Privesc spre cer şi iar spre huma albă, Cu-o mută deznădejde, apoi scurmă, Trist, după ierbi uscate, sub zăpadă. Clear Frost succeeds, and thro‘ the blew Serene For Sight too fine, th‘Aetherial Nitre flies, To bake the Glebe, and bind the slip‘ry Flood. This of the wintry Season is the Prime; Pure are the Days, and lustrous are the Nights, Brighten‘d with starry Worlds, till then unseen – E-un ger curat, şi-n adieri senine, Ce nu se văd, un praf eteric zboară, Uscând ţărâna şi-ngrădind torenţii. Aceasta-i floarea timpului de iarnă: E clară ziua, şi lucioasă noaptea. Cu lumi de stele încă nevăzute... But hark! the nightly Winds, with hollow Voice, Blow, blustering, from the South - the Frost subdu‘d, Gradual, resolves into a weeping Thaw. Spotted, the Mountains shine: loose Sleet descends, And floods the Country round: the Rivers swell, Impatient for the Day. - Those sullen Seas, That wash th‘ungenial Pole, will rest no more, Beneath the Shackles of the mighty North; But, rousing all their Waves, resistless heave, And hark! - the length‘ning Roar, continuous, runs Athwart the rifted Main; at once, it bursts, And piles a thousand Mountains to the Clouds! Ill fares the Bark, the Wretches‘ last Resort, That, lost amid the floating Fragments, moors Beneath the Shelter of an Icy Isle; While Night o‘erwhelms the Sea, and Horror looks More horrible. Can human Hearts endure Th‘assembled Mischiefs, that besiege them round: Unlist‘ning Hunger, fainting Waeriness, ...Dar vântul nopţii cu-al său glas sinistru, Din sud amarnic bate. Geru-nvins Treptat se schimbă-ntr-un dezgheţ ce plânge. Pătaţi, străluce munţii: vin puhoaie Şi-neacă şesu-n jur; se umflă râuri Necontenit. Acele mări ursuze, Ce spală polul aspru, nu mai rabdă Cătuşele puternicului nord, Ci valuri mână-ncoace şi se-nalţă, Şi-auzi! prelungul vuiet cum aleargă Peste-ncreţita-ntindere şi urlă, Şi pân‘ la nori morman de munţi ridică! Vai luntrii, ultim scut pentru sărmanul Ce, printre sfărmături, pierdut se-aburcă, Vrând adăpost, pe-o insulă de gheaţă! Acum, se lasă noaptea, iară groaza Mai groaznică-i. E-n stare omul oare Să-ndure câte rele-l împresoară? Cumplita foame, leşin, oboseală, 108 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Roar of Winds, and Waves, and Crush of Ice, Now, ceasing, now, renew‘d, with louder Rage, And bellowing round the Main: Nations remote, Shook from their Midnight-Slumbers, deem they hear Portentous Thunder, in the troubled Sky. More to embroil the Deep, Leviathan, And his unweildy Train, in horrid Sport, Tempest the loosen‘d Brine; while, thro‘ the Gloom, Far, from the dire, unhospitable Shore, The Lyon‘s Rage, the Wolf‘s sad Howl is heard, And all the fell Society of Night. (The Seasons) Talazuri, vânt nebun, ruptura gheţii, Ba molcom, ba crescând, cu grea turbare Vuind pe ape? Neamuri depărtate Tresar din somn şi parcă-aud un tunet, Precum o piază-rea, pe cerul sumbru. Sporind Leviathan1 al apei haos, Cu-alaiul său smintit, în dans năpraznic, Frământă marea beată, iar prin beznă, Departe, de pe ţărmul neprielnic, Se-aud, cu urlet şi cu răcnet, fiare Şi-ntreaga hoardă crâncenă a nopţii. (Anotimpurile) Traducere T. Boşca. 109 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1745. Edward YOUNG. Invocation to Night. Boşca. 67 lines. Author: Edward YOUNG (1683-1765) Text: Invocation to Night. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: The Night is young, says Shakespeare somewhere in Hamlet. Do you believe that? (100 words) Invocation to Night. Invocarea nopţii. Tir‘d Nature‘s sweet restorer, balmy Sleep! He, like the world, his ready visit pays Where Fortune smiles; the wretched he forsakes; Swift on his downy pinion flies from woe; And lights on lids unsully‘d with a tear. From short (as usual) and disturb‘d repose, I wake: How happy they, who wake no more! Yet that were vain, if dreams infest the grave. I wake, emerging from a sea of dreams Tumultuous; where my wreck‘d desponding thought, From wave to wave of fancy‘d misery, At random drove, her helm of reason lost. Tho‘ now restor‘d, tis only change of pain, (A bitter change!) severer for severe. The day too short for my distress; and night, Ev‘n in the zenith of her dark domain, Truditei Firi balsam i-e Somnul dulce! El, ca noi toţi, e oaspe numai unde Norocu-i darnic; jalea nu-l atrage; Cu zboru-i lin, de lacrimi fuge-n grabă, Şi doar pe gene fără plâns coboară. Mă scol din scurt şi tulburat repaos: Ferice-i cel ce-n veci nu se mai scoală! Ci-n van e şi-asta, de-om visa şi-n groapă. Mă scol, ieşind din marea unor visuri De groază: nava deznădejdii mele, Din val în val de crâncene vedenii, Plutea-n neştire, fără cârma minţii. Acum, că-s treaz, se schimbă doar tortura (Un schimb amar): din aspră, în mai aspră. La chinu-mi, ziua-i scurtă; iară noaptea, Chiar şi-n zenit de negru hău, e soare 110 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Is sunshine to the colour of my fate. Night, sable goddess! from her ebon throne, In rayless majesty, now stretches forth Her leaden sceptre o‘er a slumb‘ring world. Silence, how dead! and darkness, how profound! Nor eye, nor list‘ning ear, on object finds: Creation sleeps. Tis as the gen‘ral pulse Of life stood still, and nature made a pause; An awful pause! prophetic of her end. And let her prophesy be soon fulfill‘d; Fate! drop the curtain; I can lose no more. Silence and Darkness! solemn sisters! twins From ancient night, who nurse the tender thought To reason, and on reason buil resolve, (That column of true majesty in man) Assist me: I will thank you in the grave; The grave, your kingdom: there this frame shall fall A victim sacred to your dreary shrine. But what are ye? Thou, who didst put to flight Primaeval silence, when the morning-stars, Exulting, shouted o‘er the rising ball; O, Thou, whose word from solid darkness struck That spark, the sun; strike wisdom from my soul; My soul, which flies to Thee, her trust, her treasure, As misers to their gold, while others rest. Thro‘ this opaque of nature, and of soul, This double night, transmit one pitying ray, To lighten, and to chear. O lead my mind, (A mind that fain would wander from its woe) Deplin pe lângă bezna soartei mele. Cernită Zee, Noaptea! De pe tronu-i De abanos, cu negru nimb şi sceptru De plumb, veghează lumea adormită. Ce pace grea! Şi bezna ce profundă-i! Nimic nu prinde ochiul, nici urechea: Zidirea doarme. Parcă pulsul vieţii S-ar fi oprit, şi stă-n răgaz natura: Cumplit răgaz, al ei sfârşit vestindu-l. De s-ar plini mai iute prorocirea-i! Destin, cortina jos! N-am ce mai pierde. Pace şi Beznă: gemene fiice Ale străvechii nopţi, ce gândul firav Îl faceţi cuget, şi pe cuget vrere Clădiţi (stâlp al umanei glorii), staţi-mi Alături: vă voi mulţumi din groapă, Căci ea vă e regat, şi-n ea cădea-va Ăst trup jertfit pe-altarul vostru sumbru. Dar ce sunteţi voi? Tu, ce-ai pus pe fugă Tăcerea-ntâi, când stele-n zori, voioase, Slăviră astrul ce suia pe boltă; O, Tu, al cărui glas iscă din beznă A soarelui scântei, ştiinţă iscă-mi În suflet: el e-atras de tine, crezul Şi-averea-i, cum de-arginţi avarul, noaptea. Prin acest zid din suflet şi natură, Ce-i dublă noapte, dă-mi o blândă rază De-avânt şi de lumină. Poartă-mi mintea (O minte ce s-ar smulge din restrişte-i) 111 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Lead it thro‘ various scenes of life and death; And from each scene, the noblest truths inspire. Nor less inspire my conduct, than my song; Teach my best reason, reason; my best will, Teach rectitude; and fix my firm resolve Wisdom to wed, and pay her long arrear: Nor let the phial of my vengeance, pour‘d On this devoted head, be pour‘d in vain. The bell strikes One. We take no note of time But from its loss. To give it then a tongue Is wise in man. As if an angel spoke, I feel the solemn sound. If heard aright, It is the knell of my departed hours: Where are they? With the years beyond the flood. It is the signal that demandes dispatch: How much is to be done? My hopes and fears Start up alarm‘d, and o‘er life‘s narrow verge Look down - On what? a fathomless abyss; A dread eternity! how surely mine! And can eternity belong to me, Poor pensioner on the bounties of an hour? (Night the First) Prin scene-ale vieţii şi-ale morţii; Din ele adevăruri mari inspiră-mi, Nu doar pentru-a cânta, ci şi-n purtare-mi; Învaţă-mi raţiunea şi voinţa; Arată-mi ce-i dreptatea, şi-nţeleaptă Fă-mi fapta, şi greşeala ei o iartă. Opreşte valul răzbunării tale Să-mi bată, în zadar, umila frunte. Răsună ora unu. Ştim ce-i timpul, Doar când îl pierdem. Deci e-o-nţelepciune, Ca omul să-i dea grai. Un înger parcă Bătu solemnul sunet. El înseamnă Prohodul vremii mele irosite: Pe unde-o fi? Cu anii, peste-adâncuri. E-un semn care-şi aşteaptă împlinirea. Au cât mai am? Speranţele şi teama Tresar, şi peste-ngustul prag al vieţii Se uită-n jos. La ce? Hău fără capăt. Sinistră veşnicie! Da, a mea e! A mea să fie oare veşnicia, Biet oaspe-n dărnicia unei ore? (Noaptea întâia) Traducere T. Boşca. 112 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1747. William COLLINS. Ode to Evening. Boşca. 52 lines. Author: William COLLINS (1721-1759). Text: Ode to Evening. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: Associate poetic emotions with the various parts of the day+night (the Swedish lang uage has dygn, one single word for that): you‘ll see you land into a very strange ritual... try to scramble them at random, and the ritual b ecomes even stranger... We are slaves of Time. Ode to Evening. Odă serii. If aught of oaten stop, or pastoral song, May hope, chaste Eve, to soothe thy modest ear, Like thy own solemn springs, Thy springs and dying gales; Dacă vreun zvon de nai sau vreun cânt rustic Ţi-alintă-auzul blând, o, Seară castă, Cum face, grav, pârâul Şi boarea ta ce moare; O nymph reserved, while now the bright-hair‘d sun Sits in yon western tent, whose cloudy skirts, Withe brede ethereal wove, O‘erhang his wavy bed: Sfioasă nimfă, când bălaiul soare E-n cortu-i, la apus, şi-un fald de nouri Un văl eteric ţese Peste-al său pat de valuri: Now air is hush‘d, save where the weak-eyed bat With short shrill shrick flits by on leathern wing, Or where the beetke winds His small but sullen horn, Când, prin tăceri, doar liliacul zboară, Miop, cu ţipăt scurt, şi-aripi de piele, Sau gâza micul zumzet Posac şi-l toarce-n aer, 113 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry As oft he rises, midst the twilight path Against the pilgrim borne in heedless hum: Now teach me, maid composed, To breathe some soften‘d strain, Izbind, cum se tot suie spre crepuscul, Pe trecător în râvna lui buimacă, Învaţă-mă, fecioară, Să cânt un cântec gingaş, Whose numbers, stealing through thy darkening vale, May not unseemly with its stillness suit, As, musing slow, I hail Thy genial loved return! Ce, furişat prin ceaţa văii tale, Să sune-n ton cu pacea ei, când molcom Visând, întâmpin scumpa Şi dulcea ta sosire! For when thy foldind-star arising shows His paly circlet, at his warning lamp The fragrant hours, and elves Who wept in buds the day, Când, cu nimb pal, luceafărul-de-seară E sus, la semnul razei sale Ore Înmiresmate, Zâne Ce-n flori dormiră ziua, And many a nymph who wreathes her brows with sedge, And sheds the frehening dew, and, lovelier still, The pensive pleasures sweet, Prepare the shadowy car: Şi Nimfe cu cununi de stuf pe creştet, Ce rouă storc, şi, mai plăcute încă, Plăcerile gândirii Un car îţi fac din umbre: Then lead, calm votaress, where some sheety lake Cheers the lone heath, or some time hollow‘d pile, Or upland fallows grey Reflect its last cool gleam. Mă du atunci spre vreun lac neted, soră, Pe-un câmp pustiu, spre vreo ruină sacră, Sau sure stânci, ce, rece, Răsfrâng un ultim licăr. Or if chill blustering winds, or driving rain, Prevent my willing feet, be mine the hut That from the mountain‘s side Views wilds and swelling floods, Şi dacă aspru vânt sau ploaie-n ropot Opreşte pasul meu, tu dă-mi coliba Ce, de pe-un brâu de munte Şuvoaie vede repezi 114 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And hamlets brown, and dim-discover‘d spires, And hears their simple bell, and marks o‘er all Thy dewy fingers draw The gradual dusky veil. Şi sate, vag, şi, ca prin fum, clopotniţi, Şi-aude dangăt, şi-ţi contemplă mâna Cum lin, de rouă udă, Întinde pânza neagră. While Spring shall pour his show‘rs, as oft he wont, And bathe thy breathing tresses, meekest Eve! While Summer loves to sport Beneath thy lingering light; Când Primăvara dese ploi revarsă, Stropind cosiţa ta, suavă Seară, Când Vara soarbe-n joacă Lumina ta târzie, While sallow Autumn fills thy lap with leaves, Or Winter, yelling through the troublous air, Affrights thy shrinking train, And rudely rends thy robes: Când Toamna-ţi umple poala cu foi moarte, Sau când, urlând prin al tău aer, Iarna Ţi-ar frânge scurta cale, Şi-ţi rupe, crud, vestmântul, So long, regardful to thy quiet rule, Shall Fancy, Friendship, Science, rose-lipp‘d Health Thy genlest influence own, And hymn thy favourite name! Mereu domnia-ţi calmă respectând-o, Prietenie, Vis, Avânt, Ştiinţă Îţi simt înrâurirea Şi-ţi cântă sfântul nume! Traducere T. Boşca. 115 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1751. Thomas GRAY. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard. Boşca. 128 lines. Author: Thomas GRAY (1716-1771). Text: Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: There is one stanza in this poem that you must learn by heart: find out which! Afte rwards explain its meaning. (100 words) Elegy written in a Country Churchyard. Elegie scrisă într-un cimitir de la ţară. The Curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd wind slowly o‘er the lea, The plowman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me. Lung dangăt plânge după ziua moartă, Cirezi mugind curg molcom pe câmpie; Pas trudnic pe plugar spre casă-l poartă, Şi lumea le-o dă umbrelor şi mie. Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds; Priveliştea mai şters acum se-arată, Solemnă pace-n aer e stăpână; Doar un bondar în zumzet zboară roată, Şi vag, tălăngi se-ngână-n somn la stână. Save that from yonder ivy-mantled tow‘r The moping owl does to the moon complain Of such as, wand‘ring near her secret bow‘r, Molest her ancient solitary reign. Doar dintr-un turn cu iederă drept haină, Se plânge lunii buha cu mânie, Când unii trec prin locul ei de taină Şi-i tulbură tăcuta-mpărăţie. Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree‘s shade, Where heaves the turf in many a mould‘ring heap, Each in his narrow cell for ever laid, Sub ulmii strâmbi şi tisă, la răcoare, Roi de movile ştirbe umflă glia: Culcat în hruba-i strâmtă, fiecare, 116 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The rude Forefathers of the hamlet sleep. Ai satului străbuni îşi dorm vecia. The breezy call of incense-breathing Morn, The swallow twitt‘ring from the straw-built shed, The cock shrill clarion, or the echoing horn, No more shall rouse them from their lowly bed. A dimineţii parfumată boare Sau din şopron al rândunelei tril, Glas de cocoş sau corn de poştă-n zare Nu-i mai trezesc din patul lor umil. For them no more the blazing hearth shall burn, Or busy housewife ply her evening care: No children run to lisp their sire‘s return, Or climb his knees the envied kiss to share. Nu mai stă plita pentru ei fierbinte, Nici pun neveste cina pe-ntrecute, Nu-i mai fug tatii prunci peltici-nainte, Nici i se urcă-n braţe, să-i sărute. Oft did the harvest to their sickle yield, Their furrow oft the stubborn glebe has broke: How jocund did they drive their team afield! How bow‘d the woods beneath their sturdy stroke! Grâu mult sub seceri au culcat prin ani, Mult şi-au arat uscatele ogoare! Ce bici voios pocneau peste plăvani! Cum răpuneau copacii sub topoare! Let not Ambition mock their useful toil, Their homely joys, and destiny obscure: Nor Grandeur hear with a disdainful smile The short and simple annals of the poor. Ambiţia nu râdă de-a lor trudă Cu bucurii de rând şi soartă pală, Nici cu dispreţ Grandoarea să audă Al plebei hronic scurt şi fără fală! The boast of heraldry, the pomp of pow‘r, And all that beauty, all that wealth e‘er gave, Awaits alike th‘inevitable hour: The paths of glory lead but to the grave. Blazon trufaş, putere-naurită Şi tot ce-i mândru şi-n averi străluce, La fel aşteaptă ora hărăzită: Poteca slavei doar la groapă duce. Nor you, ye Proud, impute to These the fault, If Memory o‘er their Tomb no Trophies raise, Where through the long-drawn aisle and fretted vault Nici voi, cei mari, nu le scorniţi păcate, Că n-au, prin vremi, trofee pe morminte, În temple largi, unde, sub bolţi sculptate, 117 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The pealing anthem swells the note of praise. Cresc laudele-nalt, din mari cuvinte. Can storied urn or animated bust Back to its mansion call the fleeting breath? Can Honour‘s voice provoke the silent dust, Or Flatt‘ry soothe the dull cold ear of death? Al urnei grai sau bustul ca şi viu Pun oare viaţă-n stinsa răsuflare? Re-nvie pompa colbul din sicriu, Sau surda Moarte-aude imnul oare? Perhaps in this neglected spot is laid Some heart once pregnant with celestial fire; Hands, that the rod of empire might have sway‘d, Or waked to ecstasy the living lyre. Poate-n acest loc sterp găsi hodină Vreun suflet plin de-o flacără cerească; Mâini care-un sceptru-ar fi putut să ţină, Sau lira spre extaz s-o-nsufleţească. But Knowledge to their eyes her ample page Rich with the spoils of time did ne‘er unroll; Chill Penury repress‘d theit noble rage, And froze the genial current of the soul. Dar lor Ştiinţa pagina ei vie, Cu tâlcuri vechi, nicicând nu le-o deschise; Avântul lor s-a stins sub sărăcie, Şi fără rod pieriră a lor vise. Full many a gem of purest ray serene The dark unfathom‘d caves of ocean bear: Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its sweetness on the desert air. Atâtea rare pietre nestemate Rămân în peşteri din adânc de mare! Atâtea flori răsar, necontemplate, Şi-şi pierd, pustii, mireasmă şi culoare! Some village Hampden that with dauntless breast The little tyrant of his fields withstood, Some mute inglorious Milton here may rest, Some Cromwell guiltess of his country‘s blood. Vreun rustic Hampden dârz, care-a ştiut Pe-un mic tiran din sat în chingi a-l strânge; Sau poate doarme-aici vreun Milton mut, Vreun Cromwell nepătat de-al ţării sânge. Th‘applause of list‘ning senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o‘er a smiling land, Aplauze-n senat ei să stârnească, Sfidând război, duşmani şi-ameninţări, Vreun norocos ţinut să-mbogăţească, 118 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And read their history in a nation‘s eyes, Citindu-şi fapta-n ochii unei ţări, Their lot forbade: nor circumscribed alone Their growing virtues, but their crimes confined: Forbade to wade through slaughter to a throne, And shut the gates of mercy on mankind. N-a vrut destinul: el struni, la fel, Şi-a lor virtuţi frumoase şi-a lor crime; N-a vrut spre tron să-i mâie prin măcel, Să-ncuie-a milei porţi către mulţime, The struggling pangs of conscious truth to hide, To quench the blushes of ingenuous shame, Or heap the shrine of Luxury and Pride With incense kindled at the Muse‘s flame. Râvnitul adevăr ascuns să fie, Sfioasa cuviinţă să dispară. Să-nalţe înspre Lux şi Semeţie Tămâie-aprinsă la a Muzei pară. Far from the madding crowd‘s ignoble strife Their sober wishes never learn‘d to stray; Along the cool sequester‘d vale of life They kept the noiseless tenor of their way. Străini de-a gloatei certuri ne-ncetate, Nu şi-au pierdut a lor modeste ţinte; Prin valea-ngustă-a unei vieţi curate, Ei drumul şi l-au mers călcând cuminte. Yet ev‘n these bones from insult to protect, Some frail memorial still erected nigh, With uncouth rhymes and shapeless sculpture deck‘d, Implores the passing tribute of a sigh. Şi dând acestor oase ocrotire, Câte-un mai firav monument răzleţ, Sculptat stângaci, cu şchioapă stihuire, Imploră un suspin de la drumeţ. Their name, their years, spelt by th‘unletter‘d muse, The place of fame and elegy supply: And many a holy text arpund she strews, That teach the rustic moralist to die. Un nume, anii; muza fără carte Le-a scris în loc de bocet şi-nchinare, Şi texte sacre-a pus de câte-o parte, Să-nveţe pe cei vrednici cum se moare. For who, to dumb Forgetfulness a prey, This pleasin anxious being e‘er resign‘d, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Căci cine, rob Uitării fără grai, Acest amarnic dulce trai îl curmă, Şi lasă-al zilei calde vesel plai, 119 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Nor cast one longing ling‘ring look behind? Fără-a privi cu dor prelung în urmă? On some fond breast the parting soul relies, Some pious drops the closing eye requires; Ev‘n from the tomb the voice of Nature cries, Ev‘n in our Ashes live their wonted Fires. Plecând, un suflet pe-un sân drag se-apleacă, Şi-un ochi murind o lacrimă cerşeşte; Chiar şi-n mormânt Natura n-o să tacă, Şi-n scrumul nostru jarul lor trăieşte. For thee, who, mindful of th‘unhonour‘d dead, Dost in these lines their artless tale relate, If chance, by lonely contemplation led, Some kindred spirit shall inquire thy fate, Iar tu, ce lauzi morţi lipsiţi de slavă, Şi-n vers le cânţi sărmanele destine, Dacă, trecând pe-aici, în vreo zăbavă, Un spirit rudă va-ntreba de tine, Haply some hoary-headed Swain may say, Oft have we seen him at the peep of dawn Brushing with hasty steps the dews away To meet the sun upon the upland lawn. Va zice, poate, vreun ţăran albit: Noi l-am văzut ades, în zori de zi, Cum, roua măturând, suia grăbit, Cu soarele pe deal spre-a se-ntâlni. There at the foot of yonder nodding beech That wreaths its old fantastic roots so high, His listless length at noontide would he stretch, And pore upon the brook that babbles by. Sub fagul gârbov ce colea veghează, Boltind ciudate rădăcini pe sus, El se-ntindea alene, la amiază, Pârâu-n şopot urmărindu-l dus. Hard by yon wood, now smiling as in scorn, Mutt‘ring his wayward fancies he would rove, Now dropping, woeful wan, like one forlorn, Or crazed with care, or cross‘d in hopeless love. Pe sub pădure, ba zâmbind ca-n silă, Umbla şoptind vreo şoadă născocire, Ba frânt şi galben, parc-ar cere milă, Nebun de griji, sau ros de-o rea iubire. One morn I miss‘d him on the custom‘d hill, Along the heath and near his fav‘rite tree; Another came; nor yet beside the rill, Dar într-o zi nu-l mai văzui pe deal, La fagul lui iubit şi-n iarba moale; Veni a doua: nici pe-al apei mal 120 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Nor up the lawn, nor at the wood was he; N-a fost, nici la pădure, nici în vale. The next with dirges due in sar array Slow through the church-way path we saw him borne. Approach and read (for thou canst read) the lay Graved on the stone beneath yon aged thorn:‘ „A treia zi cu-alai îl petrecură La cimitir, în rugă şi suspin. Hai să citeşti (căci ai învăţătură) Ce-au scris în piatră, sub bătrânul spin: THE EPITAPH EPITAF Here rests his head upon the lap of Earth A Youth to Fortune and to Fame unknown. Fair Science frown‘d not on his humble birth, And Melancholy mark‘d him for her own. Aicea doarme-n a ţărânii poală Un tânăr fără faimă şi-avuţie: Deşi sărac, n-a fost lipsit de şcoală, Iar semnul şi-l găsi-n Melancolie. Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere, Heav‘n did a recompense as largely send: He gave to Mis‘ry all he had, a tear, He gain‘d from Heav‘n (twas all he wish‘d) a friend. Purta gând bun şi dărnicie-ntr-însul, Şi, darnic, Cerul plată i-a menit: Dând la sărmani ce-avea, adică plânsul, Iubit a fost de Cer (cum şi-a dorit). No farther seek his merits to disclose, Or draw his frailties from their dread abode. (There they alike in trembling hope repose,) The bosom of his Father and his God. Nu-i pune şi-alte merite-n balanţă, Nici pete nu-i scădea-n lăcaşul său; (Dorm toate-acolo-n tremur şi speranţă,) Lângă-al său Tată, lângă Dumnezeu. Traducere T. Boşca. 121 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1782. BURNS. John Barleycorn. Leviţchi. 60 lines. Author: Robert BURNS (1759-1796). Text: John Barleycorn. Translator: Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Who was Robert Burns? Who was John Barleycorn? (20 words) John Barleycorn. John Bob-de-orz. There was three kings into the east, Three kings both great and high, And they hae sworn a solemn oath John Barleycorn should die. Erau trei regi în răsărit, Trei regi de stirpe mare, Juraţi pe Johnnie Bob-de-orz Cumva să îl omoare. They took a plough and plough‘d him down, Put clods upon his head, And they hae sworn a solemn oath John Barleycorn was dead. Au luat un plug, l-au îngropat, Pe cap pământ i-au pus Și au jurat cu jurământ Că John a fost răpus. But the cheerful Spring came kindly on, And show‘rs began to fall; John Barleycorn got up again, And sore surpris‘d them all. Dar când se-ntoarse primăvara Cu ploaie şi cu spor, Se ridică iar Bob-de-orz Spre ciuda tuturor. The sultry suns of Summer came, And he grew thick and strong; His head weel arm‘d wi‘ pointed spears, Veniră-ai verii sori fierbinţi Şi prinse John grăsime Şi suliţi îi crescură-n cap, 122 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That no one should him wrong. Să nu-l înfrunte nime! The sober Autumn enter‘d mild, When he grew wan and pale; His bending joints and drooping head Show‘d he began to fail. Când pogorî, blând, toamna, John Se gălbeji la faţă, Se gârbovi, se cocârjă, Ca la amurg de viaţă. His colour sicken‘d more and more, He faded into age; And then his enemies began To show their deadly rage. Iar când era mai fără vlagă Şi mai bicisnic John, Atunci şi-au arătat duşmanii Grozavul parapon. They‘ve taen a weapon, long and sharp, And cut him by the knee; Then tied him fast upon a cart, Like a rogue for forgerie. L-au retezat cu un cosor Lucios și ascuţit Şi-ntr-o căruţă, ca pe-un hoţ, Burduf l-au cetluit. They laid him down upon his back, And cudgell‘d him full sore; They hung him up before the storm, And turned him o‘er and o‘er. L-au prăvălit, l-au ciomăgit, De-orce puteri l-au stors, În buza vântului l-au pus, Şi l-au sucit şi-ntors. They filled up a darksome pit With water to the brim; They heaved in John Barleycorn, There let him sink or swim. O groapă neagră au umplut Cu apă-ntunecată Și-ntr-însa l-au zvârlit pe John Se-neacă au înoată? They laid him out upon the floor, To work him farther woe; L-au aşternut, ca să-l supună La cazne, pe arman; 123 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And still, as signs of life appear‘d, They toss‘d him to and fro. Şi cum clintea, cum năpădeau Şi-l burduşeau avan. They wasted, o‘er a scorching flame, The marrow of his bones; But a miller us‘d him worst of all, For he crush‘d him between two stones. Din oase măduva i-au scos, L-au pus pe-o vâlvătaie, Iar un morar, cel mai hapsân, L-a frânt între pietroaie. And they hae taen his very heart‘s blood, And drank it round and round; And still the more and more they drank, Their joy did more abound. I-au luat tot sângele şi cana A mers din mână-n mână Şi de ce beau, de ce erau Ei toţi mai îndemână. John Barleycorn was a hero bold, Of noble enterprise; For if you do but taste his blood, Twill make your courage rise. Erou a fost John Bob-de-orz Cu inima vitează; Din sângele-i, un singur strop Pe om îmbărbătează; Twill make a man forget his woe; Twill heighten all his joy; Twill make the widow‘s heart to sing, Tho‘ the tear were in her eye. Îl mângâie pe obidit Când simte că-i pe ducă: Pe văduvă o-nveseleşte Şi lacrima-i usucă. Then let us toast John Barleycorn, Each man a glass in hand; And may his great posterity Ne‘er fail in old Scotland! Să închinăm, dar, pentru John, Cu mâna pe stacană; Să propăşească John de-a pururi În ţara scoţiană! Traducere L. Levţchi. 124 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1783. George CRABBE. The Pauper’s Funeral. Boşca. 29 lines. Author: George CRABBE (1754-1832). Text: The Pauper‘s Funeral. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: How do you go about learning both English and Poetics by comparing the Original wit h the Translation? Explain in detail. The Pauper’s Funeral. Prohodul săracului. Now once again the gloomy scene explore, Less gloomy now; the bitter hour is o‘er, The man of many sorrows sighs no more. – Up yonder hill, behold how sadly slow The bier moves winding from the vale below; There lie the happy dead, from trouble free, And the glad parish pays the frugal fee. No more, O Death! the victim starts to hear Churchwarden stern, or kingly overseer; No more the farmer claims his humble bow, Thou art his lord, the best of tyrants thou! Now to the church behold the mourners come, Sedately torpid and devoutly dumb; The village children now their games suspend, To see the bier that bears their ancient friend; For he was one in all their idle sport, Cumplita scenă vezi-o încă-o dată; Acu-i mai calmă; ora-ntunecată S-a dus: sărmanul n-o să se mai zbată. Pe deal, departe, şerpuind agale, Vezi cum sicriul suie dinspre vale. Acolo dorm cei morţi, scăpaţi de chin, Iar obştea, azi, mai cheltuie puţin. Cel stins, o, moarte, n-o să mai audă Vătaf regesc sau crâsnic plin de ciudă; Boierul nu-i mai dă porunci, strigând; Domn îi eşti tu, tiranul cel mai blând! Vin la prohod şi nişte bocitoare, Dar tac, într-o pioasă nepăsare. Ai satului copii s-au strâns grămadă, Sicriul unui vechi ortac să-l vadă; Căci el a fost mereu în ceata lor, 125 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And like a monarch ruled their little court. The pliant bow he form‘d, the flying ball, The bat, the wicket, were his labours all; Him now they follow to his grave, and stand Silent and sad, and gazing, hand in hand; While bending low, their eager eyes explore The mingled relics of the parish poor. The bell tolls late, and moping owl flies round; Fear marks the flight and magnifies the sound; The busy priest, detain‘d by weightier care, Defers his duty till the day of prayer; And, waiting long, the crowd retire distress‘d, To think a poor man‘s bones should lie unbless‘d. Şi-o cârmuise ca un domnitor. Arc le făcea şi minge zburătoare; Dibaci era la porţi şi bătătoare. Pe el îl duc pe ultima lui cale, Şi, mână-n mână, merg privind cu jale. Plecându-se, cu ochi isteţi străbat Mormintele săracilor din sat. Bat clopote târziu, şi-o buhă zboară; Pe toţi îi face frica să tresară. Iar popa, prins cu treburi, pleacă fuga: La ziua celor morţi amână ruga. Se-mprăştie şi lumea, cugetând Că n-ai nici popă, când eşti om de rând. Traducere T. Boşca. 126 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1786. Robert BURNS. My Father Was a Farmer. Boşca. 72 lines. Author: Robert BURNS (1759-1796). Text: My Father Was a Farmer. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: How do you go about learning both English and Poetics by comparing the Original wit h the Translation? Explain in detail. My Father was a Farmer. Ţăran îmi fuse tata. My father was a farmer Upon the Carrick border, And carefully he bred me In decency and order. He bade me act a manly part, Though I had ne‘er a farthing, For without an honest, manly heart, No man was worth regarding. Ţăran îmi fuse tata, Pe malul unei ape, Cu-alese gânduri gata Mereu să mă adape. Zicea să fiu un om mereu, Chiar dacă n-am parale, Căci dacă nu eşti nepătat, Dispreţ culegi în cale. Then out into the world My course I did determine, Though to be rich was not my wish, Yet to be great was charming, My talents they were nit the worst, Nor yet my education; Resolved was I at least to try Apoi, ajuns în lume, Cărare mi-am croit; N-am vrut averi, dar nume Întruna mi-am dorit. Talentul nu mi-a fost prea sterp, Nici bruma mea de carte, Şi m-am silit din răsputeri 127 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To mend my situation. Din toate să am parte. In many a way, and vain essay, I courted Fortune‘s favour; Some cause unseen still stept between To frustrate each endeavour: Sometimes by foes I was o‘erpowered; Sometimes by friends forsaken; And when my hope was at the top, I still was worst mistaken. Prin multe încercări şi căi, Vrui să-mi atrag norocul, Dar ceva nevăzut mi-a pus Doar piedici în tot locul. Duşmani m-au doborât ades, Prieteni mă trădară; Şi-ades de pe-a speranţei culmi Căzui nevolnic iară. Then sore harassed, and tired at last, With Fortune‘s vain delusion, I dropt my shemes, like idle dreams, And came to this conclusion: The past was bad, and the future hid; Its good or ill untried; But the present hour was in my power, And so I would enjoy it. Apoi, sătul şi obosit De-a sorţii ură trează, Din visuri vane mă smulsei, Gândind precum urmează: Ce-a fost, e rău; iar ce va fi, Nu desluşeşte nime‘. Dar pe prezent sunt eu stăpân, Şi-l sorb în întregime. No help, nor hope, nor view had I, Nor person to befriend me; So I must toil, and sweat, and broil, And labour to sustain me. To plough and sow, to reap and mow, My father bred me early; For one, he said, to labour bred, Was a match for Fortune fairly. N-aveam nădejdi, nici ajutor, Pe nimeni lângă mine; Deci voi munci, voi asuda, Prin trudă mă voi ţine. Să ar, să semăn, să cosesc, Bătrânul mă-nvăţase, Zicând: pe cel ce va lucra Norocul n-o să-l lase. Thus, all obscure, unknown and poor, Sărac, străin şi neştiut 128 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Through life I‘m droomed to wander, Till down my weary bones I lay, In everlasting slumber. No view nor care, but shun whate‘er Might breed me pain or sorrow; Alive to-day as well‘s I may, Regardless of tomorrow, Mi-e dat să trec prin viaţă, Pân‘ oasele-mi s-or odihni În somnul cel de gheaţă. Nici griji, nici teamă nu m-abat, Nu cad sub apăsare, Căci azi sunt viu, trăiesc din plin, De mâine nu mă doare. But cheerful still, I am as well As a monarch in a palace, Though Fortune‘s frown still hunts me down, With all her wonted malice; I make indeed my daily bread, But ne‘er can make it farther; But as daily bread is all I need, I do not much regard her. Ba încă vesel sunt mereu, Ca pe-al său tron un rege; Iar că se-ncruntă uneori Destinul, se-nţelege. Eu pâinea zilnic mi-o frământ, Dar nu mi-o fac mai mare: Doar pâinea zilnică mi-o vreau, Deci nu mă zbat prea tare. When sometimes by my labour I earn a little money, Some unforeseen misfortune Comes generally upon me; Mischance, mistake, or by neglect, Or my good natured folly; But come that will, I‘ve sworn it still, I‘ll ne‘er be melancholy. Când, uneori, prin muncă, Vreun ban îmi cade-n pungă, Vreo pacoste sunt sigur Că are să m-ajungă: O fi greşeală, nenoroc, Sau poate nepăsare, Dar vie ce-o veni, mă jur Să fug de întristare! All you who follow wealth and power With unremitting ardour, The more in this you look for bliss, You live your view the farther. Voi, ce mărire şi averi Vânaţi mereu, amarnic, La fericire de visaţi, Luptatul vi-i zadarnic. 129 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Had you the wealth Potosi boasts, Or nations to adore you, A cheerful, honest-hearted clown I will prefer before you. Oricâte bogăţii să-aveţi, Orice minuni aţi face, Un vesel şi cinstit bufon Mai mult ca voi îmi place. Traducere T. Boşca. 130 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1789a. BLAKE. The Little Black Boy. Blaga. Boşca. 28 lines. Author: William BLAKE (1757-1827). Text: The Little Black Boy. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: How do you go about learning both English and Poetics by comparing the Original wit h the Translation? Explain in detail. The Little Black Boy. Micuţul negru. My mother bore me in the southern wild, And I am black, but O, my soul is white! White as an angel is the English child, But I am black, as if bereaved of light. În sud sălbatic mama m-a născut. Sunt negru; o, dar sufletul mi-e alb. Alb ca un înger e micul englez, eu negru, parcă de lumină despoiat. My mother taught me underneath a tree, And, sitting down before the heat of day, She took me on her lap and kissèd me, And, pointing to the East, began to say: Mama, vorbindu-mi, mă-nvăţa subt pom. Pe jos, mai înainte de a da căldura zilei, mă lua în poala ei, şi arătând spre răsărit, grăia: Look at the rising sun: there God does live, And gives His light, and gives His heat away, And flowers and trees and beasts and men receive Comfort in morning, joy in the noonday. ,,În dosul soarelui, acolo-i Dumnezeu. El dă căldura şi lumina ce o vezi. Copaci şi dobitoace, flori şi oameni de-acolo tihna şi-o primesc pe la nămiezi. And we are put on earth a little space, Scurt timp noi suntem pe tărâmuri puşi 131 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That we may learn to bear the beams of love; And these black bodies and this sunburnt face Are but a cloud, and like a shady grove. iubirea s-o-ndurăm până la os. Înfăţişarea noastră neagră e la fel c-un nor, şi ca un crâng umbros. For when our souls have learn‘d the heat to bear, The cloud will vanish, we shall hear His voice, Saying, Come out from the grove, my love and care, And round my golden tent like lambs rejoice. Când noi vom fi-nvăţat să îndurăm căldura, norul va dispare. Dumnezeu va zice : „Dragi copii ieşiţi din crâng şi bucuraţi-vă ca mieii-n jurul meu. Thus did my mother say, and kissèd me, And thus I say to little English boy. When I from black and he from white cloud free, And round the tent of God like lambs we joy, Mama aşa-mi spunea, şi-o sărutare-mi da. Micuţului englez aşa-i zic eu: Când eu de negrul, el de albul nor, ne-om dezbrăca, pe lângă Dumnezeu I‘ll shade him from the heat till he can bear To lean in joy upon our Father‘s knee; And then I‘ll stand and stroke his silver hair, And be like him, and he will then love me. noi ne-om juca, şi umbră-i voi ţinea ca să îndure bucuria, când s-a sprijini de Tatăl nostru. Eu voi fi atunci ca el, şi el mă va iubi. Traducere L. Blaga. 132 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Little Black Boy. Băieţelul de negru. My mother bore me in the southern wild, And I am black, but O, my soul is white! White as an angel is the English child, But I am black, as if bereaved of light. Măicuţa-n sudul crâncen mi-a dat viaţă, Şi-s negru, dar la suflet, crin curat! Copilul de englez e alb la faţă, Eu, negru: de lumină par furat. My mother taught me underneath a tree, And, sitting down before the heat of day, She took me on her lap and kissèd me, And, pointing to the East, began to say: Măicuţa sub un pom mă învăţa, La umbră, când sta soarele-n zenit; În poală mă lua, mă săruta, Şi-apoi zicea, privind spre răsărit: Look at the rising sun: there God does live, And gives His light, and gives His heat away, And flowers and trees and beasts and men receive Comfort in morning, joy in the noonday. „Vezi, Dumnezeu acolo e, în soare, Şi toate cu-al său foc le luminează, Şi de la el, om, fiară, pom şi floare Beau vlagă-n zori, şi-s veseli la amiază. And we are put on earth a little space, That we may learn to bear the beams of love; And these black bodies and this sunburnt face Are but a cloud, and like a shady grove. Pe-aest pământ petreci un scurt răgaz, Ca de-al iubirii foc să fii călit; Şi-un negru trup sau un bronzat obraz Sunt doar un nor sau ca un crâng umbrit. For when our souls have learn‘d the heat to bear, The cloud will vanish, we shall hear His voice, Saying, Come out from the grove, my love and care, And round my golden tent like lambs rejoice. Când arşiţa vei şti a o răbda, Va trece norul: «Haideţi, fiii mei, Din crâng, va zice El pentru-a zburda e lângă cortul meu, ca nişte miei!» Thus did my mother say, and kissèd me, Aşa cum îmi vorbea măicuţa, blând, 133 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And thus I say to little English boy. When I from black and he from white cloud free, And round the tent of God like lambs we joy, Eu pruncului englez îi voi vorbi: Eu, negru nor, el alb înlăturând, Doi miei sub cortul Domnului vom fi. I‘ll shade him from the heat till he can bear To lean in joy upon our Father‘s knee; And then I‘ll stand and stroke his silver hair, And be like him, and he will then love me. De soare-o să-l feresc şi-am să-l alint, La Domnu-n braţe când va huzuri, Şi mângâia-voi părul său de-argint, Şi-oi fi ca el, şi-atunci mă va iubi. Traducere T. Boşca. 134 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1789b. BLAKE. Reeds of Innocence. Boşca. 20 lines. Author: William BLAKE (1757-1827). Text: Reeds of Innocence. Translator: T. Boşca. FrageStellung: a. How do you go about learning both English and Poetics by comparing the Original with the Translation? Explain in detail. b. Is rhyme essential in the translation of this – only apparently – very limpid text? Would it ha ve the same effect if you disregarded the ryhyme in translation? Does the rhyme support a symbol, or is the poem all about m usicality? Reeds of Innocence. Cântecele nevinovăţiei. Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: Pipe a song about a Lamb!‘ Fluieram de pe-un ponor Un cânt vesel, coborând, Şi-am zărit un prunc pe-un nor, Iară el grăi râzând: „Zi un cântec despre miel! So I piped with merry cheer. Piper, pipe that song again;‘ So I piped: he wept to hear. Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer!‘ Şi l-am zis, precum dorea. „Zi, trişcar, zi-l iar, la fel! Şi l-am zis, iar el plângea. „Zvârle-ţi fluierul în vânt! Zi din glas, şi-mi va plăcea! So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. Şi-am zis iar acelaşi cânt: El, de fericit, plângea. 135 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Piper, sit thee down and write In a book that all may read.‘ So he vanish‘d from my sight; „Şezi, trişcar, să-l scrii pe-o carte, Şi la cititori să-l dai! Şi-a pierit, zburând departe... And I pluck‘d a hollow reed, And I made a rural pen, And I stain‘d the water clear, And I wrote my happy songs, Every child may joy to hear. Eu o trestie luai Şi-mi făcui o pană simplă, Apa limpede-o mânjii, Şi scrisei cântări voioase, Să le placă la copii. Traducere T. Boşca. 136 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1794. BLAKE. The Garden of Love. Tartler. 12 lines. Author: William BLAKE (1757-1827). Text: The Garden of Love. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: a. How do you go about learning both English and Poetics by comparing the Original with the Translation? Explain in detail. b. How does the translator adapt her words to the poetic symbol, in comparison with the original? The Garden of Love. Grădina Iubirii. I went to the Garden of Love, And saw what I never had seen: A Chapel was built in the midst, Where I used to play on the green. And the gates of this Chapel were shut, And `Thou shalt not‘ writ over the door; So I turn‘d to the Garden of Love, That so many sweet flowers bore, And I saw it was filled with graves, And tomb-stones where flowers should be: And Priests in black gowns were walking their rounds, And binding with briars my joys and desires. Am fost în Grădina Iubirii Şi-am văzut ce nicicând n-am văzut: O capelă zidită în iarba Unde mă jucam la-nceput. Şi pe poarta închisă-a capelei Era-nscrisul „Să nu... şi „Să nu... Şi atunci m-am întors în grădina Ce flori minunate avu. Plină-i acum cu morminte Şi pietre, unde altcândva flori Şi preoţi în negre vestminte Cu mohor îmi legau orice dor. Traducere G. Tartler. 137 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1797a. Ienăchiţă VCRESCU. Testament literar. 4 lines. Author: Ienăchiţă VCRESCU (1740-1797). Text: Testament literar. Translator: FrageStellung: Testament literar. Urmaşilor mei Văcăreşti! Las vouă moştenire: Creşterea limbei româneşti Ş-a patriei cinstire. Translation required. 138 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1797b. Ienăchiţă VCRESCU. Amărâtă turturea. 28 lines. Author: Ienăchiţă VCRESCU (1740-1707). Text: Amărâtă turturea. Translator: FrageStellung: Amărâtă turturea. Amărâtă turturea Când rămâne singurea, Căci soţia şi-a răpus, Jalea ei nu e de spus. Translation required. Cât trăieşte tot jăleşte, Şi nu se mai însoţeşte! Trece prin flori, prin livede, Nu să uită, nici nu vede Trece prin pădurea verde Şi să duce de se pierde. Zboară până de tot cade, Dar pre lemn verde nu şade. 139 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi când şade câteodată, Tot pre ramură uscată. Umblă prin dumbrav-adâncă, Nici nu bea, nici nu mănâncă. Unde vede apă rece, Ea o turbură şi trece; Unde e apa mai rea, O mai turbură şi bea. Unde vede vânătorul, Acolo o duce dorul, Ca s-o vază, s-o lovească, Să nu se mai pedepsească. Când o biată păsărică Atât inima îşi strică, Încât doreşte să moară Pentru a sa soţioară, Dar eu om de-naltă fire, Decât ea mai cu simţire, Cum poate să-mi fie bine?! Oh, amar şi vai de mine! 140 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1797c. Ienăchiţă VCRESCU. Într-o grădină. 6 lines. Author: Ienăchiţă VCRESCU (1740-1797). Text: Într-o grădină. Translator: FrageStellung: Într-o grădină. Translation required. Într-o grădină, Lâng-o tulpină, Zării o floare ca o lumină. S-o tai, să strică! S-o las, mi-e frică Că vine altul şi mi-o ridică. 141 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1797d. Ienăchiţă VCRESCU. Spune, inimioară, spune. 12 lines. Author: Ienăchiţă VCRESCU (1740-1797). Text: Spune, inimioară, spune. Translator: FrageStellung: Have a go, and translate this short poem yourself: it is not at all difficult! Spune, inimioară, spune. Translation required. Spune, inimioară, spune Ce durere te răpune? Arată ce te munceşte? Ce boală te chinuieşte? Fă-o cunoscută mie, Ca să-ţi caut dohtorie. Te rog, fă-mă a pricepe Boala din ce ţi se-ncepe? Arată, spune, n-ascunde! Dă-mi un cuvânt şi-mi răspunde: Spune, inimioară, spune Ce durere te răpune? 142 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1798. COLERIDGE. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. 1. Lines 1-82. Leviţchi. 82 lines. Author: Samuel Taylor COLERIDGE (1772-1834). Text: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. 1. Lines 1-82. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Something very unusual, and out of the way, happens between the two interlocutors, in Stanzas 1 + 4: What exactly is it? One word...You can describe it in only one word, if you scrutinize the two stanzas together. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Povestea bătrânului marinar. I I 1. It is an ancient Mariner, And he stoppeth one of three. By thy long grey beard and glittering eye, Now wherefore stopp‘st thou me? Un marinar bătrân aţine Pe unul din cei trei. „Pe ochiu-ţi viu, pe barba-ţi sură! Cum îndrăzneşti? Ce vrei? 2. The Bridegroom‘s doors are opened wide, And I am next of kin; The guests are met, the feast is set: May‘st hear the merry din. Odaia mirelui deschisă-i Şi neam de-aproape-i sunt; Masa e-ntinsă, lumea strânsă – N-auzi zarvă şi cânt? 3. He holds him with his skinny hand, There was a ship, quoth he. Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon! Eftsoons his hand dropt he. „A fost un vas, zice, ţinându-l Cu mâna lui osoasă. „Ia mâna, ticălos bătrân! Şi-ntr-adevăr, o lasă 143 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 4. He holds him with his glittering eye – The Wedding-Guest stood still, And listens like a three years child: The Mariner hath his will. Şi-l ţine-acum cu scânteioasă A ochiului privire; Nuntaşu-ascultă – prunc supus Voinţei peste fire. 5. The Wedding-Guest sat on a stone: He cannot chuse but hear; And thus spake on that ancient man, The bright-eyed Mariner. Şi cum nu are încotro Se-aşează pe un stei Iar marinarul povesteşte, Zvârlind din ochi scântei: 6. The ship was cheered, the harbour cleared, Merrily did we drop Below the kirk, below the hill, Below the light-house top. „În chiote-am plecat din port, Plutind spre marea-adâncă Pe lângă deal şi paradis Şi farul de pe stâncă 7. The Sun came up upon the left, Out of the sea came he! And he shone bright, and on the right Went down into the sea. Şi soarele pe stânca noastră, Se culegea din ape, Lucea şi se pleca spre dreapta În mare să se-ngroape. 8. Higher and higher every day, Till over the mast at noon – The Wedding-Guest here beat his breast, For he heard the loud bassoon. Mai sus, mai sus, de-l săgeta Catargu-n miez de zi... Nuntaşul auzi fagotul Şi pumnu-i se zgârci. 9. The bride hath paced into the hall, Red as a rose is she; Nodding their heads before her goes The merry minstrelsy. Mireasa,-mbujorată foarte, Păşeşte-n casa mare, Iar lăutarii merg în frunte Cu veselă cântare. 144 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 10. The Wedding-Guest he beat his breast, Yet he cannot chuse but hear; And thus spake on that ancient man, The bright-eyed Mariner. Degeaba se loveşte-n piept Nuntaşul într-acestea; Bătrânul marinar nu cată Şi-şi deapănă povestea. 11. And now the Storm-Blast came, and he Was tyrannous and strong: He struck with his o‘ertaking wings, And chased south along. „Apoi, năvalnică şi aspră, S-a năpustit furtuna; Cu aripa-i spre miază-zi Ne-a îndemnat întruna. 12. With sloping masts and dipping prow, As who pursued with yell and blow Still treads the shadow of his foe And forward bends his head, The ship drove fast, loud roared the blast, And southward aye we fled. Catartu-i frânt; sub apă puntea; Ca un învins ce-şi pleacă fruntea Sub biciul duşmanului crud Şi-n umbra-i îşi iuţeşte pasul, În urletul furtunii vasul Gonea mereu spre sud. 13. And now there came both mist and snow, And it grew wondrous cold: And ice, mast-high, came floating by, As green as emerald. Veniră neguri şi zăpezi Şi frigul din înalturi; Iar gheaţa, verde ca smaragdul, Ajunse la catarturi. 14. And through the drifts the snowy clifts Did send a dismal sheen: Nor shapes of men nor beasts we ken – The ice was all between. Şi prin nămeţi, albii pereţi Luceau fără de viaţă; Nici om, nici dobitoc în preajmă, Doar un pustiu de gheaţă. 15. The ice was here, the ice was there, The ice was all around: It cracked and growled, and roared and howled, În jur doar gheaţă,-n spate,-n faţă, Oceanul era plin – Trosnind, crăpând, mugind, urlând 145 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Like noises in a swound! Cu vuiet de leşin! 16. At length did cross an Albatross: Thorough the fog it came; As if it had been a Christian soul, We hailed it in God‘s name. Dintr-un nor gros, un albatros Veni într-un târziu; Toţi creştineşte l-am primit Ca pe un suflet viu. 17. It ate the food it ne‘er had eat, And round and round it flew. The ice did split with a thunder-fit; The helmsman steered us through! Mâncă mâncări lui neştiute Şi se roti pe-aproape... Şi-am fost scăpaţi, căci gheaţa prinse Cu bubuit să crape. 18. And a good south wind sprung up behind; The Albatross did follow, And every day, for food or play, Came to the mariners‘ hollo! Porni vânt bun, iar albatrosul Ne urmări în zbor; Când marinarii îl chemau Venea la joaca lor. 19. In mist or cloud, on mast or shroud, It perched for vespers nine; Whiles all the night, through fog-smoke white, Glimmered the white Moon-shine. Sta nouă ceasuri cocoţat Pe vergi şi pe vântrele; Iar luna licărea bolnav Prin negurile grele. 20. God save thee, ancient Mariner, From the fiends, that plague thee thus! – Why look‘st thou so? – With my cross-bow I shot the Albatross. «Bătrâne, de vrăjmaşi te aibă În paza-I Cel de Sus! Arăţi cumplit...» Cu arbaleta Eu pasărea-am răpus. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 146 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1802. WORDSWORTH. My Heart Leaps Up. Blaga. 9 lines. Author: William WORDSWORTH (1770-1850). Text: My Heart Leaps Up. Translator: L. Blaga. FrageStellung: What is this particular English poet famous for, in the first place? My Heart Leaps Up. Îmi saltă inima. My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky. So was it when my life began; So is it now I am a man; So be it when I grow old, Or let me die! The Child is father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety. Îmi saltă inima, un curcubeu când văd pe cerul meu. Aşa era, când începu viaţa mea. Aşa-i acum că sunt bărbat. Şi când voi fi bătrân, de-asemenea. Şi dacă astfel nu va fi, mai bine mor şi n-oi mai şti. Copilul e tatăl Bărbatului. Doresc să-mi fie zilele legate printr-o firească pietate. Traducere L. Blaga. 147 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1816. BYRON. The Dream. Teodorescu. 206 lines. Author: George Gordon, Lord BYRON (1788-1824). Text: The Dream. Translator: V. Teodorescu. FrageStellung: Retranslate one stanza (of your choice) into plain elegant prose, using words quite different from those of the translator... The Dream. Visul. I I Our life is twofold; Sleep hath its own world, A boundary between the things misnamed Death and existence: Sleep hath its own world, And a wide realm of wild reality, And dreams in their development have breath, And tears, and tortures, and the touch of joy; They leave a weight upon our waking thoughts, They take a weight from off waking toils, They do divide our being; they become A portion of ourselves as of our time, And look like heralds of eternity; They pass like spirits of the past they speak Like sibyls of the future; they have power The tyranny of pleasure and of pain; They make us what we were not what they will, And shake us with the vision that‘s gone by, Ni-i viaţa dublă: somnul îşi are lumea lui – Hotărnicind tărâmul ce s-a numit greşit Viaţă şi moarte. Somnul îşi are lumea lui: Fantastic, fără margini imperiu, străbătut De-a visului suflare, ce trece încărcat De bucurii şi lacrimi, de zbucium sau tăceri. Ades, străbate visul, chiar trezi, al nostru gând, Presară plumb asupra-i, sau îl avântă-n slăvi, Se-mplântă-n noi şi-n două fiinţa ne-o despică, Răstălmăceşte timpul şi-asemeni c-un trimis Al veşniciei, duhuri recheamă din trecut, Dezleagă viitorul, căci ele au puterea Tiranică-a plăcerii şi a suferinţei. Fac Ce vor din noi, ce n-am fost nicicând, şi ne-nspăimântă Cu umbrele ivite din timpii ce-au apus. Părelnic e trecutul? Şi visurile-s, oare, 148 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The dread of vanished shadows Are they so? Is not the past all shadow? What are they? Creations of the mind? The mind can make Substances, and people planets of its own With beings brighter than have been, and give A breath to forms which can outlive all flesh. I would recall a vision which I dreamed Perchance in sleep for in itself a thought, A slumbering thought, is capable of years, And curdles a long life into one hour. Răsaduri ale minţii? Dezvăluie, o, spirit, Spre-a zămisli fiinţe mai mândre decât noi, Făpturi ce-au frânt zăgazul nimicniciilor. Voi povesti-ntâmplarea ce mi-a sădit-o visul Pe când dormeam; căci gândul, îmbrăţişat de somn, E-n stare să străbată prin vreme şi să-nchege O viaţă, în fugarul răstimp al unui ceas. II II I saw two beings in the hues of youth Standing upon a hill, a gentle hill, Green and of mild declivity, the last As twere the cape of a long ridge of such, Save that there was no sea to lave its base, But a most living landscape, and the wave Of woods and corn-fields, and the abodes of men Scattered at intervals, and wreathing smoke Arising from such rustic roofs: the hill Was crowned with a peculiar diadem Of trees, in circular array, so fixed, Not by the sport of nature, but of man: These two, a maiden and a youth, were there Gazing the one on all that was beneath Fair as herself but the boy gazed on her; And both were young, and one was beautiful: Două făpturi văzut-am, în plină tinereţe, Şezând, întinse-n iarba, pe-un deluşor, tihnit, Colina care-ncheie, cu dulcea-i pantă, şirul Unduitor de dealuri şi care nu-şi muia Picioarele în mare, ci, o scăldau, la poale: Podgoriile, crângul şi lanurile verzi… Iar în oceanu-acesta se arată, ici-acolo, Un coperiş de ţară şi fumul şerpuind Câtre senin. Colina de-un brâu era încinsă, O verde diademă de pomi sădită de mâna De om, şi nu de mâna capricioasei firi. Deci fata şi flăcăul, precum v-am spus, priveau De pe colină: fata, în jurul ei; flăcăul La ea – la fel de tineri dar osebiţi ca vârstă. 149 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And both were young yet not alike in youth. As the sweet moon on the horizon‘s verge, The maid was on the eve of womanhood; The boy had fewer summers, but his heart Had far outgrown his years, and to his eye There was but one beloved face on earth, And that was shining on him; he had looked Upon it till it could not pass away; He had no breath, no being, but in hers: She was his voice; he did not speak to her, But trembled on her words; she was his sight, For his eye followed hers, and saw with hers, Which coloured all his objects; he had ceased To live within himself: she was his life, The ocean to the river of his thoughts, Which terminated all; upon a tone, A touch of hers, his blood would ebb and flow, And his cheek change tempestuously his heart Unknowing of its cause of agony. But she in these fond feelings had no share: Her sighs were not for him; to her he was Even as a brother but no more; twas much, For brotherless she was, save in the name Her infant friendship had bestowed on him; Herself the solitary scion left Of a time-honoured race. It was a name Which pleased him, and yet pleased him not and why? Time taught him a deep answer when she loved Se presimţea femeia în ea, precum se-arată În ceaţa serii, luna, pe câtă vreme el Un copilandru încă părea arzând de dor. Căci ochii lui în lume un singur chip zăreau: Al fetei de alături, întipărit în minte Ca-n veci să nu se şteargă, printr-însa el trăia Şi glăsuia printr-însa, cutremurat atunci Când ea vorbea şi lumea printr-însa o vedea, Prin ochii mari ai fetei întrezărea culoarea, Suflarea-i se-mpletise cu răsuflarea ei Şi ea-i era făgaşul noianului de gânduri; Apropierea numai sau glasului ei şoptit Făcea să-i năvălească tot sângele în faţă, I-l îngheţa în vine – mereu schimbat la chip, Dar fără a cunoaşte temei-acestui zbucium. Ea nu-l iubea şi pieptu-i sălta într-un suspin Gândindu-se la altul. Ea frate-l socotea Pe cel de-alături – frate – căci n-avusese frate, Şi se-nvăţase încă din fragedă pruncie Să îl boteze astfel, ea, ultimul vlăstar Al unui neam de frunte şi vechi. Era un nume Care-i plăcea şi totuşi nu-l bucura. De ce? O să dezlege timpul enigma! De un altul Era îndrăgostită fecioara. Chiar şi-acum 150 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Another; even now she loved another, And on the summit of that hill she stood Looking afar if yet her lover‘s steed Kept pace with her expectancy, and flew. Ea se gândea la altul şi cerceta de-acolo De pe colină, zarea, nădăjduind că, poate, Iubitul ei veni-va călare pe-un fugaci, Mai repede ca gândul, să-i potolească dorul. III III A change came o‘er the spirit of my dream. There was an ancient mansion, and before Its walls there was a steed caparisoned: Within an antique Oratory stood The Boy of whom I spake; he was alone, And pale, and pacing to and fro: anon He sate him down, and seized a pen, and traced Words which I could not guess of; then he leaned His bowed head on his hands and shook, as twere With a convulsion then rose again, And with his teeth and quivering hands did tear What he had written, but he shed no tears. And he did calm himself, and fix his brow Into a kind of quiet: as he paused, The Lady of his love re-entered there; She was serene and smiling then, and yet She knew she was by him beloved; she knew For quickly comes such knowledge that his heart Was darkened with her shadow, and she saw That he was wretched, but she saw not all. He rose, and with a cold and gentle grasp He took her hand; a moment o‘er his face Dar visu-şi schimbă cursul: văd o străveche casă Şi-un armăsar la poartă, învesmântat bogat, Iar în capela veche, flăcăul despre care V-am povestit, el, singur, păşind îngândurat, Cu faţa pală. Iată-l că prinde-n mâna pana, Se-aşează, sloveneşte ceva ce n-am putut Să dezlusesc, în palme apoi şi-ascunde fruntea, Un tremur îl străbate, se scoală şi sfâşie Cu mâinile şi dinţii scrisoarea, dar nu varsă O lacrimă, ci fruntea-şi înalţă-ngândurat Şi liniştit. În vreme ce cugetă, deodată Femeia mult-iubită-n capelă a pătruns, Senină, zâmbitoare, deşi ştia preabine Ce zbucium îl frământă – ştia, căci ele văd Dintr-o privire numai – că inima-i tânjeşte De dorul ei; ea chinul i-l cunoaşte şi, totuşi, Nu-nţelegea nimica. El se clinti din loc, Cu-o strângere uşoară şi rece îi luă mâna, Pe fata lui, o clipă, se-ntipări noianul 151 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry A tablet of unutterable thoughts Was traced, and then it faded, as it came; He dropped the hand he held, and with slow steps Retired, but not as bidding her adieu, For they did part with mutual smiles; he passed From out the massy gate of that old Hall, And mounting on his steed he went his way; And ne‘er repassed that hoary threshold more. De gânduri tăinuite, dar fără veste, toate Se stinseră, iar mâna-i căzu fără putere, Cu paşi înceţi spre poarta porni, dar n-arăta C-ar vrea să-şi ia adio: se desparte zâmbind. Trecu prin greaua poartă-a palatului, urcă În şa şi-n lumea largă porni. De-atunci nicicând N-a mai trecut el pragul bătrân şi înnegrit. IV IV A change came o‘er the spirit of my dream. The Boy was sprung to manhood: in the wilds Of fiery climes he made himself a home, And his Soul drank their sunbeams; he was girt With strange and dusky aspects; he was not Himself like what he had been; on the sea And on the shore he was a wanderer; There was a mass of many images Crowded like waves upon me, but he was A part of all; and in the last he lay Reposing from the noontide sultriness, Couched among fallen columns, in the shade Of ruined walls that had survived the names Of those who reared them; by his sleeping side Stood camels grazing, and some goodly steeds Were fastened near a fountain; and a man, Glad in a flowing garb, did watch the while, While many of his tribe slumbered around: And they were canopied by the blue sky, Se schimbă iară visul: e-acum bărbat, flăcăul. Aflându-şi adăpostul într-un ţinut pustiu, Dogorâtor, sălbatic, el sufletul şi-l scaldă În razele de soare, de oameni tuciurii Înconjurat, şi stranii – schimbat şi el la chip, Rătăcitor pe mare şi pe uscat, acum Era o-ngrămădire deasupra mea, în toate Trăind de o potrivă. Sub cel din urmă chip. În arşiţa amiezii zăcea, culcat sub stâlpii Surpaţi, umbrit de zidu-n ruină, martor mut Al celor ce-l durară; păşteau pe mal cămile, Păşteau şi armăsarii, prinşi în pripon, pe mal. Un om veghea în preajmă,-mbrăcat într-o manta Ce flutura în juru-i, în timp ce-ntregul trib Dormea culcat în iarbă, subt baldachinu-albastru Al cerului, atâta de străveziu şi pur, 152 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry So cloudless, clear, and purely beautiful, That God alone was to be seen in heaven. Că numai Domnul, singur, se răsfrângea într-însul. V V A change came o‘er the spirit of my dream. The Lady of his love was wed with One Who did not love her better: in her home, A thousand leagues from his, her native home, She dwelt, begirt with growing Infancy, Daughters and sons of Beauty, but behold! Upon her face there was a tint of grief, The settled shadow of an inward strife, And an unquiet drooping of the eye, As if its lid were charged with unshed tears. What could her grief be? she had all she loved, And he who had so loved her was not there To trouble with bad hopes, or evil wish, Or ill-repressed affliction, her pure thoughts. What could her grief be? she had loved him not, Nor given him cause to deem himself beloved, Nor could he be a part of that which preyed Upon her mind -a spectre of the past. Aici se schimbă visul din nou. Iubita lui Se măritase-acum cu altul dar bărbatul N-o prea iubea. Departe,-n ţinutul ei natal, La mii de leghe,-acolo şi-avea acum sălaşul, Trăind înconjurată de prunci, băieţi şi fete La fel de minunate ca ea. Dar ia priviţi! A poposit durerea pe chipul ei si norii Lăuntricului zbucium, iar pleoapele-i se zbat Împovărate parcă, de lacrime neplânse. Ce deznădejdi o-ncearcă? Dorinţele ei, toate, S-au împlinit, iar omul care-o iubea atât N-o tulbură, şoptindu-i cuvinte vinovate, Nu-i răscoleşte gândul curat, căci e plecat. Ce deznădejdi o-ncearcă? De el îndrăgostită N-a fost şi nu-i dăduse nicicând vre un prilej Să creadă că vreodată va fi iubit. Nu el, Fantasmă din trecutul îndepărtat, venea, În inima-i să-mplânte jungherul suferinţei. VI VI A change came o‘er the spirit of my dream. The Wanderer was returned. I saw him stand Şi iar se schimbă visul. Pribeagul s-a întors Şi-l văd păşind în faţa altarului, la braţ 153 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Before an altar with a gentle bride; Her face was fair, but was not that which made The Starlight of his Boyhood; as he stood Even at the altar, o‘er his brow there came The selfsame aspect and the quivering shock That in the antique Oratory shook His bosom in its solitude; and then As in that hour a moment o‘er his face The tablet of unutterable thoughts Was traced and then it faded as it came, And he stood calm and quiet, and he spoke The fitting vows, but heard not his own words, And all things reeled around him; he could see Not that which was, nor that which should have been But the old mansion, and the accustomed hall, And the remembered chambers, and the place, The day, the hour, the sunshine, and the shade, All things pertaining to that place and hour, And her who was his destiny, came back And thrust themselves between him and the light; What business had they there at such a time? Cu tânăra-i mireasa suavă. E frumoasă, Dar nu ca steaua dalbă a tinereţii lui, Şi iată cum, deodată, pe chipului lui apare Aceeaşi tulburare ce l-a cutremurat, Pe vremuri, în capela bătrână; pentru-o clipă, Ca şi atunci, noianul de gânduri tăinuit I-acoperă obrazul şi piere fără veste Cum a venit, şi iată-l în linişte rostind Cuvintele cerute de legământ, dar glasul Strein îi pare, totul se-nvârte-n jurul lui, Nu vede nici ce este, nici ce-ar putea să fie, Ci casa veche, sala familială, largă, Odăile şi locul şi ceasul anumit, El vede umbra, vede lumina cum coboară, Prilejul care-l leagă de-acel suprem minut Şi-o vede pe femeia care i-a fost menită Cum se strecoară iarăşi umbrindu-i ziua. Dar De ce, în astă clipa, i se-arătase iarăşi? VII VII A change came o‘er the spirit of my dream. The Lady of his love; Oh! she was changed, As by the sickness of the soul; her mind Had wandered from its dwelling, and her eyes, They had not their own lustre, but the look Din nou se schimbă visul. Femeia ce-o iubea Se ofilise-acuma ca după-o boală lungă, Privirea-i rătăcită, lipsită de lucire, Părea nepământească şi inima-i părea Că-şi părăsise locul, era acum regina Unui tărâm fantastic, iar gândurile ei 154 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Which is not of the earth; she was become The queen of a fantastic realm; her thoughts Were combinations of disjointed things; And forms impalpable and unperceived Of others‘ sight familiar were to hers. And this the world calls frenzy; but the wise Have a far deeper madness, and the glance Of melancholy is a fearful gift; What is it but the telescope of truth? Which strips the distance of its fantasies, And brings life near in utter nakedness, Making the cold reality too real! Erau o-nvălmăşală de lucruri fără noimă Şi forme, nevăzute de alţii, pătrundeau În ochii ei, vrăjind-o. Era împărăţia Ciudata-a nebuniei; dar oamenii-nţelepţi Ajung până-n străfunduri, căci au cumplitul dar De-a-ntrezări izvorul durerii lor. Nu-i, oare, Acesta telescopu-adevărului ce şterge Distanţa, despuindu-şi de-nchipuiri deşarte, Şi ne arată viaţa în goliciunea ei? VIII VIII A change came o‘er the spirit of my dream. The Wanderer was alone as heretofore, The beings which surrounded him were gone, Or were at war with him; he was a mark For blight and desolation, compassed round With Hatred and Contention; Pain was mixed In all which was served up to him, until, Like to the Pontic monarch of old days, He fed on poisons, and they had no power, But were a kind of nutriment; he lived Through that which had been death to many men, And made him friends of mountains; with the stars And the quick Spirit of the Universe He held his dialogues: and they did teach To him the magic of their mysteries; Se schimbă visul iară. Pribeag, ca mai demult, Şi părăsit de oameni sau socotit vrăjmaş, Era acum ruina durerii, peste tot De ura şi discordii întâmpinat, mereu Sorbind din suferinţă până-a ajuns să fie Ca Miltridat din Pontus care-a sorbit, pe vremuri, Atât venin cu-ncetul, încât, de la un timp, Nu mai avea putere asupra lui otrava. Trăia sorbind din chinul ce-ar fi răpus pe alţii, Prieteni îşi făcuse în munţi şi sta la sfat Cu stelele, în sânul naturii-nsufleţite, Şi firea îi deschise adâncul tăinuit, Imensa cartea-a Nopţii o răsfoia şi voci Venite din abisuri şopteau despre minuni Şi nepătrunse taine. Aşa-l văzui in vis! 155 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To him the book of Night was opened wide, And voices from the deep abyss revealed A marvel and a secret. – Be it so. IX IX My dream is past; it had no further change. It was of a strange order, that the doom Of these two creatures should be thus traced out Almost like a reality the one To end in madness both in misery. Nimic nu se mai schimbă, căci visul a pierit. Dar cât de straniu,-ai crede dintr-o porunca anume, El mi-a vădit ursita acestor două vieţi, De parcă-a fost aievea – în nebunie, una, Sfârşind – şi a amândouă sfârşind în nenoroc. Traducere V.Teodorescu. 156 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1816. BYRON. Darkness. 82 lines. Author: George Gordon, Lord BYRON (1788-1824) Text: Darkness. Translator: FrageStellung: Who was he ultimately among his peers? Was he a Great Poet? Try to place him among his peers... (50 words) Darkness. I had a dream, which was not all a dream. The bright sun was extinguished, and the stars Did wander darkling in the eternal space, Rayless, and pathless, and the icy earth Swung blind and blackening in the moonless air; Morn came and went and came, and brought no day, And men forgot their passions in the dread Of this their desolation; and all hearts Were chilled into a selfish prayer for light; And they did live by watchfires -and the thrones, The palaces of crowned kings – the huts, The habitations of all things which dwell, Were burnt for beacons; cities were consumed, And men were gathered round their blazing homes To look once more into each other‘s face; Happy were those which dwelt within the eye Translation required. 157 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Of the volcanoes, and their mountain-torch; A fearful hope was all the world contained; Forests were set on fire but hour by hour They fell and faded and the crackling trunks Extinguished with a crash and all was black. The brows of men by the despairing light Wore an unearthly aspect, as by fits The flashes fell upon them: some lay down And hid their eyes and wept; and some did rest Their chins upon their clenched hands, and smiled; And others hurried to and fro, and fed Their funeral piles with fuel, and looked up With mad disquietude on the dull sky, The pall of a past world; and then again With curses cast them down upon the dust, And gnashed their teeth and howled; the wild birds shrieked, And, terrified, did flutter on the ground, And flap their useless wings; the wildest brutes Came tame and tremulous; and vipers crawled And twined themselves among the multitude, Hissing, but stingless they were slain for food; And War, which for a moment was no more, Did glut himself again; a meal was bought With blood, and each sate sullenly apart Gorging himself in gloom: no love was left; All earth was but one thought and that was death, Immediate and inglorious; and the pang Of famine fed upon all entrails men Died, and their bones were tombless as their flesh; 158 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The meagre by the meagre were devoured, Even dogs assailed their masters, all save one, And he was faithful to a corse, and kept The birds and beasts and famished men at bay, Till hunger clung them, or the drooping dead Lured their lank jaws; himself sought out no food, But with a piteous and perpetual moan, And a quick desolate cry, licking the hand Which answered not with a caress he died. The crowd was famished by degrees; but two Of an enormous city did survive, And they were enemies: they met beside The dying embers of an altar-place Where had been heaped a mass of holy things For an unholy usage: they raked up, And shivering scraped with their cold skeleton hands The feeble ashes, and their feeble breath Blew for a little life, and made a flame Which was a mockery; then they lifted up Their eyes as it grew lighter, and beheld Each other‘s aspects saw, and shrieked, and died Even of their mutual hideousness they died, Unknowing who he was upon whose brow Famine had written Fiend. The world was void, The populous and the powerful was a lump, Seasonless, herbless, treeless, manless, lifeless – A lump of death a chaos of hard clay. The rivers, lakes, and ocean all stood still, And nothing stirred within their silent depths; 159 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ships sailorless lay rotting on the sea, And their masts fell down piecemeal; as they dropped They slept on the abyss without a surge – The waves were dead; the tides were in their grave, The Moon, their mistress, had expired before; The winds were withered in the stagnant air, And the clouds perished! Darkness had no need Of aid from them – She was the Universe! 160 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1818a. KEATS. Modern Love. Covaci. 17 lines. Author: John KEATS (1795-1821). Text: Modern Love. Translator: A. Covaci. FrageStellung: Why is Keats so very representative of his time? What gives him such a centrality a mong his close contemporaries? (20 words) Modern Love. Dragostea modernă. And what is love? It is a doll dress‘d up For idleness to cosset, nurse, and dandle; A thing of soft misnomers, so divine That silly youth doth think to make itself Divine by loving, and so goes on Yawning and doting a whole summer long, Till Miss‘s comb is made a pearl tiara, And common Wellingtons turn Romeo boots; Ce-i dragostea? Păpuşă dichisită, S-o mângâie şi s-o răsfeţe lenea; Urzeală de încurcături divine, Încât neghiobii tineri toţi se cred Divini prin dragoste; si-aşa se scurge O vară,-n căscături şi nebunie; Curând ajunge-al domnişoarei piaptăn O diademă toată numai perle, Iar bietele ciubote Welington A lui Romeo fină-ncălţăminte. Atunci la 7 bis sta Cleopatra Şi sta Antonius pe Brunswick Square. Neghiobilor!... Înalte patimi dacă Au încălzit odată lumea; dacă Then Cleopatra lives at number seven, And Antony resides in Brunswick Square. Fools! if some passions high have warm‘d the world, 161 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry If Queens and Soldiers have play‘d deep for hearts, It is no reason why such agonies Should be more common than the growth of weeds. Regine şi Soldaţi s-au zbuciumat Să cucerească inimi – zău, nu văd De ce asemeni zbuciumări s-ar naşte Mai multe, mai de rând ca buruiana! Fools! make me whole again that weighty pearl The Queen of Egypt melted, and I‘ll say That ye may love in spite of beaver hats. Neghiobilor!... Ci întregiţi-mi iară Topită perla grea a Cleopatrei Şi zice-voi că toţi puteţi iubi În ciuda pălăriilor de castor. Traducere A. Covaci. 162 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1818b. SHELLEY. Ozymandias. Tartler. 14 lines. Author: Percy Bysshe SHELLEY (1792-1822). Text: Ozymandias. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: Explain the philosophy of this poem to yourself. Find sayings in any language to ma tch its ultimate conclusion... Ozymandias. Ozymandias. I met a traveller from an antique land, Who said – "two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert ... near them, on the sand, Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lips, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed; And on the pedestal these words appear: My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings, Look on my Works ye Mighty, and despair! Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away. Am întâlnit un călător din vechi ţinut Istorisind: două picioare fără trunchi De piatră, în deşert mai stau…. căzut Alături, jumătate îngropat şi spart, un chip Cu buza strânsă, aspră de porunci, Vădind că sculptoru-a citit c-o să rămână Acele patimi încă vii în lucruri, Marcate de-a sa inimă şi mână. Pe-un soclu, încă vorbe la vedere: Sunt Ozymandias, rege de regi, priviţi ce-am făptuit, voi cei puternici, vă uimiţi! Nimic alt‘ n-a rămas. Doar decăderea Marii ruini şi-n jur nisipuri goale, Nemărginite, singure, egale. Traducere G. Tartler. 163 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1819a. KEATS. Ode on a Grecian Urn. Covaci. 50 lines. Author: John KEATS (1795-1821). Text: Ode on a Grecian Urn. Translator: A. Covaci. FrageStellung: What is an ode? Is the word Grecian unusual in English? And why... Ode on a Grecian Urn. Odă la o urnă grecească. Thou still unravish‘d bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of silence and slow time, Sylvan historian, who canst thus express A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme: What leaf-fring‘d legend haunt about thy shape Of deities or mortals, or of both, In Tempe or the dales of Arcady? What men or gods are these? What maidens loth? What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape? What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy? Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter: therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear‘d, Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone: Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare; Mireas-a liniştii eterne, fecioară încă nerăpită, Copil de suflet al tăcerii şi-al timpului ce trece greu, Povestitoare din pădure, ce spui povestea înflorită Mai dulce ca în versul meu, O ! spune, spune ce-i legenda cu zei şi oameni dimpreună. Din plaiurile-Arcadiene ori din a Tempei mândre vai, Şi care-n horbota de frunze, frumosul trup ţi-l încunună ? Şi ce fecioare răzvrătite, ce oameni sunt colo, ce zei ? Şi ce-i năvala cea nebună şi lupta ceea de scăpare ? Şi fluierele care cântă ş-acea sălbatec-admirare ? Sunt dulci cântările-auzite, dar pentru mine-i mai plăcută Cântarea care nu s-aude ; o! fluiere, cântaţi mereu, Nu pentru simţurile mele, ci melodia voastră mută Cântaţi-o sufletului meu ! O ! tinere, ce stai la umbră, cântarea ta nu vei curma-o, Cum din copacul larg de ramuri nici frunza nu s-a scutura. 164 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Bold lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal - yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair! Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed Your leaves, nor ever bid the spring adieu; And, happy melodist, unwearied, For ever piping songs for ever new; More happy love! more happy, happy love! For ever warm and still to be enjoy‘d, For ever panting, and for ever young; All breathing human passion far above, That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloy‘d, A burning forehead, and a parching tongue. Who are these coming to the sacrifice? To what green altar, O mysterious priest, Lead‘st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, And all her silken flanks with garlands drest? What little town by river or sea shore, Or mountain-built with peaceful citadel, Is emptied of this folk, this pious morn? And, little town, thy streets for evermore Will silent be; and not a soul to tell Why thou art desolate, can e‘er return. O Attic shape! Fair attitude! with brede Of marble men and maidens overwrought, With forest branches and the trodden weed; Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought As doth eternity: Cold Pastoral! When old age shall this generation waste, Cu orişicâtă îndrăzneală, nicicând tu nu vei săruta-o, Oricât te-ai crede de aproape. Şi totuşi nu te întrista: Deşi nu ţi-ai văzut norocul, nu-mbătrâneşte-a ta mireasă, Şi tu de-a pururi vei iubi-o şi ea va fi mereu frumoasă. O ramuri, fericite ramuri ! frunzişul vostru totdeauna Îl veţi păstra şi primăverii voi nu veţi zice bun-rămas ! Ferice cântareţ ! Din fluier doineşti mereu şi nou întruna E-al fluierului dulce glas. Iar tu, iubire fericită, tu încă eşti mai fericită, Şi tinereţea ta-i eternă, în veci înfiorată eşti, Tu veşnic caldă, bucurie ce-ntruna poate fi simţită, Deasupra timpului ce trece ş-a patimilor omeneşti, Ce-ţi lasă inima închisă, de jale şi durere frântă, Usucă limba ta în gură şi fruntea ta o înfierbântă. Dar cine-s oamenii de colo ? Ei vin la jertfă şi misteruri. O ! preot ne-nţeles de lume, la ce altar aduci grăbit Sărmana juncă ce se zbate şi muge-ntruna către ceruri Cu pântecele-mpodobit ? Ce orăşel se vede-acolo, pe malul râului sau mării, Ce paşnică cetate oare în vârful muntelui o fi, Din care iese tot poporul în dimineaţa închinării ? O ! mic oraş, a tale strade de lume nu vor mai vui. Şi niciun suflet de pe lume nu va veni ca să ne spuie De ce acuma stă acolo o părăsită cetăţuie. O ! formă atică ! ce zveltă eşti în podoabele-ţi sculptate ! Cu mândri tineri şi fecioare ca statuile-nmărmuriţi, Cu ramurile din pădure şi buruienile călcate, De frumuseţea ta vrăjiţi, Noi stăm ca-n faţa veşniciei, tăcuta pastorală rece ! Tu vei rămâne în mijlocul durerilor ce vor mai fi, 165 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say‘st, "Beauty is truth, truth beauty," – that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. Atunci când vârsta cea de astăzi din viaţa asta s-o petrece, Şi omenirii, ca prieten, vei spune tot ce poate şti: Că Adevărul e Frumosul, Frumosul Adevăr se cheamă, Atâta-i tot ce ştiţi aicea, de alta nu mai ţineţi seama. Traducere A. Covaci. 166 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1819b. KEATS. Bright star. Tartler. 14 lines. Author: John KEATS (1795-1821). Text: Bright Star. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: Which of Keats's poems is worth learning by heart? And why... Bright star... Sclipindă stea... Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art – Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like nature‘s patient, sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth‘s human shores, Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask Of snow upon the mountains and the moors – No – yet still stedfast, still unchangeable, Pillowed upon my fair love‘s ripening breast, To feel for ever its soft fall and swell, Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, And so live ever – or else swoon in death. Sclipindă stea, de-aş fi neschimbător Ca tine – nu-n splendoarea nopţii ţintuit, Prin pleoape larg căscate singur privitor Ca un sihastru al naturii nedormit La apele ca preoţii spălând Pământul omenesc cu-abluţiuni, Sau contemplând uşoara mască de curând Căzută, a zăpezii, pe genuni; Nu – ci-n credinţă-n veci neschimbător La sânul dragei ce se pârguie, să-l ştiu Mereu umflându-se şi coborând uşor, De-o dulce neodihnă treaz să fiu, Ca doar, ca doar s-aud respiru-i, să i-l cer, Şi astfel să trăiesc mereu – de nu, să pier. Traducere G. Tartler. 167 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1819c. KEATS. La Belle Dame Sans Merci. Blaga. 48 lines. Author: John KEATS (1795-1821). Text: La Belle Dame Sans Merci. Translator: L. Blaga. FrageStellung: a. Who was Keats‘ greatest enemy from among the English poets, and is even said to have precipitated his untimely death? (100w) b. There is one line in this poem, which, if translated appropriately, is highly ambiguous: it can suggest that La Belle Dame is the victim, not the Knight. Can you identify it and give your own Romanian version, so as to suggest t he ambiguity more effectively? La Belle Dame Sans Merci. La Belle Dame Sans Merci. Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering? The sedge has withered from the lake, And no birds sing. „Ce suferinţă, cavaler în zea. Te face, palid, să te pierzi? În lac rogoz şi trestii s-au uscat, Cu păsări nu te mai dezmierzi. Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, So haggard and so woe-begone? The squirrel‘s granary is full, And the harvest‘s done. Ce suferinţă, cavaler în zea, Te rătăceşte printre umbre, stins? Grânarul veveriţa îşi umplu, Recolta zilelor s-a strâns. I see a lily on thy brow, With anguish moist and fever-dew, And on thy cheeks a fading rose Pe fruntea ta zăresc un chin de crin. Rouă de febră, stropi de stea. Tânjeşte-o roză pe obrajii tăi. 168 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Fast withereth too. Ce grabnic s-a uscat şi ea. I met a lady in the meads, Full beautiful – a faery‘s child, Her hair was long, her foot was light, And her eyes were wild. „Am întâlnit domniţă-n lunci, fata Frumseţă ca de zână-avea, Şi ochi sălbatici, umbletul uşor. În valuri lungi păru-i cădea. I made a garland for her head, And bracelets too, and fragrant zone; She looked at me as she did love, And made sweet moan. Cunună, cingătoare, i-am lucrat, Brăţări din mâna mea lua. Şi dulce se făcea parc-ar iubi. Din gură dulce murmur da. I set her on my pacing steed, And nothing else saw all day long, For sidelong would she bend, and sing A faery‘s song. Şi-o ridicai pe cal. La pas mergeam. Şi-apoi nimic nu mai văzui, Căci ea-ntr-o parte s-a înclinat cântând Pentru auzul nimănui. She found me roots of relish sweet, And honey wild, and manna-dew, And sure in language strange she said – I love thee true‘. Şi rădăcini cu gustul minunat, Miere sălbatică mi-a dat. În grai străin, desigur, ea mi-a spus: Eu te iubesc cu-adevărat. She took me to her elfin grot, And there she wept and sighed full sore, And there I shut her wild wild eyes With kisses four. La grota zânelor spre-apus m-a dus. Durerea-acolo ea şi-a plâns. Acolo ochii i-am închis punând Săruturi patru înadins. And there she lulled me asleep And there I dreamed – Ah! woe betide! – The latest dream I ever dreamt Şi-acolo ea m-a legănat s-adorm. Şi-acolo am visat un vis, Ah, ultimul ce-l mai avut vreodat‘, 169 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry On the cold hill side. Pe faţa rece-a dâmbului, un vis. I saw pale kings and princes too, Pale warriors, death-pale were they all; They cried – La Belle Dame sans Merci Hath thee in thrall!‘ Regi palizi am văzut, războinici, prinţi Palizi ca moartea, am zărit, Şi toţi strigau: La Belle Dame Sans Merci Te ţine rob, legat vrăjit. I saw their starved lips in the gloam, With horrid warning gaped wide, And I awoke and found me here, On the cold hill‘s side. Pierite buze-n beznă, am văzut. Cătau fatidic a mă preveni. Şi m-am trezit din vis. Şi m-am trezit În faţa rece-a vântului, pe-aci. And this is why I sojourn here Alone and palely loitering, Though the sedge is withered from the lake, And no birds sing. De-aceea timpul singur îmi petrec Şi palid umblu şi mă pierd, Deşi acuma trestii s-au uscat, Cu păsări nu mă mai dezmierd. Traducere L. Blaga. 170 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1819d. KEATS. Ode to a Nightingale. Covaci. 80 lines. Author: John KEATS (1795-1821). Text: Ode to a Nightingale. Translator: A. Covaci. FrageStellung: Does such a poem still appeal to you? Try to put in words your response to it... Yo u may consider it out of fashion. (100 words) Ode to a Nightingale. Odă la o privighetoare. My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk: Tis not through envy of thy happy lot, But being too happy in thine happiness, – That thou, light-winged Dryad of the trees, In some melodious plot Of beechen green and shadows numberless, Singest of summer in full-throated ease. Mi-i somn în simţuri… Inima mă doare Şi pare-se cucută doar şi opiu De-o clipă c-am băut cu însetare; M-afund în Lethe, de neant m-apropiu. Nu pizmuindu-ţi neamu-n aste ore, Ci-n fericirea ta prea fericită, Driada-n crâng, cu aripi jucăuşe, În melodii sonore, Prin fagii verzi, de umbre-nvăluită, Cânţi vara din cu drag umflată guşe. O, for a draught of vintage! that hath been Cool‘d a long age in the deep-delved earth, Tasting of Flora and the country green, Dance, and Provençal song, and sunburnt mirth! O duşcă doar de vin să mă dezmierde Dospit în beci adânc o veşnicie, Cu iz de Flora şi campestru verde, Cânt provensal, şi dans, şi veselie! 171 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry O for a beaker full of the warm South, Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene, With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stained mouth; That I might drink, and leave the world unseen, And with thee fade away into the forest dim: O cupă-n care stors e sudul cald Şi vii văpăi de foc din Hippocrene Clipind din perle-spumă în pahar, Cu purpură în fald, Să beau, să nu văd lumea printre gene, Cu tine-n umbra sihlei să dispar! Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget What thou among the leaves hast never known, The weariness, the fever, and the fret Here, where men sit and hear each other groan; Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs, Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies; Where but to think is to be full of sorrow And leaden-eyed despairs, Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, Or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow. Departe să dispar – topit – uitând Ce n-ai ştiut nicicând pe ramul crud: Urâtul, arderi, oamenii-n frământ Pe glia unde toţi gemând se-aud Si-n alb păr rar sfârşelile irump Iar tinerii cresc pali, spectrali – şi mor Si de tristeţi te umple şi gândirea! Disperi cu ochi de plumb Şi-s morţi ai frumuseţii ochi – ori vor De peste mâine, proaspătă, Iubirea. Away! away! for I will fly to thee, Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards, But on the viewless wings of Poesy, Though the dull brain perplexes and retards: Already with thee! tender is the night, And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne, Cluster‘d around by all her starry Fays; But here there is no light, Save what from heaven is with the breezes blown Through verdurous glooms and winding mossy ways. Să plec! Să zbor spre vraja melodiei, Nu tras de Bachus şi consorţii lui… Pe aripa ce n-o vezi a poeziei. Zăgaz nici negurosul creier nu-i! Cu tine sunt! E noaptea mai blajină, Ferice e pe tron Regina-Lună Cu zâne-stele-n juru-i rânduite. O, este-aici lumină Doar vântul într-o boare cât adună Prin bezne verzi şi căi de muşchi, sucite. I cannot see what flowers are at my feet, Nu pot să văd ce flori am la picioare, 172 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs, But, in embalmed darkness, guess each sweet Wherewith the seasonable month endows The grass, the thicket, and the fruit-tree wild; White hawthorn, and the pastoral eglantine; Fast fading violets cover‘d up in leaves; And mid-May‘s eldest child, The coming musk-rose, full of dewy wine, The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves. Din ramuri ce miresme moi se varsă; Dar mierea-i bezna, toata-mbălsămare, De anotimpul priitor întoarsă În pomi sălbatici, ierburi, crâng şi plai Ţin violete-n teci de frunze firul, Măceşul iscă-a florilor povară Şi – făt din miez de mai – Cu vinu-i rouă vine trandafirul Şi muşte bâzâie-a-nceput de vară. Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call‘d him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain To thy high requiem become a sod. Ascult în întuneric… Deseori Am îndrăgit uşorul Morţii duh; I-am spus dulci nume-n mii de rime-n zbor Să-mi suie răsuflarea în văzduh. Belşug mai mult înseamnă moartea azi: M-aş stinge-n miez de noapte, fără chin, Când al tău suflet preschimbat e-n harpă, Cu negrăit extaz! Ai mai cânta – dar prea-ţi aud puţin Requiemul înalt – azi colţ de iarbă! Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! No hungry generations tread thee down; The voice I hear this passing night was heard In ancient days by emperor and clown: Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home, She stood in tears amid the alien corn; The same that oft-times hath Charm‘d magic casements, opening on the foam Eterna Pasăre! Eşti fără moarte! Te cruţă-nfometate generaţii. Acelaşi viers, de mult, vrăjit-a foarte Pe clovnii toţi cum şi pe împăraţii. O cale şi-a tăiat acelaşi viers În sufletul lui Ruth, râvnindu-şi casa, Plângând printre străinele bucate; Şi spre ferestre-a mers Vrăjite – şi uitate-n furtunoasa 173 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn. Forlorn! the very word is like a bell To toll me back from thee to my sole self! Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well As she is fam‘d to do, deceiving elf. Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades Past the near meadows, over the still stream, Up the hill-side; and now tis buried deep In the next valley-glades: Was it a vision, or a waking dream? Fled is that music: – Do I wake or sleep? Stihie de pe ţărmuri fermecate. Uitate! Clopot e acest cuvânt! Mă smulge de sub vraja ta stăpână. Adio! Fantezia-i vorbă-n vânt, Nu-ndeajuns înşelătoare zână! Adio! Piere imnul tău de jale Prin pajişti, peste râu – ia dealu-n piept – Şi iată-l îngropat în noi livezi, În alt crâng, alta vale… O nălucirea-a fost? Un vis deştept? Zburat-a cântecul… Sunt treaz? Visez? Traducere A. Covaci. 174 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1827. Vasile CÂRLOVA. Păstorul întristat. 68 lines. Author: Vasile CÂRLOVA (1809-1831). Text: Păstorul întristat. Translator: FrageStellung: Why, in your opinion, has this poem never been translated? Păstorul întristat. Un păstor tânăr, frumos la faţă, Plin de mâhnire cu glas duios Cânta din fluier jos pă verdeaţă, Sub umbră deasă de pom stufos. Translation required. De multe versuri spuse cu jale Uimite toate sta împrejur: Râul oprise apa din cale, Vântul tăcuse din lin murmur. Cât colo turme de oi frumoase Se răspândise pe livejuni Şi ascultându-l iarba uitase, Pătrunse toate de mila lui. Câinele numai mai cu durere Stând lângă dânsul căta în jos 175 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi ca s-aducă lui mângâiere, Glas câteodată scotea milos. Eho, ce zace de om departe, Îl auzise din loc ascuns; Şi cu suspinuri de greutate La toată vorba îi da răspuns. Viu lângă dânsul, pătruns de milă Şi cu blândeţe îl întrebai: „Tinere, spune-mi, nu-ţi fie silă, Ce foc, ce chinuri, ce gânduri ai? Viaţa voastră necazuri n-are: E simplă, lină, fără dureri, Şi-n toată lumea nici o suflare Ca voi nu gustă multe plăceri. Vouă natura vă este dată; Câmpii şi codrii voă zâmbesc; Vânturi şi râuri voă arată Cum curg de dulce, cum răcoresc. Soarele încă voă răvarsă Lumină dulce, tot cu senin, Şi cerul iarăşi mila îşi varsă Spre fericire voă deplin. El cu suspinuri atunci răspunse: „Frate, se poate vrun muritor 176 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Oricât să n-aibă dureri ascunse, Fie pe scaun, fie păstor? Orice viaţă supusă zace Sub patimi grele mult mai puţin! Soarta nu lasă un om în pace Cu mulţumire a fi deplin. Precum nu-nceată de vânt suflarea Nici către crânguri, nici pe câmpii; Aşa nu-nceată nici tulburarea De multe patimi către cei vii. Adevăr, slavă, cinste, putere Sau bogăţie eu nu doresc. Acestea toate drept o părere, Drept nălucire le socotesc. Dar mai puternic, greu a supune Orice simţire, simţ pe amor, El, izvor dulce de-ntristăciune, Lesne aprinde foc tutulor. Iubesc prea dulce o păstoriţă Cu chip prea dulce, prea drăgălaş! Pentru ea numai simţ neputinţă, Pentru ea numai sunt pătimaş. De lângă mine ea când lipseşte, Natura n-are nimic frumos; 177 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sufletul tare mi se mâhneşte, Orice privire e de prisos. Şi drept aceea a tânguire Fac să răsune fluierul meu Lăsând şi turma în năpustire, Vărsând şi lacrimi din ochi mereu. 178 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1829. SHELEY. The Aziola. Pillat. 21 lines. Author: Percy Bysshe SHELLEY (1792-1822). Text: The Aziola. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: Who was Shelley? (30 words). What was his wife famous for? And what was her exact n ame? The Aziola. Aziola. Do you not hear the Aziola cry? Methinks she must be nigh,‘ Said Mary, as we sate In dusk, ere stars were lit, or candles brought; And I, who thought This Aziola was some tedious woman, Asked, Who is Aziola?‘ How elate I felt to know that it was nothing human, No mockery of myself to fear or hate: And Mary saw my soul, And laughed, and said, Disquiet yourself not; Tis nothing but a little downy owl.‘ „Aziola cum plânge n-o auzi? Aproape o fi sub duzi. Mi-a spus pe când şedeam În colb de-amurg când stea şi sfeşnic nu se-aprind; Şi socotind Că-i vreo femeie plicticoasă ce bocea, „Cine – te-am întrebat – e Aziola? Ce uşurat să ştiu că om nu este Să nu mă tem de-o ironie sau de-o ură. Tu mi-ai citit în suflet lesne, Şi-ai râs, şi-ai zis: ,,Din fire nu-ţi ieşi; E doar o cucuvaie mică-n seara sură. Sad Aziola! many an eventide Thy music I had heard By wood and stream, meadow and mountain-side, Prin câte amurgiri, mâhnită Aziola! Străinu-ţi vers l-am auzit În crâng, pe râu, poiană şi vâlcea, 179 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And fields and marshes wide,– Such as nor voice, nor lute, nor wind, nor bird, The soul ever stirred; Unlike and far sweeter than them all. Sad Aziola! from that moment I Loved thee and thy sad cry. Prin câmp şi stufăriş la nesfârşit, Cum grai de om, din viori, privighetori sau vânt Nu-mi răscolise sufletul nicicând; Mai altfel şi mai dulce decât toate... Mâhnită Aziola! Din acel ceas Te-am îndrăgit, o, tu, cu tristul glas. Traducere I. Pillat. 180 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1835. BROWNING. Song from Paracelsus. Tartler. 16 lines. Author: Robert BROWNING (1812-1889). Text: Song from Paracelsus. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: Where did Browning live most of his life? And why? (50 words) Song from Paracelsus. Cântec din Paracelsus. Heap cassia, sandal-buds and stripes Of labdanum, and aloe-balls, Smear‘d with dull nard an Indian wipes From out her hair: such balsam falls Down sea-side mountain pedestals, From tree-tops where tired winds are fain, Spent with the vast and howling main, To treasure half their island-gain. Din cassia, santal înmugurind, fâşii De-aloes şi labdanum când şi când, Sau nard ce-o indiancă risipi Din părul ei: acest balsam căzând Din piedestal de munţi spre-al mării rând, Din vârf de pomi când adieri se-nclin, Risipă-i unei largi, vuinde mâini, Comornicind al insulei preaplin. And strew faint sweetness from some old Egyptian‘s fine worm-eaten shroud Which breaks to dust when once unroll‘d; Or shredded perfume, like a cloud From closet long to quiet vow‘d With moth‘d and dropping arras hung, Mouldering her lute and books among, As when a queen, long dead, was young. Împrăştiind dulceag leşin precum Vechi giulgii egiptene care praf Se fac dacă le desfăşori acum; Mireasmă spulberată ca un vraf De nori, din loc închis, tăcut; canaf Urzit, de molii ros, ce-atârnă smult, Cum prin lăute putrezind şi cărţi ascult Juna regină ce-a murit demult. Traducere G. Tartler. 181 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1840. Grigore ALEXANDRESCU. Anul 1840. 76 lines. Author: Grigore ALEXANDRESCU (1810-1885). Text: Anul 1840. Translator: FrageStellung: Anul 1840. Să stăpânim durerea care pe om supune; Să aşteptăm în pace al soartei ajutor; Căci cine ştie oare, şi cine îmi va spune Ce-o să aducă ziua şi anul viitor? Mâine, poimâine, poate, soarele fericirii Se va arăta vesel pe orizont senin; Binele ades vine pe urmele mâhnirii, Şi o zâmbire dulce după-un amar suspin. Aşa zice tot omul ce-n viitor trăieşte, Aşa zicea odată copilăria mea; Şi un an vine, trece, ş-alt an îl moşteneşte; Şi ce nădejdi dă unul, acelălalt le ia. Puţine-aş vrea, iubite, din zilele-mi pierdute, Zile ce-n veşnicie şi-iau repedele zbor; Puţine suvenire din ele am plăcute: A fost numai-n durere varietatea lor! Dar pe tine, an tânăr, te văz cu mulţumire! Pe tine te doreşte tot neamul omenesc! Translation required. 182 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi eu sunt mică parte din trista omenire, Şi eu a ta sosire cu lumea o slăvesc! Când se născu copilul ce s-aştepta să vie, Ca să ridice iarăşi pe omul cel căzut, Un bătrân îl luă în braţe, strigând cu bucurie: „Sloboade-mă, stăpâne, fiindcă l-am văzut. Astfel drepţii ar zice, de ar vedea-mplinite Câte într-al tău nume ne sunt făgăduite. O, an prezis atâta, măreţ reformator! Începi, prefă, răstoarnă şi îmbunătăţează, Arată semn acelor ce nu voiesc să crează; Adu fără zăbavă o turmă ş-un păstor. A lumii temelie se mişcă, se clăteşte, Vechile-i instituţii se şterg, s-au ruginit; Un duh fierbe în lume, şi omul ce gândeşte Aleargă către tine, căci vremea a sosit! Ici umbre de noroade le vezi ocârmuite De umbra unor pravili călcate, siluite De alte mai mici umbre, neînsemnaţi pitici. Oricare sentimente înalte, generoase, Ne par ca nişte basne de povestit, frumoase, Şi tot entuziasmul izvor de idei mici. Politica adâncă stă în fanfaronadă, Şi ştiinţa vieţii în egoism cumplit; De-a omului mărire nimic nu dă dovadă, Şi numai despotismul e bine întărit. An nou! Aştept minunea-ţi ca o cerească lege; Dacă însă păstorul ce tu ni l-ai alege Va fi tot ca păstorii de care-avem destui, Atunci... lasă în starea-i bătrâna tiranie, 183 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry La darurile tale eu nu simt bucurie, De-mbunătăţiri rele cât vrei suntem sătui. Ce bine va aduce o astfel de schimbare? Şi ce mai rău ar face o stea, un comet mare, Care să arză globul ş-ai lui locuitori? Ce pasă bietei turme, în veci nenorocită, Să ştie de ce mână va fi măcelărită Şi dacă are unul sau mulţi apăsători? Eu nu îţi cer în parte nimica pentru mine: Soarta-mi cu a mulţimii aş vrea să o unesc: Dacă numai asupra-mi nu poţi s-aduci vreun bine, Eu râz de-a mea durere şi o dispreţuiesc. După suferiri multe inima se-mpietreşte; Lanţul ce-n veci ne-apasă uităm cât e de greu; Răul se face fire, simţirea amorţeşte Şi trăiesc în durere ca-n elementul meu. Dar aş vrea să văz ziua pământului vestită, Să răsuflu un aer mai slobod, mai curat, Să pierz ideea tristă, de veacuri întărită, Că lumea moştenire-ntâmplărilor s-a dat! Atunci dac-a mea frunte galbenă, obosită, Dacă a mea privire s-o-ntoarce spre mormânt, Dac-a vieţii-mi triste făclie osândită S-o-ntuneca, s-ar stinge de-al patimilor vânt, Pe aripile morţii celei mântuitoare, Voi părăsi locaşul unde-am nădăjduit; Voi lăsa fericirea aceluia ce-o are, Şi a mea pomenire acelor ce-am iubit. 184 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1841. Anton PANN. Despre vorbire. 309 lines. Author: Anton PANN (1793-1854). Text: Despre vorbire. Translator: FrageStellung: Despre vorbire. Îmbucătura mare să-nghiţi Şi vorba mare să nu o zici. Deşi Îmbucătura cea mare Se înghite cu-necare. Căci Vorbele celor mari sunt ca zmochinele de dulci, Iar vorbele celor mici sună ca nişte nuci. Zice un înţelept: Sau taci, sau zi ceva mai bun decât tăcerea! Şi Dacă vei să trăieşti liniştit, să nu vezi, să n-auzi, să taci. Vorba-şi are şi ea vremea ei, Iar nu să o trânteşti când vei. După proverbul turcesc: Sioileiesem sioz olur, sioilemeiesem dert olur, Translation required. 185 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Adică: De voi zice, vorbă să face, de nu voi zice, venin să face. Şi cum zice românul: Limba vacii este lungă, Dar la coada-şi tot n-ajungă. Şi iarăşi, Sarea-i bună la hiertură, Însă nu peste măsură. Că Unde este vorbă multă, Acolo e treabă scurtă (puţină). Totdeauna Cine are limbuţia, E mai rea decât beţia. Unul ca acela Parcă se pune la cioarbă Una-ntr-altă tot să soarbă, Asfel nu-ţi dă pas de vorbă. Până-şi găseşte să-i zică: Stăi, că nu ţ-e gura chioară, Ţine rândul ca la moară. Aici la râşniţă nu e, Care când o vrea să puie. Limbutul N-are cine să-l asculte Şi el spune,-ndrugă multe. Şi Silă de vorbă îşi face, Tot să troncănească-i place. Parcă 186 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry A mâncat picioare de găină Ş-îl tot răcăie la inimă. De aceea Săracul n-are nici haină, Nici la inimă vro taină. Totdauna Vorbele cele ferite În piaţă şi-n moară-s vorbite. Povestea ăluia. Într-un oraş oarecare, Ca şi Bucureştiul de mare, Unde lumea în piaţ iese Şi-ncoaci-încolo să ţese, Pintre cei ce vând producte Şi fel de feluri de fructe, Unde răsună haznale Trântindu-se pe tablale, Unde unii iau, dau, număr, Alţii încarc braţ, mâini, umăr, Unde glasuri şi guri multe Nu stau să se mai asculte, Vorbind orce-n gură mare, Altul de ei habar n-are, Unde mulţi casc guri degeabă Şi de sănătăţi să-ntreabă, Aci şi-eu ca lumea toată, Într-o zi umblând prin gloată 187 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ş-ascultând cum vorbea unii Cu glasuri mari, ca nebunii, Văzui doi inşi se-ntâlniră Şi cu zâmbet se opriră, Căciulile îşi luară Şi asfel se salutară: Bună ziua, măi, neavere! Îţi mulţumesc, dragă vere! Ce mai faci, cum îţi mai pasă, Sunt toţi sănătoşi p-acasă? Tari, mari, neavere, ca piatră, Mănânc cenuşe pe vatră. Dar tu, măre, dragă vere, Ai de mâncare, de bere? Cum o duci cu sărăcia? Ce-ţi mai face calicia? Sănătos voinic sunt, vere, Şi trăiesc după putere, De sărăcie nu-mi pasă, Că şade supt pat acasă, Au ouat ş-acum cloceşte, Ce-o vrea Dumnezeu sporeşte. Şi de multă datorie, Umblu beat de bucurie. Ba ca să zici, măi neavere, Vesel eşti, or am părere? Dar or nu vezi? Ce pustie! Tu o să mori în prostie. Apoi, te uită la faţă Şi mă-ntreabă de viaţă. 188 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ba te văz cu faţa vie Şi, de deochi să nu-ţi fie, Eşti la piele ca curcanul, Galben de gras ca şofranul. Dar ce mănânci de ţi-e bine Şi eşti numai os şi vine? Ce bucată îţi prieşte, Aşa de te-ngălbeneşte? Şi asta mă întrebi încă, Nu ştii omul ce mănâncă? Negreşit, nici fân, nici paie, Nici bea apă din copaie, Ci mămăligă cu ceapă Şi un căuş, doi, cu apă. Ba, ba, vere, mă cam iartă, Că nu ţ-e fasolea hiartă, Eu am mâncat, ce să cheamă, Un mezelic de pastramă Cu un dumicat de pâine, De sunt patru zile mâine, Şi uite pe loc mă dete La o pustie de sete; Nu faci tu vrun fleac de cinste, Ca să-mi ud măcar un dinte? Bucuros, cu voie bună, Dar în buzunări nu sună, Că croitorul, ovreiul, Mi le-a cusut cu temeiul, S-au spart păn‘ la săptămâna, Făr‘ să bag într-înşii mâna; 189 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Punga, care n-o am iară, S-a bolnăvit d-astă-vară Ş-au ajuns într-o slăbire, De nu-şi poate veni-n fire. Şi dintr-asta, cum să vede, Îţi spui dreptul, de m-ai crede, De când n-am văzut paraua, I-am uitat cum e turaua. Tpiu! la dracu, pentr-o pungă Ţinuşi un ceas vorbă lungă, Aci în mijloc de cale; Nu intrarăm colea-ncaile La acea ospătărie, Unde pe părete scrie: „Azi bem şi mâncăm bucate Pe parale peşin date, Şi mâine, fără cârteală, Ospătăm pe cicăleală? Astfel zicând, se-mbiară Ş-a se ospăta intrară. Mă făcui şi eu cu treabă Şi-ntrai după ei în grabă, Să văz ce-o să se urmeze Şi cum o să ospeteze. Şezând dar eu deoparte Şi ascultând de departe, Văz, ei după ce cerură Mâncare şi băutură Şi se săturară bine De toate, cum se cuvine, 190 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Au venit să-i socotească, Ospăţul ca să-şi plătească. Neaverea se scoală-ndată Şi pe perete arată, Zicând: Domnule, azi scrie Ca să bem pe datorie, Fiindcă ieri fuse anul De când trântii colea banul, De-ţi plătii cum să cuvine Şi te-ai mulţămit de mine. Domnule, birtaşul zise N-ai înţeles cele scrise; Ia mai citeşte o dată Şi vezi, zice ş-azi cu plată Şi iar ca ieri mai la vale Că mâine fără parale? Jupâne, zise neaverea Şi orcum ţ-o fi plăcerea Şi sporeşte cât de multe Cui o vrea să te asculte. Nu trebuia să-mi scrii mie Vorbe cu iconomie, Că fiecare cap n-are C-al dumitale de mare, Să judece cele scrise, Că sunt după cum zici zise, Ci pe şleau le înţelege, Fără să le mai deslege. Iacă eu unul sunt care 191 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry N-am înţeles ce tâlc are, De aceea nici n-am vină, Dumneata eşti de pricină, De venii făr‘ de parale După scrisurile tale. Că-mi este urât, nu-mi vine Să port parale la mine, Ba nici acasă în ladă Nu-mi place bani să văz grămadă, Ca şi acum, bunioară, Nu e în ea para chioară; Dar cântecul dumitale, Fiindcă cere parale, Şi eu iar, deocamdată, Ţ-oi cânta ceva drept plată. Ce spui? birtaşul îi zise, Strigând (cum se necăjise) Să-mi cânţi cântece pe plată? Bani, că te-ncaier îndată! Eu am dat bani pe bucate, Nimeni nu-mi dă pe cântate; Haide, zic, parale scoate, De nu, te despoi de toate. Neaverea sfecli de frică, Gândi, hai, îl ia de chică; Şi-ncepu cu binişorul Să moaie pe negustorul, Zicând: Jupâne, mă iartă, Aici nu încape ceartă, 192 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry N-am plecat pe uş-afară, Ca să mă iei la ocară; Stăi, aici e învoială, Noi să facem o tocmeală, Să-ţi cânt şi, dacă nu-ţi place, Atunci fă-mi orce-mi vei face, Iar de-ţi va fi pe plăcere, Atunci n-ai nimic a-mi cere; Am un cântec, s-auzi numa, E nou, făcut chiar acuma, Ia să încep şi ascultă, Că nu e cu vorbă multă. Aşa el tuşi dodată Ş-începu să cânte-ndată: „Toată vara fără treabă, pierdui ca un nerod, Câţi umblă-nhăitaţi degeabă, Eu eram cu ei pe pod. Dacă mi să făcea foame, Eu la masă mă duceam, De la supă păn‘ la poame Închinam şi chef făceam. Câte basne firoscoşii, Undeva spune-n vileag, Şi eu ca năbădăioşii Alergam s-ascult cu drag. Dacă mi să făcea foame, Eu la masă mă duceam, De la supă păn‘ la poame Închinam şi chef făceam. 193 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Îmi plăcea la cântecele Să ascult; când auzeam Frunză verde trei lalele, Alţi cânta, eu chiuiam. Dacă mi să făcea foame, Eu la masă mă duceam, De la supă păn‘ la poame Închinam şi chef făceam. Nu-mi venea să şez în casă, Nici de lucru să m-apuc, Lumea unde sta mai deasă, Mă grăbeam iar să mă duc. Dacă mi să făcea foame, Eu la masă mă duceam, De la supă păn‘ la poame Închinam şi chef făceam. Câţiva bani ce-aveam în ladă, Să-i păstrez nu mai gândeam; Tot luam des din grămadă, Cheltuiam, galant eram. Carne cumpăram şi poame Şi acasă le duceam, Dacă mi se făcea foame, Beam, mâncam şi chef făceam. Vreme bună pe cât fuse, Eu la iarnă n-am gândit; Când din pungă tot se duse, Iacă şi ea a sosit. Dacă mi să face foame, Privesc masa când mă duc, 194 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Nu e supă, nu e poame, N-am o dată să îmbuc. Ies pe poduri, viu acasă, Văz ca şi afară frig, Nu e pâine, nu e masă, N-am ce să fierb, ce să frig. Nevasta acum îmi strigă: „Bărbate, lemne, mălai, Pruncii: „pâine, mămăligă, Îmi zbier toţi ş-îmi fac alai. Sfârşind cîntecul, neaverea Întrebă să-şi dea părerea De i-a plăcut cântecelul, Iar de nu, să-i schimbe felul. Birtaşul îi zise iară: Bani, bani, şi curând afară! De cântec nu-mi pasă mie, Plăteşte-mi cu omenie, Iar de nu, ieşi cu necinste! Ai înţeles de cuvinte? Scoate colea punguliţa, Fă-o să-şi caşte guriţa, Să verse din gât dulci glasuri, Soprani, secunde şi basuri, Să vezi cum mă-mpaci cu ele, Iar nu cu seci cântecele. Neaverea nu zăboveşte, Ia punga ş-o descreţeşte Binişor cu două deşte, Cântând vorbele aceste: 195 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Deschide-te, punguliţă, Cască draga ta guriţă, Răsună frumos din corde Ale tale dulci acorde Şi scoate acele glasuri, Soprani, secunde şi basuri, Birtaşului cum îi place, Ca cu mine să se-mpace. El încă nu isprăvise, Dar birtaşul sărind zise: Ha, vezi, ast cântec îmi place, Asta pentru mine face, Dar nu d-alde pierde-vară, Fire-ai cu el de ocară! La aste vorbe, neaverea Sare îndată cu verea Ş-apucă pe uş-afară, Zicând: — Ne plătirăm dară. Este o zicală: Boul se leagă de coarne şi omul de limbă. 196 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1842a. BROWNING. The Pied Piper of Hamelin. Banuş. 301 lines. Author: Robert BROWNING (1812-1889). Text: The Pied Piper of Hamelin. Translator: M. Banuş. FrageStellung: Is this a Legend? What is the Story? (50 words) Emphasize the Romanian connection, if any... The Pied Piper Of Hamelin. Cântăreţul vrăjitor. Hamelin Town‘s in Brunswick, By famous Hanover city; The river Weser, deep and wide, Washes its wall on the southern side; A pleasanter spot you never spied; But, when begins my ditty, Almost five hundred years ago, To see the townsfolk suffer so From vermin, was a pity. Burgul Hameln e-n Braunschweig aflat, Lângă Hanovra, oraş cunoscut; Fluviul Weser, adânc şi lat, Zidu-i scaldă, în partea de sud; Un loc mai plăcut nici n-aţi mai văzut; Dar, când începe povestea de vale, Acum cinci sute de ani fără ceva, Să-i vezi pe târgoveţi aşa De chinuiţi, era o jale. Rats! They fought the dogs, and killed the cats, And bit the babies in the cradles, And ate the cheeses out of the vats, And licked the soup from the cook‘s own ladles, Şobolani! Se luptau cu câinii, omorau motani, În leagăn muşcau copilaşul, Mâncau din putină caşul, Lingeau bucătarului din farfurii, 197 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Split open the kegs of salted sprats, Made nests inside men‘s Sunday hats, And even spoiled the women‘s chats, By drowning their speaking With shrieking and squeaking In fifty different sharps and flats. Despicau butoiaşele de scrumbii, Cuib făceau domnilor în pălării. Femeilor chiar, de mă crezi, Taifasu-l stricau Atât chiţăiau şi ţipau, În nenumăraţi bemoli şi diezi. At last the people in a body To the Town Hall came flocking: ‘Tis clear,‘ cried they, our Mayor‘s a noddy; And as for our Corporationshocking To think we buy gowns lined with ermine For dolts that can‘t or won‘t determine What‘s best to rid us of our vermin! You hope, because you‘re old and obese, To find in the furry civic robe ease? Rouse up, Sirs! Give your brains a racking To find the remedy we‘re lacking, Or, sure as fate, we‘ll send you packing!‘ At this the Mayor and Corporation Quaked with a mighty consternation. În cele din urmă întregul norod La Primărie se strânse în goană: „E clar, strigară, „Primaru-i nerod; Cât despre Sfat o ruşine! să dăm de pomană Mántii scumpe împodobite cu blană Unor proşti ce nu pot sau nu vor să ştie Cum să scape târgul de această urgie. Fiindcă sunteţi graşi şi bătrâni vă-nchipuiţi Că-n mántiile scumpe veţi sta liniştiţi? Sus, domnilor! Spargeţi-vă capul niţel, Sau de nu, tălpăşiţa v-o luaţi frumuşel! La asemenea vorbe, Primar şi Sfat De spaimă s-au cutremurat. An hour they sate in council, At length the Mayor broke silence: For a guilder I‘d my ermine gown sell; I wish I were a mile hence! It‘s easy to bid one rack one‘s brain I‘m sure my poor head aches again I‘ve scratched it so, and all in vain. Un ceas întreg au stat şi au stat, Până spuse Primarul cu glas visător: «Pe-un ban mi-aş da mántia de dregător, Aş vrea să fiu la o leghe de-aici, în zbor! E uşor să spui cuiva: „Bate-ţi capul! Al meu, uite, parcă-mi plezneşte, săracul, De cât îl bătui şi tot n-aflai leacul. 198 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Oh for a trap, a trap, a trap!‘ Just as he said this, what should hap At the chamber door but a gentle tap? Bless us,‘ cried the Mayor, what‘s that?‘ (With the Corporation as he sat, Looking little though wondrous fat; Nor brighter was his eye, nor moister Than a too-long-opened oyster, Save when at noon his paunch grew mutinous For a plate of turtle green and glutinous) Only a scraping of shoes on the mat? Anything like the sound of a rat Makes my heart go pit-a-pat!‘ Pentru o cursă, o cursă, o, ce n-aş da!» Dar ce s-a ivit, chiar acum, când vorbea? Un deget, în uşă, uşor ciocănea. „Doamne, strigă Primarul, „ce s-a-ntâmplat? (Mic arăta Primarul de stat, Cum şedea în grăsimea sa cufundat; Privirea lui stinsă, stătută, Ca o stridie prea de mult desfăcută, Se-aprindea doar la prânz când un sos unsuros De poftă-i sucea burdăhanul pe dos.) „Scârţâie ghetele doar pe covor? Orice îmi sună a rozător Face să-mi treacă prin piept un fior! Come in!‘the Mayor cried, looking bigger: And in did come the strangest figure! His queer long coat from heel to head Was half of yellow and half of red; And he himself was tall and thin, With sharp blue eyes, each like a pin, And light loose hair, yet swarthy skin, No tuft on cheek nor beard on chin, But lips where smiles went out and in There was no guessing his kith and kin! And nobody could enough admire The tall man and his quaint attire: Quoth one: It‘s as my great-grandsire, Starting up at the Trump of Doom‘s tone, Had walked this way from his painted tombstone!‘ „Intră! strigă Primarul, părând mai mare; Şi iată intrând o stranie-arătare Cu haină lungă, lungă, de la cap la călcâie, Jumătate roşă, jumătate gălbuie; El însuşi tras ca prin inel, Ochii albaştri, ca de oţel; Plete bălaie, faţa brună, Niciun fir pe obraz, de barbă nici urmă, Pe buze-i joacă-un zâmbet şui; Din ce neam este greu să spui: Se miră care mai de care De tânăru-nalt, în veşminte bizare. Unul zise: „Parcă stră-strămoşu-mi mare, La Trâmbiţa Judecăţii-de-Apoi Speriat s-a săltat din mormânt către noi! 199 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry He advanced to the council-table: And, Please your honours,‘ said he, I‘m able, By means of a secret charm, to draw All creatures living beneath the sun, That creep or swim or fly or run, After me so as you never saw! And I chiefly use my charm On creatures that do people harm, The mole and toad and newt and viper; And people call me the Pied Piper.‘ (And here they noticed round his neck A scarf of red and yellow stripe, To match with his coat of the selfsame cheque; And at the scarf‘s end hung a pipe; And his fingers, they noticed, were ever straying As if impatient to be playing Upon this pipe, as low it dangled Over his vesture so old-fangled.) Yet,‘ said he, poor piper as I am, In Tartary I freed the Cham, Last June, from his huge swarms of gnats; I eased in Asia the Nizam Of a monstrous brood of vampire-bats; And, as for what your brain bewilders, If I can rid your town of rats Will you give me a thousand guilders?‘ One? fifty thousand!‘was the exclamation Of the astonished Mayor and Corporation. El păşi înainte spre masa cea mare, Zicând: „Cu voia Voastră-s în stare Prin tainică vrajă s-atrag după mine Orişice fel de vieţuitoare. Orice aleargă, se târâie, noată sub soare, Când fluier, în urma mea se aţine. Şi-n primul rând vraja-mi e necruţătoare Cu-acele fiinţe răufăcătoare: Viperă, sobol, guzgan, mortăciune. Fluierarul Pestriţ mi se spune. (Atunci la gâtul lui ei văzură O galbenă-roşie legătură, La fel ca şi portu-i împestriţat, Şi-un fluier la capăt purta aninat. Văzură şi mâinile-i fremătătoare, Jucând parcă-n aer de nerăbdare Să cânte pe fluierul cel legănat Deasupra veşmântului vechi, demodat.) „Deşi, zise, „sunt doar un biet fluierar, Stârpit-am, în iunie, pentru Hanul tătar, Oşti mari de ţânţari ucigători: În Asia eu l-am scăpat pe Sultan De-un neam cumplit de vampiri sugători. Cât despre cei ce vă turbură-aşa, De curăţ cetatea de rozători, O mie de ducaţi mi-aţi da? „Nu una! Cincizeci! au strigat, Miraţi, Primarul şi-al său Sfat. 200 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Into the street the Piper stepped, Smiling first a little smile, As if he knew what magic slept In his quiet pipe the while; Then, like a musical adept, To blow the pipe his lips he wrinkled, And green and blue his sharp eyes twinkled Like a candle flame where salt is sprinkled; And ere three shrill notes the pipe uttered, You heard as if an army muttered; And the muttering grew to a grumbling; And the grumbling grew to a mighty rumbling; And out of the houses the rats came tumbling. Great rats, small rats, lean rats, brawny rats, Brown rats, black rats, grey rats, tawny rats, Grave old plodders, gay young friskers, Fathers, mothers, uncles, cousins, Cocking tails and pricking whiskers, Families by tens and dozens, Brothers, sisters, husbands, wives Followed the Piper for their lives. From street to street he piped advancing, And step for step they followed dancing, Until they came to the river Weser, Wherein all plunged and perished! – Save one who, stout a Julius Caesar, Swam across and lived to carry (As he, the manuscript he cherished) În stradă Fluierarul păşi, Zâmbind un zâmbet abia mijit, Parcă ştia el ce vrajă-ar dormi În fluierul său liniştit. Şi, ca un meşter iscusit, Pe fluier buzele-a-ncreţit, Şi ochii verde-albastru-au scăpărat Ca focu-n care sare-ai presărat. Şi abia scoase trişca trei note, subţire, Că parcă-mprejur murmura o oştire; Din murmurat se făcu mormăială; Din mormăit se făcu bombăneală; Din care ieşeau în rostogoleală Şobolani mari, şobolani mici, sfrijiţi, vânjoşi şobolani, Oacheşi, negri, suri, roşcovani şobolani, Bătrâni gravi, vlăguiţi, săltăreţi domnişori, Taţi, mame, unchi şi verişori, Cozi ridicate, mustăţi ca peria, Familii întregi, cu duzina, cu seria, Fraţi şi surori şi un bărbat şi soţie, Pe Fluierar îl urmau pe vecie. Din stradă în stradă trecea fluierând, Ei pas cu pas urmau dansând, Pân‘ ce la fluviul Weser au sosit, Unde, în valuri, cu toţii au pierit! ... Numai unul, asemeni lui Cezar, voinic, A trecut înot şi a dus cu sine (Ca Iuliu Cezar manuscrisul iubit) 201 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To Rat-land home his commentary: Which was, "At the first shrill notes of the pipe I heard a sound as of scraping tripe, And putting apples, wondrous ripe, Into a cider-press‘s gripe: And a moving away of pickle-tub-boards, And a leaving ajar of conserve-cupboards, And a drawing the corks of train-oil-flasks, And a breaking the hoops of butter-casks; And it seemed as if a voice (Sweeter far than by harp or by psaltery Is breathed) called out Oh, rats, rejoice! The world is grown to one vast drysaltery! So munch on, crunch on, take your nuncheon, Breakfast, supper, dinner, luncheon!‘ And just as a bulky sugar-puncheon, All ready staved, like a great sun shone Glorious scarce and inch before me, Just as methought it said Come, bore me!‘ – I found the Weser rolling o‘er me." Comentariul, în ţara Şobolănime; În el sta scris: «La-ntâiul fluierat ascuţit Auzii un sunet ca un ghiorăit, Şi ca de mere coapte, mustoase, Când încep sub teasc să se lase, Ca borcane ciocnite de castraveciori, Ca uşi deschise larg la cămări, Ca dopuri trase la butelci cu ulei, Ca doage sărite la putinei; Şi se făcea că un glas aerian (Mai dulce decât cântarea uşoară A harfei) striga: „Bucuraţi-vă, o, şobolani, Lumea s-a preschimbat în uriaşă cămară; Ronţăiţi, plescăiţi, mestecaţi, Dejunul şi prânzul şi cina luaţi! Şi tocmai atunci când se făcea C-o bute de zahăr în preajmă-mi lucea Precum un soare şi mă-mbia: „Ce stai? Hai, ronţăie-mă, hai! Sub val, în Weser, mă aflai.» You should have heard the Hamelin people Ringing the bells till they rocked the steeple. Go,‘ cried the Mayor, and get long poles! Poke out the nests and block up the holes! Consult with carpenters and builders, And leave in our town not even a trace Of the rats!‘ when suddenly, up the face Of the Piper perked in the market-place, Din clopote aşa sunară Că turlele se clătinară. Strigă Primarul: „Hai, luaţi prăjini, De cuiburi daţi, astupaţi vizuini, De la dulgheri şi zidari luaţi povaţă, Să nu rămână-n târg nici pomeneală De şobolani! Când, brusc, ciudata faţă A Fluierarului, iat-o în Piaţă: 202 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry With a, First, if you please, my thousand guilders!‘ „Mia mea de ducaţi, rogu-vă, după-nvoială! A thousand guilders! The Mayor looked blue; So did the Corporation too. For council dinners made rare havoc With Claret, Moselle, Vin-de-Grave, Hock; And half the money would replenish Their cellar‘s biggest butt with Rhenish. To pay this sum to a wandering fellow With a gypsy coat of red and yellow! Beside,‘ quoth the Mayor with a knowing wink, Our business was done at the river‘s brink; We saw with our eyes the vermin sink, And what‘s dead can‘t come to life, I think. So, friend, we‘re not the folks to shrink From the duty of giving you something for drink, And a matter of money to put in your poke; But, as for the guilders, what we spoke Of them, as you very well know, was in joke. Beside, our losses have made us thrifty. A thousand guilders! Come, take fifty!‘ O mie de galbeni! Primarul păli; Adunarea şi ea se-nvineţi. Căci ospeţele Sfatului aveau trebuinţă De cele mai scumpe vinuri de viţă. Jumătate din bani le-ar ajunge din plin Să-şi umple beciul cu vinuri de Rin. Aşa bănet pentru o haimana Ce ţigăneşte se înveşmânta! „Şi-apoi spuse Primarul, clipind mucalit, „Târgu-ncheiat la fluviu s-a sfârşit. Am văzut cum guzganii se-neacă pe rând, Şi ceea ce-i mort cred că n-o fi-nviând. Aşa, prietene, noi nu ne codim, Ne facem datoria şi-ţi plătim Ceva de băut şi de cheltuială; Cât despre galbeni şi-aşa zisa-nvoială. C-a fost doar o glumă, ştii, fără-ndoială. Şi apoi paguba ne-a făcut mai calici. O mie de galbeni! Cincizeci, ţine-aici! The Piper‘s face fell, and he cried No trifling! I can‘t wait, beside! I‘ve promised to visit by dinner-time Bagdat, and accept the prime Of the Head Cook‘s pottage, all he‘s rich in, For having left, in the Calip‘s kitchen, Of a nest of scorpions no survivor Strigă Fluierarul, la faţă schimbat: „N-am timp de glumit şi nici de-aşteptat! La cină fi-voi la Bagdad, Astfel cuvântul mi l-am dat. Chiar bucătarul Şef îmi face Alese feluri, tot ce-mi place, Căci n-am lăsat din scorpii una vie 203 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry With him I proved no bargain-driver, With you, don‘t think I‘ll bate a stiver! And folks who put me in a passion May find me pipe to another fashion.‘ În a Califului bucătărie. El la tocmeală nu a stat ca voi, aşa, Să vă văd că-mi ciupiţi fie chiar şi-o pará! Şi-apoi cui mă scoate din fire de tot, Şi eu ştiu alt cântec din fluier să-i scot. How?‘ cried the Mayor, d‘ye think I‘ll brook Being worse treated than a Cook? Insulted by a lazy ribald With idle pipe and vesture piebald? You threaten us, fellow? Do your worst, Blow your pipe there till you burst!‘ „Cum? Socoteşti că voi răbda, strigă Primarul „Să fiu mai prost tratat ca Bucătarul? Să fiu jignit astfel de-un nemâncat, Cu fluier trândav şi cu strai bălţat? Ne ameninţi, băiete? Fă ce pofteşti! Din fluier suflă până ce plesneşti! Once more he stepped into the street; And to his lips again Laid his long pipe of smooth straight cane; And ere he blew three notes (such sweet Soft notes as yet musician‘s cunning Never gave the enraptured air) There was a rustling, that seemed like a bustling Of merry crowds justling at pitching and hustling, Small feet were pattering, wooden shoes clattering, Little hands clapping and little tongues chattering, And, like fowls in a farmyard when barley is scattering, Out came the children running. All the little boys and girls, With rosy cheeks and flaxen curls, And sparkling eyes and teeth like pearls, Tripping and skipping, ran merrily after The wonderful music with shouting and laughter. Şi încă o dată în uliţă păşi Şi fluierul la buze-l duse iar, Fluierul lung şi drept, cu sunet rar, Şi nu suflă de trei ori bine (Dulci sunete atât de line Că tot văzduhul îl vrăji) Şi iată, se aude foşnind, parc-ar trece vuind, Voioase mulţimi, izbind, înghiontând, în puhoi venind, Picioare mici tropăind, saboţi bocănind, Mâini mici ropotind, limbi mici piuind, Ca puii-n ogrăzi, când vin la seminţe cu jind; Ieşeau copiii din case fugind, Toţi, băieţaşi şi fetiţe, Cu obraji rumeni şi bălaie cosiţe, Cu ochi sclipind, şi cu dinţi sclipitori şi guriţe, Zburdând, ţopăind, voios alergând, Vrăjitul cântec urmau râzând. 204 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Mayor was dumb, and the Council stood As if they were changed into blocks of wood, Unable to move a step, or cry To the children merrily skipping by And could only follow with the eye That joyous crowd at the Piper‘s back. But how the Mayor was on the rack, And the wretched Council‘s bosoms beat, As the Piper turned from the High Street To where the Weser rolled its waters Right in the way of their sons and daughters! However he turned from South to West, And to Koppelberg Hill his steps addressed, And after him the children pressed; Great was the joy in every breast. He never can cross that mighty top! He‘s forced to let the piping drop, And we shall see our children stop!‘ When, lo, as they reached the mountain‘s side, A wondrous portal opened wide, As if a cavern was suddenly hollowed; And the Piper advanced and the children followed, And when all were in to the very last, The door in the mountain-side shut fast. Did I say, all? No! One was lame, And could not dance the whole of the way; And in after years, if you would blame Primaru-amuţise, întregul Sfat În stane de piatră părea preschimbat. Nu puteau să strige, niciun pas să facă Spre puştii ce treceau în joacă. ... Din ochi puteau doar să petreacă Voioasa ceată şi-al ei Fluierar. Dar cum stătea Primarul ca pe jar Şi pentru Sfatul jalnic ce calvar, Când Fluierarul din Strada Înaltă Coti în partea cealaltă, Spre Weserul ce apele-şi purta Şi drept spre puştii lor venea! Dar el, din sud s-a-ntors către apus, Spre Piscul Koppelberg s-a dus, Şi-n urma lui, buluc, copiii. Părinţii — pradă bucuriei. „Nu, piscu-nalt nu-l va sui! Şi fluieru-i va amuţi! Copiii noştri s-or opri! Dar vai, la munte-au ajuns şi iată, S-a fost deschis ca o vrăjită poartă, De parc-o peşteră s-ar fi scobit deodată. Fluieraru-nainte, copiii în urma lui, gloată. Şi când toţi în peşteră-au intrat, Porţile muntelui s-au ferecat. Oare-am spus tot? Nu, unul şchiop Nu a ţinut atât la joc Şi, după ani, când îl mustrai 205 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry His sadness, he was used to say, It‘s dull in our town since my playmates left! I can‘t forget that I‘m bereft Of all the pleasant sights they see, Which the Piper also promised me: For he led us, he said, to a joyous land, Joining the town and just at hand, Where waters gushed and fruit-trees grew, And flowers put forth a fairer hue, And everything was strange and new; The sparrows were brighter than peacocks here, And their dogs outran our fallow deer, And honey-bees had lost their stings, And horses were born with eagles‘ wings: And just as I became assured My lame foot would be speedily cured, The music stopped and I stood still, And found myself outside the Hill, Left alone against my will, To go now limping as before, And never hear of that country more!‘ Pentru că-i trist, îl auzeai: „Urât mi-e-n târg de când ne-au părăsit! Şi nu pot să uit că doar eu sunt lipsit De-acele privelişti mândru-ntocmite, De Fluierar şi mie făgăduite. El spunea că ne duce-ntr-o ţară senină Şi tare aproape, cu târgul vecină, Ape acolo ţâşnesc şi pomi-înalţi cresc, Şi flori în culori mai vii înfloresc, Şi toate stranii se vădesc. Vrăbii mai falnice-s decât păunii, Mai iute ca ciuta aleargă câinii, Albinele n-au ace-otrăvitoare, Caii-au arípi de vultúr din născare; Şi tocmai când eram încredinţat Că picioru-mi beteag va fi vindecat, Fluierarul a stat şi-nmărmurit M-am pomenit la Muntele Vrăjit, Fără de voia mea rămas afară, Şi-acum, şontâc, eu trec prin uliţi iară, Nimic nu mai aud despre-acea ţară. Alas, alas for Hamelin! There came into many a burgher‘s pate A text which says, that Heaven‘s Gate Opes to the Rich at as easy rate As the needle‘s eye takes a camel in! The Mayor sent East, West, North, and South, To offer the Piper, by word of mouth, Vai, vai, biet Hameln! Multe capete-atunci au aflat De ce intră mai lesne cămila prin ac Decât în rai zgârcitul bogat. De la miazănoapte la miazăzi Primarul pământu-mpânzi Cu soli ca să dea Fluierarului veste Că oricâţi arginţi şi galbeni râvneşte 206 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Wherever it was men‘s lot to find him, Silver and gold to his heart‘s content, If he‘d only return the way he went, And bring the children behind him. But when they saw twas a lost endeavour, And Piper and dancers were gone for ever, They made a decree that lawyers never Should think their records dated duly If, after the day of the month and year, These words did not as well appear, And so long after what happened here On the Twenty-second of July, Thirteen hundred and seventy-six‘: And the better in memory to fix The place of the children‘s last retreat, They called it, the Pied Piper‘s Street Where any one playing on pipe or tabor Was sure for the future to lose his labour. Nor suffered they hostelry or tavern To shock with mirth a street so solemn; But opposite the place of the cavern They wrote the story on a column, And on the great Church-Window painted The same, to make the world acquainted How their children were stolen away; And there it stands to this very day. And I must not omit to say That in Transylvania there‘s a tribe Of alien people that ascribe Va căpăta cu vârf şi-ndesat, Doar să se-ntoarcă de unde-a plecat Şi-n urmă-i aducă băieţi şi fetiţe. Dar văzând că degeaba-s orice silinţe, Că nu-i vor mai vedea vreodată, Ei făcură o lege, ca niciodată Să n-aibă tărie un act şi nici dată, De nu poartă alături de zi, lună, leat, Acest adaos, bine-nvederat: „Atât şi-atâta de când s-a-ntâmplat, La două‘şdouă iulie an blestemat O mie trei sute şaptezeci şi şase. Şi pentru ca locul de unde plecase Cu pruncii, în veci să fie amintiţi, Numiră calea: Fluierarul Pestriţ. Nu-ngăduie-aici cârciumi, nici iarmaroc, Ocară-ar fi cheful în jalnicul loc. Şi-n faţa peşterii ce-a fost odată, Au scris pe o coloană povestea toată; Şi-n catedrală, pe geam, o pictară, Să afle lumea cum odinioară Le-au fost copiii răpiţi din cetate, Şi-acolo-s şi azi însemnate. Dar tocmai era să uit de urmare: În Transilvania, spre Soare-Răsare, Trăieşte alături de băştinaşi Un neam străin, cu port de oraş, De care vecinii grăiesc cam aşa: 207 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The outlandish ways and dress On which their neighbours lay such stress, To their fathers and mothers having risen Out of some subterraneous prison Into which they were trepanned Long time ago in a mighty band Out of Hamelin town in Brunswick land, But how or why, they don‘t understand. Părinţii lor ieşit-au cândva Dintr-o temniţă subpământeană, Ademeniţi de o vrajă vicleană, Din Hameln (în Braunschweig e-acel olat) Dar cum şi de ce ei nu au aflat. So, Willy, let you and me be wipers Of scores out with all menespecially pipers: And, whether they pipe us free, from rats or from mice, If we‘ve promised them aught, let us keep our promise. Deci, Willy, tu şi eu cinstiţi vom fi Cu toţi cu fluierarii şi mai şi! Cântând, guzgani şi şoareci de alungă, Să scoatem banii cei promişi din pungă! Traducere M. Banuş. 208 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1842b. TENNYSON. Ulysses. Leviţchi. 70 lines. Author: Alfred, Lord TENNYSON (1809-1892). Text: Ulysses. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Who is Tennyson? (50 words) Who is Ulysses? (20 words) Ulysses. Ulise. It little profits that an idle king, By this still hearth, among these barren crags, Matched with an aged wife, I mete and dole Unequal laws unto a savage race, That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me. Biet rege stând cu vârstnica mea soaţă În faţa vetrei, printre stânci pustii, Ce noimă are să-ntocmesc legi strâmbe Pentru un neam barbar ce strânge prăzi, Mănâncă, doarme şi nu mă cunoaşte? I cannot rest from travel; I will drink life to the lees. All times I have enjoyed Greatly, have suffered greatly, both with those that loved me, and alone; on shore, and when Through scudding drifts the rainy Hyades Vexed the dim sea. I am become a name; For always roaming with a hungry heart Much have I seen and known–cities of men And manners, climates, councils, governments, Myself not least, but honored of them all – Simt iarăşi dor de ducă voi bea viaţa Până la drojdii. Mult m-am veselit Întotdeauna, mult am îndurat, Cu-ai mei sau singur, pe uscat, de-asemeni Când prin a norilor grozave trâmbe Ploioasele Hyade dojeneau Pâcloasa mare sunt acum un nume! Tot pribegind cu inima-nsetată, Multe-am văzut şi cunoscut: meleaguri, Cetăţi, moravuri, sfaturi şi domnii, 209 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And drunk delight of battle with my peers, Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy. I am part of all that I have met; Yet all experience is an arch wherethrough Gleams that untraveled world whose margin fades Forever and forever when I move. How dull it is to pause, to make an end. To rust unburnished, not to shine in use! As though to breathe were life! Life piled on life Were all too little, and of one to me Little remains; but every hour is saved From that eternal silence, something more, A bringer of new things; and vile it were For some three suns to store and hoard myself, And this gray spirit yearning in desire To follow knowledge like a sinking star, Beyond the utmost bound of human thought. Cinstit de toţi, sorbind plăcerea luptei Pe vânzolitele câmpii troiene. Din tot ce-am întâlnit sunt azi o parte; Dar experienţa e un arc prin care Se vede lumea nebătătorită Cu margini ce se şterg mereu când merg. E trist să stai deoparte, ruginind În loc să străluceşti prin folosinţă! De parcă a sufla înseamnă viaţă! Vieţi peste vieţi şi încă-ar fi puţin, Iar dintr-a mea nu mai rămâne mult; Dar fiecare ceas poate scăpa De veşnica tăcere; şi în anii Cât voi mai vieţui e-o mârşăvie Să stau şi să adun, iar într-acestea, Căruntul duh să ardă de dorinţa De-a urmări cunoaşterea, mult peste Hotarele gândirii omeneşti — Asemeni unei stele ce se stinge. This is my son, my own Telemachus, To whom I leave the scepter and the isle – Well-loved of me, discerning to fulfill This labor, by slow prudence to make mild A rugged people, and through soft degrees Subdue them to the useful and the good. Most blameless is he, centered in the sphere Of common duties, decent not to fail In offices of tenderness, and pay Acesta-i Telemac, feciorul meu Atât mi-e de drag şi lui îi las Şi insula şi sceptrul; el va şti, Cu minte nepripită, să-mblânzească Un neam sălbatic, să-l deprindă-ncet Cu tot ce e folositor şi bun. E-un suflet nepătat; atunci când plec, Se-apleacă-asupra treburilor cu grijă, De oameni nu-i străin şi îi cinsteşte 210 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Meet adoration to my household gods, When I am gone. He works his work, I mine. Pe zeii casei. El cu munca lui, Eu cu a mea. There lies the port; the vessel puffs her sail; There gloom the dark, broad seas. My mariners, Souls that have toiled, and wrought, and thought with me – That ever with a frolic welcome took The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed Free hearts, free foreheads – you and I are old; Old age hath yet his honor and his toil. Death closes all; but something ere the end, Some work of noble note, may yet be done, Not unbecoming men that strove with gods. The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks; The long day wanes; the slow moon climbs; the deep Moans round with many voices. Come, my friends. Tis not too late to seek a newer world. Push off, and sitting well in order smite the sounding furrows; for my purpose holds To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths Of all the western stars, until I die. It may be that the gulfs will wash us down; It may be that we shall touch the Happy Isles, And see the great Achilles, whom we knew. Acolo-i portul; vasul Îşi umflă pânzele; cât vezi cu ochii, Cernite ape; marinarii mei, Care-aţi trudit şi-aţi cugetat cu mine Şi aţi întâmpinat cu voioşie Şi tunetul şi soarele, voi, inimi Şi gânduri libere! Suntem bătrâni. Dar vârsta are cinstea ei şi munca; Şi dacă moartea-ncheie toate, încă Putem să săvârşim o faptă mare, De slavă unor ce-au luptat cu zeii. Lumini prind să clipească printre stânci; Prea lunga zi apune; luna urcă; Adâncul murmură. Veniţi, prieteni, Nu este prea târziu să căutăm O lume nouă. Hai, desprindeţi nava Şi, aşezându-vă cu şart, loviţi Cu toţi odată, brazdele stârnite. Vom merge dincolo de asfinţit Şi scăldătoarea stelelor din zarea-i Aceasta-i cea din urmă ţintă-a mea. De nu ne-nghite valul, cu putinţă-i S-atingem Insulele Fericite Şi să-l vedem pe marele Ahile. Mult ni s-a luat, dar, iarăşi, mult mai este, Deşi n-avem puterea de-altădată Though much is taken, much abides; and though We are not now that strength which in old days 211 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are – One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. Ce zguduia pământ şi cer; şi suntem Ce suntem: inimi de eroi, slăbite De timp şi soartă. Dar vom năzui Şi, dârzi, vom căuta şi vom afla. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 212 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1843. Heliade RDULESCU. Sburătorul. 104 lines. Author: Ion Heliade RDULESCU (1802-1872). Text: Sburătorul. Translator: FrageStellung: Does this poem have, in your opinion, any European value? Sburătorul. La doamna A*** M*** „Vezi, mamă, ce mă doare! şi pieptul mi se bate, Mulţimi de vineţele pe sân mi se ivesc; Un foc s-aprinde-n mine, răcori mă iau la spate, Îmi ard buzele, mamă, obrajii-mi se pălesc! Translation required. Ah! inima-mi zvâcneşte!… şi zboară de la mine! Îmi cere… nu-ş‘ ce-mi cere! şi nu ştiu ce i-aş da; Şi cald, şi rece, uite, că-mi furnică prin vine, În braţe n-am nimica şi parcă am ceva; Că uite, mă vezi, mamă? aşa se-ncrucişează, Şi nici nu prinz de veste când singură mă strâng, Şi tremur de nesaţiu, şi ochii-mi văpăiază, Pornesc dintr-înşii lacrămi, şi plâng, măicuţă, plâng. Ia pune mâna, mamă, – pe frunte, ce sudoare! Obrajii… unul arde şi altul mi-a răcit! 213 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Un nod colea m-apucă, ici coasta rău mă doare; În trup o piroteală de tot m-a stăpânit. Oar‘ ce să fie asta? Întreabă pe bunica: O şti vrun leac ea doară… o fi vrun zburător. Or aide l-alde baba Comana, or Sorica, Or du-te la moş popa, or mergi la vrăjitor. Şi unul să se roage, că poate mă dezleagă; Mătuşele cu bobii fac multe şi desfac; Şi vrăjitorul ala şi apele încheagă; Aleargă la ei, mamă, că doar mi-or da pe leac. De cum se face ziuă şi scot mânzat-afară S-o mâi pe potecuţă la iarbă colea-n crâng, Vezi, câtu-i ziuliţa, şi zi acum de vară, Un dor nespus m-apucă, şi plâng, măicuţă, plâng. Brânduşa paşte iarbă la umbră lângă mine, La râuleţ s-adapă, pe maluri pribegind; Zău, nu ştiu când se duce, că mă trezesc când vine, Şi simţ că mişcă tufa, auz crângul trosnind. Atunci inima-mi bate şi sai ca din visare, Şi parc-aştept... pe cine? şi pare c-a sosit. Acest fel toată viaţa-mi e lungă aşteptare, Şi nu soseşte nimeni!… Ce chin nesuferit! În arşiţa căldurei, când vântuleţ adie, Când pleopul a sa frunză o tremură uşor 214 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi-n tot crângul o şoaptă s-ardică şi-l învie, Eu parcă-mi auz scrisul pe sus cu vântu-n zbor; Şi când îmi mişcă ţopul, cosiţa se ridică, Mă sperii, dar îmi place – prin vine un fior Îmi fulgeră şi-mi zice: «Deşteaptă-te, Florică, Sunt eu, viu să te mângâi…» Dar e un vânt uşor! Oar‘ ce să fie asta? Întreabă pe bunica: O şti vrun leac ea doară… o fi vrun zburător! Or aide l-alde baba Comana, or Sorica, Or du-te la moş popa, or mergi la vrăjitor. Aşa plângea Florica şi, biet, îşi spunea dorul Pe prispă lângă mă-sa, ş-obida o neca; Junicea-n bătătură mugea, căta oborul, Şi mă-sa sta pe gânduri, şi fata suspina. Era în murgul serei şi soarele sfinţise; A puţurilor cumpeni ţipând parcă chema A satului cireadă, ce greu, mereu sosise, Şi vitele muginde la zgheab întins păşea. Dar altele-adăpate trăgea în bătătură, În gemete de mumă viţeii lor striga; Vibra al serei aer de tauri grea murmură; Zglobii sărind viţeii la uger alerga. S-astâmpără ast zgomot, ş-a laptelui fântână Începe să s-audă ca şoaptă în susur, 215 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Când ugerul se lasă subt fecioreasca mână Şi prunca viţeluşă tot tremură-mpregiur. Încep a luci stele rând una câte una Şi focuri în tot satul încep a se vedea; Târzie astă-seară răsare-acum şi luna, Şi, cobe, câteodată tot cade câte-o stea. Dar câmpul şi argeaua câmpeanul osteneşte Şi dup-o cină scurtă şi somnul a sosit. Tăcere pretutindeni acuma stăpâneşte, Şi lătrătorii numai s-aud necontenit. E noapte naltă, naltă; din mijlocul tăriei Veşmântul său cel negru, de stele semănat, Destins coprinde lumea, ce-n braţele somniei Visează câte-aievea deşteaptă n-a visat. Tăcere este totul şi nemişcare plină: Încântec sau descântec pe lume s-a lăsat; Nici frunza nu se mişcă, nici vântul nu suspină, Şi apele dorm duse, şi morele au stat. …………………………………………………………… „Dar ce lumină iute ca fulger trecătoare Din miazănoapte scapă cu urme de schintei? Vro stea mai cade iară? vrun împărat mai moare? Or e – să nu mai fie! – vro pacoste de zmei? Tot zmeu a fost, surato. Văzuşi, împeliţatu, Că ţintă l-alde Floarea în clipă străbătu! 216 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi drept pe coş, leicuţă! ce n-ai gândi, spurcatu! Închină-te, surato! – Văzutu-l-ai şi tu? Balaur de lumină cu coada-nflăcărată, Şi pietre nestimate lucea pe el ca foc. Spun, soro, c-ar fi june cu dragoste curată; Dar lipsa d-a lui dragosti! departe de ast loc! Pândeşte, bată-l crucea! şi-n somn colea mi-ţi vine Ca brad un flăcăiandru, şi tras ca prin inel, Bălai, cu părul d-aur! dar slabele lui vine N-au nici un pic de sânge, ş-un nas – ca vai de el! O! biata fetişoară! mi-e milă de Florica Cum o fi chinuind-o! vezi, d-aia a slăbit Şi s-a pălit copila! ce bine-a zis bunica: Să fugă fata mare de focul de iubit! Că-ncepe de visează, şi visu-n lipitură Începe-a se preface, şi lipitura-n zmeu, Şi ce-i mai faci pe urmă? că nici descântătură, Nici rugi nu te mai scapă. Ferească Dumnezeu! 217 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1845. Edgar POE.The Raven. Doinaş # Solomon # Dragomir # Lari # Săvescu. 108 lines. Author: Edgar Allan POE (1809-1849). Text: The Raven. Translator: St. A. Doinaş # P. Solomon # M. Dragomir # L. Lari # I.C. Săvescu. FrageStellung: a. The greatest among the great. Why do the Americans downgrade him? b. Would the poem have the same effect if you translated it without rhymes, and ignoring the music ality of its key words rhythmically repeated? The Raven. Corbul. Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. `‘Tis some visitor,‘ I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door – Only this, and nothing more.‘ Într-un sumbru miez de noapte când, sleit şi slab, în şoapte, Cercetam doctrine stranii strânse-n jerpelit cotor, Şi picam de somn, – de-odată, auzii o foarte-nceată Lovitură repetată-n uşa mea izbind uşor. „E vreun călător, şoptit-am, „care ciocăne uşor, – Doar atât – un călător. Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow; – vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow – sorrow for the lost Lenore – For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Nameless here for evermore. Ah, mi-aduc aminte – ceaţă, şi-un decembrie de gheaţă; Lent agonizând tăciunii-şi lăsau spectrul pe covor. Zorii-i aşteptam să vie, şi-n zadar ceream tărie Din cărţi vechi, la jalea vie după stinsa mea Lenore, – Fata-flacără pe care îngerii-o numesc Lenore, – Nu aici – în lumea lor. 218 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me – filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating `‘Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door – Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; – This it is, and nothing more,‘ Foşnetul mătasei grele-n purpuriile perdele Mă-njunghia, – vărsa în pieptu-mi un ciudat, adânc fior; Ca să-mi potolesc nebuna inimă ziceam într-una „Vreun drumeţ ce-aşteaptă luna bate-n uşă-ncetişor, Rătăcit drumeţ ce bate-n uşa mea încetişor. Doar atât – un călător. Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer, `Sir,‘ said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you‘ – here I opened wide the door; – Darkness there, and nothing more. Repede-adunând putere-n suflet, fără-ntârziere, „Domnule, am zis, „ori doamnă, mila voastră o implor; Fapt e că dormeam; – puţină, doar bătaia-a fost de vină, O bătaie mult prea lină-n uşa mea, încât uşor Am luat-o drept părere, – şi-am deschis uşa uşor; – Beznă – nici un călător. Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!‘ This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!‘ Merely this and nothing more. Sfredelind a nopţii smoală, plin de spasme şi-ndoială, Stam visând ce-n vis vreodată n-a visat vreun muritor; Dar tăcerea şi pământul erau grele ca mormântul; Se-auzi numai cuvântul murmurat abia – „Lenore? – Eu l-am spus, – apoi ecoul repetă cernit „Lenore! Doar atât – o vorbă-n zbor. Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before. `Surely,‘ said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore – Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; – Tis the wind and nothing more!‘ Întorcându-mă-n odaie, mistuit ca de-o văpaie, Desluşii acelaşi sunet, de-astă dată mai cu spor. „Sigur, zis-am, sigur trece cineva; – sub geamul rece, Ia, să văd ce se petrece; – am să lămuresc uşor Taina-aceasta; – să-mi trag firea şi-o voi lămuri uşor; E doar vântul călător; Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore. Iute-am dat oblonu-n lături şi, cu negrele-i peneturi, Un vechi Corb din sfinte vremuri apăru solemn, în zbor; 219 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door – Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door – Perched, and sat, and nothing more. Fără pic de ezitare, fără nici o înclinare, Ca un domn sau doamnă care nu cunosc răgaz, nici zor, S-aşeză pe bustul mândrei Pallas fără nici un zor, Chiar de-asupra, sfidător. Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, `Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,‘ I said, `art sure no craven. Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore – Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night‘s Plutonian shore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Şi, cum pasărea ursuză îmi stârnea surâs pe buză Prin severa-i etichetă, gravă, – am şoptit uşor „Deşi creasta ţi-e golaşă, nu pari o fiinţă laşă, – Corb spectral purtând cămaşă de-ntuneric, foşnitor, – Spune-ţi numele de domn pe ţărmul Nopţii foşnitor! Zise Corbul „Nevermore. Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly, Though its answer little meaning – little relevancy bore; For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door – Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door, With such name as `Nevermore.‘ Mult m-am minunat de-această pasăre cu tunsă creastă, Că vorbea, – deşi răspunsul nu era lămuritor; Însă nimănui în viaţă nu i se arată-n faţă Pasăre tronând semeaţă chiar de-asupra pe uşor, – Pasăre sau arătare stând pe-un bust, lângă uşor, Cu-acest nume „Nevermore. But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only, That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. Nothing further then he uttered – not a feather then he fluttered – Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before – On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.‘ Then the bird said, `Nevermore.‘ Însă Corbul care-acuma sta pe bust rostise numai Un cuvânt în care-ntregu-i suflet se stingea de dor. N-am mai zis nimic, – o vreme n-a mişcat nici el din pene, – Până ce-am şoptit alene „Alţi amici s-au dus în zbor; Mâine şi el o să plece, ca Speranţa mea, în zbor. Dar el zise „Nevermore. Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken, `Doubtless,‘ said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store, Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disaster Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore – Tresărind că vocea-i spartă-mi răspundea cu-atâta artă, „Da, mi-am zis, „e tot ce ştie, tot bagajul vorbitor Smuls unui stăpân prea-jalnic, căruia Dezastrul falnic I-a schimbat un cânt şăgalnic în refren croncănitor, – 220 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden bore Of "Never–nevermore." Tânguirile Speranţei în refren croncănitor, Precum „Never-Nevermore. But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore – What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking `Nevermore.‘ Şi, cum pasărea ursuză îmi stârnea surâs pe buză, Am împins grăbit fotolui chiar sub bust, lângă uşor, Şi, surpat în el, cu gândul visul de alt vis legându-l, Mă-ntrebam mereu, scrutându-1, ce mesaj prevestitor, – Slab, din sfinte vremuri, sumbru – ce mesaj prevestitor Mi-aducea prin „Nevermore. This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom‘s core; This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining On the cushion‘s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o‘er, But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o‘er, She shall press, ah, nevermore! Asta frământam în minte, iscodind fără cuvinte Corbul ce-aţintea asupra-mi ochiul fix, sfredelitor. Asta, şi mai multe, – toate vrând să ştiu – lăsam pe spate Capu-n pernele muşcate de-un reflex Strălucitor, – Perne de mătasă-n care părul ei strălucitor Nu va mai pluti uşor. Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor. `Wretch,‘ I cried, `thy God hath lent thee – by these angels he has sent thee Respite – respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore! Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Camera-mi părea ţesută de-o tămâie nevăzută Arsă de-un Seraf cu paşii ca un clinchet pe covor. „Vai, sărmane!, am zis, „Prin cete de heruvi, Cel sfânt îţi dete Un răgaz – şi suc – să-mbete gândul tău pentru Lenore; Bea acest suav nepenthes, bea, – şi uit-o pe Lenore! Zise Corbul „Nevermore! `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! – Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted – On this home by horror haunted – tell me truly, I implore – Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Piază rea! strigai, „Prooroace! – Corb sau diavol, n-are-a face! Fie că Ispititorul, fie că furtuna-n zbor Cuteză să te trimită în pustia mea vrăjită, – Într-o casă bântuită de Oroare, – te implor! E vreun balsam în Iudeea? – spune, spune-mi, – te implor! Zise Corbul „Nevermore. 221 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! By that Heaven that bends above us – by that God we both adore – Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn, It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Piază rea! , strigai, „Prooroace! – Corb sau diavol, n-are-a face! Pe boltitul cer, pe Domnul adorat de noi în cor, – Spune-mi – săruta-voi oare în Edenul sfânt din zare Fata-flacără pe care îngerii-o numesc Lenore, – Fata pură, ca o rază, care s-a numit Lenore? Zise Corbul „Nevermore! `Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!‘ I shrieked upstarting – `Get thee back into the tempest and the Night‘s Plutonian shore! Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken! Leave my loneliness unbroken! – quit the bust above my door! Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Ultimul cuvânt să-ţi fie!, – corb sau drac! în vijelie Să te-ntorci, – te-nchidă Noaptea sub plutonicu-i zăvor! Pene nu lăsa pe cale – martore minciunii tale! Nu-mi sfărma cu-aripi spectrale sihăstria! – Piei în zbor! Scoate-ţi crudul plisc din mine, forma spulberă-ţi-o-n zbor! Zise Corbul „Nevermore! And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon‘s that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o‘er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted – nevermore! De-atunci Corbul, ca o stană, nu mai flutură din pană, Stând pe bustul mândrei Pallas, – fantomatic, sfidător. Ochii lui au para trează-a unui demon ce visează, Baza lămpii-i proiectează umbra neagră pe covor, Şi-al meu suflet niciodată, smuls din ea, de pe covor, Nu va mai sui în zbor. Traducere Şt. A. Doinaş. 222 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Raven. Corbul. Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. `‘Tis some visitor,‘ I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door – Only this, and nothing more.‘ Într-un miez de noapte crâncen, pe când – ostenit şi lânced – Meditam peste vechi tomuri – o, uitat e tâlcul lor! – Mi-a părut, ca-n vis, că bate cineva la uşă: „Poate E vreun oaspe ce se-abate pe la mine-ntâmplător, Da, un oaspe care bate-n uşa mea, încetişor. Mi-am şoptit, încrezător. Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow; – vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow – sorrow for the lost Lenore – For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Nameless here for evermore. Gândul, vai, mă mai petrece spre acel Dechemvre rece Când tăciunii păreau stafii alungite pe covor. Zorii-i aşteptam cu sete: nici un tom vreun leac nu-mi dete Ca să uit de moartea fetei, căreia-i spuneau Lenore Înşişi îngerii – frumoasa, luminoasa mea Lenore, Dusă-n vecii vecilor! And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me – filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating `‘Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door – Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; – This it is, and nothing more,‘ Purpuriile perdele, cu foşninde catifele, Mă făceau, ca niciodată, în adânc să mă-nfior, Încât repetam într-una, pentru-a potoli furtuna Inimii, zvâcnind nebună: „E vreun oaspe doritor Să-l primesc la mine-n casă, – vreun prieten trecător. De ce-aş fi bănuitor? Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer, ‘Sir,‘ said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, Când mi-am mai venit în fire, spus-am fără şovăire: „Domnule, sau poate Doamnă, să mă ierţi, eu te implor: Somnul îmi dădea târcoale, când bătaia dumitale 223 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you‘ – here I opened wide the door; – Darkness there, and nothing more. Se-auzi, atât de moale şi atât de-nşelător, C-am crezut că mi se pare... Şi-am deschis, netemător, Beznei ce pîndea-n pridvor. Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!‘ This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!‘ Merely this and nothing more. Uluit ca de-o minune, am scrutat acea genune, Plin de vise cum n-aş crede c-a visat vreun muritor, Însă liniştea cumplită a rămas, ca-nmărmurită. Doar o vorbă-abia şoptită se-auzi prin ea: LENORE, Iar ecoul îmi întoarse şoapta stranie LENORE – Ce se stinse-ncetişor. Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before. `Surely,‘ said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore – Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; – Tis the wind and nothing more!‘ Întorcându-mă-n odaie, mistuit ca de-o văpaie, Auzii că bate iarăşi, parcă mai stăruitor. „Ale-oblonului zăbrele sunt de vină, numai ele! Ia să văd, şi tainei grele adâncimea să-i măsor, Liniştindu-mi pentru-o clipă sufletul fremătător.... E doar vântul, vuitor. Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore. Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door – Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door – Perched, and sat, and nothing more. Am deschis oblonu-n pripă şi, cu foşnet de aripă, Un corb falnic din vechimea sfântă, a intrat în zbor Şi, de mine făr‘ să-i pese, cu-aerul unei crăiese Sau al unui crai, purcese şi se-opri, impunător, Pe un bust al zeei Pallas, aşezat peste uşcior, – Şi rămase – negru nor. Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, `Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,‘ I said, `art sure no craven. Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore – Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night‘s Plutonian shore!‘ Pasărea abanosie-mi smulse din stenahorie Tristul suflet, ce surâse văzând chipul gânditor: „Deşi creasta ţi-este cheală, tu eşti plin de îndrăzneală, Corb cumplit din vremi de fală, – spune-mi, ce nume sonor Ţi s-a dat pe Ţărmul Nopţii, corbule rătăcitor? 224 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Corbul spuse: NEVERMORE. Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly, Though its answer little meaning – little relevancy bore; For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door – Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door, With such name as `Nevermore.‘ M-a uimit peste măsură ăst cuvânt la cobe-n gură Deşi nu prea avea noimă, – însă cărui muritor I-a fost dat vreodat‘ să vadă cum o pasăre – de pradă Sau de rând – vine să şadă peste-al uşii lui uşcior, Pe un bust al zeei Pallas şi, cu glas croncănitor, Îi răspunde NEVERMORE? But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only, That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. Nothing further then he uttered – not a feather then he fluttered – Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before – On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.‘ Then the bird said, `Nevermore.‘ Proţăpit pe-acea statuie, doar atât putea să spuie, Sufletul parcă turnându-şi în cuvântul izbitor. Alte vorbe nu-i ieşiră. Penele-i încremeniră. Atunci buzele-mi şoptiră: „Va pleca şi el în zori, Ca atâţia alţi prieteni şi nădejdi de viitor. Corbul spuse: NEVERMORE! Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken, `Doubtless,‘ said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store, Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disaster Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore – Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden bore Of "Never–nevermore." Uluit de potriveală, mi-am zis: „Fără îndoială C-a deprins această vorbă auzind vreun bocitor Care, urgisit de soartă, şi-a jelit nădejdea moartă Pînă când, cu vocea spartă, a ajuns, răzbit de dor, Să repete în neştire un refren apăsător – Trista vorbă NEVERMORE! But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore – What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking `Nevermore.‘ Cum a corbului vedere încă-mi mai făcea plăcere, Mi-am tras jilţul lângă uşă, chiar sub bustul sclipitor. Cufundat în catifele şi în gândurile mele, Încercai să aflu-n ele ce vrea corbul cobitor – Pasărea aceasta sumbră, care croncăne de zor Numai vorba NEVERMORE? 225 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom‘s core; This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining On the cushion‘s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o‘er, But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o‘er, She shall press, ah, nevermore! Chinuit de întrebare, căutam o dezlegare Sub ai cobei ochi de pară, mistuit de focul lor. Stând cu capul dat pe spate, pradă perinei bogate Cu luciri catifelate, îmi spuneam încetişor, Că EA n-o să mai dezmierde perina cu-al ei căpşor Niciodată, NEVERMORE! Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor. `Wretch,‘ I cried, `thy God hath lent thee – by these angels he has sent thee Respite – respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore! Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Îmi păru că-n aer suie o mireasmă de căţuie Clătinată de arhangheli – călcau parcă pe covor! Şi strigai: „Nenorocite! Prin heruvi, Domnu-ţi trimite Vrăjile-ndelung râvnite ca să uiţi de-a ta Lenore! Soarbe vrăjile acestea, ca să uiţi de-a ta Lenore ! Corbul spuse: NEVERMORE! `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! – Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted – On this home by horror haunted – tell me truly, I implore – Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Diavole, sau zburătoare! dar proroc, pe cât se pare, Iadul te-a trimis, ori vântul, pe-acest ţărm îngrozitor, În chilia mea pustie, unde Groaza-i pururi vie, Deşi-o rabd cu semeţie,– spune-mi, dară, te implor, Oare-n Galaad se află vreun balsam vindecător? Corbul spuse: NEVERMORE! `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! By that Heaven that bends above us – by that God we both adore – Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn, It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Diavole, sau zburătoare! dar proroc, pe cât se pare, Te conjur pe Dumnezeul nostru drag, al tuturor: Inima-mi avea-va parte, în Edenul de departe, Să îmbrăţişeze-n moarte pe sfinţita-n veci Lenore, – Pe-acea fată care poartă numele-ngeresc Lenore? Corbul spuse: NEVERMORE! `Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!‘ I shrieked upstarting – „Corb sau demon! Piei odată cu-a ta vorbă blestemată! 226 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry `Get thee back into the tempest and the Night‘s Plutonian shore! Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken! Leave my loneliness unbroken! – quit the bust above my door! Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Te întoarce în Tărâmul Nopţii, înspăimântător! Să nu-ţi uiţi vreo pană-n casă, mărturie mincinoasă Ca şi vorba ta! Mă lasă! Singur să rămân mi-e dor! Ia-ţi din inima mea pliscul lung şi rău-prevestitor! Corbul spuse: NEVERMORE! And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon‘s that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o‘er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted – nevermore! Şi de-atunci, stă ca o stană, făr‘ să-şi mişte nici o pană, Pe-albul bust al zeei Pallas, aşezat peste uşcior. Cu-ai săi ochi ce scânteiază, pare-un demon ce visează, Când a lămpii mele rază-i zvârle umbra pe covor. Şi, legat de-această umbră, nu se mai avântă-n zbor Al meu suflet, NEVERMORE! Traducere P. Solomon. 227 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Raven. Corbul. Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. `‘Tis some visitor,‘ I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door – Only this, and nothing more.‘ Stând, cândva, la miez de noapte, istovit, furat de şoapte Din oracole ceţoase, cărţi cu tâlc tulburător, Piroteam, uitând de toate, când deodată-aud cum bate, Cineva părea că bate – bate-n uşa mea uşor. „E vreun trecător – gândit-am – şi-a bătut întâmplător. Doar atât, un trecător. Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow; – vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow – sorrow for the lost Lenore – For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Nameless here for evermore. O, mai pot uita vreodată ? Vânt, decembrie cu zloată, Jaru-agoniza, c-un straniu dans de umbre pe covor, Beznele-mi dădeau târcoale – şi niciunde-n cărţi vreo cale Să-mi aline greaua jale – jalea grea pentru Lenore – Fata fără-asemuire – îngerii îi spun Lenore – Nume-n lume trecător. And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me – filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating `‘Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door – Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; – This it is, and nothing more,‘ În perdele învinse roşul veşted de mătase Cu-o foşnire de nelinişti, ca-ntr-un spasm chinuitor; Şi-mi spuneam, să nu mai geamă inima zvâcnind de teamă: „E vreun om care mă cheamă, vrând să afle-un ajutor – Rătăcit prin frig şi noapte vrea să ceară-un ajutor – Nu-i decât un trecător. Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer, `Sir,‘ said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you‘ – here I opened wide the door; – Astfel liniştindu-mi gândul şi de spaime dezlegându-l „Domnule – am spus – sau doamnă, cer iertare, vă implor; Podidit de oboseală eu dormeam, fără-ndoială, Şi-aţi bătut prea cu sfială, prea sfios, prea temător; Am crezut că-i doar părere! Şi-am deschis, netemător, 228 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Beznă, nici un trecător. Darkness there, and nothing more. Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!‘ This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!‘ Merely this and nothing more. Şi-am rămas în prag o vreme, inima simţind cum geme, Năluciri vedeam, cum nimeni n-a avut, vreun muritor; Noapte numai, nesfârşită, bezna-n sinea-i adâncită, Şi o vorbă, doar şoptită, ce-am şoptit-o eu: „Lenore! Doar ecou-adânc al beznei mi-a răspuns şoptit: „Lenore! Doar ecoul trecător. Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before. `Surely,‘ said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore – Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; – Tis the wind and nothing more!‘ Întorcându-mă-n odaie, tâmplele-mi ardeau văpaie, Şi-auzii din nou bătaia, parcă mai stăruitor. „La fereastră este, poate, vreun drumeţ strein ce bate... Nu ştiu, semnele-s ciudate, vreau să aflu tâlcul lor. Vreau, de sunt în beznă taine, să descopăr tâlcul lor! Vânt şi nici un trecător. Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore. Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door – Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door – Perched, and sat, and nothing more. Geamul l-am deschis o clipă şi, c-un foşnet grav de-aripă, a intrat un Corb, străvechiul timpului stăpânitor. N-a-ncercat vreo plecăciune de salut sau sfiiciune, Ci făptura-i de tăciune şi-a oprit, solemn, din zbor, Chiar pe bustul albei Palas – ca un Domn stăpânitor, Sus, pe bust, se-opri din zbor. Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, `Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,‘ I said, `art sure no craven. Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore – Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night‘s Plutonian shore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Printre negurile-mi dese, parcă-un zâmbet mi-adusese, Cum privea, umflat în pene, ţanţoş şi încrezător. Şi-am vorbit: „Ţi-e creasta cheală, totuşi intri cu-ndrăzneală, Corb bătrân, strigoi de smoală dintr-al nopţii-adânc sobor! Care ţi-e regalul nume dat de-al Iadului sobor? Spuse Corbul: ,,Nevermore!’’ 229 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly, Though its answer little meaning – little relevancy bore; For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door – Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door, With such name as `Nevermore.‘ Mult m-am minunat, fireşte, auzindu-l cum rosteşte Chiar şi-o vorbă fără noimă, croncănită-ntâmplător; Însă nu ştiu om pe lume să primească-n casă-anume Pasăre ce-şi spune-un nume – sus, pe bust, oprită-n zbor – Pasăre, de nu stafie, stând pe-un bust strălucitorCorb ce-şi spune: „Nevermore. But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only, That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. Nothing further then he uttered – not a feather then he fluttered – Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before – On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.‘ Then the bird said, `Nevermore.‘ Dar, în neagra-i sihăstrie, alta nu părea că ştie, Sufletul şi-l îmbrăcase c-un cuvânt sfâşietor. Mult rămase, ca o stană.n-a mişcat nici fulg, nici pană, Până-am spus: „S-au dus, în goană, mulţi prieteni, mulţi, ca-n zbor – Va pleca şi el, ca mâine, cum s-a dus Nădejdea-n zbor. Spuse Corbul: „Nevermore”. Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken, `Doubtless,‘ said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store, Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disaster Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore – Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden bore Of "Never–nevermore." Uluit s-aud că-ncearcă vorbă cugetată parcă, M-am gândit: „E-o vorbă numai, de-altele-i neştiutor. L-a-nvăţat vreun om, pe care Marile Dezastre-amare L-au purtat fără-ncetare cu-ăst refren chinuitor – Bocetul Nădejdii-nfrânte i-a ritmat, chinuitor, Doar cuvântul: «Nevermore». But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore – What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking `Nevermore.‘ Corbul răscolindu-mi, însă, desnădejdea-n suflet strânsă, Jilţul mi l-am tras alături, lângă bustul sclipitor; Gânduri rânduiam, şi vise, doruri, şi nădejdi ucise, Lângă vorba ce-o rostise Corbul nopţii, cobitor – Cioclu chel, spectral, sinistru, bădăran şi cobitor – Vorba Never – Nevermore. This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing Nemişcat, învins de frică, însă negrăind nimică, 230 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom‘s core; This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining On the cushion‘s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o‘er, But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o‘er, She shall press, ah, nevermore! Îl priveam cum mă fixează, până-n gând străbătător, Şi simţeam iar îndoiala, mângâiat de căptuşeala Jilţului, pe care pala rază-l lumina uşor – Dar pe care niciodată nu-l va mângâia, uşor, Ea, pierduta mea Lenore. Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor. `Wretch,‘ I cried, `thy God hath lent thee – by these angels he has sent thee Respite – respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore! Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Şi-am simţit deodată-o boare, din căţui aromitoare, Nevăzuţi pluteau, c-un clinchet, paşi de înger pe covor; „Ţie, ca să nu mai sângeri, îţi trimite Domnul îngeri – Eu mi-am spus – „să uiţi de plângeri, şi de dusa ta Lenore. Bea licoarea de uitare, uită gândul la Lenore ! Spuse Corbul : ,,Nevermore. `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! – Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted – On this home by horror haunted – tell me truly, I implore – Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Tu, profet cu neagră pană, vraci, oracol, sau satană, Sol al Beznei sau Gheenei, dacă eşti iscoditor, În noroasa mea ruină, lângă-un ţărm fără lumină, Unde spaima e regină – spune-mi, spune-mi te implor, Este-n Galaad – găsi-voi un balsam alinător? Spuse Corbul: ,,Nevermore”. `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! By that Heaven that bends above us – by that God we both adore – Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn, It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Tu, profet cu neagră pană, vraci, oracol, sau satană, Spune-mi, pe tăria bolţii şi pe Domnul iertător, Sufletu-ntâlni-va oare, în Edenul plin de floare, Cea mai pură-ntre fecioare – îngerii îi spun Lenore – Fata căreia şi-n ceruri îngeri îi spun Lenore? Spuse Corbul: ,,Nevermore”. `Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!‘ I shrieked upstarting – „Fie-ţi blestemat cuvân tul! Piei, cu beznele şi vântul, `Get thee back into the tempest and the Night‘s Plutonian shore! Piei în beznă şi furtună, sau pe ţărmul Nopţii-n zbor! 231 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken! Leave my loneliness unbroken! – quit the bust above my door! Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Nu-mi lăsa nici fulg în casă din minciuna-ţi veninoasă! Singur pentru veci mă lasă ! Pleacă de pe bust în zbor! Scoate-ţi pliscu-nfipt în mine, pleacă la Satan, în zbor! Spuse Corbul: ,,Nevermore”. And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon‘s that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o‘er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted – nevermore! Şi de-atunci, pe todeauna, Corbul stă, şi stă într-una, Sus, pe albul bust, deasupra uşii mele, pânditor, Ochii veşnic stau de pază, ochi de demon ce visează, Lampa îşi prelinge-o rază de pe pana-i pe covor; Ştiu, eu n-am să scap din umbra-i nemişcată pe covor. Niciodată – Nevermore. Traducere M. Dragomir. 232 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Raven. Corbul. Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. `‘Tis some visitor,‘ I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door – Only this, and nothing more.‘ Într-o noapte-ntunecoasă, istovit, şedeam la masă Cu străvechi volume-n faţă, cugetând asupra lor, Şi pe-o carte cam ciudată aţipii, când deodată O bătaie neaşteptată se-auzi uşor-uşor, Cred că, murmurai încet eu, a bătut vreun trecător, Nu-i decât un trecător. Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow; – vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow – sorrow for the lost Lenore – For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Nameless here for evermore. Şi acum mi-e desluşită iarna cea mohorâtă: Cărbunii, pierind în vatră, năşteau stafii pe podea, Aşteptam doar dimineaţa, căci în cărţile din faţă Nu găsisem vreo povaţă ce aş face fără ea, Fără-a mea Lenore, pe care îngerii o vor cânta, Doar în ceruri undeva. And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me – filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating `‘Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door – Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; – This it is, and nothing more,‘ Şi mătasea parcă vie din perdeaua purpurie Mă umplea, foşnind, de spaime şi să nu mă înfior, Izbutind să-mi vin în fire, repetam parcă-n neştire: Bate`n uşa casei, sire, un grozav vizitator Bate-aşa târziu în uşă, poate cere ajutor Un grozav vizitator. Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer, `Sir,‘ said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you‘ – here I opened wide the door; – Inima mi se-mpietrise, n-am tăcut prea mult şi zisei: „Domn sau doamnă, mă iertaţi, dar… s-a-ntâmplat s-adorm un pic, Nu-auzii întâia dată o bătaie-atât de-nceată, O bătaie delicată…Cine poate fi, îmi zic, Şi deschid în cale-i uşa, să nu zăbovească-n frig, 233 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Beznă – şi mai mult nimic. Darkness there, and nothing more. Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!‘ This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!‘ Merely this and nothing more. Mult am stat privind afară, gânduri stranii mă-ncercară N-a trecut aşa hotare duhul vreunui murito rNoaptea îşi sporea-n putere, peste tot domnea tăcere, Numai şoapta de durere sparse liniştea:„Lenore… Cine-o fi răspuns?… Ecoul? – că-am rostit încetişorE ecoul călător. Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before. `Surely,‘ said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore – Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; – Tis the wind and nothing more!‘ Întorcându-mă-n odaie, auzii din nou bătaia, Numai că de astă dată – mai răsunător ceva Şi mi-am zis cu-nfrigurare: înţeleg acum, se pare Că acesta-i vântul care să deschidă geamuri vrea, Fără îndoială el e cel de la fereastra mea, Vântul şi nu altceva. Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore. Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door – Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door – Perched, and sat, and nothing more. Cum oblonul îl trântisem, cu aripile întinse Brusc intră, umflându-şi pieptul, şi măreţ înainta Un sinistru corb – minune de pe timpuri vechi, străbune Şi fără vreo plecăciune, ca un lord ce se ţinea Pe bustul zeiţei Pallas se-aşeză şi, uite-aşa, Sta, nici semn că i-ar păsa. Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, `Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,‘ I said, `art sure no craven. Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore – Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night‘s Plutonian shore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Negru şi cu pene rare, era grav la-nfăţişare, Că surâsem fără voie, deşi îmi doream să mor, Nu eşti arătos, ei bine, însă intri plin de sine, Pribegind până la mine ca un stol rătăcitor, Spune-mi numele ce-avuseşi pe-acel tărâm ne-ndurător, Zise corbul: „Nevermore. 234 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly, Though its answer little meaning – little relevancy bore; For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door – Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door, With such name as `Nevermore.‘ Şi uimirea mă pătrunse că o pasăre-mi răspunse, Deşi înţelesul frazei nu-l găsii mulţumitor, Dar s-a pomenit vreodată şi-a fost binecuvântată Vreo fiinţă să mai vadă-n ochi tabloul următor: Stând un corb deasupra uşii, sigur şi nepăsător, Corb pe nume: „Nevermore. But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only, That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. Nothing further then he uttered – not a feather then he fluttered – Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before – On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.‘ Then the bird said, `Nevermore.‘ Când acest cuvânt rostise, parcă sufletu-şi golise, Că fără-a clinti vreo pană, iar tăcu necruţător. Atunci spusei cu tristeţe:„N-am amici ca-n tinereţe, Numai el îmi stă pe-ospeţe, nepoftit şi sfidător, Mâine va pleca cum pleacă orice vis amăgitor… Zise corbul:„Nevermore. Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken, `Doubtless,‘ said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store, Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disaster Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore – Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden bore Of "Never–nevermore." Tot se-nvălmăşi în mine că-mi răspunse-atât de bine Şi mi-am zis în gând: „Fireşte, ce-i aici îngrozitor, E că-n ţara lui destinul i-o fi prigonit stăpânul, Până-n cântecele-i chinul se-adună răscolitor În acest cuvânt pe care corbul îl păstră uşor În cuvântul „Nevermore. But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore – What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking `Nevermore.‘ Fără ca din ochi să-mi scape, am tras jilţul mai aproape De-acel bust, zâmbind întruna, deşi îmi venea să mor… Cufundat în perne fine, meditam ce e şi cine L-a-ndreptat tocmai la mine pe ciudatul zburător, Ce să-nsemne croncănitu-i des, de rău prevestitor Din fatalul „Nevermore. This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing Meditam fără vreo grabă, fără-a spune vreo silabă 235 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom‘s core; This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining On the cushion‘s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o‘er, But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o‘er, She shall press, ah, nevermore! Orătăniei, privirea căreia mă mistuia Şi, slăbit fiind, deodată capul îmi lăsai să cadă În pernă stins luminată-a jilţului de catifea, În catifeaua de care nu se va atinge ea Niciodată-n viaţa mea. Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor. `Wretch,‘ I cried, `thy God hath lent thee – by these angels he has sent thee Respite – respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore! Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Îmi păru atunci că-n aer se-nchină c-un tainic vaier O cădelniţă şi-un înger pogorâse pe covor… Am strigat în disperare: „E-un trimis de sus ce are Un balsam pentru uitare, un balsam mântuitor, Bea, hai bea licoarea asta şi uita-vei de Lenore! Zise corbul:„Nevermore. `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! – Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted – On this home by horror haunted – tell me truly, I implore – Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ ................................................................................... `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! By that Heaven that bends above us – by that God we both adore – Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn, It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Piază rea, căzută mie din a nopţilor pustie! Ne supune-aceeaşi soartă, de aceea te implor, Spune-mi, în Eden, departe, ce mă-aşteaptă după moarte? Şi avea-va oare parte sufletu-mi, sfârşit de dor, Să-ntâlnească-acea fecioară, pe iubita mea Lenore? Zise corbul:„Nevermore. `Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!‘ I shrieked upstarting – Pasăre sau nălucire!… e un semn de despărţire `Get thee back into the tempest and the Night‘s Plutonian shore! Vorba ta?… Atunci dar pleacă pe-acel ţărm ne-ndurător 236 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken! Leave my loneliness unbroken! – quit the bust above my door! Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Cu tristeţea mea mă lasă, nu scăpa vreo pană-n casăUrmă necuviincioasă dintr-un joc înşelător Şi din inimă îmi scoate pliscul tău ucigător Zise corbul: „Nevermore. And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon‘s that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o‘er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted – nevermore! Şi nu zboară, nu se-ntoarce, stă şi tace, stă şi tace Ca un demon, numai ochii mă ţintesc pătrunzător, Lampa tot mai viu se-aprinde, umbra corbului cuprinde Şi din umbra ce se-ntinde uriaşă pe covor Dat nu este să mai iasă sufletu-mi pătimitor „Nevermore, o, Nevermore! Traducere L. Lari. 237 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Raven. Corbul. Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. `‘Tis some visitor,‘ I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door – Only this, and nothing more.‘ Sunase miezul nopţii, pierdut în cugetare, Mai răsfoiam volume, uitate şi bizare, Când cineva la uşe bătu uşor, uşor. Era cam prin Decembrie, murindul foc, din umbre Fantastice pe ziduri, svârlea contururi sumbre, Iar eu cătam, zădarnic, în cărţi vreun ajutor. Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow; – vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow – sorrow for the lost Lenore – For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Nameless here for evermore. La chinurile mele, la vechiul meu amor La dânsa, tot la dânsa zbura a mea gândire, La palida Lenora, a cărei strălucire În lume n-are seamăn, şi căreia, în cer, Chiar îngerii, Lenora îi zic. Dar ce mister, Căci totul, chiar mişcarea perdelei de mătase, And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me – filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating `‘Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door – Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; – This it is, and nothing more,‘ O straşnică teroare în nervii mei băgase, Şi ca să-mi ţin curajul, în mine singur zic: „O fi vr‘o cunoştinţă şi altceva nimic! Şi fără-a pierde vreme, strigai: „Vă cer iertare, Aproape adormisem când aţi bătut, Şi-n stare n-am fost s-aud şi ápoi băteaţi încet de tot! Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer, `Sir,‘ said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you‘ – here I opened wide the door; – Deschid, mă uit, dar nimeni, şi să pătrund nu pot A nopţii întunecime. Ce vis ciudat mă-nşeală? Strigai încet: „Lenora! Ecoul, cu sfială Repetă scumpul nume, şi altceva nimic! Am reintrat în casă, dar făr‘ a pierde vreme 238 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Acelaşi sunet vine, din nou să mă recheme. Darkness there, and nothing more. Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!‘ This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!‘ Merely this and nothing more. Bătaia era clară. De astă dată-mi zic: „S-aude la fereastră, acuma, deci, urmează Să luminăm misterul ce-atât mă torturează, Şi să vedem, nu-i vântul?… Deschid, un corb măreţ, Bătând frumos din aripi, se năpusti în casă, Şi fără plecăciune, ca un baron se lasă Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before. `Surely,‘ said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore – Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; – Tis the wind and nothing more!‘ Pe bustul divei Pallas, privindu-mă-ndrăzneţ. În faţa unui oaspe cu mutră de cucernic, Şi negru ca ebenul, cercasem în zadar Să stăpânesc un zâmbet, apoi, cu glas puternic, Strigai: „Pe ţărmii nopţii ce nume prinţiar Ai tu? El, la-ntrebare, răspunse: „Niciodată! Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore. Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door – Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door – Perched, and sat, and nothing more. Răspunsul, pentru mine, era fără-nţeles, Şi cine-avu prilejul a întâlni vreodată O pasăre lugubră, şi noaptea mai ales Când este în putere, să şadă cocoţată Pe bustul divei Pallas, s-o cheme „Niciodată! Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, `Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,‘ I said, `art sure no craven. Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore – Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night‘s Plutonian shore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Dar corbul numai două cuvinte-avu de zis Şi parcă-ntregu-i suflet în ele şi-a închis! Atunci şoptii: „Mulţi alţii s-au dus de lângă mine, Din cei iubiţi; ca mâine şi dânsul va zbura. Şi dânsul se va prinde în tristele ruine, Ca stolul de iluzii ce-atât mă-nconjura! Iar pasărea sinistră răspunse: „Niciodată! 239 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly, Though its answer little meaning – little relevancy bore; For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door – Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door, With such name as `Nevermore.‘ Desigur, aste vorbe le-a învăţat vreodată De la un om de soartă şi ceruri prigonit, Un om fără iluzii şi-atâta de zdrobit Încât, văzându-şi viaţa de soartă blestemată, Nu mai putea să spere în lume: „Niciodată! But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only, That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. Nothing further then he uttered – not a feather then he fluttered – Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before – On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.‘ Then the bird said, `Nevermore.‘ ............................................................................. Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken, `Doubtless,‘ said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store, Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disaster Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore – Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden bore Of "Never–nevermore." ............................................................................... But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore – What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking `Nevermore.‘ Trăsei, în a lui faţă, un scaun şi-ncercai Să aflu ce-nţelege o pasăre ciudată Şi slabă, şi stingheră, şi tristă, fără grai, Printr-un refren ce vecinic răsună: „Niciodată! 240 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom‘s core; This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining On the cushion‘s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o‘er, But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o‘er, She shall press, ah, nevermore! Nu-i mai vorbii, căci ochii ca flacăra-i ardeau Şi cu săgeţi nestinse în suflet mă izbeau. Şi ca să-i aflu gândul, am stat în nemişcare Pe scaunul de plisă, albastru-violet, Pe care se răsfrânge lumina-ncet încet, Lumina sepulcrală din lampa suspendată, Ce n-o va mai aprinde Lenora: „Niciodată! Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor. `Wretch,‘ I cried, `thy God hath lent thee – by these angels he has sent thee Respite – respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore! Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ Atunci oftai mai liber, părea că prin văzduh Pluteşte ca parfumul, al îngerilor duh; „Oh! Crud şi mizerabil! – strigai atuncia – Domnul Din toată omenirea pe mine m-a ales? Oh! Bea, fără nesaţiu, divinul Nephemés Şi uită pe Lenora, pe scumpa răposată! Iar corbul, grav şi rece, răspunse: „Niciodată! `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! – Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted – On this home by horror haunted – tell me truly, I implore – Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Profete sau mai bine tu pasăre-a pieirii, Tu pasăre sau demon, în numele iubirii, Fiindcă Satan te mână în casa-mi dezolată, Răspunde-mi se mai află balsamuri la Gadei? Dar pasărea lugubră răspunse: „Niciodată! `Prophet!‘ said I, `thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! By that Heaven that bends above us – by that God we both adore – Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn, It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore – Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Tu pasăre sau demon, profet, te jur pe zei, Pe zeii-n care credem şi eu şi tu cu mine, Oh, spune, al meu suflet aşteaptă de la tine. Voi mai vedea în ceruri pe tânăra curată, Lenora? Însă corbul răspunse: „Niciodată! 241 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry `Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!‘ I shrieked upstarting – `Get thee back into the tempest and the Night‘s Plutonian shore! Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken! Leave my loneliness unbroken! – quit the bust above my door! Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!‘ Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘ „Te du, răcnii atuncea, şi lasă-mă, te du Acolo unde Pluton, azilul îţi dădu. Un fulg să nu rămână din carnea-ţi blestemată, Să-mi mai aducă-aminte minciuna ce mi-ai spus. Mă lasă-n pustnicie, atâta am de spus. Dar corbul şi acuma răspunde: „Niciodată! And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon‘s that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o‘er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted – nevermore! Şi corbul, mut şi rece, cu aripile grele, Pe bustul divei Pallas, deasupra uşii mele, Încremenit rămase, iar ochii lui de foc Lucesc ca ai Satanei şi al luminii joc, Pe scânduri îi răsfrânge lumina blestemată, Ce nu se va mai şterge acum şi „Niciodată! Traducere I.C. Săvescu. 242 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1845. ALECSANDRI. Zburătorul. 40 lines. Author: Vasile ALECSANDRI (1821-1890). Text: Zburătorul. Translator: FrageStellung: Why is the surname of this Romanian author spelt that way? (Compare spellings with Grigore Alexandrescu) (30 words) Translation required. Zburătorul. Dragă, dragă surioară, Nu ştii cântecul ce spune Că prin frunzi când se strecoară Raza zilei ce apune, Zburătorul se aruncă La copila care vine Să culeagă fragi în luncă, Purtând flori la sân ca tine? Fragii el din poală-i fură Cu-a sa mână nevăzută, Şi pe frunte şi pe gură 243 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry El o muşcă ş-o sărută. Soro, buza-ţi e muşcată! Fragii, poţi să le duci dorul. Spune,-n lunca-ntunecată Nu-ntâlnişi pe Zburătorul? Dragă surioară, dragă, Cântecul mai spune încă De-acel duh c-ades se leagă, Când e umbra mai adâncă, De copila mândră, albă, Ce culege viorele, Purtând pe ea scumpă salbă, Scumpă salbă de mărgele. Salba el râzând i-o strică Cu-o plăcută dezmierdare Şi de fieşce mărgică Lasă-o dulce sărutare. Pe sân, dragă, eşti muşcată! Salba, poţi ca să-i duci dorul. Spune,-n lunca-ntunecată Nu-ntâlnişi pe Zburătorul? Astfel vesel pe-o cărare Glumeau gingaşele fete. Iar în luncă stau la zare 244 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Doi voinici cu negre plete Şi, cântând în poieniţă, Aninau cu veselie Unu-o salbă-n chinguliţă, Altul flori la pălărie. 245 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1846. Edward LEAR. A Book of Nonsense. Lines 1-45. Abăluţă and Stoenescu. 45 lines. Author: Edward LEAR (1812-1888). Text: A Book of Nonsense. Lines 1-45. Translator: C. Abăluţă and Şt. Stoenescu. FrageStellung: What is nonsense? (50 words) Where exactly did Edward Lear spent most of his life? Who was buried next to him? There was an Old Man with a beard, Who said, It is just as I feared! Two Owls and a Hen, Four Larks and a Wren, Have all built their nests in my beard!‘ Un bătrân avea o barbă; Spuse: „Veni ziua oarbă! Două buhe şi-o găină, Trei scatii şi-un cuc, deplină Cuibăreală-ntr-a mea barbă! Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. There was a Young Lady of Ryde, Whose shoe-strings were seldom untied. She purchased some clogs, And some small spotted dogs, And frequently walked about Ryde. Era o domnişoară în Dakar; Şireturile-i se desfăceau rar. Deci îşi cumpără saboţi Şi căţei tărcaţi cu toţi Ea se plimba adesea prin Dakar. Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. 246 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry There was an Old Man with a nose, Who said, If you choose to suppose, That my nose is too long, You are certainly wrong!‘ That remarkable Man with a nose. Un bătrân avea un nas Şi spunea: „Te înşeli cras De-ţi închipui că-i prea Lung nasul meu!, spunea Straşnicul ins cu nas. Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. There was an Old Man on a hill, Who seldom, if ever, stood still; He ran up and down, In his Grandmother‘s gown, Which adorned that Old Man on a hill. Pe-un deal era un bătrânel Ce rareori se-oprea niţel; Căci fugea din deal în vale În rochia bunicii sale Gătit, ciudatul bătrânel. Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. There was a Young Lady whose bonnet, Came untied when the birds sate upon it; But she said: I don‘t care! All the birds in the air Are welcome to sit on my bonnet!‘ Unei fete chiar pe pălărie Păsări începuseră să-i vie Descusând-o rău, dar ea: „Nu-i bai! Păsările toate în alai Să ia loc pe a mea pălărie! Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. There was a Young Person of Smyrna, Whose Grandmother threatened to burn her; But she seized on the cat, Era o domnişoară în Maroc Bunica-i tot spunea: „Te bag în foc! Dar ea prinse o pisică: 247 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And said, Granny, burn that! You incongruous Old Woman of Smyrna!‘ „Arde-o pe dânsa, bunică, Bătrână ţicnită din Maroc! Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. There was an Old Person of Chili, Whose conduct was painful and silly, He sate on the stairs, Eating apples and pears, That imprudent Old Person of Chili. Era un oarecare-n Baleare De-o neghiobie fără de hotare. Sta morfolind pe scară Câte-un măr, câte-o pară, Imprudentul oarecare din Baleare. Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. There was an Old Man with a gong, Who bumped at it all day long; But they called out, O law! You‘re a horrid old bore!‘ So they smashed that Old Man with a gong Un bătrânel avea un gong Şi-l bătea zilnic à la long. Îi strigau: „Pe legea mea, Eşti un pisălog sadea! Îl sfărâmară deci pe cel cu gong. Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. There was an Old Lady of Chertsey, Who made a remarkable curtsey; She twirled round and round, Till she sunk underground, Which distressed all the people of Chertsey Era o bătrânică în Maienza Ce-şi compunea teribil reverenţa, Rotindu-se până când S-a scufundat în pământ Întristându-i pe toţi în Maienza. Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. 248 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1847. Tennyson. Tears, Idle Tears. Tartler. 20 lines. Author: Alfred, Lord TENNYSON (1809-1892). Text: Tears, Idle Tears. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: What is a Poet Laureate in Great Britain? Name several, particularly the latest... Tears, Idle Tears. Lacrimi, încete lacrimi. Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean, Tears from the depth of some divine despair Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes, In looking on the happy Autumn-fields, And thinking of the days that are no more. Fresh as the first beam glittering on a sail, That brings our friends up from the underworld, Sad as the last which reddens over one That sinks with all we love below the verge; So sad, so fresh, the days that are no more. Ah, sad and strange as in dark summer dawns The earliest pipe of half-awaken‘d birds To dying ears, when unto dying eyes The casement slowly grows a summering square; So sad, so strange, the days that are no more. Dear as remember‘d kisses after death, Lacrimi, încete lacrimi, eu nu ştiu ce înseamnă, Lacrimi venind din miezul divinei disperări, În inimă cum urcă şi se adună-n ochii Privind la fericitele câmpuri întomnate Şi amintindu-şi zile ce-acuma nu mai sunt. Vii, ca întâia rază ce urcă pe frânghia Care ne readuce pe dragi de sub pământ, Triste precum o ultimă rumenire care Sub viţă cade-alături de tot ce mai iubim: Atât de vii şi triste zile ce nu mai sunt. O, triste şi ciudate ca-n dimineţi de vară Încă pe întuneric un ciripit în somn Pentru urechi murinde, când sub murinzii ochi Se conturează-ncet pătratul ce sclipeşte; Atât de stranii, triste, zile ce nu mai sunt. Dragi precum sărutările-n minte după moarte 249 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry On lips that are for others; deep as love, Deep as first love, and wild with all regret; Death in Life, the days that are no more! Şi dulci ca-nchipuite de cel fără speranţă Pe buze pentru alţii; adânci precum iubirea, Adânci ca-ntâiul dor, sălbatice-n regrete; O, moarte-n viaţă, zile ce-acuma nu mai sunt! Traducere G.Tartler. 250 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1850. Dante Gabriel ROSSETTI. The Blessed Damozel. Leviţchi. 150 lines. Author: Dante Gabriel ROSSETTI (1828-1882). Text: The Blessed Damozel. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Was Rossetti a trend-setter? (50 words) The Blessed Damozel. Slăvita doamnă. The blessed damozel leaned out From the gold bar of Heaven; Her eyes were deeper than the depth Of waters stilled at even; She had three lilies in her hand, And the stars in her hair were seven. Her robe, ungirt from clasp to hem, No wrought flowers did adorn, But a white rose of Mary's gift, For service meetly worn; Her hair that lay along her back Was yellow like ripe corn. Herseemed she scarce had been a day One of God's choristers; The wonder was not yet quite gone From that still look of hers; Albeit, to them she left, her day Slăvita doamnă desfăcu A cerului perdele; Îi erau ochii mai adânci Ca apa din cişmele; Trei crini avea în mâna ei Şi-n păru-i şapte stele. De flori nempodobit, veșmântul Ea îl purta descins; Un alb răsur dat de Maria De gât îi era prins Şi părul ei bălan ca grâul Se revărsa aprins. O zi i se părea c-a fost În ceruri cântăreaţă; Uimirea tot mai stăruia Pe liniştita-i faţă; Măcar că pentru cei din jur 251 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Had counted as ten years. (To one, it is ten years of years. ...Yet now, and in this place, Surely she leaned o'er me — her hair Fell all about my face. . . . Nothing: the autumn-fall of leaves. The whole year sets apace.) It was the rampart of God's house That she was standing on; By God built over the sheer depth The which is Space begun; So high, that looking downward thence She scarce could see the sun. It lies in Heaven, across the flood Of ether, as a bridge. Beneath, the tides of day and night With flame and darkness ridge The void, as low as where this earth Spins like a fretful midge. O zi era o viaţă. (Iar pentru mine, vieţi şi vieţi... ...Acum, aici, odată M-a-mbrăţişat şi-mi era faţa În păru-i îngropată. Frunzişul toamnei cade. Anul Va asfinţi îndată). În casa din vecii zidită A Domnului stătea, În tinda unde-ncepe spaţiul Peste genunea grea Şi soarele, din înălţime, I se părea o stea. Încinge tinda ca o punte Eterul temerar; Jos, zi şi noapte se îngână Şi-şi caută hotar Pân-spre pământul ce se-nvârte Cu zumzet de bondar. Around her, lovers, newly met 'Mid deathless love's acclaims, Spoke evermore among themselves Their heart-remembered names; And the souls mounting up to God Went by her like thin flames. And still she bowed herself and stooped Out of the circling charm; Until her bosom must have made The bar she leaned on warm, Ci-n preajma dânsei era pacea Luminii curgătoare Şi-a liniştii. Pe serafimi În zborul lor nici boare Nu-i abătea şi nici răsunet Din piscuri sau ponoare. Ea se plecă şi se desprinse Din cearcănul vrăjit, Se rezemă pe caldu-i piept Ca de-un pervaz râvnit, 252 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And the lilies lay as if asleep Along her bended arm. From the fixed place of Heaven she saw Time like a pulse shake fierce Through all the worlds. Her gaze still strove Within the gulf to pierce Its path; and now she spoke as when The stars sang in their spheres. The sun was gone now; the curled moon Was like a little feather Fluttering far down the gulf; and now She spoke through the still weather. Iar crinii de pe braţu-i strâns Păreau c-au adormit. Vedea cum timpul, printre lumi, Pulsează-ameţitor; Privirea-i căuta poteca N al hăului pripor; Apoi vorbi, cântând cum cântă Planetele în cor. Sfinţise; luna ghemuită Plutea peste genună Ca fulgul; şi tăcerea oarbă Căta să şi-o supună. Her voice was like the voice of the stars Had when they sang together. (Ah sweet! Even now, in that bird's song, Strove not her accents there, Fain to be hearkened? When those bells Possessed the mid-day air, Strove not her steps to reach my side Down all the echoing stair?) 'I wish that he were come to me, For he will come,' she said. Lord, Lord, has he not pray'd? Are not two prayers a perfect strength? And shall I feel afraid? 'When round his head the aureole clings, And he is clothed in white, I'll take his hand and go with him Cu-un glas, ca-al sferelor cereşti Când cântă împreună. (Nu mi-a trimis prin tril de păsări Cântarea care-mi place? Când clopotele stăpâneau A dulce-amiezii pace, Pe scara de ecouri, paşii Nu i-a-ndreptat încoace?) „Ah, de-ar veni la mine, spuse „El ar dori să vie! Nu ne-am rugat –el pe pământ Şi eu în cer? Tărie Nu este-n două rugi unite? Teamă de ce să-mi fie? Când nimbu-i va încinge fruntea Şi-o fi în dalb veşmânt, 253 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To the deep wells of light; As unto a stream we will step down, And bathe there in God's sight. 'We two will stand beside that shrine, Occult, withheld, untrod, Am să-i arăt ale luminii Izvoare câte sunt Şi ca-ntr-un râu ne vom scălda În văzul Celui Sfânt. Vom sta lângă altarul tainic Whose lamps are stirred continually With prayer sent up to God; And see our old prayers, granted, melt Each like a little cloud. 'We two will lie i' the shadow of That living mystic tree Within whose secret growth the Dove Is sometimes felt to be, While every leaf that His plumes touch Saith His Name audibly. 'And I myself will teach to him, I myself, lying so, The songs I sing here; which his voice Shall pause in, hushed and slow, And find some knowledge at each pause, Or some new thing to know.' (Alas! We two, we two, thou say'st! Yea, one wast thou with me That once of old. But shall God lift To endless unity Was but its love for thee?) A cărui flăcărui Fără-ncetare sunt stârnite De rugi nălţate Lui; Şi-a noastre s-or topi, primite, Ca pâcle albăstrui! Vom sta culcaţi în umbra sacră A pomului ceresc; Adesea, frunzele-i Porumbul Cu grijă-l oploşesc Şi când le-atinge el cu pana, Sfânt Numele-i rostesc. Stând astfel, ce cântări cunosc Chiar eu l-oi învăţa; Şi glasu-i blând mă va-ntrerupe Şi în tăcerea mea Ştiinţă nouă şi putere El pururi va afla. Noi doi, spui tu... Cândva, demult, Fusesem una. Dar Cum să înveşnicească Domnul Al contopirii har, Când sufletu-mi era al tău Prin dragostea lui doar?) 254 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 'We two,' she said, 'will seek the groves Where the lady Mary is, With her five handmaidens, whose names Are five sweet symphonies, Cecily, Gertrude, Magdalen, Margaret and Rosalys. 'Circlewise sit they, with bound locks And foreheads garlanded; Into the fine cloth white like flame Weaving the golden thread, To fashion the birth-robes for them Who are just born, being dead. 'He shall fear, haply, and be dumb: Then will I lay my cheek To his, and tell about our love, Not once abashed or weak: And the dear Mother will approve My pride, and let me speak. 'Herself shall bring us, hand in hand, To him round whom all souls Kneel, the clear-ranged unnumbered heads Bowed with their aureoles: „Noi doi, grăi, „vom cerceta Dumbrăvile Mariei Şi-a ei cinci serve-al căror nume Sunt cinci mari simfonii: Cecilia, Gertrude, Magdalena, Marg‘ret şi Rosalie. Li-i părul împletit şi fruntea Cununi le-o înconjor; Şi roată stând, torc fir de flăcări Din aurit fuior Spre-a ţese-mbrăcăminte celor Născuţi după ce mor. De s-o sfii şi o să tacă, Eu faţa-mi o s-o-nclin Spre-a lui, de dragoste vorbindu-i Nesfiicios, deplin, Şi Sfânta-mi va ierta mândria Şi eu am să-l alin. Ea ne va duce, mână-n mână, La Domnul, Cărui gloate Se pleacă-adânc, împresurându-l Cu frunţile nimbate; And angels meeting us shall sing To their citherns and citoles. 'There will I ask of Christ the Lord Thus much for him and me: — Only to live as once on earth With Love, — only to be, As then awhile, for ever now Şi-n cale îngeri ne-or cânta Din lire minunate. Şi pentru el şi mine-atâta Voi cere Celui Sfânt: În dragoste să vieţuim Ca-altdată pe pământ – Atunci, puţin, acum –de-a pururi, 255 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Together, I and he.' She gazed and listened and then said, Less sad of speech than mild, — 'All this is when he comes.' She ceased. The light thrilled towards her, fill'd With angels in strong level flight. Her eyes prayed, and she smil'd. (I saw her smile.) But soon their path Was vague in distant spheres: And then she cast her arms along The golden barriers, And laid her face between her hands, And wept. (I heard her tears.) Căci draga lui eu sunt. Privi şi ascultă; şi vorba-i Se stinse-apoi, blajină: „Când va veni. Tăcu. O-nvăluise Un freamăt de lumină Şi-un stol de serafimi. Cu ochii Ea se ruga senină. (Surâsu-i l-am văzut). Când ei Pieriră-n nesfârşit, Ea braţele îşi sprijini De gardul aurit Şi faţa-şi coperi şi plânse. (Cum plânge-am auzit). Traducere L. Leviţchi. 256 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1853. ALECSANDRI. Mioriţa. Snodgrass # popular version. 122 lines. Author: Vasile ALECSANDRI (1821-1890). Text: Mioriţa. Translator: W.D. Snodgrass. FrageStellung: What is the connection Mioritza – Alecsandri? Expand upon the phenomenon. (80 words ) Mioriţa. Mioritza. Pe-un picior de plaiu, Pe-o gură de raiu, Iată vin în cale, Se cobor la vale Trei turme de miei Cu trei ciobănei Unu-i Moldovean Unu-i Ungurean Şi unu-i Vrâncean. Near a low foothill At Heaven‘s doorsill, Where the trail‘s descending To the plain and ending, Here three shepherds keep Their three flocks of sheep, One, Moldavian, One, Transylvanian And one, Vrancean. Iar cel Ungurean, Şi cu cel Vrâncean, Mări se vorbiră, Ei se sfătuiră Pe l‘apus de soare Ca să mi-l omoare Pe cel Moldovan Că-i mai ortoman Now, the Vrancean And the Transylvanian In their thoughts, conniving, Have laid plans, contriving At the close of day To ambush and slay The Moldavian; He, the wealthier one, 257 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ş‘are oi mai multe, Mândre şi cornute, Şi cai invăţaţi Şi câni mai bărbaţi!... Had more flocks to keep, Handsome, long-horned sheep, Horses, trained and sound, And the fiercest hounds. Dar cea Mioriţă Cu lâna plăviţă De trei zile‘ncoace Gura nu-i mai tace, Iarba nu-i mai place. One small ewe-lamb, though, Dappled gray as tow, While three full days passed Bleated loud and fast; Would not touch the grass. – Mioriţă laie, Laie, bucălaie, De trei zile‘ncoace Gura nu-ţi mai tace! Ori iarba nu-ţi place, Ori eşti bolnăvioară, Draguţă Mioară? Ewe-lamb, dapple-gray, Muzzled black and gray, While three full days passed You bleat loud and fast; Don‘t you like this grass? Are you too sick to eat, Little lamb so sweet? – Drăguţule bace! Dă-ţi oile‘ncoace La negru zăvoi, Că-i iarba de noi Şi umbra de voi. Stăpâne, stăpâne, Iţi cheamă ş‘un câne Cel mai bărbătesc Şi cel mai frăţesc, Oh my master dear, Drive the flock out near That field, dark to view, Where the grass grows new, Where there‘s shade for you. Master, master dear, Call a large hound near, A fierce one and fearless, Strong, loyal and peerless. Că l‘apus de soare The Transylvanian 258 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Vreau să mi te-omoare Baciul Ungurean Şi cu cel Vrâncean! – Oiţă bârsană, De eşti năzdrăvană Şi de-a fi să mor In câmp de mohor, Să spui lui Vrâncean Şi lui Ungurean Ca să mă îngroape Aice pe-aproape În strunga de oi, Să fiu tot cu voi; In dosul stânii, Să-mi aud cânii, Aste să le spui, And the Vrancean When the daylight‘s through Mean to murder you. Lamb, my little ewe, If this omen‘s true, If I‘m doomed to death On this tract of heath, Tell the Vrancean And Transylvanian To let my bones lie Somewhere here close by, By the sheepfold here So my flocks are near, Back of my hut‘s grounds So I‘ll hear my hounds. Tell them what I say: Iar la cap să-mi pui Fluieraş de fag, Mult zice cu drag! Fluieraş de os, Mult zice duios! Fluieraş de soc, Mult zice cu foc! Vântul când a bate Prin ele-a răzbate, Ş‘oile s‘or strânge Pe mine m‘or plânge Cu lacrimi de sânge! Iar tu de omor There, beside me lay One small pipe of beech Whith its soft, sweet speech, One small pipe of bone Whit its loving tone, One of elderwood, Fiery-tongued and good. Then the winds that blow Would play on them so All my listening sheep Would draw near and weep Tears, no blood so deep. How I met my death, 259 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Să nu le spui lor. Să le spui curat Că m‘am însurat Cu-o mândră crăiasă, A lumei mireasă; Că la nunta mea A căzut o stea; Soarele şi luna Mi-au ţinut cununa; Brazi şi păltinaşi I-am avut nuntaşi; Preoţi, munţii mari, Paseri, lăutari, Păsărele mii, Şi stele făclii! Tell them not a breath; Say I could not tarry, I have gone to marry A princess – my bride Is the whole world‘s pride. At my wedding, tell How a bright star fell, Sun and moon came down To hold my bridal crown, Firs and maple trees Were my guests; my priests Were the mountains high; Fiddlers, birds that fly, All birds of the sky; Torchlights, stars on high. Iar dacă-i zării, Dacă-i întâlnii Măicuţă bătrână Cu brâul de lână, Din ochi lăcrimând, Pe culmi alergând, Pe toţi întrebând Şi la toţi zicând: But if you see there, Should you meet somewhere, My old mother, little, With her white wool girdle, Eyes with their tears flowing, Over the plains going, Asking one and all, Saying to them all, Cine-au cunoscut, Cine mi-au văzut Mândru ciobănel Tras printr‘un inel? Feţişoara lui, Who has ever known, Who has seen my own Shepherd fine to see, Slim as a willow tree, With his dear face, bright 260 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Spuma laptelui; Musteţioara lui, Spicul grâului; Perişorul lui, Peana corbului; Ochişorii lui, Mura câmpului!... As the milk-foam, white, His small moustache, right As the young wheat‘s ear, With his hair so dear, Like plumes of the crow Little eyes that glow Like the ripe black sloe?‘ Tu Mioara mea, Să te‘nduri de ea Şi-i spune curat Că m‘am însurat Cu-o fată de crai, Pe-o gură de rai. Ewe-lamb, small and pretty, For her sake have pity, Let it just be said I have gone to wed A princess most noble There on Heaven‘s doorsill. Iar la cea măicuţă Să nu spui, drăguţă, Că la nunta mea A căzut o stea, C‘am avut nuntaşi Brazi si păltinaşi, Preoţi, munţii mari, Paseri, lăutari, Păsărele mii, Şi stele făclii!... To that mother, old, Let it not be told That a star fell, bright, For my bridal night; Firs and maple trees Were my guests, priests Were the mountains high; Fiddlers, birds that fly, All birds of the sky; Torchlights, stars on high. Traducere W. D. Snodgrass. 261 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Mioriţa sau HOREA PĂCURARULUI interpretată de GRIGORE LEŞE culeasă de acesta de la Lucreţia Horţ din Groşii Ţibleşului – Maramureş Sus la verdele din munţi La iarbă până-n jenunţi Sun‘ tri-lei păcurărei, Hei, cei mai mari îs veri primari Da‘ pi cel mai mic ii străinel Ca şi-o lună de inel Da‘ pi tăt îl suie şi-l adună Cu oile la păşună Da‘ pi tăt îl suie şi-l scoboară Cu oile la izvoară Facu-i lerjea să-l omoară Tu ţâie ce moarte-ţi vrei Vrei de puşcă-mpuşcat Or‘ de sabie dimnicat Fraţâlor, fârtaţâlor Voi dacă mi-ţi omorî Pă mine să mă-ngropaţi În strunguţa oilor Da‘ pi, în tărcuţu‘ mieilor Da‘ pă mine pământ nu puneţi 262 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Da‘ pi, numa‘ guba sânguré Şi-un fluier după curé Susuoară de-a dreapta Voi să-mi puneţi tilinca Când vânt mare a sufla Tilinca a tilinca Fluieru‘ a fluiera Oile tăte-or zdiera Hei, oi, oi, oi mândre bălăi Da‘ pi, mândru mi-ţi cânta pă văi Oi, oi, oi mândre cornute Da‘ pi, mândru mi-ţi plânje pă munte Oi, oi, oi mândre săine Da‘ pi, mândru mi-ţi plânjă pă mine Şi mămuca-auzi Ş-a veni şi m-a jăli Cu cină caldă pă masă Şi cu apă răce-n vasă Să-i vie slujbuca-acasă. 263 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1855a. BROWNING. A Grammarian’s Funeral. Leviţchi. 148 lines. Author: Robert BROWNING (1812-1889). Text: A Grammarian‘s Funeral. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Why the subtitle? Summarize the whole in the light of Subtitle... Do you agree with its translation? If not, why not? A Grammarian’s Funeral. Înmormântarea unui cărturar. Shortly after the revival of learning in Europe. Curând după începutul Renaşterii în Europa. Let us begin and carry up this corpse, Singing together. Leave we the common crofts, the vulgar thorpes Each in its tether Sleeping safe on the bosom of the plain, Cared-for till cock-crow: Look out if yonder be not day again Rimming the rock-row! That‘s the appropriate country; there, man‘s thought, Rarer, intenser, Self-gathered for an outbreak, as it ought, Chafes in the censer. Leave we the unlettered plain its herd and crop; Seek we sepulture On a tall mountain, citied to the top, Crowded with culture! Săltaţi coşciugul, dar, cântând în cor. Noi vom lăsa în urmă, Împiedicate în priponul lor, Cătun, ogradă, turmă, Dormind ferite pe câmpie până Vor trâmbiţa cocoşii. Priviţi spre buza crestei cum se-ngână, Cu bezna, zorii roşii! Acolo-n vârf, pe nenfricatul stei, Gândirea mult aleasă, Ca din cădelniţă, din sinea ei, Se zbate ca să iasă. Lăsăm cireada şesului – noi sus Va să-i săpăm mormântul, Pe-un munte-ncins de-oraş, unde şi-a spus Cultura greu cuvântul! 264 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry All the peaks soar, but one the rest excels; Clouds overcome it; No! yonder sparkle is the citadel‘s Circling its summit. Thither our path lies; wind we up the heights: Wait ye the warning? Our low life was the level‘s and the night‘s; He‘s for the morning. Step to a tune, square chests, erect each head, Ware the beholders! This is our master, famous calm and dead, Borne on our shoulders. Înalt e orice pisc, ci unul doar Mai sus de nouri suie. Priviţi! L-încearcănă ca un pojar Lumini din cetăţuie. Poteca-aceasta urcă spre tării. Ce aşteptaţi? Noi, bieţii, Suntem ai nopţii şi-ai câmpiei fii; El este-al dimineţii. Păşiţi făr-a privi, cu pieptul plin, Semeţi, în pas cu corul. Pe umeri ducem, renumit, senin Şi mort, pe-nvăţătorul. Sleep, crop and herd! sleep, darkling thorpe and croft, Safe from the weather! He, whom we convoy to his grave aloft, Singing together, He was a man born with thy face and throat, Lyric Apollo! Long he lived nameless: how should spring take note Winter would follow? Till lo, the little touch, and youth was gone! Cramped and diminished, Moaned he, New measures, other feet anon! My dance is finished? No, that‘s the world‘s way: (keep the mountain-side, Make for the city!) He knew the signal, and stepped on with pride Over men‘s pity; Left play for work, and grappled with the world Dormi, turmă! Dormi cătun ferit de ploi! Noi vom purcede-acolo, Spre înălţimi. Cel prohodit de noi, O, liricule-Apolo, Îţi semăna la chip şi glas. Câtva Nu l-a ştiut o lume. Cum poate primăvara prevedea Că iarna tot pe drum e? Şi anii tineri au sfinţit apoi. Sfrijit, adus din spate, Oftă: „Vin ritmuri şi picioare noi! Mi-e dansul pe-ncheiate? Nu! Asta-i calea lumii. (Spre oraş! V-aţineţi lângă munte!) A oamenilor milă, dârz, trufaş, El a ştiut s-o-nfrunte. Trudind, râvnind să fie dezlegat, 265 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Bent on escaping: What‘s in the scroll, quoth he, thou keepest furled? Show me their shaping, Theirs who most studied man, the bard and sage, – Give! – So, he gowned him, Straight got by heart that book to its last page: Learned, we found him. Yea, but we found him bald too, eyes like lead, Accents uncertain: Time to taste life, another would have said, Up with the curtain! This man said rather, Actual life comes next? Patience a moment! Grant I have mastered learning‘s crabbed text, Still there‘s the comment. Let me know all! Prate not of most or least, Painful or easy! Even to the crumbs I‘d fain eat up the feast, Ay, nor feel queasy. Oh, such a life as he resolved to live, When he had learned it, When he had gathered all books had to give! Sooner, he spurned it. Image the whole, then execute the parts – Fancy the fabric Quite, ere you build, ere steel strike fire from quartz, Ere mortar dab brick! Cu toţi s-a luat la trântă. „Ce ţii în sulu-acela-nfăşurat? Arată-mi ce cuvântă Poetul şi-nţeleptul despre om! S-a-nveşmântat în robă, A învăţat de-a rostu-ntregul tom Şi-a fost de carte tobă. Aflatu-l-am cu ochi de plumb şi chel, Cu limba-mpleticită. „Sus vălul! ziceau unii. „Joacă-altfel! Nu pierde o clipită! „Adevărata viaţă va urma? O clipă! Ştiu glosarul Prea trudnic al ştiinţei; dar mai va Să aflu comentarul. Vreau să ştiu tot – de-i greu sau de-i uşor! Am să mă-nfrupt cât zece – La benchet – pân-la ultimul oscior – Şi n-o să mi se-aplece. Ce viaţă-şi hotăra adeseori Când ar fi fost să scape, Când va fi strâns a cărţilor comori! Dar n-o simţea aproape. La-ntreg ia seama, dup-aceea doar Fă partea, dup-aceea Zideşte zid şi iscă din amnar Şi cremene scânteia! (Here‘s the town-gate reached: there‘s the market-place Gaping before us.) (Suntem la porţi. Acolo, negreşit E piaţa – se zăreşte.) 266 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Yea, this in him was the peculiar grace (Hearten our chorus!) That before living he‘d learn how to live – No end to learning: Earn the means first – God surely will contrive Use for our earning. Others mistrust and say, But time escapes: Live now or never! He said, What‘s time? Leave Now for dogs and apes! Man has Forever. Back to his book then: deeper drooped his head Calculus racked him: Leaden before, his eyes grew dross of lead: Tussis attacked him. Now, master, take a little rest! – not he! (Caution redoubled, Step two abreast, the way winds narrowly!) Not a whit troubled Back to his studies, fresher than at first, Fierce as a dragon He (soul-hydroptic with a sacred thirst) Sucked at the flagon. Oh, if we draw a circle premature, Heedless of far gain, Greedy for quick returns of profit, sure Bad is our bargain! Was it not great? did not he throw on God, (He loves the burthen) – God‘s task to make the heavenly period Perfect the earthen? Avea un gând al său deosebit – (Căutaţi mai bărbăteşte!) Pân-a trăi, a învăţat mereu Cum să trăiască-anume. Câştigă-ntâi muncind; şi Dumnezeu Ţi va da un rost în lume. Spun sceptici: „Timpul fuge! Să trăieşti Ori azi, ori niciodată! „Ce-i timpul? Azi e pentru câini şi peşti. Vecia ne e dată! De calculus chircit, de tussis supt, Cu capul şubred foarte, Cu plumb topit în ochi, neîntrerupt S-a cocârjat spre carte. „Maestre, te-odihneşte! Ţi-ai găsit! (Doar câte doi în rânduri. Păzea! E drumul strâmt şi şerpuit!) Nestrămutat în gânduri, La buchii iar, trudind mai abitir, (Suflet aprins-burete); Precum un zmeu năprasnic, din potir Sorbea cu sacră sete. O, prost ni-e târgul dac-am desenat Un cerc prea de cu vreme, Râvnind, în loc de-un rod îndepărtat, Pripite tantieme! N-a fost măreţ? La Domnul n-a cerut (Povara Lui îi place) Eonul sfânt şi fără de-nceput Să îl strămute-ncoace? 267 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Did not he magnify the mind, show clear Just what it all meant? He would not discount life, as fools do here, Paid by instalment. He ventured neck or nothing – heaven‘s success Found, or earth‘s failure: Wilt thou trust death or not? He answered Yes: Hence with life‘s pale lure! That low man seeks a little thing to do, Sees it and does it: This high man, with a great thing to pursue, Dies ere he knows it. That low man goes on adding nine to one, His hundred‘s soon hit: This high man, aiming at a million, Misses an unit. That, has the world here – should he need the next, Let the world mind him! This, throws himself on God, and unperplexed Seeking shall find him. So, with the throttling hands of death at strife, Ground he at grammar; Still, through the rattle, parts of speech were rife: While he could stammer He settled Hoti‘s business – let it be! – Properly based Oun – Nu a sporit gândirea, arătând Ce înţeles au toate? El viaţa, cum fac oamenii de rând, N-a decontat-o-n rate. Tot sau nimic! Izbândă pentru zei Sau pentru noi sminteală. „Te-ncrezi în moarte-au ba? „Vezi bine! Piei, Ispită-a vieţii, pală! De fleacuri lacom, cel neînţelept Le află-o viaţă-ntreagă; Cei falnici dau cu măreţia piept Şi mor făr‘ să-nţeleagă. Cel mic adună bob cu bob şi-ades La suta lui răzbate: Din milionul omului ales Lipseşte-o unitate. Un om mărunt îşi are lumea-aici; O alta dacă-şi cere, Să i-o găsească oamenii pitici, Dacă le stă-n putere! Cel mare-i juruit lui Iehova; Cătându-L, cu adinsul, E-ncredinţat că într-o zi, cumva, Îl va afla pe Dânsul! Tocea gramatică mereu, ne-nfrânt De-a morţii mâini hapsâne; Dar se-njgheba şi partea de cuvânt. Cât mai putea să-ngâne, Pe Hoti l-a-nţeles într-un sfârşit, L-a pus pe Oun la cale, 268 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Gave us the doctrine of the enclitic De, Dead from the waist down. Well, here‘s the platform, here‘s the proper place: Hail to your purlieus, All ye highfliers of the feathered race, Swallows and curlews! Here‘s the top-peak; the multitude below Live, for they can, there: This man decided not to Live but Know – Bury this man there? Here – here‘s his place, where meteors shoot, clouds form, Lightnings are loosened, Stars come and go! Let joy break with the storm, Peace let the dew send! Lofty designs must close in like effects Loftily lying, Leave him – still loftier than the world suspects, Living and dying. Pe De enclitic ni l-a tălmăcit, Mort de la brâu la vale. Aici e creştetul. Să-l coborâm. V-aducem închinare, Înaripatelor de-nalt tărâm, Zăgani şi corbi de mare! Aici e piscul cel mai avântat. Mulţimea necuprinsă Trăieşte dedesubt, căci i-a fost dat Şi-astfél a fost deprinsă. Ci el, nu să trăiască-a înţeles El a dorit să ştie! Cum, tocmai lui să-i fi zidit la şes Locaşul de vecie? Aici e glia cuvenită lui, Aici zbor meteorii, Îşi sapă fulgerele cărărui, Se înfiripă norii Şi stele vin şi pier. Cu desfătări Furtuna să-l răsfeţe Iar roua păcii dinspre patru zări În zori să-i dea bineţe! La ţel înalt, înalt deznodământ. De noi, deci, se desparte Mai sus decât s-ar crede pe pământ, Viu, trăitor şi-n moarte. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 269 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1855b. BROWNING. Fra Lippo Lippi. Leviţchi. 392 lines. Author: Robert BROWNING (1812-1889). Text: Fra Lippo Lippi. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Outline the features of Browning‘s Dramatic Monologue. How does it compare with Joy ce‘s monologues? Discuss. (100 words) Fra Lippo Lippi. Fra Lippo Lippi. I am poor brother Lippo, by your leave! You need not clap your torches to my face. Zooks, what‘s to blame? you think you see a monk! What, tis past midnight, and you go the rounds, And here you catch me at an alley‘s end Where sportive ladies leave their doors ajar? The Carmine‘s my cloister: hunt it up, Do,harry out, if you must show your zeal, Whatever rat, there, haps on his wrong hole, And nip each softling of a wee white mouse, Weke, weke, that‘s crept to keep him company! Aha, you know your betters! Then, you‘ll take Your hand away that‘s fiddling on my throat, And please to know me likewise. Who am I? Îngăduiţi! sunt bietul frate Lippo! Nu-mi scoateţi ochii cu aceste torţe! Ce naiba! Nu arăt eu a călugăr? Cum? E trecut de miezul nopţii Şi voi vă faceţi rondul şi m-aţi prins Aici, la capătul aleii unde uşa O las‘ crăpată fetele sprinţare? Sunt din Carmine. Scotociţi, dar hai! De vreţi să v-arătaţi zeloşi, stârpiţi Orice guzgan ieşit din vizuină Şi gâtuiţi chiţ! şoricelul alb Deprins cu-asemenea tovărăşie! Aha! Ţi-e teamă de superiori? Atunci ia mâna de pe beregată, Că nu e scripcă şi să mă prezint. Cine sunt eu, dom‘ şef? Păi, locuiesc La un amic, trei uliţi mai încolo, E unul, cum îi ziceţi, un patron... Why, one, sir, who is lodging with a friend Three streets offhe‘s a certain . . . how d‘ye call? 270 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Mastera ...Cosimo of the Medici, I‘ the house that caps the corner. Boh! you were best! Remember and tell me, the day you‘re hanged, How you affected such a gullet‘s-gripe! But you, sir, it concerns you that your knaves Pick up a manner nor discredit you: Zooks, are we pilchards, that they sweep the streets And count fair price what comes into their net? He‘s Judas to a tittle, that man is! Just such a face! Why, sir, you make amends. Lord, I‘m not angry! Bid your hang-dogs go Drink out this quarter-florin to the health Of the munificent House that harbours me (And many more beside, lads! more beside!) And all‘s come square again. I‘d like his face His, elbowing on his comrade in the door With the pike and lantern,for the slave that holds John Baptist‘s head a-dangle by the hair With one hand ("Look you, now," as who should say) And his weapon in the other, yet unwiped! It‘s not your chance to have a bit of chalk, A wood-coal or the like? or you should see! Yes, I‘m the painter, since you style me so. What, brother Lippo‘s doings, up and down, You know them and they take you? like enough! I saw the proper twinkle in your eye Tell you, I liked your looks at very first. Let‘s sit and set things straight now, hip to haunch. Da, Cossimo de Medici în colţ. Am năduşit... Vezi, nu uita să-mi spui În ziua când te-or agăţa în furci, Unde-ai găsit un cuţitar ca ăsta. Dom‘ şef, mai dă-ţi pe brazdă mocofanii, Te fac de râs. Păi cum? Suntem sardele De mătur‘ străzile şi socotesc Câştig cinstit ce cade-n vârşa lor? E-o mare iudă omul! Faţa lui! Te dai pe brazdă... Nu m-am supărat. Ia banul ăsta şi zăvozii tăi Să-l bea în sănătatea mândrei case În care m-am adăpostit şi eu Şi mulţi, mulţi alţii şi-o să fie pace. Îmi place chipul omului din uşă Care-nghionteşte pe un alt străjer Cu lancea şi lanterna; i-ar sta bine Ca gâde-al sfântului Ioan de plete Să-i ţină capul cu o mână (juri Că vrea să spună: „Ei, acum priviţi!) Iar cu cealaltă să mai ţină barda, Cu sângele neşters. Păcat, dom‘ şef, Că n-ai un pic de cretă sau cărbune Puteai vedea ceva... Da, sunt zugravul Zugravul, dacă vrei să-mi spui aşa. Ştii, aşadar, isprăvile lui Lippo? Le ştii şi-ţi plac? În ochi ţi-am desluşit Un licăr ce-aşteptam te-am îndrăgit De cum ne-am cunoscut. Hai să şedem 271 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Here‘s spring come, and the nights one makes up bands To roam the town and sing out carnival, And I‘ve been three weeks shut within my mew, A-painting for the great man, saints and saints And saints again. I could not paint all night Ouf! I leaned out of window for fresh air. There came a hurry of feet and little feet, A sweep of lute strings, laughs, and whifts of song, Flower o‘ the broom, Take away love, and our earth is a tomb! Flower o‘ the quince, I let Lisa go, and what good in life since? Flower o‘ the thyme and so on. Round they went. Scarce had they turned the corner when a titter Like the skipping of rabbits by moonlight, three slim shapes, And a face that looked up . . . zooks, sir, flesh and blood, That‘s all I‘m made of! Into shreds it went, Curtain and counterpane and coverlet, All the bed-furniturea dozen knots, There was a ladder! Down I let myself, Hands and feet, scrambling somehow, and so dropped, And after them. I came up with the fun Hard by Saint Laurence, hail fellow, well met, Flower o‘ the rose, If I‘ve been merry, what matter who knows? And so as I was stealing back again To get to bed and have a bit of sleep Ere I rise up to-morrow and go work Şi toate să le rânduim cu şart. E primăvară. Oamenii acum Fac zi şi noapte, umblă în neştire Pe uliţi sau petrec la carnaval; Iar eu am stat zidit trei săptămâni, Pictând, pentru măritul, sfinţi şi sfinte. Dar n-am putut dormi o noapte-ntreagă Şi aer proaspăt am sorbit pe geam. Floare de vânt, Ia dragostea pământul e mormânt! Floare de ceas, Când Lisa a plecat, ce-a mai rămas? Floare de cimbru şi aşa întruna, Când au trecut de colţ, au chicotit, S-au hârjonit cu iepurii pe lună... Trei siluete zvelte şi un chip Ce se uita în sus carne şi sânge, Cum sunt şi eu alcătuit! Am rupt, Bucăţi, perdeaua, perina, cearceaful, Tot aşternutul unsprezece noduri Şi gata scara! m-am lăsat în jos, M-am legănat prin aer, am căzut, Am alergat... Alaiul l-am ajuns La sfântul Laurenţiu bun venit! Flori de gutui, Am petrecut socoată să dau cui? Şi cum mă furişam din nou acasă Voiam să trag măcar un pui de somn Căci mâine-am să muncesc din nou, s-arăt 272 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry On Jerome knocking at his poor old breast With his great round stone to subdue the flesh, You snap me of the sudden. Ah, I see! Though your eye twinkles still, you shake your head Mine‘s shaveda monk, you saythe sting s in that! If Master Cosimo announced himself, Mum‘s the word naturally; but a monk! Come, what am I a beast for? tell us, now! I was a baby when my mother died And father died and left me in the street. I starved there, God knows how, a year or two On fig-skins, melon-parings, rinds and shucks, Refuse and rubbish. One fine frosty day, My stomach being empty as your hat, The wind doubled me up and down I went. Old Aunt Lapaccia trussed me with one hand, (Its fellow was a stinger as I knew) And so along the wall, over the bridge, By the straight cut to the convent. Six words there, While I stood munching my first bread that month: "So, boy, you‘re minded," quoth the good fat father Wiping his own mouth, twas refection-time, "To quit this very miserable world? Will you renounce" . . . "the mouthful of bread?" thought I; By no means! Brief, they made a monk of me; I did renounce the world, its pride and greed, Palace, farm, villa, shop, and banking-house, Cum sfântul Ieronim şi-ucide pieptul Cu lovituri ca să supună carnea Daţi buzna peste mine. Înţeleg! În ochi mai ai un scapăr încă, totuşi Clăteşti din cap al meu e ras îţi spui: „Călugăr e, aici e grozăvia! Maestro Cosimo dac-ar fi fost, Aş fi tăcut chitic dar un călugăr! Ascultă, pentru ce sunt animal? Eram copil când mama a murit, Apoi şi tata şi-am rămas pe uliţi. Doi ani de zile m-am tot ghiftuit Cu coajă de smochine şi de pepeni, Fărâmituri şi zoaie. Într-o zi, Cu burta goală cum mi-e pălăria, Mă-ncovrigam sub vântul îngheţat. Când, cu o mână, tuşa Lapaccia (În timp ce cu cealaltă mână mă-mboldea) M-a înhăţat de umăr şi m-a dus De-a lungul zidului, pe pod, de-a dreptul, La abaţie. Vreo cinci vorbe doar Pe când muşcam flămând din prima pâine Din luna-aceea: „Aşadar, băiete, Eşti pregătit, grăi grasul monah, Ştergându-şi gura era ceasul mesei Să lepezi ticăloasă lumea-aceasta? Să laşi... Ăst colţ de pâine? m-am gândit. Nici gând! În scurt, călugăr m-au făcut. M-am lepădat de lume, de mândria 273 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Trash, such as these poor devils of Medici Have given their hearts toall at eight years old. Well, sir, I found in time, you may be sure, Twas not for nothingthe good bellyful, The warm serge and the rope that goes all round, And day-long blessed idleness beside! "Let‘s see what the urchin‘s fit for"that came next. Not overmuch their way, I must confess. Such a to-do! They tried me with their books: Lord, they‘d have taught me Latin in pure waste! Flower o‘ the clove. All the Latin I construe is, "amo" I love! But, mind you, when a boy starves in the streets Eight years together, as my fortune was, Watching folk‘s faces to know who will fling The bit of half-stripped grape-bunch he desires, And who will curse or kick him for his pains, Which gentleman processional and fine, Holding a candle to the Sacrament, Will wink and let him lift a plate and catch The droppings of the wax to sell again, Or holla for the Eightand have him whipped, How say I? nay, which dog bites, which lets drop His bone from the heap of offal in the street, Why, soul and sense of him grow sharp alike, He learns the look of things, and none the less Şi lăcomia ei, de bănci, palate, Conace, ferme, prăvălii prostii Ce i-au tot scos din minţi pe sărăntocii De Medici şi asta la opt ani. Mi-am dat din vreme seama, pot să jur, Că face pântecele-ndestulat, Mătasea călduroasă, cingătoarea Şi sfânta lene peste zi. Apoi: „Ia să vedem de ce-i în stare piciul. Nu foarte multe de-ale lor, e drept. Ce vavilon! M-au îndemnat la carte. M-au învâţat de-a surda! latineşte... Floare de grozamă, Ştiu să conjug un verb — îi zice „amo. Dar, vezi, când, la opt ani, un băieţaş Colindă uliţele mort de foame, Ghicind din chipul oamenilor cine O să-i azvârle-o coadă de ciorchin Sau cine-o să-l înjure şi lovească După corvezi ce domn în scumpe-odăjdii Purtând spre-altar un sfeşnic, s-o-ncrunta Dar o să-l lase să ridice-un taler, Ca să culeagă picături de ceară Şi să le vândă iar, sau după-aceea, Hiritisit de junii florentini, De ei să fie şi bătut ce zic? Ghicind mereu ce câine-l va muşca Sau care va lăsa să-i scape osul Cules din stiva de gunoi a străzii, 274 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry For admonition from the hunger-pinch. I had a store of such remarks, be sure, Which, after I found leisure, turned to use. I drew men‘s faces on my copy-books, Scrawled them within the antiphonary‘s marge, Joined legs and arms to the long music-notes, Found eyes and nose and chin for A‘s and B‘s, And made a string of pictures of the world Betwixt the ins and outs of verb and noun, On the wall, the bench, the door. The monks looked black. "Nay," quoth the Prior, "turn him out, d‘ye say? In no wise. Lose a crow and catch a lark. What if at last we get our man of parts, We Carmelites, like those Camaldolese And Preaching Friars, to do our church up fine And put the front on it that ought to be!" And hereupon he bade me daub away. Thank you! my head being crammed, the walls a blank, Never was such prompt disemburdening. First, every sort of monk, the black and white, I drew them, fat and lean: then, folk at church, From good old gossips waiting to confess Şi sufletul şi simţurile lui S-au ascuţit; el a deprins Tocmeala lucrurilor şi-a urmat Îndemnul chiorăielilor din pântec. Aveam, te-ncredinţez, o visterie De însemnări pe care le-am folosit Mult mai târziu în clipe de odihnă: Am desenat pe file de caiet Profiluri omeneşti le-am mâzgâlit Pe margini de tropare, am legat Picior şi braţ de note muzicale, Le-am dat lui A sau B nas, ochi, bărbie Şi-am strâns un şir de poze ale lumii Pe câmpii dintre verb şi substantiv, Pe zid, pe bancă sau pe uşă. Fraţii Aveau privirea de gheenă. „Cum? Grăi egumenul. Să-l dăm afară? Nici gând! Pierd cioara, prind o ciocârlie... E dăruit; e poate omul nostru, Al Carmeliţilor Camaldolezii Şi-l au pe-al lor, la fel Predicatorii Biserica să ne-o împodobească, Să-i dea înfăţişarea cuvenită! Apoi m-a pus să zugrăvesc degrabă. Prea mulţămescu-ţi! Eu cu capul plin, Ei cu pereţii goi... cred că nicicând N-a fost despovărare mai pripită. Întâi i-am desenat pe fraţi, albi, oacheşi, Burtoşi şi slabi; apoi pe credincioşi, 275 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Their cribs of barrel-droppings, candle-ends, To the breathless fellow at the altar-foot, Fresh from his murder, safe and sitting there With the little children round him in a row Of admiration, half for his beard and half For that white anger of his victim‘s son Shaking a fist at him with one fierce arm, Signing himself with the other because of Christ (Whose sad face on the cross sees only this After the passion of a thousand years) Till some poor girl, her apron o‘er her head, (Which the intense eyes looked through) came at eve On tiptoe, said a word, dropped in a loaf, Her pair of earrings and a bunch of flowers (The brute took growling), prayed, and so was gone. I painted all, then cried "Tis ask and have; Choose, for more‘s ready!" laid the ladder flat, And showed my covered bit of cloister-wall. The monks closed in a circle and praised loud Till checked, taught what to see and not to see, Being simple bodies,—‘That‘s the very man! Look at the boy who stoops to pat the dog! De la bătrânele mahalagioaice Venite la spovadă ca să spună Ce zdrenţe şi ce mucuri au furat, La ucigaşul proaspăt gâfâind La poalele altarului, ferit, Înconjurat de-o droaie de copii Care-l priveau pizmaş ori pentru barbă, Ori pentru alba furie din chipul Feciorului celui ucis, un braţ Zgârcindu-şi pumnul ameninţător. Iar celălalt făcându-şi semnul crucii În numele lui Crist Mântuitorul (Pe crucifix mâhnita-i faţă vede Numai asemeni lucruri de-un mileniu!) Şi-ntr-un amurg, o fată nevoiaşă, Privind aprins prin şorţul dat pe cap, Veni tiptil, şopti ceva, zvârli O pâine, doi cercei şi un buchet (Tâlharul le culese mârâind), Apoi se închină grăbit şi merse. Pictând acestea eu le-am zis: „Mai cereţi Şi vă mai dau alegeţi, mai am gata! Am pus deci scara jos şi au văzut Bucata de perete-acoperită. Călugării s-au strâns şi-au lăudat În gura mare, până când au fost Opriţi şi învăţaţi cum ce se cade A fi văzut şi ce anume nu; Căci erau trupuri goale. „Ăsta-i omul! 276 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That woman‘s like the Prior‘s niece who comes To care about his asthma: it‘s the life!‘ But there my triumph‘s straw-fire flared and funked; Their betters took their turn to see and say: The Prior and the learned pulled a face And stopped all that in no time. "How? what‘s here? Quite from the mark of painting, bless us all! Faces, arms, legs, and bodies like the true As much as pea and pea! it‘s devil‘s-game! Your business is not to catch men with show, With homage to the perishable clay, But lift them over it, ignore it all, Make them forget there‘s such a thing as flesh. Your business is to paint the souls of men Man‘s soul, and it‘s a fire, smoke . . . no, it‘s not . . . It‘s vapour done up like a new-born babe (In that shape when you die it leaves your mouth) It‘s . . . well, what matters talking, it‘s the soul! Give us no more of body than shows soul! Here‘s Giotto, with his Saint a-praising God, That sets us praisingwhy not stop with him? Why put all thoughts of praise out of our head With wonder at lines, colours, and what not? Paint the soul, never mind the legs and arms! Priviţi băiatul care se apleacă Să mângâie-un căţel! Femeia asta Parcă-i nepoata stareţului aia De vine ca să-l caute de astm. E viaţa! Însă focul ca de paie Al biruinţei mele pâlpâia... Veniră şi mai-marii lor să vadă. Abatele şi diacii se-ncruntară Curmând acestea toate. „Ce-i aici? Pictura nu descrie-aşa ceva! Cum? feţe, braţe, trupuri şi picioare Asemeni celor vii? E-un truc drăcesc! Dator eşti nu să-i ispiteşti pe oameni Cu ceea ce-i părelnic, aducând Ţărinii stricătoare-nchinăciune, Ci să-i înalţi deasupra-i, să-i fereşti, Să-i faci să uite că există carnea. Dator eşti sufletul să-l zugrăveşti, El este foc şi este fum nu, nu e... E abur ce se naşte ca un prunc (Când mori, tot astfel părăseşte gura), E... n-are rost să mai vorbim, e... suflet! Să nu ne dărui mai mult trup decât Arată sufletul! Uite-l pe Giotto Cu sfântul său ce-l laudă pe Domnul Şi te îmbie să-L slăveşti şi tu Opreşte-te la el! De ce să scoţi Din mintea noastră orice gând de slavă, Uimindu-ne cu linii şi culori? 277 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Rub all out, try at it a second time. Oh, that white smallish female with the breasts, She‘s just my niece . . . Herodias, I would say, Who went and danced and got men‘s heads cut off! Have it all out!" Now, is this sense, I ask? A fine way to paint soul, by painting body So ill, the eye can‘t stop there, must go further And can‘t fare worse! Thus, yellow does for white When what you put for yellow‘s simply black, And any sort of meaning looks intense When all beside itself means and looks nought. Why can‘t a painter lift each foot in turn, Left foot and right foot, go a double step, Make his flesh liker and his soul more like, Both in their order? Take the prettiest face, The Prior‘s niece . . . patron-saint—is it so pretty You can‘t discover if it means hope, fear, Sorrow or joy? won‘t beauty go with these? Suppose I‘ve made her eyes all right and blue, Can‘t I take breath and try to add life‘s flash, And then add soul and heighten them three-fold? Or say there‘s beauty with no soul at all Pictează sufletul şi lasă-ncolo Picioarele şi braţele! Ştergi tot Şi mai încerci. Ah, femeiuşca albă Cu sânii goi, juri că-i nepoata mea... Când colo-i Ierodiada, ce-a dansat Şi-a retezat atâtor oameni capul... Am zis! Şi-acum te-ntreb: e noimă-n asta? Pictezi, dar, sufletul, şi trupul L înfăţişezi atât de slut că ochii Nu pot să se oprească-aici, siliţi Să meargă mai departe tii, ce drum! Aşa e galbenul în loc de alb Când negru e ce-ai vrea să fie galben Şi orice înţeles pare adânc Când toate în afara lui nu-nseamnă Şi nici nu sunt nimic. Oare de ce Nu poate-un picior ridica, pe rând, Piciorul stâng, piciorul drept? De ce Nu poate aşeza el, după cin, Ce-i carne şi ce-i suflet, amândouă Mai vii ca viaţa? Dulce chipu-acesta, Nepoata sfântului ocrotitor, Atâta-i de frumos că nu se ştie Dacă trădează teamă ori nădejde, Amar sau bucurie? Frumuseţea Nu poate nicidecum să le-nsoţească? Să zicem că-i fac ochi albaştri: adică Nu pot să le-mprumut al vieţii licăr Şi suflet să le-adaug, ca să sporească? 278 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry (I never saw itput the case the same) If you get simple beauty and nought else, You get about the best thing God invents: That‘s somewhat: and you‘ll find the soul you have missed, Within yourself, when you return him thanks. "Rub all out!" Well, well, there‘s my life, in short, And so the thing has gone on ever since. I‘m grown a man no doubt, I‘ve broken bounds: You should not take a fellow eight years old And make him swear to never kiss the girls. I‘m my own master, paint now as I please Having a friend, you see, in the Corner-house! Lord, it‘s fast holding by the rings in front Those great rings serve more purposes than just To plant a flag in, or tie up a horse! And yet the old schooling sticks, the old grave eyes Are peeping o‘er my shoulder as I work, The heads shake still"It‘s art‘s decline, my son! You‘re not of the true painters, great and old; Brother Angelico‘s the man, you‘ll find; Brother Lorenzo stands his single peer: Fag on at flesh, you‘ll never make the third!" Flower o‘ the pine, Cum, este frumuseţe fără suflet? (Eu unul n-am văzut, dar n-are-a face.) Dar însăşi zămislirea frumuseţii E mult e lucrul cel mai bun ce Domnul E-n stare-a născoci. Şi-atuncea când O să-i aduceţi mulţumiri, vedea-veţi Că sufletul de care n-aţi ştiut E-n voi. „Hai, şterge tot! Da, da... fireşte! Osânda mi-e aici n-o mai lungim! Şi treaba tot în felul ăsta-a mers. N-am pregetat, sunt om în toată firea: Nu poţi sili sub jurământ un puşti Să nu sărute-o fată-n veci de veci! Stăpânul meu sunt eu pictez când vreau Şi-n casa cea din colţ am un prieten! Belciugele vârâte-n zidul ei Sunt trepte de nădejde de ce doar Să ţină flamuri sau să lege cai? Dar hârburile şcolii, ochii aspri, Mai cată peste umăr când pictez, Iar capetele tot se mai clătesc: „Vai, fiule, declinul Artei este! Nu ţii de meşteri adevăraţi, Neîntrecuţi şi vechi; ai să-ţi dai seama Că fratele Angelico e unul; Că fratele Lorenzo seamăn n-are; Că tu al treilea nu poţi să fii, Căznindu-te să zugrăveşti doar trupul! O, flori de micşunele, 279 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry You keep your mistr ... manners, and I‘ll stick to mine! I‘m not the third, then: bless us, they must know! Don‘t you think they‘re the likeliest to know, They with their Latin? So, I swallow my rage, Clench my teeth, suck my lips in tight, and paint To please themsometimes do and sometimes don‘t; For, doing most, there‘s pretty sure to come A turn, some warm eve finds me at my saints A laugh, a cry, the business of the world (Flower o‘ the peach Death for us all, and his own life for each!) And my whole soul revolves, the cup runs over, The world and life‘s too big to pass for a dream, And I do these wild things in sheer despite, And play the fooleries you catch me at, In pure rage! The old mill-horse, out at grass After hard years, throws up his stiff heels so, Although the miller does not preach to him The only good of grass is to make chaff. What would men have? Do they like grass or no May they or mayn‘t they? all I want‘s the thing Settled for ever one way. As it is, You tell too many lies and hurt yourself: You don‘t like what you only like too much, You do like what, if given you at your word, Tu cu năravurile tale, eu cu ale mele! Deci nu-s al treilea de, se pricep! Nu ei sunt cei ce-ar trebui să ştie, Cu latineasca lor? Mă înfrânez, Scrăşnesc din dinţi, fac mărunţel din buze Şi zugrăvesc aşa cum mi-au cerut Când mai pe-a lor, când mai pe-a mea, căci, ştii, După atâta trudă e nevoie Şi de puţin răgaz; o seară caldă O să mă afle printre sfinţii mei Un râset sau un chiot, trebi lumeşti. (O, floare de cicoare, Toţi mor, dar să trăiască fiecare!) Se răzvrăteşte sufletul, paharul Dă peste margini, viaţa noastră, lumea Prea mari sunt ca să fie doar un vis Şi fac aceste nebunii de-al naibii, Îmi dau în petec căci sunt cătrănit! Când, după ce-a trudit la roata morii Ani grei, bătrânul cal e scos la iarbă, Morarul nu-l învaţă că doar şişca E rostul ierbii verzi. Cât despre oameni, Ei ce-şi doresc? Vor iarbă sau nu vor? Le este-ngăduit sau nu, s-o vrea? Iar eu râvnesc ceva statornicit Pentru vecie; vezi tu, din păcate, Prea multe spui minciuni şi păgubeşti; Nu-ţi place tocmai ce iubeşti mai mult; Te-ncântă lucrul despre care juri 280 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry You find abundantly detestable. For me, I think I speak as I was taught; I always see the garden and God there A-making man‘s wife: and, my lesson learned, The value and significance of flesh, I can‘t unlearn ten minutes afterwards. You understand me: I‘m a beast, I know. But see, nowwhy, I see as certainly As that the morning-star‘s about to shine, What will hap some day. We‘ve a youngster here Comes to our convent, studies what I do, Slouches and stares and lets no atom drop: His name is Guidihe‘ll not mind the monks They call him Hulking Tom, he lets them talk He picks my practice uphe‘ll paint apace. I hope so—though I never live so long, I know what‘s sure to follow. You be judge! You speak no Latin more than I, belike; However, you‘re my man, you‘ve seen the world The beauty and the wonder and the power, The shapes of things, their colours, lights and shades, Changes, surprises, and God made it all! For what? Do you feel thankful, ay or no, For this fair town‘s face, yonder river‘s line, Că e scârbos din cale-afară. Eu Vorbesc, cred, cum am fost deprins. Mereu Văd cea grădină şi în ea pe Domnul, Zidind femeie pentru om; temeinic Am învăţat, zău, lecţia virtuţii Şi-a-nsemnătăţii cărnii. Cum, adică, Să o dezvăţ cinci clipe mai târziu? Mă înţelegi ştiu, sunt un animal. Dar, iată, văd, aşa cum văd că arde Luceafărul, ce-o să se-ntâmple-odată. Un tânăr ce-l avem în mânăstire Mi-a dat târcoale-ntruna când lucram, Îngenuncheat, chircit, holbat şi hâlpav Îl cheamă Guidi şi de fraţi nu-i pasă Aceştia-i spun Greoiul Tom, şi el Îi lasă să vorbească meşteşugul Mi l-a deprins câtva nădăjduiesc Că va picta curând, deşi nu cred S-apuc să-i văd isprava. Ştiu prea bine Ce va urma. Te iau judecător! N-oi fi vorbind mai bine latineşte Ca mine, dar eşti omul meu, cunoşti Această lume, frumuseţea ei, Puterea, desfătările; ce forme Au lucrurile, coloritul lor, Lumina, umbra, apele zglobii Şi El zidit-a toate. Pentru ce? Nu-ncerci recunoştinţă? Da sau nu? Când vezi frumos al urbei noastre chip, 281 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The mountain round it and the sky above, Much more the figures of man, woman, child, These are the frame to? What‘s it all about? To be passed over, despised? or dwelt upon, Wondered at? oh, this last of course!—you say. Beteala gârlei, muntele din preajmă, Al bolţii clopot şi, cu osebire, Bărbatul şi femeia şi copilul Pe cari îi înrămează toate-aceste? La ce sunt? Pentru-a fi dispreţuite? Traducere L. Leviţchi. 282 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1862. Christina ROSSETTI. Remember. Porsenna. 14 lines. Author: Christina ROSSETTI (1830-1894). Text: Remember. Translator: N. Porsenna. FrageStellung: Very often quoted. Explain why. (50 words) Remember. Adu-ţi aminte. Remember me when I am gone away, Gone far away into the silent land; When you can no more hold me by the hand, Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay. Remember me when no more day by day You tell me of our future that you planned: Only remember me; you understand It will be late to counsel then or pray. Yet if you should forget me for a while And afterwards remember, do not grieve: For if the darkness and corruption leave A vestige of the thoughts that once I had, Better by far you should forget and smile Than that you should remember and be sad. Să-ţi aminteşti când eu voi fi departe, În ţara fără drumuri înapoi, De ziua când, de mână amândoi, Întârziam clipita ce desparte. Să-ţi aminteşti de-un nume scris pe-o carte... Să-ţi aminteşti atunci când niciodată Nu vom mai ţese gând de viitor, De serile când împleteam cu dor Cununi de visuri pentru viaţa toată. Iar dac-o fi să uiţi că mai exist, Nu-nvinui destinul, nu fi trist; Căci vei zâmbi cândva de ce-ai simţit, Mai bine mă cufundă-n întuneric Decât să-ţi aminteşti că m-ai iubit! Traducere N. Porsenna. 283 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1863?. HOPKINS. The Alchemist in the City. Dima. 44 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text:The Alchemist in the City. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: The Alchemist in the City. Alchimistul din oraş. My window shews the travelling clouds, Leaves spent, new seasons, alter'd sky, The making and the melting crowds: The whole world passes; I stand by. Nori peregrini mi-arată fereastra imobilă, veştede frunze, tot alte anotimpuri, cer nestatornic, mulţime în tumult ori mistuită fără milă; lumea întreagă trece: alături, eu – în veghe numai spornic. They do not waste their meted hours, But men and masters plan and build: I see the crowning of their towers, And happy promises fulfill'd. Nu-şi risipesc ei soroace drămuite, pline. Zeloşii lucrători înalţă după plan, tot fuga. Contemplu desăvârşirea fortăreţelor sublime, semn că se împlineşte, apoteotic, ruga. And I – perhaps if my intent Could count on prediluvian age, The labours I should then have spent Might so attain their heritage, Cât despre mine, doar de vreun tainic gând m-ar strămuta în vremea dinainte de potop, să-mi dobândesc, pesemne, doar azi mi-ar fi la rând răsplata după trudnicul meu op 284 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry But now before the pot can glow With not to be discover'd gold, At length the bellows shall not blow, The furnace shall at last be cold. însă acum, până ce creuzetul va sclipi de aurul ce nimeni n-o să-l sece, în fine, din suflat foalele vor conteni, furnalul va rămâne în cele din urmă rece. Yet it is now too late to heal The incapable and cumbrous shame Which makes me when with men I deal More powerless than the blind or lame. Să îmi tămăduiesc e, totuşi, prea târziu, astă ruşine stingheră şi neputincioasă, care mă face cu oamenii stângaci să fiu, de parcă nevolnicia unui orb sau şchiop m-apasă. No, I should love the city less Even than this my thankless lore; But I desire the wilderness Or weeded landslips of the shore. Să port oraşu-n suflet, zău, mi-e peste poate, măcar cât erudiţia ingrată, proastă, de fapt. Întruna jinduiesc după pustietate, ori după buruienişul de pe argiloasa coastă. I walk my breezy belvedere To watch the low or levant sun, I see the city pigeons veer, I mark the tower swallows run Cotind pe răcorosu-mi belvedere, cu ochii ţintă la soarele scăzut ori în urcuş în jocul porumbeilor găsesc plăcere, ca şi în zborul rândunelelor, divin arcuş Between the tower-top and the ground Below me in the bearing air; Then find in the horizon-round One spot and hunger to be there. zvârlit din vârful turnului, pân‘ la pământ, în jos, în aerul atotîndurător ce ne cuprinde, apoi descopăr în rotunjimea zării, luminos, un punct – acolo să mă aflu-mi vine-n minte. And then I hate the most that lore That holds no promise of success; Then sweetest seems the houseless shore, Then free and kind the wilderness, Şi-atunci nesuferită mi-e la culme ştiinţa fără har, mi-e limpede că nu mă poate duce spre izbândă, şi-ndată meandrele acestui ţărm îmi par delicii, iar sălbăticia – ţară fără oprelişti, blândă. 285 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Or ancient mounds that cover bones, Or rocks where rockdoves do repair And trees of terebinth and stones And silence and a gulf of air. La fel şi tumulii străvechi ce-ascund cu grijă oase şi stâncile spre care pescăruşi îşi iau elan, copacii terebinţi, mulţimea de pietre zgrunţuroase, tăcerea, lângă golful intim, aerian. There on a long and squared height After the sunset I would lie, And pierce the yellow waxen light With free long looking, ere I die. Acolo, pe-o coamă pătrată şi prelungă, seara, după apus, aş vrea să stau întins, fixând în voie lumina galbenă ca ceara, cu văzul liber, până de moarte-oi fi învins. Traducere S.G. Dima. 286 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1864. HOPKINS. Heaven-Haven. Dima. 8 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: Heaven-Haven. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: Can the rhythms of Hopkins‘ poem in English be preserved in a Romanian translation? Is rhythm more important than rhyme in this poem? Or rhyme more important than rhythm? Heaven-Haven. A nun takes the veil. Liman celest. O tânără se călugăreşte. I have desired to go Where springs not fail, To fields where flies no sharp and sided hail And a few lilies blow. Să merg, dintotdeauna mi-am visat, pe calea primăverii etern înmugurite, pe câmpuri ce de grindini aspre-s ocolite, în locul unde vezi doar crini în leagăn eterat. And I have asked to be Where no storms come, Where the green swell is in the havens dumb, And out of the swing of the sea. Şi am cerut să fiu a zării unde furtuni nu nasc nicicând, iar verdea hulă amuţeşte blând în porturi, sustrasă zbuciumului mării. Traducere S.G. Dima. 287 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1866?a. HOPKINS. Let Me Be to Thee as the Circling Bird. Dima. 14 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: Let Me Be to Thee as the Circling Bird. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: Find one technical element worth formulating a question about in this poem, and pro vide your own answer to it. (50 w) Let Me Be to Thee as the Circling Bird. Îngăduie-mi roată să-ţi dau, ca pasărea, întruna. Let me be to Thee as the circling bird, Or bat with tender and air-crisping wings That shapes in half-light his departing rings, From both of whom a changeless note is heard. I have found my music in a common word, Trying each pleasurable throat that sings And every praisèd sequence of sweet strings, And know infallibly which I preferred. Îngăduie-mi roată să-Ţi dau, ca pasărea, întruna, ori ca liliacul molcom ce dăruie văzduhului un glas, să-ngâne, prin fâlfâiri înfiorate, în amurg, un bun-rămas – din mine-aceeaşi notă s-ar auzi – ce sunt mi-ar fi totuna. The authentic cadence was discovered late Which ends those only strains that I approve, And other science all gone out of date And minor sweetness scarce made mention of: I have found the dominant of my range and state— Love, O my God, to call Thee Love and Love. O vorbă simplă mi-a dăruit fiorul şi cununa, după ce-n toate izvoarele de melos, neostoit, am mas, făr-a le cădea în mreajă, când am făcut popas – iar astăzi ştiu exact de ce-i fără egal doar una. Târziu descoperit-am cadenţa aceea preavie şi reală ce pune capăt singurei sforţări pe care-o socotesc de preţ, în vreme ce-alte ştiinţe în faţa mea s-au scuturat de fală şi foarte rar mai pomeneşte cineva mărunte frumuseţi. Mi-am revelat a gamei mele dominantă, emblema seniorială: Iubire, Doamne, repetând, doar Ţie îţi rămân de-a pururi cântăreţ. Traducere S.G. Dima. 288 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1866b. HOPKINS. The Habit of Perfection. Dima. 28 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: The Habit of Perfection. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: There is a danger in regular rhythm and rhyme over a number of stanzas. How does th e tranlsator avoid the peril of monotony in the Romanian version of this poem? The Habit of Perfection. Cutuma perfecţiunii. Elected Silence, sing to me And beat upon my whorlèd ear, Pipe me to pastures still and be The music that I care to hear. Tăcere nobilă, strecoară-ţi tactul şi melodia, gingaş, în spirele auzului meu, condu-mă negreşit, în cântece de fluier, spre paşnicul imaş, fii muzica de care-s etern îndrăgostit. Shape nothing, lips; be lovely-dumb: It is the shut, the curfew sent From there where all surrenders come Which only makes you eloquent. Buze, nu rotunjiţi cuvinte; amuţiţi de drag: doar zvonul clopotului vestitor al stingerii de seară, vuind din spaţiul unde se macerează orice cheag al sinelui, vă face vorbirea grăitoare, clară. Be shellèd, eyes, with double dark And find the uncreated light: This ruck and reel which you remark Coils, keeps, and teases simple sight. Ochi, adăpostiţi-vă sub brâul îndoit şi negru. Aflaţi astfel lucoarea luminii increate: mosorul, cutele ivite-n faţa voastră menţin integru văzul, îl înfăşoară, îl mântuie de-ariditate. Palate, the hutch of tasty lust, Tu, cer al gurii, palat al poftei de savoare; 289 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Desire not to be rinsed with wine: The can must be so sweet, the crust So fresh that come in fasts divine! să nu doreşti să fii stropit şi răsfăţat cu vin: şi, decât „poate, vorba „trebuie să-ţi pară mai îmbietoare, aidoma dulceţii unei coji de pâine-n post divin. Nostrils, your careless breath that spend Upon the stir and keep of pride, What relish shall the censers send Along the sanctuary side! Iar uşuraticului vostru suflu, nări pripite, frânt de-aţâţarea falei, a vieţii ei focoase, ce-arome de cutremur îi vor trimite cădelniţele din sanctuare ca prinoase! O feel-of-primrose hands, O feet That want the yield of plushy sward, But you shall walk the golden street And you unhouse and house the Lord. O, mâini suave ca primula, tălpi ce tânjesc după velurul din poiana verde, veţi colinda în schimb un drum împărătesc, case-ale Domnului fiind, ori aer în care El se pierde. And, Poverty, be thou the bride And now the marriage feast begun, And lily-coloured clothes provide Your spouse not laboured-at nor spun. Şi-ntruchipează-te mireasă, tu, Sărăcie, la sărbătoarea nunţii ce tocmai a-nceput, tu dăruie-i perechii tale o mantie liliachie la care nimeni n-a tors, nici n-a ţesut. Traducere S.G. Dima. 290 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1867. Matthew ARNOLD. Dover Beach. Leviţchi. 37 lines. Author: Matthew ARNOLD (1822-1888). Text: Dover Beach. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: a. Write a brief outline of this remarkable writer‘s literary achievements... (100 words) b. Find one line which you can identify with today, a century and a half after this poem was writt en, and try to translate it using a very contemporary Romanian language, devoid of the scent of history. Can the language of a poem be adapted to the language of another age than the moment when it was written? Do you perceive this translator as close or remote in time? C an you lend more contemporary life to the Romanian version of these lines than he did? Dover Beach. Faleza Doverului. The sea is calm to-night. The tide is full, the moon lies fair Upon the straits; on the French coast the light Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand; Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay. Come to the window, sweet is the night-air! Only, from the long line of spray Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land, Listen! you hear the grating roar Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling, At their return, up the high strand, Begin, and cease, and then again begin, With tremulous cadence slow, and bring The eternal note of sadness in. În seara asta marea-i calmă. E flux şi luna a-mbrăcat strâmtoarea În strai bogat; pe ţărmul Franţei, Lumina licăreşte şi se stinge; Faleza Angliei se-nalţă clar. Aprinsă, vastă,-n golful liniştit. Vin‘ la fereastră, aerul e blând! Doar dinspre franjul spumei unde marea Atinge malul argintat de lună Se-aude hârşâitul ce îl face Pietrişul smuls de valuri şi din nou Zvârlit pe ţărm, un veşnic du-te-vino În ritm încet şi larg ce sugerează Tristeţea nesfârşită-a lumii. 291 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sophocles long ago Heard it on the A gaean, and it brought Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow Of human misery; we Find also in the sound a thought, Hearing it by this distant northern sea. Pe ţărmul egean, Sofocle — Sunt mii de ani de-atunci — l-a ascultat Şi s-a gândit la fluxul şi refluxul Mizeriei umane; noi Găsim ecoul cugetării sale Când ascultăm aceste mări din nord. The Sea of Faith Was once, too, at the full, and round earth‘s shore Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled. But now I only hear Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar, Retreating, to the breath Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear And naked shingles of the world. Şi Mările Credinţei Erau cândva în flux şi-ntreg uscatul Îl încingeau cu scumpă cingătoare. Acum aud Doar vuietul lor trist ce se retrage În urletul furtunilor de noapte Spre marginile-acestui veac. Ah, love, let us be true To one another! for the world, which seems To lie before us like a land of dreams, So various, so beautiful, so new, Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain; And we are here as on a darkling plain Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, Where ignorant armies clash by night. Iubito, unul altui să ne fim Tari în credinţă! Lumea-n faţa noastră Se-ntinde ca un ţărm de vis — e nouă, Frumoasă, felurită; dar, de fapt, Nu ştie tihnă, dragoste, lumină, Convingeri, fericire, ajutor În ceasul suferinţei; stăm aici Ca pe un câmp al soarelui-apune Surzit de corni şi tobe, unde, noaptea, Se-ncaieră neştiutoare oşti. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 292 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1872. Lewis CARROLL. The Walrus and the Carpenter. Ieronim. 108 lines. Author: Lewis CARROLL (1832-1898). Text: The Walrus and the Carpenter. Translator: I. Ieronim. FrageStellung: What was the Author‘s main profession? What is he most famous about? The Walrus and the Carpenter. Morsa şi dulgherul. The sun was shining on the sea, Shining with all his might: He did his very best to make The billows smooth and bright – And this was odd, because it was The middle of the night. Pe mare soarele-n amiază Cu toată forţa strălucea, El îşi dădea toată silinţa Şi valurile netezea. Era ciudat cum nu se poate Că se făcuse miez de noapte. The moon was shining sulkily, Because she thought the sun Had got no business to be there After the day was done – "It‘s very rude of him," she said, "To come and spoil the fun!" Iar luna lumina ursuză Gândind, ce cată soarele acum Doar ziua s-a-ncheiat demult, Să-şi vadă soarele de drum. E bădăran, orice s-ar zice, Petrecerea vrea să ne-o strice. The sea was wet as wet could be, The sands were dry as dry. You could not see a cloud, because No cloud was in the sky: Şi udă era marea, udă, Nisipul, ah, uscat de tot, Chiar niciun nor nu se vedea Pe boltă sau la orizont. 293 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry No birds were flying over head – There were no birds to fly. Priveai zadarnic cerul, era gol, Nu se-arăta nici pasăre, nici stol. The Walrus and the Carpenter Were walking close at hand; They wept like anything to see Such quantities of sand: "If this were only cleared away," They said, "it would be grand!" Iar Morsa şi Dulgherul, ei Se tot plimbau pe-aproape, Plângeau în hohote nisip Şuvoaie de sub pleoape. „De s-ar mai curăţa pe-aci Salut am zice – şi merci. "If seven maids with seven mops Swept it for half a year, Do you suppose," the Walrus said, "That they could get it clear?" "I doubt it," said the Carpenter, And shed a bitter tear. „Şapte fete, şapte mopuri De-ar trece-acum la curăţat Crezi tu că ele,-ntrebă Morsa, Ar face-ntr-adevăr curat? „Nu cred, zise dulgherul cu o voce tristă Amar vărsând o lacrimă-n batistă. "O Oysters, come and walk with us!" The Walrus did beseech. "A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk, Along the briny beach: We cannot do with more than four, To give a hand to each." „Voi, stridii, veniţi la plimbare cu noi! Le invită Morsa politicos. „O plăcută petrecere vă promit La ţărmul mării cel spumos: Putem lua doar patru cu noi. Ne ţinem de mână doi câte doi. The eldest Oyster looked at him. But never a word he said: The eldest Oyster winked his eye, And shook his heavy head – Meaning to say he did not choose Baba stridie îl ţinti printre gene, Dar nu scoase niciun cuvânt. Le făcu, şireată, cu ochiul, Clătinându-și creştetul cărunt – Ea n-a vrut, adică, să părăsească 294 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To leave the oyster-bed. Cetatea stridiilor împărătească. But four young oysters hurried up, All eager for the treat: Their coats were brushed, their faces washed, Their shoes were clean and neat – And this was odd, because, you know, They hadn‘t any feet. Dar patru mici stridii s-au şi repezit Să profite de acest prilej: Haine periate, feţe spălate, Pantofii daţi cu negru şi bej – Curios, te-ntrebi pantofi cum purtau Când picioare defel nu aveau. Four other Oysters followed them, And yet another four; And thick and fast they came at last, And more, and more, and more – All hopping through the frothy waves, And scrambling to the shore. Le-au urmat încă patru stridii Şi iute alte patru după ele, Se rostogoleau rând pe rând În valuri mari şi vălurele, Prin spume năvăleau mii şi sute Grămezi la mal, pe nisipuri ude. The Walrus and the Carpenter Walked on a mile or so, And then they rested on a rock Conveniently low: And all the little Oysters stood And waited in a row. Iar Morsa noastră cu dulgherul Au mers ce-au mers pe lângă apă, Într-un târziu șezură pe un bolovan, O piatră nu prea mică, să-i încapă: Iar stridioarele s-au înşirat Pe lângă ei, la aşteptat. "The time has come," the Walrus said, "To talk of many things: Of shoes – and ships – and sealing-wax – Of cabbages – and kings – And why the sea is boiling hot – And whether pigs have wings." „De-acum e timpul, zise Morsa, „De lucruri multe ca să discutăm: Pantofi, vapoare, ceară de peceţi, Sau verze – şi de regi să întrebăm, Şi despre mare, de ce fierbe oare? Sau are porcul aripi, ca să zboare? 295 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry "But wait a bit," the Oysters cried, "Before we have our chat; For some of us are out of breath, And all of us are fat!" "No hurry!" said the Carpenter. They thanked him much for that. „Mai aşteptaţi puţin, ţipară stridiile, „Până să-ncepem adunarea Fiindcă, uite, suntem grase toate, Iar unele ne-am şi pierdut suflarea! Atunci zise dulgherul: „Nu e grabă! Și ele-au apreciat că este om de treabă. "A loaf of bread," the Walrus said, "Is what we chiefly need: Pepper and vinegar besides Are very good indeed – Now if you‘re ready Oysters dear, We can begin to feed." „Ne trebuie o pâine, vorbi şi Morsa, „Altfel nu mai e nevoie de nimic: Puţin piper şi oţet alături Să adăugăm câte-un pic – Dragi stridii, de nu e cu supărare Putem să trecem la mâncare. "But not on us!" the Oysters cried, Turning a little blue, "After such kindness, that would be A dismal thing to do!" "The night is fine," the Walrus said "Do you admire the view? „Dar nu să ne mâncaţi pe noi!, strigară ele Făcându-se la faţă cam albastre. „După atâta curte şi drăgălăşenii N-ar fi frumos, la rangurile noastre! Morsa grăi: „Superbă noapte, nu-i aşa? Cred că aveţi ce admira. "It was so kind of you to come! And you are very nice!" The Carpenter said nothing but "Cut us another slice: I wish you were not quite so deaf – I‘ve had to ask you twice!" Frumos din partea voastră să veniţi! Şi fiecare, vai, atâta de drăguţă. Dulgherul nu zise nimic, ci doar: „Taie-o felie, dom‘le, mai lunguţă: De n-ai fi surd, ar fi cu mult mai bine – N-ar mai trebui să strig așa la tine! "It seems a shame," the Walrus said, Dar Morsa răbufni, „E rușinos, 296 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry "To play them such a trick, After we‘ve brought them out so far, And made them trot so quick!" The Carpenter said nothing but "The butter‘s spread too thick!" "I weep for you," the Walrus said. "I deeply sympathize." With sobs and tears he sorted out Those of the largest size. Holding his pocket handkerchief Before his streaming eyes. "O Oysters," said the Carpenter. "You‘ve had a pleasant run! Shall we be trotting home again?" But answer came there none – And that was scarcely odd, because They‘d eaten every one.‘ Noi să ne batem joc în aşa hal, Acuma zici că bal să fie, dacă-i bal! Rosti dulgherul rar și tacticos: „Untul e-ntins cu mult prea gros! „Eu plâng, plâng pentru voi, mai spuse Morsa: „Am o profundă compasiune. Şi suspinând începe să le-aleagă Pe cele ample ca dimensiune, Ţinând la faţă o batistă mare În care aduna lacrimi amare. „Voi stridii, stridii, observă dulgherul, Aţi străbătut un drum de vis! De-acum ne vom întoarce-acasă? Dar nu s-a mai auzit nici „pis; Aşa se spune că a fost – tot ce se poate! De vreme ce ei le-au mâncat pe toate! Taraducere I. Ieronim. 297 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1876. EMINESCU. Lacul. Cuclin. 20 lines. Author: Mihai EMINESCU (1850-1889). Text: Lacul. Translator: D. Cuclin. FrageStellung: Enumerate and discuss a few of Eminescu‘s distinct areas of interest as emerging cl early from his Manuscripts. (100 words) Lacul. The Lake. Lacul codrilor albastru Nuferi galbeni îl încarcă; Tresărind în cercuri albe El cutremură o barcă. Water lilies load all over The blue lake amid the woods, That imparts, while in white circles Startling, to a boat its moods. Şi eu trec de-a lung de maluri, Parc-ascult şi parc-aştept Ea din trestii să răsară Şi să-mi cadă lin pe piept; And along the strands I‘m passing Listening, waiting, in unrest, That she from the reeds may issue And fall, gently, on my breast; Să sărim în luntrea mică, Îngânaţi de glas de ape, Şi să scap din mână cârma, Şi lopeţile să-mi scape; That we may jump in the little Boat, while water‘s voices whelm All our feelings; that enchanted I may drop my oars and helm; Să plutim cuprinşi de farmec That all charmed we may be floating 298 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sub lumina blândei lune Vântu-n trestii lin foşnească, Unduioasa apă sune! While moon‘s kindly light surrounds Us, winds cause the reeds to rustle And the waving water sounds. Dar nu vine... Singuratic În zadar suspin şi sufăr Lângă lacul cel albastru Încărcat cu flori de nufăr. But she does not come; abandoned, Vainly I endure and sigh Lonely, as the water lilies On the blue lake ever lie. Traducere D. Cuclin. 299 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1877a. HOPKINS. Pied Beauty. Dima. 11 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: Pied Beauty. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: Pied Beauty. Multicolora frumuseţe. Glory be to God for dappled things— For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow; For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim; Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches' wings; Landscape plotted and pieced—fold, fallow, and plough; And áll trades, their gear and tackle and trim. All things counter, original, spáre, strange; Whatever is fickle, frecklèd (who knows how?) With swíft, slów; sweet, sóur; adázzle, dím; He fathers-forth whose beauty is pást change: Práise hím. Slavă Divinului pentru policromie şi hora de culori viteze – pentru efervescenţa hâtră a unor ceruri cu dungi şi pete, ca vacile bălţate; pentru spuzeala roz ce-o poartă-n glorie păstrăvii pe spate; pentru cascada reavănă-a castanelor strălucitoare; şi pentru aripi de cinteze; pentru peisajul parcelat şi împărţit – în stână, ţelină şi-ogoarearate harnic; şi pentru-atâtea meşteşuguri, scripeţi, tipícuri etalate, pentru belşugul de lucruri opuse, abundente, originale ori bizare; pentru orice e capricios şi pistruiat; mieros ori acru; cu faţa smolită ori învăpăiată; pe toate le aduce în lumină Acela a cărui frumuseţe-i dincólo de schimbare: doar măiestria-I se cuvine lăudată. Traducere S.G. Dima. 300 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1877b. HOPKINS. God’s Grandeur. Tartler # Dima. 14 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: God‘s Grandeur. Translator: G. Tartler # Dima. FrageStellung: Give an outline of the Poet‘s life and occupations. When exactly did he first becom e known as a writer of poetry? (100 words) God’s Grandeur. Măreţia lui Dumnezeu. The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man‘s smudge and shares man‘s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod. Lumea e încărcată cu măreţia lui Dumnezeu. Va arde cu flamă, ca folia care-n strălucire se zbate. Se adună în măreţie, ca seminţele pentru ulei sfărâmate. De ce oamenii maiul i-l recunosc aşa greu? Generaţii întregi zdrobiră, zdrobiră, zdrobiră mereu; Totul ars de negoţ, mânjit de trudă, spurcat e; Poartă petele omului, mirosul cu el îl împarte: Ogorul e sterp, nici tălpi nu-l simt, încălţate. And for all this, nature is never spent; There lives the dearest freshness deep down things; And though the last lights off the black West went Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs— Because the Holy Ghost over the bent World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings. Şi cu toate acestea, natura rămâne necheltuită; Prospeţime de preţ adânc în lucruri transpare; Ultimul licăr din negrul apus mai palpită Trecând, răsărind în zorii cu margini deschise-n culoare, Pentru că Sfântul Duh peste lumea-ndoită Cloceşte cu pieptul cald şi ah! aripi strălucitoare. Traducere G. Tartler. 301 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry God’s Grandeur. Splendoarea divină. The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man‘s smudge and shares man‘s smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod. Musteşte magic lumea de dumnezeire, noian splendid, aprins cu flacără, leit zvâcnirea de văpaie a unei foiţe de aur mângâiate. Se-adună în şuvoaie, asemeni clisei din teasc. De ce uităm de sceptru-i suveran? And for all this, nature is never spent; There lives the dearest freshness deep down things; And though the last lights off the black West went Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs— Because the Holy Ghost over the bent World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings. Însă, cu toate-acestea, belşugul firii nu s-a irosit de fel. Există şi acum, afund în lucruri, preţiosul frupt. Şi, chiar de-i beznă în Apus, căci toate luminile-au fugit din el, o, dimineaţa irumpe negreşit pe însoritul ţărm răsăritean, abrupt. Potop de generaţii tot merg fără oprire, tot merg, an după an. Încât e totul ars de paşi, pârlit de trudă şi bătaie, a oameni adiind, pătat de omeneşti noroaie, iar solul golaş nu poate simţi, prin încălţări, piciorul diafan. Căci Duhul Sfânt proteguieşte omenirea îndoită ca-n cerc de-oţel, cu albul aripilor şi o nutreşte cu lapte cald, îndată supt. Traducere S.G. Dima. 302 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1877c. HOPKINS. The Windhover. Dima. 14 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: The Windhover. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: Can alliterations, assonaces be approximated in translation? Should the translator aim for that or for the meaning alone? The Windhover: To Christ our Lord. Şoimul: Domnului nostru Iisus Hristos. I caught this morning morning's minion, king – dom of daylight's dauphin, dapple-dawn-drawn Falcon, in his riding Of the rolling level underneath him steady air, and striding High there, how he rung upon the rein of a wimpling wing In his ecstasy! then off, off forth on swing, As a skate's heel sweeps smooth on a bow-bend: the hurl and gliding Rebuffed the big wind. My heart in hiding Stirred for a bird, – the achieve of, the mastery of the thing! Cum l-am zărit în zori pe servul dimineţii, o tânără alteţă-a regatului diurn, şoimul stârnit înco ace de zori pestriţi, călare pe aerul vârtos, acerb rostogolit sub el; răpit apoi într-o planare acolo-n înălţime, cum mai suna din hăţul unei aripi şfichiuitoare, dedat extazului! după care-o lua spre dreapta-n legănare, precum călcâiul patinând înaintează lin, pe-un arc: elan şi lunecare ce-ngenunchează vânt năpraznic. Inima mea-n ascunzătoare, stârnită de-o pasăre, de-un ce magnific, care seamăn n-are! Brute beauty and valour and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here Buckle!AND the fire that breaks from thee then, a billion Times told lovelier, more dangerous, O my chevalier! O, farmec brut, curaj şi faptă, văzduh, mândrie, pană – aici înmănuncheate! Iar focul ce ţâşneşte-apoi din tine, de un milion de ori e spus mai tandru, mai primejdios, o, cavaler şi frate! 303 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry No wonder of it: shéer plód makes plough down sillion Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear, Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermilion. Nu-i de mirare: luceşte tăişul plugului numai prin chinul trudnic, monoton, iar rămăşiţe de tăciuni, spre vineţiu fanate, o, dragul meu, căzând, dau la iveală-adânci scântei de auriu şi roşu vermillon. Traducere S.G. Dima. 304 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1878. William COWPER. The Diverting History of John Gilpin. Leviţchi. 252 lines. Author: William COWPER (1731-1800). Text: The Diverting History of John Gilpin. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Comment on the metre of this poem. (50 words) The Diverting History of John Gilpin. Năstrușnica istorie a lui John Gilpin. John Gilpin was a citizen Of credit and renown, A train-band captain eke was he, Of famous London town. Era John Gilpin de ispravă Al Londrei cetăţean Şi cunoscut în Cheapside, başca De poteri căpitan. John Gilpin‘s spouse said to her dear, Though wedded we have been These twice ten tedious years, yet we No holiday have seen. „Bărbate, spuse soaţa, „uite, Sunt douăzeci de veri De când ne-am luat; şi nu m-ai dus, De-atuncea, nicăieri. To-morrow is our wedding-day, And we will then repair Unto the Bell‘ at Edmonton, All in a chaise and pair. Cum mâine-i ziua nunţii noastre, Ce-ar fi să mergem toţi La Edmonton într-o caleaşcă – Doi cai şi patru roţi? My sister, and my sister‘s child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise; so you must ride Eu, sora mea şi fiul dânsei, Copiii-trei; încap Atâţia-ntr-o trăsură – tu, 305 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry On horseback after we. Pe cal, teleap-teleap. He soon replied, I do admire Of womankind but one, And you are she, my dearest dear, Therefore it shall be done. John Gilpin spuse: „Ntre femei Doar una-i mai presus Şi-aceea, pot să jur, eşti tu. Va fi precum ai spus. I am a linendraper bold, As all the world doth know, And my good friend the calender Will lend his horse to go. Că sunt un postăvar cinstit O ştie tot cvartalul; De-l rog pe croitor, îndată Îmi împrumută calul. Quoth Mrs. Gilpin, That‘s well said; And for that wine is dear, We will be furnished with our own, Which is both bright and clear. „Prea bine, zise doamna Gilpin. „Cum vinul s-a scumpit, Mă socotesc să luăm de-al nostru, Că-i ros şi limpezit. John Gilpin kissed his loving wife. O‘erjoyed was he to find. That though on pleasure she was bent, She had a frugal mind. Îşi sărută John scumpa soaţă, Prea mulţumit, bag seamă, Că doamna lui, petrecăreaţă, E-atât de econoamă. The morning came, the chaise was brought, But yet was not allowed To drive up to the door, lest all Should say that she was proud. În zori, caleaşca fu adusă Dar nu chiar la intrare, Să nu se spună cum că doamna Trage spre lumea mare. So three doors off the chaise was stayed, Where they did all get in; Six precious souls, and all agog Deci, şase suflete iubite La trei uşi mai departe Urcând, se lepădară-n voia 306 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To dash through thick and thin. Atotputinţei soarte. Smack went the whip, round went the wheels, Were never folks so glad! The stones did rattle underneath, As if Cheapside were mad. Plesni biciuşca, patru roţi Porniră să se-ntoarcă, Scrâşni pietrişul – Cheapside tot Înnebunise parcă. John Gilpin at his horse‘s side Seized fast the flowing mane, And up he got, in haste to ride, But soon came down again; De coama calului John Gilpin Se apucă vânjos, Se aruncă în şea şi-ndată Se pomeni pe jos. For saddletree scarce reached had he, His journey to begin, When, turning round his head, he saw Three customers come in. Urcă apoi pe scara şelei, Dar când să strige „dii! Întoarce capul şi văzu Că-i vin trei muşterii. So down he came; for loss of time, Although it grieved him sore, Yet loss of pence, full well he knew, Would trouble him much more. Descălecă; întârzierea Îl supăra câtva; Dar pierderea de bani, vezi bine În cumpănă trăgea. Twas long before the customers Were suited to their mind, When Betty screaming came downstairs, The wine is left behind! Pân‘ să-şi aleagă cei trei marfa Nu a trecut puţin, Când Betty coborî, strigând: „Vaaai! Au uitat de vin! Good lack! quoth he, yet bring it me, My leathern belt likewise, „Hait, zise el, „Adă-l încoace, Şi adă-mi și o curea – 307 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry In which I bear my trusty sword When I do exercise. Pe cea în care-mi pun eu spada Ca să mă-ncerc cu ea. Now Mistress Gilpin (careful soul!) Had two stone bottles found, To hold the liquor that she loved, And keep it safe and sound. (Ştiţi, grijulia doamnă Gilpin În două mari ulcioare Pusese, pentru zile negre, Plăcuta ei licoare). Each bottle had a curling ear, Through which the belt he drew, And hung a bottle on each side, To make his balance true. Cureaua John şi-o petrecu Prin cele două toarte Şi-ncins, de cumpăt păsător, Le puse-n câte-o parte. Then over all, that he might be Equipped from top to toe, His long red cloak, well brushed and neat, He manfully did throw. Apoi, spre-a fi el dichisit Din creştet până jos, Şi luă manta roşie, periată Cu grijă şi prisos. Now see him mounted once again Upon his nimble steed, Full slowly pacing o‘er the stones, With caution and good heed. Deci, iată-l cocoţat din nou Pe propriul său cal, Purces la pas printre pietroaie La vale şi la deal. But finding soon a smoother road Beneath his well-shod feet, The snorting beast began to trot, Which galled him in his seat. Nou potcovitul dobitoc Scăpând de drumul slut, Porni la trap şi John simţi Că-l arde la şezut. So, fair and softly! John he cried, But John he cried in vain; Strigă John: „Murgule, domol! Dar John striga-n zadar; 308 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. Şi trapul se făcu galop Căci frâul n-avea har. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasped the mane with both his hands, And eke with all his might. Plecându-se, cum șade bine Când să stai drept ţi-e teamă, Cu mâinile-amândouă John Se apucă de coamă. His horse, who never in that sort Had handled been before, What thing upon his back had got, Did wonder more and more. Şi cum nu mai umblase nimeni Într-acest fel cu dânsul, Vrea calul sarcina să-şi afle Tot mai cu dinadinsul. Away went Gilpin, neck or nought, Away went hat and wig; He little dreamt, when he set out, Of running such a rig. Zbura! zbură şi pălăria, Zbură şi cea perucă. John nu ştiuse-acestea când Prinsese dor de ducă. The wind did blow, the cloak did fly Like streamer long and gay, Till, loop and button failing both. At last it flew away. În vânt, mantaua flutura Ca steagul nentrerupt Până ce bumbii, câţi erau, Din cheotori s-au rupt; Then might all people well discern The bottles he had slung; A bottle swinging at each side, As hath been said or sung. Şi a putut vedea tot natul Ulcioarele-atârnând Lui John de-a dreapta şi de-a stânga, Cum spus-am de curând. The dogs did bark, the children screamed, Dulăii hămăiau, copiii 309 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Up flew the windows all; And every soul cried out, Well done! As loud as he could bawl. Zbierau, după putinţă, Şi, din ferestre, mulţi răcneau: „Să-ţi fie de priinţă! Away went Gilpin–who but he? His fame soon spread around; He carries weight! he rides a race! Tis for a thousand pound! Zbura, dar, Gilpin – cine altul? Şi-i merse-ndată buhul: „Este jocheu! Pe mii de lire Şi-a zălogit el duhul! And still as fast as he drew near, Twas wonderful to view How in a trice the turnpike-men Their gates wide open threw. Şi cum venea, nu-i de mirare Că, încă de departe, Străjerii de la barieră Au dat poarta-ntr-o parte. And now, as he went bowing down His reeking head full low, The bottles twain behind his back Were shattered at a blow. Şi cum zbura, cu capul abur Şi pântecul chircit, Ulcioarele,-ajungând în spate S-au spart şi s-au ciobit. Down ran the wine into the road, Most piteous to be seen, Which made the horse‘s flanks to smoke, As they had basted been. S-a scurs vinaţul tot pe drum – O, ceas grozav şi crunt! – Şi calul fumega de parcă Plutea pe plită-n unt. But still he seemed to carry weight. With leathern girdle braced; For all might see the bottle-necks Still dangling at his waist. Dar, cu cureaua-ncins, John Gilpin Avea samar, fiindcă Mai atârnau de la ulcioare Ce gâturi erau încă. Thus all through merry Islington Prin Islington cu-asemeni şotii 310 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry These gambols he did play, Until he came unto the Wash Of Edmonton so gay; Trecu fără să-i pese Şi-n Edmonton, prin locul unde Spălau spălătorese. And there he threw the wash about On both sides of the way, Just like unto a trundling mop, Or a wild goose at play. Acolo-n rufe dete iama Năprasnic și de-odată, Ca măturoiul furios Sau gâsca mâniată. At Edmonton his loving wife From the balcony spied Her tender husband, wondering much To see how he did ride. La Edmonton, iubita-i soaţă Văzu de pe balcon Şi mult se minună văzând Cum călăreşte John. Stop, stop, John Gilpin!–Here‘s the house! They all at once did cry; The dinner waits, and we are tired; Said Gilpin–So am I! „Opreşte, John! Aceasta-i casa! Strigau toţi cu dârzie – „E gata masa – ne e foame! Răspunse John: „Şi mie! But yet his horse was not a whit Inclined to tarry there; For why?–his owner had a house Full ten miles off, at Ware. Dar calul nu se îmbia Să zăboveasc-acolo – Stăpânul lui avea o casă Opt mile mai încolo – So like an arrow swift he flew, Shot by an archer strong; So did he fly–which brings me to The middle of my song. Spre Ware zbura, deci, ca săgeata Ce-o trage-un braţ cumplit – Şi cu acestea, jumătate De cântec am sfârşit. 311 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Away went Gilpin, out of breath, And sore against his will, Till at his friend the calender‘s His horse at last stood still. Zbură şi John, cu scârbă multă Şi-osârdie puţină, Până ce calul poposi La casa cu pricina. The calender, amazed to see His neighbour in such trim, Laid down his pipe, flew to the gate. And thus accosted him: Uimit de-acestea, croitorul Uită de-aprinsa-i pipă Fugi spre poartă într-un suflet Şi-l întrebă cu pripă: What news? what news? your tidings tell; Tell me you must and shall– Say why bareheaded you are come, Or why you come at all? „Ce s-a-ntâmplat? Doresc să aflu Întregul adevăr! În capul gol? De ce-ai venit? Spune-mi de-a fir a păr! Now Gilpin had a pleasant wit, And loved a timely joke; And thus unto the calender In merry guise he spoke: Era John Gilpin om de duh Şi-i cam ardea de glume; Deci, croitorului, şăgalnic, Aşa-i vorbi anume: I came because your horse would come; And, if I well forebode, My hat and wig will soon be here, They are upon the road. „De ce-am venit? Întreabă-ţi calul! Eu – pot atât prezice: Că pălăria şi peruca Vor fi curând aice! The calender, right glad to find His friend in merry pin, Returned him not a single word, But to the house went in; Iar croitorul, bucuros Că John e-n toane bune, Se duse-n casă-n graba mare O vorbă far-a spune; 312 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Whence straight he came with hat and wig, A wig that flowed behind, A hat not much the worse for wear, Each comely in its kind. De-aici i-aduse o perucă Nu tocmai de temei Şi-o pălărie – fiecare Urâtă-n felul ei. He held them up, and in his turn Thus showed his ready wit: My head is twice as big as yours, They therefore needs must fit. I le-arătă şi şugui La rându-i: „Am un cap Ca-al tău de două ori mai mare – Eu zic că te încap. But let me scrape the dirt away, That hangs upon your face; And stop and eat, for well you may Be in a hungry case. Dar mai intâi dă-mi voie faţa Să-ţi şterg de murdărie Şi... să mănânci ceva, căci foame S-ar cam putea să-ţi fie. Said John, It is my wedding-day, And all the world would stare If wife should dine at Edmonton, And I should dine at Ware. Dar John: „E ziua mea de nuntă. Ce-ar zice toţi de asta: Eu să prânzesc aici, în Ware, Şi-n Edmonton nevasta? So turning to his horse, he said I am in haste to dine; Twas for your pleasure you came here, You shall go back for mine. Se-ntoarse-apoi spre cal şi-i spuse: „De foame, zău, sunt stors! Plăcerea ţi-ai făcut venind, Fă-mi-o pe-a mea l-a-ntors! Ah! luckless speech, and bootless boast! For which he paid full dear; For while he spake, a braying ass Did sing most loud and clear; O, vorbe grele, pentru care Avea John să plătească! Pe când vorbea, trase-un măgar Cântare măgărească; 313 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Whereat his horse did snort, as he Had heard a lion roar, And galloped off with all his might, As he had done before. Şi calul sforăi, de parcă Un leu ar fi răcnit Şi iar o luă-n galop, precum Era obişnuit. Away went Gilpin, and away Went Gilpin‘s hat and wig; He lost them sooner than at first, For why? – they were too big. Zbura! Zbură şi pălăria, Zbură și cea perucă; Fiind mai mari, se pricepură Mai iute să se ducă. Now Mistress Gilpin, when she saw Her husband posting down Into the country far away, She pulled out half-a-crown; Când doamna Gilpin îl văzu Gonind pe-a zării geană Umblă la teşcherea şi scoase Dintr-însa o coroană And thus unto the youth she said That drove them to the Bell, This shall be yours when you bring back My husband safe and well. Şi vizitiului de grabă Îi răspică aşa: „Dacă-mi aduci bărbatul viu Şi teafăr – e a ta. The youth did ride, and soon did meet John coming back amain; Whom in a trice he tried to stop, By catching at his rein. Săltând de sârg acesta-n şea, Pe John îl întâlni Şi apucând de frâu, cercă Din cale a-l opri; But not performing what he meant, And gladly would have done, The frighted steed he frighted more, And made him faster run. Dar ne-mplinind el ce-ar fi vrut, Alesul dintre cai Se spăimântă şi socoti Să fugă mai dihai. 314 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Away went Gilpin, and away Went postboy at his heels, The postboy‘s horse right glad to miss The lumbering of the wheels. Zbura şi John şi vizitiul, Iar calul de la spate Se bucura că nu aude Huruituri de roate. Six gentlemen upon the road, Thus seeing Gilpin fly, With postboy scampering in the rear. They raised the hue and cry. În drum, cinci gentlemeni văzând Cum fuge John călare Şi-l urmăreşte celălalt, Strigară-n gura mare: Stop thief! stop thief! a highwayman!‘ Not one of them was mute; And all and each that passed that way Did join in the pursuit. „Opriţi tâlharul! Puneţi mâna! Mut nu era niciunul; Şi muţi n-au fost nici alţii care Pe-acolo-şi aveau drumul. And now the turnpike-gates again Flew open in short space; The toll-man thinking, as before, That Gilpin rode a race. A barierei poartă grea S-a dat iar la o parte, Crezând străjerii iar de John La curse că ia parte. And so he did, and won it too, For he got first to town; Nor stopped till where he had got up, He did again get down. Şi-a câştigat, căci el dintâiul A Londrei mândre case Le-a-ntâmpinat şi-a coborât Chiar unde-ncălecase. Now let us sing, Long live the King, And Gilpin, long live he; And when he next doth ride abroad. May I be there to see. Trăiască regele – şi Gilpin, Le deie Domnul viaţă! Iar John, de-o să mai urce-n şea, Să fim şi noi de faţă! Traducere L. Leviţchi 315 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1878. EMINESCU. Singurătate. Grimm # Popescu. 40 lines. Author: Mihai EMINESCU (1850-1889). Text: Singurătate. Translator: P. Grimm # C.M. Popescu. FrageStellung: Wht exactly is the Noica – Eminescu connection? (100 words) Singurătate. Solitude. Cu perdelele lăsate, Şed la masa mea de brad, Focul pâlpâie în sobă, Iară eu pe gânduri cad. Near my simple fir-wood table With the curtains drawn I sit, In the grate the fire is flick‘ring, Musingly I look at it. Stoluri, stoluri trec prin minte Dulci iluzii. Amintiri Ţârâiesc încet ca greieri Printre negre, vechi zidiri, And like swallows sweet illusions Come in flights and wander all; Dear remembrances seem crickets Chirping in a ruined wall, Sau cad grele, mângâioase Şi se sfarmă-n suflet trist, Cum în picuri cade ceara La picioarele lui Crist. Or caressing come and sadly, Heavy in the soul they stop, Like the wax from candles falling Near Christ‘s icon, drop by drop. În odaie prin unghere In my room in every corner 316 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry S-a ţesut păinjeniş Şi prin cărţile în vravuri Umblă şoarecii furiş. Spiders have their cobwebs spun, And among the piled books hiding Furtively the mice now run. În această dulce pace Îmi ridic privirea-n pod Şi ascult cum învelişul De la cărţi ei mi le rod. In this peace mine eye distracted Upward to the ceiling looks, And I listen as they slowly Gnaw the covers of my books. Ah! de câte ori voit-am Ca să spânzur lira-n cui Şi un capăt poeziei Şi pustiului să pui; Oft I thought, the lyre forsaking, To depart and change my mood, And to leave off writing verses In this wasting solitude. Dar atuncea greieri, şoareci, Cu uşor-măruntul mers, Readuc melancolia-mi, Iară ea se face vers. But then mice with tripping noises, Chirping crickets bring and nurse My old thoughts, my melancholy, And this soon becomes a verse. Câteodată... prea arare... A târziu când arde lampa, Inima din loc îmi sare Când aud că sună cleampa... Sometimes while the lamp is burning Late, Fm dreaming without sleep, When I hear the door-latch clicking, Suddenly my heart will leap. Este Ea. Deşarta casă Dintr-odată-mi pare plină, În privazul negru-al vieţii-mi E-o icoană de lumină. It is SHE. The house so empty, Now at once is full of light, In my life‘s black frame appearing She, an icon shining bright. Şi mi-i ciudă cum de vremea And I cannot now but wonder 317 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Să mai treacă se îndură, Când eu stau şoptind cu draga Mână-n mână, gură-n gură. Why old Time will never rest, While I‘m with my love here whisp‘ring Hand in hand and breast to breast. Traducere P. Grimm. 318 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Singurătate. Solitude. Cu perdelele lăsate, Şed la masa mea de brad, Focul pâlpâie în sobă, Iară eu pe gânduri cad. With the curtains drawn together, At my table of rough wood, And the firelight flickering softly, Do I fall to thoughtful mood. Stoluri, stoluri trec prin minte Dulci iluzii. Amintiri Ţârâiesc încet ca greieri Printre negre, vechi zidiri, Flocks and flocks of sweet illusions, Memories the mind recalls, And they softly creep like crickets Through time‘s grey and crumbled walls; Sau cad grele, mângâioase Şi se sfarmă-n suflet trist, Cum în picuri cade ceara La picioarele lui Crist. Or they drop with gentle patter On the pavement of the soul, As does wax before God‘s altar From the sacred candles roll. În odaie prin unghere S-a ţesut păinjeniş Şi prin cărţile în vravuri Umblă şoarecii furiş. About the room in every corner Silver webs the spiders sew, While among the dusty bookshelves Furtive mice soft come and go. În această dulce pace Îmi ridic privirea-n pod Şi ascult cum învelişul De la cărţi ei mi le rod. And I gaze towards the ceiling That so many times I saw, And listen how the bindings With their tiny teeth they gnaw. Ah! de câte ori voit-am Ca să spânzur lira-n cui O, how often have I wanted My worn lyre aside to lay; 319 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi un capăt poeziei Şi pustiului să pui; Dar atuncea greieri, şoareci, Cu uşor-măruntul mers, Readuc melancolia-mi, Iară ea se face vers. Câteodată... prea arare... A târziu când arde lampa, Inima din loc îmi sare Când aud că sună cleampa... Este Ea. Deşarta casă Dintr-odată-mi pare plină, În privazul negru-al vieţii-mi E-o icoană de lumină. Şi mi-i ciudă cum de vremea Să mai treacă se îndură, Când eu stau şoptind cu draga Mână-n mână, gură-n gură. From poetry and solitude At last my thoughts to turn away. But again the mice, the crickets, With their small and rustling tread, Awake in me familiar longings And with poetry fill my head. Once in a while, alas too rarely, When my lamp is burning late, Suddenly my heart beats wildly For I hear the latch-bar grate. It is She. My dusky chamber In a moment seems to glow; As if an icon‘s holy luster Did o‘er life‘s threshold flow. And I know not how the moments Have the heart away to sneak, While we whisper low our loving, Hand in hand, and cheek to cheek. Traducere C. M. Popescu. 320 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1879?a. HOPKINS. As Kingfishers Catch Fire. Dima. 14 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: As Kingfishers Catch Fire. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: As Kingfishers Catch Fire. Aşa cum pescăruşii iau foc. As kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies draw flame; As tumbled over rim in roundy wells Stones ring; like each tucked string tells, each hung bell's Bow swung finds tongue to fling out broad its name; Each mortal thing does one thing and the same: Deals out that being indoors each one dwells; Selves — goes itself; myself it speaks and spells, Crying Whát I dó is me: for that I came. Aşa cum pescăruşii iau foc, tot astfel şi libelulele se-aprind şi cum, de pietre rostogolite peste ghizduri, sună fântâna cea rotundă, ciupite, strunele vorbesc, iar fiecare arcuită undă de clopot află-o limbă, să-şi zvârle numele făţiş, cu jind. Creaturile, cu unul şi acelaşi lucru ocupate fiind, despică de fapt unicitatea fiinţei ce-o adăpostesc profundă; cu un perpetuu eu însumi locvace, fascinant, oricare se confundă. El ţipă: Pentru-a mă făuri pe mine doar mă vezi viind. I say móre: the just man justices; Keeps grace: thát keeps all his goings graces; Acts in God's eye what in God's eye he is — Chríst — for Christ plays in ten thousand places, Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his To the Father through the features of men's faces. Dar eu spun altfel: cel drept iradiază un spirit justiţiar, păstrează harul şi astfel îl dăruie faptelor lui toate, devine în ochii lui Dumnezeu ceea ce este pentru El – chiar un Hristos, deoarece Hristos apare-n joacă în locuri depărtate, desăvârşit în fiinţă, desfătător pentru privire, dar nu a lui ci-a Tatălui, prin chipuri în eternă varietate. Traducere S.G. Dima. 321 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1879b. HOPKINS. Morning, Midday, and Evening Sacrifice. Dima. 21 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: Morning, Midday, and Evening Sacrifice. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: Morning, Midday, and Evening Sacrifice. Jertfa din zori, de la amiază şi din faptul serii. The dappled die-away Cheek and wimpled lip, The gold-wisp, the airy-grey Eye, all in fellowship— This, all this beauty blooming, This, all this freshness fuming, Give God while worth consuming. Foc vesel de pistrui, galeş obraz, buzele-n freamăt şi-n undire, strălimpezi ochi şi pletele-n talaz, de aur, respir de armonie şi unire, Both thought and thew now bolder And told by Nature: Tower; Head, heart, hand, heel, and shoulder That beat and breathe in power— This pride of prime‘s enjoyment Take as for tool, not toy meant And hold at Christ‘s employment. Neînfricate vine, gândul oţelit, măreţul turn ce firea l-a durat frumos, cap, inimă şi mână în palpit, umeri viteji, tot suflu-ţi viforos – toată această frumuseţe-n floare, întreaga-ţi frăgezime-aromitoare Domnului dă-i-o, deşi ispita-i mare. mândria tinereţii, zi sărbătorească, unealtă socoteşte-o, nu jucărie flască, şi grijuliu păstreaz-o – Iisus s-o folosească. 322 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The vault and scope and schooling And mastery in the mind, In silk-ash kept from cooling, And ripest under rind— What life half lifts the latch of, What hell stalks towards the snatch of, Your offering, with despatch, of! Bolta, diapazonul minţii: învăţătură deplină, desăvârşire a gândului, ferită de răcire-n cenuşă de mătase pură, sub coajă protectoare bine rumenită, lucrul acela deja revendicat de moarte şi după care iadul se-nnebuneşte foarte, ofranda ta – fă-i iute vânt în lumea de departe! Traducere S.G. Dima. 323 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1879. EMINESCU. Atât de fragedă. Grimm. 76 lines. Author: Mihai EMINESCU (1850-1889). Text: Atât de fragedă... Translator: P. Grimm. FrageStellung: With the works of what English poets would you associate the overall poetic achieve ments of Eminescu? (150 words) Atât de fragedă... So Fresh Thou Art... Atât de fragedă, te-asameni Cu floarea albă de cireş, Şi ca un înger dintre oameni În calea vieţii mele ieşi. So like the sweet, white cherry blossom, So tender and so fresh thou art, And on my life‘s way like an angel Appearing thou dost light impart. Abia atingi covorul moale, Mătasa sună sub picior, Şi de la creştet pân-în poale Pluteşti ca visul de uşor. Thou scarcely touchest the soft carpet, The silk on thee doth rustling stream, From top to toe so light and lofty, Thou floatest like an airy dream. Din încreţirea lungii rochii Răsai ca marmura în loc – S-atârnă sufletu-mi de ochii Cei plini de lacrimi şi noroc. From draping folds like purest marble Thine image unto me appears, My whole soul on thine eyes is hanging, Those eyes so full of joy and tears. O, vis ferice de iubire, Mireasă blândă din poveşti, O happy dream of love, so happy, Thou bride of fairy tales, so mild, 324 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Nu mai zâmbi! A ta zâmbire Mi-arată cât de dulce eşti, No, do not smile! Thy smille doth show me How sweet thou art, thou gentle child. Cât poţi cu-a farmecului noapte Să-ntuneci ochii mei pe veci, Cu-a gurii tale calde şoapte, Cu-mbrăţişări de braţe reci. My poor eyes thou canst close for ever With deepest night‘s eternal charms, With thy sweet lips‘ sweet fondling, whispers, Embracing me with thy cool arms. Deodată trece-o cugetare, Un văl pe ochii tăi fierbinţi: E-ntunecoasa renunţare, E umbra dulcilor dorinţi. A veiling thought at once now passes Thy glowing eyes thus covering: It is the dark renunciation, The sweetest yearning‘s shadowing. Te duci, ş-am înţeles prea bine Să nu mă ţin de pasul tău, Pierdută vecinic pentru mine, Mireasa sufletului meu! Thou go‘st away and, well I know it, To follow thee must I no more, Thou art for me now lost for ever, My soul‘s dear bride, whom I adore. Că te-am zărit e a mea vină Şi vecinic n-o să mi-o mai iert, Spăşi-voi visul de lumină Tinzându-mi dreapta în deşert. My only guilt was that I saw thee, Which I to pardon have no might, Mine arm I‘ll stretch for ever vainly To expiate my dream of light. Ş-o să-mi răsai ca o icoană A pururi verginei Marii, Pe fruntea ta purtând coroană – Unde te duci? Când o să vii? Like holy Virgin‘s purest image In my fond eyes thou will rise now, The brightest crown on forehead bearing, Where dost thou go? When comest thou? Traducere de P. Grimm. 325 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1881a. Oscar WILDE. Impressions de Voyage. Tartler. 15 lines. Author: Oscar WILDE (1854-1900). Text: Impressions de Voyage. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: What is Oscar Wilde most famous for? (100 words) Impression De Voyage. Impression de voyage. The sea was sapphire colored, and the sky Burned like a heated opal through the air, We hoisted sail; the wind was blowing fair For the blue lands that to the eastward lie. From the steep prow I marked with quickening eye Zakynthos, every olive grove and creek, Ithaca‘s cliff, Lycaon‘s snowy peak, And all the flower-strewn hills of Arcady. The flapping of the sail against the mast, The ripple of the water on the side, The ripple of girls‘ laughter at the stern, The only sounds:- when gan the West to burn, And a red sun upon the seas to ride, I stood upon the soil of Greece at last! O mare ca safirul, ceru-arzând Văzduhu-ncins opal rostogolit, Prin pânzele întinse vântul blând Bătea spre-albastru ţărm din răsărit. Şi de la provă mai grăbitul ochi reţine Zakynthos, cu măslini care-ar urca-o Stânca Ithacei, neaua pe Lycaon, Culmile-Arcadiei de floare pline. Al pânzei fluturat, bătând catarg, Şi apa clipocindu-i navei dusul, Şi chicotitul fetelor, prin larg Nu-s alte sunete: şi când Apusul Călări trecu pe-un soare roş mări line, Eu m-am aflat în Grecia, în fine! Katakolo Katakalo Traducere G. Tartler. 326 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1881b. HOPKINS. Inversnaid. Dima. 16 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: Inversnaid. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: Inversnaid. Inversnaid. This darksome burn, horseback brown, His rollrock highroad roaring down, In coop and in comb the fleece of his foam Flutes and low to the lake falls home. Pârâu-acesta mohorât, murg fără şa, rostogolit cu muget peste pietre, nărăvaşa lui împletitură de capricioase rotocoale, taie făgaşe-n deal şi cade-n lac, la poale. A windpuff-bonnet of fawn-froth Turns and twindles over the broth Of a pool so pitchblack, fell-frowning, It rounds and rounds Despair to drowning. Scufa de abur şi vânt înăbuşit a spumei roşcate se răsuceşte-n dans deasupra unei vâltori în clocot, smolită şi-ncruntată, căci disperării dându-i ocol, tot piere înecată. Degged with dew, dappled with dew, Are the groins of the braes that the brook treads through, Wiry heathpacks, flitches of fern, And the beadbonny ash that sits over the burn. Ciorchini nenumăraţi de rouă, cât vezi cu ochii: pe râpi boltite, sub care unde repezi curg, pe ferigi, pe ale ierbii negre, aspre fire, pe sure mărgeluşe, voioase în plutire. What would the world be, once bereft Of wet and wildness? Let them be left, Ce-ar fi cu lumea asta, de i-am răpi 327 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry O let them be left, wildness and wet; Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet. sălbăticia reavănă? Lăsaţi intacte, vii, lăsaţi în pace pustietăţile cu-afunde seve, etern să dăinuie imperiul ierbii şi-al tăcutei selve. Traducere S.G. Dima. 328 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1883a. EMINESCU. Glossă. Bantaş # Popescu # Săhlean. 80 lines. Author: Mihai EMINESCU (1850-1889). Text: Glossă. Translator: A. Bantaş # C.M. Popescu # A.G. Săhlean. FrageStellung: Describe the formal pattern of the Gloss. Find out its origins. (100 words) Glossă. The Gloss. Vreme trece, vreme vine, Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate; Ce e rău şi ce e bine Tu te-ntreabă şi socoate; Nu spera şi nu ai teamă, Ce e val ca valul trece; De ce-nseamnă, de te cheamă, Tu rămâi la toate rece. Time will come and time will fly, All is old, but new in kind; What is right and what is wry You should ponder in your mind; Don‘t be Hope‘s or Terror‘s thrall; Wave-like things like waves shall pass; Should they urge or should they call, Keep as cool as ice or glass. Multe trec pe dinainte, În auz ne sună multe, Cine ţine toate minte Şi ar sta să le asculte?... Tu aşază-le deoparte, Bazându-te pe tine, Când cu zgomote deşarte Vreme trece, vreme vine. Many sounds our ears will touch, Much – before our eyes – will glisten; Who can bear in mind so much And to all is fain to listen? Finding your own self anew You should loftily staijd by, Even though with vain ado Time will come and time will fly. 329 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Nici încline a ei limbă Recea cumpănă-a gândirii Înspre clipa ce se schimbă Purtând masca fericirii, Ce din moartea ei se naşte Şi o clipă ţine poate; Pentru cine o cunoaşte Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate. Nor should reason‘s icy scales Bend their needle, out of measure, To‘ards the moment with swift sails Fleetingly disguised as pleasure, Which is born out of its knell, – Just for moments, you may find; To whoever knows it well, All is old, but new in kind. Privitor ca la teatru Tu în lume să te-nchipui: Joace unul şi pe patru, Totuşi tu ghici-vei chipu-i, Şi de plânge, de se ceartă, Tu în colţ petreci în tine Şi-nţelegi din a lor artă Ce e rău şi ce e bine. In the world‘s dramatic show, Deem yourself a looker-on: Should some men feign joy or woe, Their true face you‘ll read anon; hould they weep or insults dart – Inwardly rejoicing, lie, Sifting out from all their art What is right and what is wry. Viitorul şi trecutul Sunt a filei două fete, Vede-n capăt începutul Cine ştie să le-nveţe; Tot ce-a fost ori o să fie În prezent le-avem pe toate, Dar de-a lor zădărnicie Te întreabă şi socoate. Both the future and the past Are but sides of that same page: In beginnings, ends are cast For whoever can be sage: All that was or e‘er will be In the present we can find; But as to its vanity, You should ponder in your mind. Căci aceloraşi mijloace Se supun câte există, Şi de mii de ani încoace For no matter what appears By the same means will be swirled. And for many thousand years, 330 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Lumea-i veselă şi tristă; Alte măşti, aceeaşi piesă, Alte guri, aceeaşi gamă, Amăgit atât de-adese Nu spera şi nu ai teamă. Mirth and grief have ruled the world; Other masks – the play‘s the same; Other lips – the same tune all; Duped too often, you keep game; Don t be Hope‘s or Terror i thrall. Nu spera când vezi mişeii La izbândă făcând punte, Te-or întrece nătărăii, De ai fi cu stea în frunte; Teamă n-ai, câtă-vor iarăşi Între dânşii să se plece, Nu te prinde lor tovarăş: Ce e val, ca valul trece. Have no hope if rogues you see Soft-tongued when victorious; Fools may top your apogee – Though you be most glorious; Never fear, they‘ll try again One another to outclass; Hurry not to join them then; Wave-like things like waves shall pass. Cu un cântec de sirenă, Lumea-ntinde lucii mreje; Ca să schimbe-actorii-n scenă, Te momeşte în vârteje; Tu pe-alături te strecoară, Nu băga nici chiar de seamă, Din cărarea ta afară De te-ndeamnă, de te cheamă. Siren songs – meant to encage – Are the nets the world unfurls; Just to change the cast on stage It will lure you in whirls; From temptations stay away; You should never heed at all Those who‘d lead your ship astray Should they urge or should they call. De te-ating, să feri în laturi, De hulesc, să taci din gură; Ce mai vrei cu-a tale sfaturi, Dacă ştii a lor măsură; Zică toţi ce vor să zică, Treacă-n lume cine-o trece; Give their touch a wide, wide berth; Hold your tongue if they blaspheme; Since you know what they are worth, What could your advice redeem? Let all say whatever they like: Never mind whom they surpass; 331 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ca să nu-ndrăgeşti nimica, Tu rămâi la toate rece. Lest you should endear some tyke, Keep as cool as ice or glass. Tu rămâi la toate rece, De te-ndeamna, de te cheamă: Ce e val, ca valul trece, Nu spera şi nu ai teamă; Te întreabă şi socoate Ce e rău şi ce e bine; Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate: Vreme trece, vreme vine. Keep as cool as ice or glass, Should they urge or should they call; Wave-like things like waves shall pass, Don‘t be Hope s or Terror‘s thrall; You should ponder in your mind What is right and what is wry, All is old, but new in kind; Time will come and time will fly. Traducere A. Bantaş. 332 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Glossă. Gloss. Vreme trece, vreme vine, Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate; Ce e rău şi ce e bine Tu te-ntreabă şi socoate; Nu spera şi nu ai teamă, Ce e val ca valul trece; De ce-nseamnă, de te cheamă, Tu rămâi la toate rece. Days go past and days come still, All is old and ail is new, What is well and what is ill, You imagine and construe; Do not hope and do not fear, Waves that leap like waves must fall; Should they praise or should they jeer, Look but coldly on it all. Multe trec pe dinainte, În auz ne sună multe, Cine ţine toate minte Şi ar sta să le asculte?... Tu aşază-le deoparte, Bazându-te pe tine, Când cu zgomote deşarte Vreme trece, vreme vine. Things you‘ll meet of many a kind, Sights and sounds, and tales no end, But to keep them all in mind Who would bother to attend?... Very little does it matter, If you can yourself fulfil, That with idle, empty chatter Days go past and days come still. Nici încline a ei limbă Recea cumpănă-a gândirii Înspre clipa ce se schimbă Purtând masca fericirii, Ce din moartea ei se naşte Şi o clipă ţine poate; Pentru cine o cunoaşte Little heed the lofty ranging That cold logic does display To explain the endless changing Of this pageantry of joy, And which out of death is growing But to last an hour or two; For the mind profoundly knowing 333 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate. Ail is old and all is new. Privitor ca la teatru Tu în lume să te-nchipui: Joace unul şi pe patru, Totuşi tu ghici-vei chipu-i, Şi de plânge, de se ceartă, Tu în colţ petreci în tine Şi-nţelegi din a lor artă Ce e rău şi ce e bine. As before some troup of actors, You before the world remain; Act they Gods, or malefactors, Tis but they dressed up again. And their loving and their slaying, Sit apart and watch, until You will see behind their playing What is well and what is ill. Viitorul şi trecutul Sunt a filei două fete, Vede-n capăt începutul Cine ştie să le-nveţe; Tot ce-a fost ori o să fie În prezent le-avem pe toate, Dar de-a lor zădărnicie Te întreabă şi socoate. What has been and what to be Are but of a page each part Which the world to read is free. Yet who knows them off by heart? All that was and is to come Prospers in the present too, But its narrow modicum You imagine and construe. Căci aceloraşi mijloace Se supun câte există, Şi de mii de ani încoace Lumea-i veselă şi tristă; Alte măşti, aceeaşi piesă, Alte guri, aceeaşi gamă, Amăgit atât de-adese Nu spera şi nu ai teamă. With the selfsame scales and gauges This great universe to weigh, Man has been for thousand ages Sometimes sad and sometimes gay; Other masks, the same old story, Players pass and reappear, Broken promises of glory; Do not hope and do not fear. Nu spera când vezi mişeii Do not hope when greed is staring 334 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry La izbândă făcând punte, Te-or întrece nătărăii, De ai fi cu stea în frunte; Teamă n-ai, câtă-vor iarăşi Între dânşii să se plece, Nu te prinde lor tovarăş: Ce e val, ca valul trece. O‘er the bridge that luck has flung, These are fools for not despairing, On their brows though stars are hung; Do not fear if one or other Does his comrades deep enthrall, Do not let him call you brother, Waves that leap like waves must fall. Cu un cântec de sirenă, Lumea-ntinde lucii mreje; Ca să schimbe-actorii-n scenă, Te momeşte în vârteje; Tu pe-alături te strecoară, Nu băga nici chiar de seamă, Din cărarea ta afară De te-ndeamnă, de te cheamă. Like the sirens‘ silver singing Men spread nets to catch their prey, Up and down the curtain swinging Midst a whirlwind of display. Leave them room without resistance, Nor their commentaries cheer, Hearing only from a distance, Should they praise or should they jeer. De te-ating, să feri în laturi, De hulesc, să taci din gură; Ce mai vrei cu-a tale sfaturi, Dacă ştii a lor măsură; Zică toţi ce vor să zică, Treacă-n lume cine-o trece; Ca să nu-ndrăgeşti nimica, Tu rămâi la toate rece. If they touch you, do not tarry, Should they curse you, hold your tongue, All your counsel must miscarry Knowing who you are among. Let them muse and let them mingle, Let them pass both great and small; Unattached and calm and single, Look but coldly on it all. Tu rămâi la toate rece, De te-ndeamna, de te cheamă: Ce e val, ca valul trece, Nu spera şi nu ai teamă; Look but coldly on it all, Should they praise or should they jeer; Waves that leap like waves must fall, Do not hope and do not fear. 335 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Te întreabă şi socoate Ce e rău şi ce e bine; Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate: Vreme trece, vreme vine. You imagine and construe What is well and what is ill; All is old and all is new, Days go past and days come still. Traducere de C. M. Popescu. 336 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Glossă. Glossa. Vreme trece, vreme vine, Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate; Ce e rău şi ce e bine Tu te-ntreabă şi socoate; Nu spera şi nu ai teamă, Ce e val ca valul trece; De ce-nseamnă, de te cheamă, Tu rămâi la toate rece. Time goes by, time comes along, All is old and all is new; What is right and what is wrong, You must think and ask of you; Have no hope and have no fear, Waves that rise can never hold; If they urge or if they cheer, You remain aloof and cold. Multe trec pe dinainte, În auz ne sună multe, Cine ţine toate minte Şi ar sta să le asculte?... Tu aşază-le deoparte, Bazându-te pe tine, Când cu zgomote deşarte Vreme trece, vreme vine. To our sight a lot will glisten, Many sounds will reach our ear; Who could take the time to listen And remember all we hear? Keep aside from all that patter, Seek yourself, far from the throng When with loud and idle clatter Time goes by, time comes along. Nici încline a ei limbă Recea cumpănă-a gândirii Înspre clipa ce se schimbă Purtând masca fericirii, Ce din moartea ei se naşte Şi o clipă ţine poate; Pentru cine o cunoaşte Nor forget the tongue of reason Or its even scales depress When the moment, changing season, Wears the mask of happiness It is born of reason‘s slumber And may last a wink as true: For the one who knows its number 337 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate. All is old and all is new. Privitor ca la teatru Tu în lume să te-nchipui: Joace unul şi pe patru, Totuşi tu ghici-vei chipu-i, Şi de plânge, de se ceartă, Tu în colţ petreci în tine Şi-nţelegi din a lor artă Ce e rău şi ce e bine. Be as to a play, spectator, As the world unfolds before: You will know the heart of matter Should they act two parts or four; When they cry or tear asunder From your seat enjoy along And you‘ll learn from art to wonder What is right and what is wrong. Viitorul şi trecutul Sunt a filei două fete, Vede-n capăt începutul Cine ştie să le-nveţe; Tot ce-a fost ori o să fie În prezent le-avem pe toate, Dar de-a lor zădărnicie Te întreabă şi socoate. Past and future, ever blending, Are the twin sides of same page: New start will begin with ending When you know to learn from age; All that was or be tomorrow We have in the present, too; But what‘s vain and futile sorrow You must think and ask of you; Căci aceloraşi mijloace Se supun câte există, Şi de mii de ani încoace Lumea-i veselă şi tristă; Alte măşti, aceeaşi piesă, Alte guri, aceeaşi gamă, Amăgit atât de-adese Nu spera şi nu ai teamă. For the living cannot sever From the means we‘ve always had: Now, as years ago, and ever, Men are happy or are sad: Other masks, same play repeated; Diff‘rent tongues, same words to hear; Of your dreams so often cheated, Have no hope and have no fear. Nu spera când vezi mişeii Hope not when the villains cluster 338 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry La izbândă făcând punte, Te-or întrece nătărăii, De ai fi cu stea în frunte; Teamă n-ai, câtă-vor iarăşi Între dânşii să se plece, Nu te prinde lor tovarăş: Ce e val, ca valul trece. By success and glory drawn: Fools with perfect lack of luster Will outshine Hyperion! Fear it not, they‘ll push each other To reach higher in the fold, Do not side with them as brother, Waves that rise can never hold. Cu un cântec de sirenă, Lumea-ntinde lucii mreje; Ca să schimbe-actorii-n scenă, Te momeşte în vârteje; Tu pe-alături te strecoară, Nu băga nici chiar de seamă, Din cărarea ta afară De te-ndeamnă, de te cheamă. Sounds of siren songs call steady Toward golden nets, astray; Life attracts you into eddies To change actors in the play; Steal aside from crowd and bustle, Do not look, seem not to hear From your path, away from hustle, If they urge or if they cheer; De te-ating, să feri în laturi, De hulesc, să taci din gură; Ce mai vrei cu-a tale sfaturi, Dacă ştii a lor măsură; Zică toţi ce vor să zică, Treacă-n lume cine-o trece; Ca să nu-ndrăgeşti nimica, Tu rămâi la toate rece. If they reach for you, go faster, Hold your tongue when slanders yell; Your advice they cannot master, Don‘t you know their measure well? Let them talk and let them chatter, Let all go past, young and old; Unattached to man or matter, You remain aloof and cold. Tu rămâi la toate rece, De te-ndeamna, de te cheamă: Ce e val, ca valul trece, Nu spera şi nu ai teamă; You remain aloof and cold If they urge or if they cheer; Waves that rise can never hold, Have no hope and have no fear; 339 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Te întreabă şi socoate Ce e rău şi ce e bine; Toate-s vechi şi nouă toate: Vreme trece, vreme vine. You must think and ask of you What is right and what is wrong; All is old and all is new, Time goes by, time comes along. Traducere A.G. Săhlean. 340 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1883b. EMINESCU. Odă (în metru antic). Bantaş. 20 lines. Author: Mihai EMINESCU (1850-1889). Text: Odă (în metru antic). Translator: A. Bantaş. FrageStellung: Could you write an Ode today? If you could, try and write one... Odă (în metru antic). Ode (in ancient metre). Nu credeam să-nvăţ a muri vrodată; Pururi tânăr, înfăşurat în manta-mi, Ochii mei nălţam visători la steaua Singurătăţii. Hardly had I thought I should learn to perish; Ever young, enwrapped in my robe I wandered, Raising dreamy eyes to the star styled often Solitude‘s symbol. Când deodată tu răsărişi în cale-mi, Suferinţă tu, dureros de dulce... Pân-în fund băui voluptatea morţii Ne‘ndurătoare. All at once, however, you crossed my pathway Suffering - you, painfully sweet, yet torture... To the lees I drank the delight of dying Pitiless torment. Jalnic ard de viu chinuit ca Nessus. Ori ca Hercul înveninat de haina-i; Focul meu a-l stinge nu pot cu toate Apele mării. Sadly racked, I‘m burning alive like Nessus, Or like Hercules by his garment poisoned; Nor can I extinguish my flames with every Billow of oceans. De-al meu propriu vis, mistuit mă vaiet, By my own illusion consumed I‘m wailing 341 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Pe-al meu propriu rug, mă topesc în flăcări... Pot să mai re‘nviu luminos din el ca Pasărea Phoenix? On my own grim pyre in flames I‘m melting... Can I hope to rise again like the Phoenix Bird from the ashes? Piară-mi ochii turburători din cale, Vino iar în sân, nepăsare tristă; Ca să pot muri liniştit, pe mine Mie redă-mă! May all tempting eyes vanish from my pathway Come back to my breast, you indifferent sorrow! So that I may quietly die, restore me To my own being! Traducere A. Bantaş. 342 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1884a. EMINESCU. Cu mâine zilele-ţi adaogi. Leviţchi. 32 lines. Author: Mihai EMINESCU (1850-1889). Text: Cu mâine zilele-ţi adaogi... Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Do you see the philosophical depth behind this poem? Was Eminescu a philosopher fir st, and a poet afterwards? (150 words) Cu mâine zilele-ţi adaogi... Your Days Increase With Each Tomorrow... Cu mâine zilele-ţi adaogi, Cu ieri viaţa ta o scazi Şi ai cu toate astea-n faţă De-a pururi ziua cea de azi. Your days increase with each tomorrow, With yesterday your life grows less, In front of you there lies, however, The present day with its distress. Când unul trece, altul vine În astă lume a-l urma, Precum când soarele apune El şi răsare undeva. Whenever one man falls, another Comes up, continuing the race Just as the sun goes down, yet only To rise above some other place. Se pare cum că alte valuri Cobor mereu pe-acelaşi vad, Se pare cum că-i altă toamnă, Ci-n veci aceleaşi frunze cad. It merely seems that other wavelets Flow down the stream by the same bed, It seems it is another autumn, Although the selfsame leaves fall dead. Naintea nopţii noastre umblă Crăiasa dulcii dimineţi; Chiar moartea însăşi e-o părere The empress of the gorgeous morning Walks steadly before our night; And Death himself is an illusion, 343 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi un vistiernic de vieţi. A treasurer of life and light. Din orice clipă trecătoare Ăst adevăr îl înţeleg, Că sprijină vecia-ntreagă Şi-nvârte universu-ntreg. For every transitory moment This truth I learn and will rehearse; One moment props eternal being And rolls the mighty universe. De-aceea zboare anu-acesta Şi se cufunde în trecut, Tu ai ş-acum comoara-ntreagă Ce-n suflet pururi ai avut. Let, then, the present year evanish, Let it be buried in the past; For even now you own the treasure Which in your soul you held so fast. Cu mâine zilele-ţi adaogi, Cu ieri viaţa ta o scazi, Având cu toate astea-n faţă De-a purure ziua de azi. Your days increase with each tomorrow, With yesterday your life grows less, In front of you there lies, however, The present day with its distress. Priveliştile sclipitoare, Ce-n repezi şiruri se diştern, Repaosă nestrămutate Sub raza gândului etern. The splendid sights, the charming landscapes In quick succession fly away, Yet ever they repose unchanging Under the thought‘s eternal ray. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 344 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1884b. EMINESCU. Din valurile vremii. Bantaş. 20 lines. Author: Mihai EMINESCU (1850-1889). Text: Din valurile vremii... Translator: A. Bantaş. FrageStellung: What, in your opinion, has happened to the famous Eminescu Manuscripts (the so-call ed Caietele Eminescu)? (120 words) Din valurile vremii... Out Of The Waves Of Time... Din valurile vremii, iubita mea, răsai Cu braţele de marmur, cu părul lung, bălai Şi faţa străvezie ca faţa albei ceri Slăbită e de umbra duioaselor dureri! Cu zâmbetul tău dulce tu mângâi ochii mei, Femeie între stele şi stea între femei Şi întorcându-ţi faţa spre umărul tău stâng, În ochii fericirii mă uit pierdut şi plâng. My darling, now you‘re rising, out of the waves of time With long and golden tresses, with marble arms sublime Your face is so transparent, as pale as wax or snow And weakened by the shadow of paintful, grievous woe! So gently, sweetly smiling - a balm for eyes you are: Amidst the stars a woman, mong women quite a star. And turning your face gently towards your fine-shaped shoulder I lose myself in joy‘s eyes - and yet in tears I smoulder. Cum oare din noianul de neguri să te rump, Să te ridic la pieptu-mi, iubite înger scump, Şi faţa mea în lacrimi pe faţa ta s-o plec, Cu sărutări aprinse suflarea să ţi-o-nec Şi mâna friguroasă s-o încălzesc la sân, Aproape, mai aproape pe inima-mi s-o ţin. Is there a chance to wrest you out of your misty ocean? To lift you to my bosom, dear angel of devotion, And then my tearful visage to bend upon your own, Then try with burning kisses your loving breath to drown, Your hand, so often chilly, to warm against my chest, To hold it close, nay, closer, upon my heart tight pressed. Dar vai, un chip aievea nu eşti, astfel de treci Şi umbra ta se pierde în negurile reci, Alas, you are not real, if you can pass like this And lose your very shadow in some cold, dark abyss, 345 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry De mă găsesc iar singur cu braţele în jos În trista amintire a visului frumos... Zadarnic după umbra ta dulce le întind: Din valurile vremii nu pot să te cuprind. To leave myself downhearted, once more bereft and lonely, To live the dream of rapture in sad remembrance only... To reach your gentle shadow I stretch my arms in vain: Out of the waves of time, now, I can‘t raise you again. Traducere A. Bantaş. 346 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1885?. HOPKINS. I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Not Day. Dima. 14 lines. Author: Gerard Manley HOPKINS (1844-1889). Text: I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Not Day. Translator: S.G. Dima. FrageStellung: Alliteration and assonance often become manneristic with Hopkins. Should the Romani an translation follow them faithfully? Can it? I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Not Day. Abia trezit, simt cum se face întuneric. I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours, O what black hours we have spent This night! what sights you, heart, saw; ways you went! And more must, in yet longer light's delay. Abia trezit, simt cum se face întuneric, iar nu zi: Ce ore de coşmar, ce lung răstimp de beznă mi-au devorat, ah, noaptea! Ce scene-atroce-ai contemplat tu, inimă a mea; prin ce hârtoape ai trecut. Şi cum te-aşteaptă încă: un stăvilar pus de lumina fără milă ce se-amână. Cu martor vorbesc. Dar când spun ceasuri, ani înţeleg – o viaţă. Iar tânguirea mi se desface-n noian de strigăte, precum, răpusă, marea scrisorilor ce, până la iubit, e-oprită de-un imobil hotar. With witness I speak this. But where I say Hours I mean years, mean life. And my lament Is cries countless, cries like dead letters sent To dearest him that lives alas! away. I am gall, I am heartburn. God's most deep decree Bitter would have me taste: my taste was me; Bones built in me, flesh filled, blood brimmed the curse. Sunt numai fiere, înveninare pură. Cea mai adâncă lege a Domnului aşa a vrut: s-o gust amară. Iar gustu-acela, se-nţelege, eram chiar eu. Mi s-a-nzidit în trup, mi-a năpădit şi carnea, din sânge, hău, 347 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Selfyeast of spirit a dull dough sours. I see The lost are like this, and their scourge to be As I am mine, their sweating selves, but worse. mi se revarsă, osânda. A spiritului drojdie creşte un sumbru aluat ce nu se drege şi văd că numai cei pierduţi mi se aseamănă-n flagelul-rege: de-a fi cum îmi sunt mie însumi, suflete-asudânde; însă mai rău. Traducere S.G. Dima. 348 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1885. EMINESCU. Sara pe deal. Grimm. 24 lines. Author: Mihai EMINESCU (1850-1889). Text: Sara pe deal. Translator: P. Grimm. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Translate into English the missing stanza... Sara pe deal. Eve on the Hill. Sara pe deal buciumul sună cu jale, Turmele-l urc, stele le scapără-n cale, Apele plâng, clar izvorând în fântâne; Sub un salcâm, dragă, m-aştepţi tu pe mine. Dreary the horn sounds in the eve on the hill, Sheepflocks return, stars on their way twinkle still, Watersprings weep murmuring clear, and I see Under a tree, love, thou art waiting for me. Luna pe cer trece-aşa sfântă şi clară, Ochii tăi mari caută-n frunza cea rară, Stelele nasc umezi pe bolta senină, Pieptul de dor, fruntea de gânduri ţi-e plină. Holy and pure passes the moon on the sky, Moist seem the stars born from the vault clear and high, Longing thine eyes look from afar to divine, Heaving thy breast, pensive thy head doth recline. Nourii curg, raze-a lor şiruri despică, Streşine vechi casele-n lună ridică, Scârţâie-n vânt cumpăna de la fântână, Valea-i în fum, fluiere murmură-n stână. ............................... Şi osteniţi oameni cu coasa-n spinare Vin de la câmp; toaca răsună mai tare, Clopotul vechi umple cu glasul lui sara, Tired with their toil, peasants come back from the field, From the old church, labourer‘s comfort and shield, Voices of bells thrill the whole sky high above; 349 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sufletul meu arde-n iubire ca para. Struck is my heart, trembling and burning with love. Ah! în curând satul în vale-amuţeşte; Ah! în curând pasu-mi spre tine grăbeşte: Lângă salcâm sta-vom noi noaptea întreagă, Ore întregi spune-ţi-voi cât îmi eşti dragă. Ah! very soon quietness steals over all, Ah! very soon hasten shall I to thy call, Under the tree, there I shall sit the whole night, Telling thee, love, thou art my only delight. Ne-om răzima capetele-unul de altul Şi surâzând vom adormi sub înaltul, Vechiul salcâm. – Astfel de noapte bogată, Cine pe ea n-ar da viaţa lui toată? Cheek press‘d to cheek, there in sweet ecstasy we, Falling asleep under the old locust-tree, Smiling in dream, seem in a heaven to live, For such a night who his whole life would not give? Traducere P. Grimm. 350 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1889. YEATS. To an Isle in the Water. Pillat. 16 lines. Author: William Butler YEATS (1865-1939). Text: To an Isle in the Water. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: Put together a biographical outline of the poet. Would you call him an internationa l poet? (200 words) To an isle in the water. Sfioasa. Shy one, shy one, Shy one of my heart, She moves in the firelight Pensively apart. Sfioasă, sfioasă, Sfioasă dorului meu, Se mişcă la para focului Cu gândul departe. She carries in the dishes, And lays them in a row. To an isle in the water With her would I go. Aduce taleree Şi le aşează la rând – Într-un ostrov pe ape Cu ea o să merg, She carries in the candles, And lights the curtained room, Shy in the doorway And shy in the gloom; Aduce lumânările Şi luminează odaia cu perdele lungi, Sfioasă pe pragul uşii Sfioasă în întuneric. And shy as a rabbit, Sfioasă ca un iepure de casă, 351 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Helpful and shy. To an isle in the water With her would I fly. Gata de ajutor şi sfioasă – Într-un ostrov de ape, Cu ea o să merg. Traducere I. Pillat. 352 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1891. COŞBUC. Trei, Doamne, şi toţi trei. Leviţchi. 80 lines. Author: George COŞBUC (1866-1918). Text: Trei,Doamne, şi toţi trei. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Should Coşbuc be better known abroad? Is there a touch of provincialism attached to him (which should not be there)? (120w) Trei, Doamne, şi toţi trei. Three, Mighty God, All Three. Avea şi dânsul trei feciori, Şi i-au plecat toţi trei deodată La tabără, sărmanul tată! Ce griji pe dânsul, ce fiori, Când se gândea că-i greu războiul, N-ai timp să simţi că mori. He had three sons and they, all three, When called, for the encampment left; So the poor father was bereft Of rest and peace, for war, thought he. Is hard – one has no time to feel That one has ceased to be. Şi luni trecut-au după luni – Şi-a fost de veste lumea plină, Că steagul turcului se-nchină; Şi mândrii codrului păuni, Românii, -au isprăvit războiul, Că s-au bătut nebuni. And many months went in and out, And rife with tidings was the world: No more were Turkish flags unfurled, The Moslems has been put to rout, For the unscared Romanians lads Full well had thought throughout. Scria-n gazetă că s-a dat Poruncă să se-ntoarcă-n ţară Toţi cei plecaţi de astă-vară – Şi rând pe rând veneau în sat The papers wrote that all the men That had been called the spring before Were due to quit the site of war; So to the village came again 353 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi ieri, şi astăzi câte unul Din cei care-au plecat. Now one, and now another yet Of those who had left then. Şi-ai lui întârziau! Plângând De drag că are să-i revadă, Sta ziua-n prag, ieşea pe stradă Cu ochii zarea măsurând, Şi nu veneau! Şi dintr-o vreme Gemea, bătut d-un gând. But they were long in coming, they. He wept – he thought how they would meet, So at the gate or in the street He scrutinized the roads all day, And they came not. And fear was born And lengthened the delay. Nădejdea caldă-n el slăbea, Pe cât creştea de rece gândul, El a-ntrebat pe toţi d-a rândul, Dar nimeni ştire nu-i ştia. El pleacă-n urmă la cazarmă Să afle ce dorea. His ardent hope waned more and more And ever bleaker grew his fear; And though he questioned far and near, All shrugged their shoulders as before; At last, then, he went to the barracks To learn what was in store. Căprarul vechi îi iese-n prag. – „Ce-mi face Radu? el întreabă, De Radu-i este mai cu grabă Că Radu-i este cel mai drag. – „E mort! El a căzut la Plevna În cel dintâi şirag! The corporal met him. Sir, my son, My Radu, well – how does he fare? He did for all his children care, But Radu was the dearest one. He‘s dead. In the first ranks, at Plevna He fell. And well he‘s done! O, bietul om! De mult simţea Că Radu-i dus de pe-astă lume, Dar astăzi, când ştia anume, El sta năuc şi nu credea. Să-i moară Radu! Acest lucru El nu-l înţelegea. Poor man... That Radu was in dust He had long felt, and felt past cure; But now, when he did know for sure, He stood bewildered and nonplussed. Dead Radu? What? The news exceeded All human sense and trust. 354 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Blăstem pe tine, braţ duşman! – „Dar George-al nostru cum o duce? – „Sub glie, taică, şi sub cruce, Lovit în piept d-un iatagan! – „Dar bietul Mircea?– „Mort şi Mircea Prin văi pe la Smârdan. Be curst, o, fiendish arm and man! And how is George? Sir, I‘m afraid Under a cross he has been laid, Breast-smitten by a yataghan. And my poor Mircea? Mircea, too, Died somewhere near Smârdan. El n-a mai zis niciun cuvânt; Cu fruntea-n piept, ca o statuie, Ca un Cristos bătut în cuie, Ţinea privirile-n pământ, Părea că vede dinainte-i Trei morţi într-un mormânt. He said no word – dumb with the doom, With forehead bent, like, on the cross, A Christ, he looked, all at a loss At the mute flooring of the room. He seemed he saw in front of him Three corpses in a tomb. Cu pasul slab, cu ochii beţi El a plecat, gemând p-afară, Şi-mpleticindu-se pe scară, Chema pe nume pe băieţi, Şi se proptea de slab, sărmanul, Cu mâna de păreţi. With a feeble gall and dizzy eyes He walks into the open air; While groaning, stumbling on the stair, He calls his boys by name and cries And fumbling for some wall around To stand upright he tries. Nu se simţea de-i mort ori treaz, N-avea puteri să se simţească; El trebuia să s-odihnească – Pe-o piatră-n drum sub un zăplaz S-a pus, înmormântând în palme-i Slăbitul său obraz. The blow he hardly can withstand; He does not know if he is dead Or still alive; he rests his head Upon a bank of burning sand; His long, emaciated face He buries in his hand. Şi-a stat aşa, pierdut şi dus. And so the man sat woe-begone. 355 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Era-n amiazi şi-n miez de vară Şi soarele-a scăzut spre seară, Şi-n urmă soarele-a apus. Iar bietul om sta tot acolo Ca mort, precum s-a pus. It was midsummer and mid-day; Yet soon the sun faded away And lastly it was set and gone; The human wreck would never budge; He just stood on and on. Treceau bărbaţi, treceau femei. Şi uruiau trăsuri pe stradă, Soldaţi treceau făcând paradă, – Şi-atunci, deştept, privi la ei Şi-şi duse pumnii strâns pe tâmple: „Trei, Doamne, şi toţi trei! Past him, men, women walked care-free, Cabs on the highroad rumbled by, Past marched the soldiers with steps high, And then, the moment he could see, He pressed his temples with his fists: Three, mighty God, all three! Traducere L. Leviţchi. 356 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1892. COŞBUC. Vestitorii primăverii. Leviţchi. 30 lines. Author: George COŞBUC (1866-1918). Text: Vestitorii primăverii. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Why does Coşbuc lie so far away from Eminescu? (100 words) Vestitorii primăverii. Spring Harbingers. Dintr-alte ţări, de soare pline Pe unde-aţi fost şi voi străine, Veniţi, dragi păsări, înapoi – Veniţi cu bine! De frunze şi de cântec goi, Plâng codrii cei lipsiţi de voi. From sunny countries and skies blue To which last autumn-tide you flew, Return, dear birds, where you belong, Most welcome, you! The wood, bereft of leaf and song, Weep for they have missed you too long. În zarea cea de veci albastră Nu v-a prins dragostea sihastră De ceea ce-aţi lăsat? Nu v-a fost dor De ţara voastră? N-aţi plâns văzând cum trece-n zbor Spre miazănoapte nor de nor? In the eternal dome of azure Did you not dream with longing pleasure Of what you left? Did you not sigh For dear Home‘s leisure? Or cry when seeing in the sky The clouds that northwardly did hie? Voi aţi cântat cu glas fierbinte Naturii calde imnuri sfinte, Ori doine dragi, când v-aţi adus De noi aminte! You sang to Nature paeans fraught With holiness, strangers you taught Our soulful doinas when, at times, Of us you thought. 357 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Străinilor voi nu le-aţi spus Că doine ca a noastre nu-s? But did you tell them that their rhymes Excel all those of other climes? Şi-acum veniţi cu drag în ţară! Voi revedeţi câmpia iară, Şi cuiburile voastre-n crâng! E vară, vară! Aş vrea la suflet să vă strâng, Să râd de fericit, să plâng! Now you come home – and you will see, Again, the wood, the field, the lea, Your nests in groves, so warm and deep; Tis summer, verily. I feel I have a mind to leap, To laugh for joy, for joy to weep! Cu voi vin florile-n câmpie Şi nopţile cu poezie, Şi vânturi line, calde ploi Şi veselie. Voi toate le luaţi cu voi Şi iar le-aduceţi înapoi! You come accompanied by flowers, By gentle winds and sun-warmed showers, And nights so rife with honey-dew, And cheerful hours. You thus take everything with you, And bring back everything anew. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 358 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1893. YEATS. When You Are Old. Pillat. 12 lines. Author: William Butler YEATS (1865-1939). Text: When You Are Old. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: By what means of transportation did Yeats go to collect his Nobel Prize? (50 words) When You Are Old. Când vei fi bătrână. When you are old and grey and full of sleep, And nodding by the fire, take down this book, And slowly read, and dream of the soft look Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep; Când vei fi bătrână, cu părul sur şi plin de somn, Când vei da din cap, moţăind lângă vatră, ia această cartea a mea Şi citeşte-o încet, şi visează la galeşa privire Pe care o avură ochii tăi odată şi la umbrele lor adânci; How many loved your moments of glad grace, And loved your beauty with love false or true, But one man loved the pilgrim Soul in you, And loved the sorrows of your changing face; La câţi au iubit clipele tale de veselă drăgălăşie Şi ţi-au iubit frumuseţea cu dor fals sau adevărat; Dar un singur om a iubit călătorul suflet din tine, Şi a iubit durerile din obrazul tău schimbat, And bending down beside the glowing bars, Murmur, a little sadly, how Love fled And paced upon the mountains overhead And hid his face amid a crowd of stars. Şi aplecat puţin printre gratiile înflăcărate, Şopteşte, cam trist, cum iubirea fuge mereu, Şi trecând peste munţii ce stau deasupra atingerii noastre, Îşi ascunde faţa în roiul de stele pribegi. Traducere I. Pillat. 359 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1893. COŞBUC. El-Zorab. Leviţchi. 155 lines. Author: George COŞBUC (1866-1918). Text: El-Zorab. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Do you find this poem profound? If not, why not? (100 words) El-Zorab. El-Zorab. La paşa vine un arab, Cu ochii stinşi, cu graiul slab. – „Sunt, paşă, neam de beduin, Şi de la Bab-el-Manteb vin Să-l vând pe El-Zorab. An Arab to pasha draws near, His eyesight dim and his voice sere. From Bedouins, pasha, I descend, From Bab-el-Mandeb – I intend To sell El-Zorab here. Arabii toţi răsar din cort, Să-mi vadă roibul, când îl port Şi-l joc în frâu şi-l las în trap! Mi-e drag ca ochii mei din cap Şi nu l-aş da nici mort. All Arabs leave their tents to see The way I walk my sorrel free, Or give him rein, or let him trot! I love him dearly and would not Give him, whate‘er may be! Dar trei copii de foame-mi mor! Uscat e cerul gurii lor; Şi de amar îndelungat, Nevestei mele i-a secat Al laptelui izvor! Of hunger my three children die! The palates of their mouths are dry, And with continual suffering A mother‘s blessed milky spring My wife has lost for aye! 360 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ai mei pierduţi sunt, paşă, toţi! O, mântuie-i, de vrei, că poţi! Dă-mi bani pe cal! Că sunt sărac! Dă-mi bani! Dacă-l găseşti pe plac, Dă-mi numai cât socoţi! My dear ones are too cruelly hit; O, save them, for you can do it! Gold for my horse! I am so poor! Gold! If you fancy him for sure, Give just as you think fit! El poartă calul, dând ocol, În trap grăbit, în pas domol, Şi ochii paşei mari s-aprind; Cărunta-i barbă netezind, Stă mut, de suflet gol. He walks the horse all around the place At hasty trot or easy pace; The pasha bulgy eyes burn bright, He strokes his grey beard with delight, Though dumb his soul and face. – „O mie de ţechini primeşti? – „O, paşă, cât de darnic eşti! Mai mult decât în visul meu! Să-ţi răsplătească Dumnezeu Aşa cum îmi plăteşti! A thousand sequins – you agree? How generous, pasha, you can be! More than I dreamt! May God the Lord Grant you the measure of reward By which you have paid me! Arabul ia, cu ochii plini De zâmbet, mia de ţechini – De-acum, de-acum ei sunt scăpaţi, De-acum vor fi şi ei bogaţi, N-or cere la străini! The Arab takes, with radiant eyes, The money that before him lies – Henceforth theirs is a happy lot, Henceforth they are rich and will not Ask alms in any wise. Nu vor trăi sub cort în fum, Nu-i vor cerşi copiii-n drum, Nevasta lui se va-ntrăma; Şi vor avea şi ei ce da Săracilor de-acum! – Nor live in the tent‘s smoke again, Their kinds won‘t beg on road or lane, He and his wife, restored, will give A friendly coin to those who live In poverty and pain! – 361 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry El strânge banii mai cu foc Şi pleacă, beat de mult noroc, Şi-aleargă dus d-un singur gând; Deodată însă, tremurând, Se-ntoarce, stă pe loc. Once more the sequins he does pluck, Then leaves, drunk with his piece of luck, And runs off as in duty bound, Yet of a sudden he turns round And stops like thunderstruck, Se uită lung la bani, şi pal Se clatină, ca dus de-un val Apoi la cal priveşte drept; Cu paşii rari, cu fruntea-n piept, S-apropie de cal. Stares at the money with spent force And staggers like a wave-tossed corpse, Then looks the sorrel in the eye; With measured steps and brow reared high He draws near his dear horse. Cuprinde gâtul lui plângând Şi-n aspra-i coamă îngropând Obrajii palizi: – „Pui de leu, Suspină trist. Odorul meu, Tu ştii că eu te vând! He weeps and does his neck enfold, And buries his face, pale and cold, Into his mane: My lion brave, You should sigh sadly. I‘m a knave – You know you have been sold! Copiii mei nu s-or juca Mai mult cu frunze-n coama ta, Nu te-or petrece la izvor; De-acum smochini, din mâna lor, Ei n-or avea cui da! My children will not play again With leaves and garlands in your mane. To springs they will not take you, and No more will feed they by the hand A horse with fig or grain! Ei nu vor mai ieşi cu drag Să-ntindă mâinile din prag, Să-i iau cu mine-n şea pe rând! Ei nu vor mai ieşi râzând În calea mea şirag! No more will peep they out with glee, Reach forth their hands and summon me To sit them on your back; no more Will Indian files come to the fore And laugh with laughter free! 362 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Copiii mei cum să-i îmbun? Nevestei mele ce să-i spun Când va-ntreba de El-Zorab! Va râde-ntregul neam arab De bietul Ben-Ardun! What, lie to children and not choke? And tell my wife what kind of joke When she asks of my friend, the best? Poor Ben-Ardun will be the jest Of all the Arab folk! Raira, tu, nevasta mea, Pe El-Zorab nu-l vei vedea De-acum, urmându-te la pas, Nici în genunchi la al tău glas El nu va mai cădea! Raira, my wife dear and true, Our horse you shall not see anew, He‘ll no more follow you behind, Not hear your voice so mild and kind And kneel in front of you! Pe-Ardun al tău, pe Ben-Ardun N-ai să-l mai vezi în zbor nebun Pe urma unui şoim uşor, Ca să-ţi împuşte şoimu-n zbor; Nu-i vei pofti: «Drum bun»! Your dear Ardun, your Ben-Ardun Shall no more weep like a simoon After a falcon flying fleet And shoot it; neither will you greet And tell us, See you soon! Nu vei zâmbi, cum saltă-n vânt Ardun al tău în alb vestmânt; Şi ca să simţi sosirea lui, Mai mult de-acum tu n-o să pui Urechea la pământ! You shall no more seen my burnoose In the soft breezes flutter loose, No more put to the ground your ear And making sure that we are near To cry at the good news. O, calul meu! Tu, fala mea, De-acum eu nu te voi vedea Cum ţii tu nările-n pământ Şi coada ta fuior în vânt, În zbor de rândunea! My horse! I‘ll no more have the right To watch your eyes, ever so bright, Your nostrils turned towards the ground, You tail by the simoon unwound. Your run – a swallow‘s flight! 363 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Cum mesteci spuma albă-n frâu, Cum joci al coamei galben râu, Cum iei pământul în galop Şi cum te-aşterni ca un potop De trăsnete-n pustiu! Ştia pustiul de noi doi Şi zarea se-ngrozea de noi – Şi tu de-acum al cui vei fi? Şi cine te va mai scuti De vânturi şi de ploi? Nu vor grăi cu tine blând, Te-or înjura cu toţi pe rând Şi te vor bate,-odorul meu, Şi te-or purta şi mult, şi greu; Lăsa-te-vor flămând! Şi te vor duce la război, Să mori tu, cel crescut de noi!... Ia-ţi banii, paşă! Sunt sărac, Dar fără cal eu ce să fac? Dă-mi calul înapoi! Se-ncruntă paşa: –„Eşti nebun? Voieşti pe ianiceri să-i pun Să te de-a câinilor? Aşa! E calul meu, şi n-aştepta De două ori să-ţi spun! You chewed the white foam on the rein And shook your streaming golden mane And galloping with ringing hoof On the dry earth, looked like a sheaf Of lightnings on the plain! The desert dreaded us; the blue Grew pale when heavenwards we flew – From now on who will be your mate? From winds and rains and ill-starred fate Whoever will shield you? They‘ll talk to you in language rude And swear at you in vicious mood And beat you savagely, horse brave, And you shall toil and moil and slave And go without your food! And they will take you to the wars, You, never trained in warfare laws! Here is the money I have sought! I‘m poor, but without him I‘m nought; Bashaw, give back my horse! The pasha frowns: He‘s mad! Beware! The jenissaries, in a trice, Will set the dogs on you, I swear! It is my horse, so don‘t wait there For me to tell it twice! 364 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry –„Al tău? Acel care-l crescu, Iubindu-l, cine-i: eu ori tu? De dreapta cui ascultă el, Din leu turbat făcându-l miel? Al tău? O, paşă, nu! He – yours? With love unmeasured, who Has reared him? Is it I or you? Whose hand obeys he? whose makes him A lamb out of a lion grim? Yours? No, that is not true! Al meu e! Pentru calul meu Mă prind de piept cu Dumnezeu – Ai inimă! Tu poţi să ai Mai vrednici şi mai mândri cai, Dar eu, stăpâne, eu? He is all mine! I would defy, For him, the very God on high! Do have a heart! Whene‘er you need, You may take hold of the best steed; But I, dread pasha, I? Întreagă mila ta o cer! Alah e drept şi-Alah din cer Va judeca ce-i între noi, Că mă răpeşti şi mă despoi, M-arunci pe drum să pier. Give me your greatest mercy, pray! Allah is just and He, I say, Will judge what is between us, He Knows you‘re a thief who will leave me Stark poor, for dogs a prey. Şi lumea te va blăstema, Că-i blăstem făptuirea ta! Voi merge, paşă, să cerşesc, Dar mila voastră n-o primesc – Ce bine-mi poţi tu da? The world will bitterly curse you, For a curst thing is what you do! I‘ll go and beg – though I‘m undone, Of your great mercy I want none; We know you through and through! Dă paşa semn: – „Să-l dezbrăcaţi Şi binele în vergi i-l daţi! Sar eunucii, vin, îl prind – Se-ntoarce-arabul răsărind Cu ochii îngheţaţi. The pasha beckons. Undress him – Let rods give him a proper trim! The eunuchs spring, leave him no chance, And he returns as in a trance, His eyes frozen and dim. 365 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry El scoate grabnic un pumnal, Şi-un val de sânge, roşu val De sânge cald a izvorât Din nobil-încomatul gât, Şi cade mortul cal. He drew the dagger, struck the head Of El-Zorab, a spirt of red, Of crimson-red, warm blood gushed out, Spilt on the neck and mane, throughout, And El-Zorab fell dead. Stă paşa beat, cu ochi topiţi, Se trag spahiii-ncremeniţi. Şi-arabul, în genunchi plecat, Sărută sângele-nchegat Pe ochii-nţepeniţi. The pasha stares, a speechless wrack; The petrified spahees step back; The Arab, kneeling Eastern-wise, Kisses upon the lifeless eyes The clotted blood turned black. Să-ntoarce-apoi cu ochi păgâni Şi-aruncă fierul crunt din mâini: –„Te-or răzbuna copiii mei! Şi-acum mă taie, dacă vrei, Şi-aruncă-mă la câni! He turns then round with savage scowls, Throws down the deadly steel and howls: My children shall avenge you soon! Now, pasha, rack and cast Ardun To dogs and preying fowls! Traducere L. Leviţchi. 366 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1894. COŞBUC. Noi vrem pământ. Leviţchi. 70 lines. Author: George COŞBUC (1866-1918). Text: Noi vrem pământ. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Do you think this poem had been over-exploited politically? (100 words) Noi vrem pământ. We Want Land. Flămând şi gol, făr-adăpost, Mi-ai pus pe umeri cât ai vrut, Şi m-ai scuipat, şi m-ai bătut, Şi câine eu ţi-am fost! Ciocoi pribeag, adus de vânt, De ai cu iadul legământ Să-ţi fim toţi câini, loveşte-n noi! Răbdăm poveri, răbdăm nevoi, Şi ham de cai, şi jug de boi: Dar vrem pământ! I‘m hungry, naked, homeless, through, Because of loads I had to carry; You‘ve spat on me, and hit me – marry, A dog I‘ve been to you! Vile lord, whom winds brought to this land, If hell itself gives you free hand To tread us down and make us bleed, We will endure both load and need, The plough and harness yet take heed, We ask for land! O coajă de mălai de ieri De-o vezi la noi tu ne-o apuci, Băieţii tu-n război ni-i duci, Pe fete ni le ceri. Înjuri ce-avem noi drag şi sfânt; Nici milă n-ai, nici crezământ! Flămânzi copiii-n drum ne mor Whene‘er you see a crust of bread, Though brown and stale, we see‘t no more; You drag our sons to ruthless war, Our daughters to your bed. You curse what we hold dear and grand, Faith and compassion you have banned; Our children starve with want and chill 367 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi ne sfârşim de mila lor – Dar toate le-am trăi uşor De-ar fi pământ! And we go mad with pity, still We‘d bear the grinding of your mill, Had we but land! De-avem un cimitir în sat, Ni-l faceţi lan, noi, boi în jug. Şi-n urma lacomului plug Ies oase şi-i păcat! Sunt oase dintr-al nostru os: Dar ce vă pasă! Voi ne-aţi scos Din case goi, în ger şi-n vânt, Ne-aţi scos şi morţii din mormânt; – O, pentru morţi şi-al lor prinos Noi vrem pământ! You‘ve turned into a field of corn The village graveyard, and we plough And dig out bones and weep and mourn, Oh, had we ne‘er been born! For those are bones of our bone, But you don‘t care, o hearts of stone! Out of our house you drive us now, And dig our dead out of their grave. A silent corner of their own The land we crave! Şi-am vrea şi noi, şi noi să ştim Că ni-or sta oasele-ntr-un loc, Că nu-şi vor bate-ai voştri joc De noi, dacă murim. Orfani şi cei ce dragi ne sunt De-ar vrea să plângă pe-un mormânt, Ei n-or şti-n care şanţ zăcem Căci nici pentr-un mormânt n-avem Pământ – şi noi creştini suntem! Şi vrem pământ! Besides, we want to know for sure That we, too, shall together lie, That on the day on which we die, You will not mock the poor. The orphans, those to us so dear, Who o‘er a grave would shed a tear, Won‘t know the ditches where we rot; We‘ve been denied a burial plot Though we are Christians, are we not? We ask for land, d‘you hear? N-avem nici vreme de-nchinat, Căci vremea ni-e în mâni la voi; Avem un suflet încă-n noi Şi parcă l-aţi uitat! Nor have we time to say a prayer, For time is in your power too; A soul is all we have, and you – Much you do care! 368 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Aţi pus cu toţii jurământ Să n-avem drepturi şi cuvânt; Bătăi şi chinuri, când ţipăm, Obezi şi lanţ, când ne mişcăm, Şi plumb, când istoviţi strigăm Că vrem pământ! You‘ve sworn to rob us of the right To tell out grievances outright; You give us torture when we shout, Unheard-of torture, chain and clout And lead when, dead tired, we cry out: For land we‘ll fight! Voi ce-aveţi îngropat aici? Voi grâu? Dar noi strămoşi şi taţi, Noi mame, şi surori, şi fraţi! În lături, venetici! Pământul nostru-i scump şi sfânt, Că el ni-e leagăn şi mormânt: Cu sânge cald l-am apărat, Şi câte ape l-au udat Sunt numai lacrimi ce-am vărsat – Noi vrem pământ! What is it you‘ve here buried? say! Corn? maize? We have forbears and mothers, We, fathers, sisters dear and brothers! Unwished – for guests, away! Our land is holy, rich and brave, It is our cradle and our grave; We have defended it with sweat And blood, and bitter tears have wet Each palm of it – so, don‘t forget: Tis land we crave! N-avem puteri şi chip de-acum Să mai trăim cerşind mereu Că prea ne schingiuiesc cum vreau Stăpâni luaţi din drum! Să nu dea Dumnezeu cel sfânt, Să vrem noi sânge, nu pământ! Când nu vom mai putea răbda, Când foamea ne va răscula, Hristoşi să fiţi, nu veţi scăpa Nici în mormânt! We can no more endure the goads, No more the hunger, the disasters That follow on the heels of the masters Picked from the roads! God grant that we shall not demand Your hated blood instead of land! When hunger will untie our ties And poverty will make us rise. E‘en in your grave we will chastise You and your band! Traducere L. Leviţchi. 369 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1895. KIPLING. If. Duţescu # Camilar # Coposu. 32 lines. Author: Rudyard KIPLING (1865-1936). Text: If. Translator: D. Duţescu # E. Camilar # C. Coposu. FrageStellung: Kipling is the paragon of a colonial writer. Do you agree with that definition? Sum marize this poem in just one word. If . Dacă. If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too; If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don‘t deal in lies, Or being hated, don‘t give way to hating, And yet don‘t look too good, nor talk too wise: Dacă eşti calm, când toţi se pierd cu firea În jurul tău, şi spun că-i vina ta; De crezi în tine, chiar când Omenirea Nu crede, dar îi crezi şi ei cumva; De ştii s-aştepţi, dar fără tevatură; De nu dezminţi minciuni minţind, ci drept; De nu răspunzi la ură tot cu ură Şi nici prea bun nu pari, nici prea-nţelept; If you can dream – and not make dreams your master; If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim; If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster And treat those two imposters just the same; If you can bear to hear the truth you‘ve spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, And stoop and build em up with worn-out tools; Dacă visezi dar nu-ţi faci visul astru; De poţi să speri dar nu-ţi faci jindul ţel; De-ntâmpini şi Triumful şi Dezastrul Mereu senin şi în acelaşi fel; Dacă suporţi să-ţi vezi vorba sucită De şarlatan, ce-ţi spurcă al tău rost; De poţi ca munca vieţii, năruită, S-o faci de la-nceput precum a fost; 370 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!" Dacă-ndrăzneşti agonisita-ţi toată S-o pui, făr‘a clipi, pe-un singur zar Şi, dac-o pierzi, să-ncepi ca prima dată Făr-să te plângi cu un oftat măcar; De ştii, cu nerv, cu inimă, cu vână, Drept să rămâi, când ele june nu-s, Şi stai tot dârz, când nu mai e stăpână Decât Voinţa ce le ţine sus; If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with kings – nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you, If all men count with you, but none too much; If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds‘ worth of distance run – Yours is the Earth and everything that‘s in it, And – which is more – you‘ll be a Man, my son! Dacă-ntre Regi ţi-e firea neschimbată Ca şi-n Mulţime – nu străin de ea; Amic sau nu, de nu pot să te-abată; De toţi de-ţi pasă, dar de nimeni prea; Dacă ţi-e dat, prin clipa zdrobitoare, Să treci şi s-o întreci, mereu bonom, atunci: a ta e Lumea asta mare şi, mai mult, fiul meu: atunci – eşti Om! Traducere D. Duţescu. 371 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry If . Dacă. If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too; If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don‘t deal in lies, Or being hated, don‘t give way to hating, And yet don‘t look too good, nor talk too wise: Dacă-ţi păstrezi temeiul, când toţi din jur anume Te-acuză că prin tine pierdură-al lor temei, Dacă te-ncrezi în tine când se-ndoieşte-o lume, Şi totuşi ţii şi seama de îndoiala ei, Dac-aşteptând, răbdării îi ţii oricând măsură, Şi când, minţit de alţii, tu vei rămâne drept, Sau, când, urât, tu însuţi n-o să ajungi la ură, Şi n-o să fii cu alţii prea bun, nici prea-nţelept, If you can dream – and not make dreams your master; If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim; If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster And treat those two imposters just the same; If you can bear to hear the truth you‘ve spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, And stoop and build em up with worn-out tools; Dacă visând, tu totuşi nu-ţi faci din vis robie, Dacă gândind, tu totuşi nu-ţi faci din gânduri ţel, Dacă înfrunţi Triumful, Dezastrul de-o să vie, Şi-aceste impostoare le vei trata la fel, Dac-o să rabzi, văzându-ţi cuvântul spus de tine Întors de vreun nemernic, şi-aşa la proşti să-l vezi, Dacă-ţi găseşti strânsura de-o viaţă în ruine, Şi vechile unelte le-apuci şi iar creezi, If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!" Dacă aduni grămadă agoniseala toată, Şi pe-o aruncătură de rişcă poţi s-o pui, Şi-o pierzi, şi de la capăt o iei, muncind la roată, Şi nici o vorbuliţă tu totuşi n-o să spui, Dacă-ţi încorzi şi nervi, şi inimă, şi vine, Când inima şi nervii îţi sunt de mult uzaţi Şi te vei ţine tare când nu mai ai în tine Decât Voinţa care le spune „Rezistaţi! 372 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with kings – nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you, If all men count with you, but none too much; If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds‘ worth of distance run – Yours is the Earth and everything that‘s in it, And – which is more – you‘ll be a Man, my son! Dacă vorbind cu gloata tot demn rămâi, şi dacă De Regi mergând alături tot demn vei rămânea, Dacă vrăjmaşi sau prieteni nu pot vreun rău să-ţi facă, Dacă pe toţi te bizui, dar nici pe unul prea, Dacă vei şti, minutul mai trecător ca vântul Să-l umpli cu durata secundelor, mereu, Cu-ntreaga lui avere al tău va fi Pământul... Mai mult: atuncea fi-vei un Om, copilul meu. Traducere E. Camilar. 373 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry If . Dacă. If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too; If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don‘t deal in lies, Or being hated, don‘t give way to hating, And yet don‘t look too good, nor talk too wise: Dacă te poţi stăpâni, când norodul din jur se frământă, Brav înfruntând insolentul reproş, cu linişte sfântă, Dacă-ţi păstrezi, în virtute, credinţa şi-ncaleci sfiala, Când se îndoieşte de tine mulţimea, şi-i ierţi îndoiala... Dacă aştepţi cu nădejde şi nu te răpune-aşteptarea, Dacă minciunii, stăpână pe lume, îi spulberi chemarea, Dacă asaltul mâniei te lasă senin, fără ură, Dacă păşeşti peste dorul de-a fi cel dintâi, cu măsură... If you can dream – and not make dreams your master; If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim; If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster And treat those two imposters just the same; If you can bear to hear the truth you‘ve spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, And stoop and build em up with worn-out tools; Dacă te leagănă visul, dar stărui stăpân peste vise Dacă din gânduri măreţe renunţi să-ţi faci ţeluri prezise Dacă cuvântul, izvor de ispite şi cruntul dezastru, Nu-s pentru tine oprelişti, nici vâsle în drumul spre astru... Dacă suporţi să auzi, despre spusele tale cinstite, Gânduri jelene, scornite de răi, pentru gloate smintite, Dacă din opera ta s-au ales doar ruine şi spaţii, Singur, cu scule stricate, de poţi s-o refaci, din fundaţii... If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!" Dacă pierzând, într-o clipă de risc pe o şansă, avutul, Poţi să începi, de la capăt, uitând în tăcere trecutul, Ferm adunând cu răbdare, întregul pe lungă durată, Fără să sufli o vorbă, de pierderea grea îndurată... Dacă superb, prin voinţă forţezi, când îţi vine sorocul, Inima, capul, tăria, să nu îşi astâmpere jocul Gol de puterea vieţii, urmându-ţi destinul spre ţinte, Tare, cu vrerea din tine, ce-ţi spune mereu: Înainte!... 374 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with kings – nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you, If all men count with you, but none too much; If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds‘ worth of distance run – Yours is the Earth and everything that‘s in it, And – which is more – you‘ll be a Man, my son! Dacă mulţimilor poţi să vorbeşti, cu deprinderi egale, Dacă constant îţi păstrezi modestia, şi-n cercuri regale Dacă eşti nevulnerabil la prieteni, la cei cu pornire, Dacă pe toţi îi stimezi îndeajuns, însă nu peste fire... Dacă momentul cumplit al prăpădului crâncen şi mare Calm vei putea să-l asemeni, în timp, c-un minut oarecare. Lumea cu tot ce cuprinde va fi stăpânită de tine, Tu, peste toţi vei răzbate: om al puterii depline! Traducere C. Coposu. 375 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1895. MACEDONSKI. Noaptea de noiembrie. Lines 293-359.Leviţchi. 21 lines. Author: Alexandru MACEDONSKI (1854-1920). Text: Noaptea de noiembrie. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Why is Macedonski so undeservedly little known? (That seems to be a rhetorical ques tion.) Just think and ponder. Noaptea de noiembrie. November Night. Simţii atunci în mine o repede schimbare... Părea că mă duc îngeri pe-o dulce legănare... Lăsându-mi învelişul la viermii din mormânt, Pluteam prin al meu suflet, mai sus de-acest pământ. Eram împins de-o forţă şi tainică şi mare, Şi aripe de vultur răpindu-mă în zbor, Purtat pe-o rază-albastră, ca raza de uşor, În casa părintească, muiat în foc de stele, Intrai pe o fereastră, prin aer tremurai, Trecui ca o suflare prin părul maicii mele, Lucii în două lacrimi, şi calea mi-o urmai. Era un zbor fantastic, un zbor fără de nume, Ca zborul lui Mazeppa pe calul său legat, Şi treieram pe vânturi, şi colindam prin lume, Purtat pe unde corpul odată mi-a călcat. I then felt within me a sudden, mighty change... I thought a troop of angels bore me on a sweet breath... Abandoning my body to its fate in the grave, I floated through my soul, high up over the earth. A huge , mysterious power impelled me; in my flight Majestic eagle‘s wings took me away and, lo, A blue ray carried me while I felt light as light, Steeped in the fire of stars; I entered through a window, The old parental home flew trembling in the air, Passed like a gentle whiff over my mother‘s hair, And sparkling in two teardrops, went on the way it came, Twas a fantastic flight, a flight without a name, The flight of a Mazzepa tied to his foaming steed, And I rode astride tempests and wandered east and west, In places where my body had never stopped to rest. Câmpiile întinse păreau nişte năluce, Şi Dunărea un şarpe dormind peste câmpii, The boundless plains and cornfields looked like so many shadows, The Danube was a serpent asleep athwart the meadows; 376 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Tot omul o furnică ce naşte şi se duce, Iar munţii cei gigantici abia nişte copii; O pată cenuşie în josul meu s-arată, E marea care vecinic cu pânze e-ncărcată... A man was but a shadow which has been bom to die, The huge mountains were babies; a grey spot under me: The never-failing harbour of ships and boats, the sea....... Traducere L. Leviţchi. 377 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1896. COŞBUC. Iarna pe uliţă. Leviţchi. 115 lines. Author: George COŞBUC (1866-1918). Text: Iarna pe uliţă. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: a. Try to learn the English version by heart! b. Can you translate the missing stanza? Iarna pe uliţă. Winter in the Village-Street. A-nceput de ieri să cadă Câte-un fulg, acum a stat, Norii s-au mai răzbunat Spre apus, dar stau grămadă Peste sat. Straying flakes have dropped since last night Until now – and it‘s fine weather; Clouds, like bags of blue-black leather, Westwards burst, yet o‘er the village Hang together. Nu e soare, dar e bine, Şi pe râu e numai fum. Vântu-i liniştit acum, Dar năvalnic vuiet vine De pe drum. Though not sunny, it is pleasant, Smoke wraps up the stream below. The wind has abated now, But the village-street betokens Awful row. Sunt copii. Cu multe sănii, De pe coastă vin ţipând Şi se-mping şi sar râzând; Prin zăpadă fac mătănii; Vrând-nevrând. It‘s the children. With their sledges They come down and, cheeks aglow, Laugh and leap and stop and go, Often kneeling willy-nilly In the snow. 378 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Gură fac ca roata morii; Şi de-a valma se pornesc, Cum prin gard se gâlcevesc Vrăbii gureşe, când norii Ploi vestesc. And their noise recalls the windmill For they never stop their clatter, Just like sparrows that will chatter On the fence, when clouds forebode Rains and spatter. Cei mai mari acum, din sfadă, Stau pe-ncăierate puşi; Cei mai mici, de foame-aduşi, Se scâncesc şi plâng grămadă Pe la uşi. The teenagers are now brawling, Ready for encounters foul; At the doors, all with a scowl, Hungry nippers wait and whimper, Cry and howl. Colo-n colţ acum răsare Un copil, al nu ştiu cui, Largi de-un cot sunt paşii lui, Iar el mic, căci pe cărare Parcă nu-i. A young one all of a sudden Turns the corner of a cot. His steps, inch-long: he, a dot; You would swear that on the footway He is not. Haina-i măturând pământul Şi-o târăşte-abia, abia: Cinci ca el încap în ea, Să mai bată, soro, vântul Dac-o vrea! Hardly can he bear the fur-coat. Hardly trail it on the ground; Five like him it wrap round – Let the wind, if he so chooses Blow and pound! El e sol precum se vede, Mă-sa l-a trimis în sat, Vezi de-aceea-i încruntat, Şi s-avântă, şi se crede Că-i bărbat; He‘s a messenger – his mother Sent him out for some great plan; So he frowns as best he can, Crawls and stalks and faces danger Like a man! 379 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Cade-n brânci şi se ridică Dând pe ceafă puţintel Toată lâna unui miel: O căciulă mai voinică Decât el. He falls flat, then, slowly rising, Cocks a little on his head All the wool a lamb once had: Fancy a fur-cap much bigger Than the lad. Şi tot vine, tot înoată, Dar deodată cu ochi vii, Stă pe loc să mi te ţii! Colo, zgomotoasa gloată, De copii! Swimming on, all of a sudden, He stands still, and his eyes stare With astonishment. Beware! The uproarious troop of children Loom up there! El degrabă-n jur chiteşte Vrun ocol, căci e pierdut, Dar copiii l-au văzut! Toată ceata năvăleşte Pe-ntrecut. In the yards, thrilled by the uproar, Dogs spring at them barking, women Leave their wonted, pressing chore For the gate, and old men open The front door. Uite-i, mă, căciula, frate, Mare cât o zi de post Aoleu, ce urs mi-a fost! Au sub dânsa şapte sate Adăpost! Hastily he looks around him For a shelter against hell, Hut the boys, spotting him well, Rush at him a triumphant, Gruesome yell. Unii-l iau grăbit la vale, Alţii-n glumă parte-i ţin Uite-i, fără pic de vin S-au jurat să-mbete-n cale Pe creştin! What a fur-cap! Tall and wide a fast-day! What a monster Of a bear had such a hide! Seven villages can surely Get inside! 380 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Vine-o babă-ncet pe stradă În cojocul rupt al ei Şi încins cu sfori de tei. Stă pe loc acum să vadă Şi ea ce-i. Some make fun of him, some others Greet him with a nice hello – They have, really, sworn to mellow, Without any drop of wine, The poor fellow! S-oţărăşte rău bătrâna Pentru micul Barba-cot. Aţi înnebunit de tot Puiul mamii, dă-mi tu mâna Să te scot! An old woman, in her fur-coat Ragged, tied up with a long Linden bast, perceives the throng And stops dead to get an inkling Of what‘s wrong. Cică vrei să stingi cu paie Focul când e-n clăi cu fân, Şi-apoi zici că eşti român! Biata bab-a-ntrat în laie La stăpân. For the dandiprat, the gammer Tries to put the rogues to rout. You are crazy all, no doubt – Darling, stretch a hand and I will Help you out! Ca pe-o bufniţ-o-nconjoară Şi-o petrec cu chiu cu vai, Şi se ţin de dânsa scai, Plină-i strâmta ulicioară De alai. Can you choke a fire with straw-wisps When it burns in stacks of hay? Is that the wise peasant‘s way? Let the crone rid of the devil If she may! Nu e chip să-i faci cu buna Să-şi păzească drumul lor! Râd şi sar într-un picior, Se-nvârtesc şi ţipă-ntruna Mai cu zor. She is hemmed in like an owl While dire racket follows her, And each boy sticks like a burr, And the whole street of the village Is astir. 381 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Baba şi-a uitat învăţul: Bate,-njură, dă din mâini: Dracilor, sânteţi păgâni? Maica mea! Să stai cu băţul Ca la câini! And the crone forgets good manners, Threatens, buffets, swears and flogs; Devils, are you heathen hogs? My! You only obey cudgels As do dogs! Şi cu băţul se-nvârteşte Ca să-şi facă-n jur ocol; Dar abia e locul gol, Şi mulţimea năvăleşte Iarăşi stol. She turns round to force a clearing With her staff – an oath, a pledge! But as soon as there‘s a wedge, In rushes the set, restoring The tight hedge. Astfel tabăra se duce Lălăind în chip avan: Baba-n mijloc, căpitan, Scuipă-n sân şi face cruce De Satan. Whistling, shouting, running, hopping. The band moves off, while the gammer, The caboodle overtopping, Strikes, crosses herself, and hisses Without stopping. Ba se răscolesc şi câinii De prin curţi, şi sar la ei. Pe la garduri ies femei, Se urnesc miraţi bătrânii Din bordei. ...................................................... Ce-i pe drum atâta gură? Nu-i nimic. Copii ştrengari. Ei, auzi! Vedea-i-aş mari, Parcă trece-adunătură De tătari! Why this hellish hurly-burly? Just some boisterous young ones, Thought it was a troop of Huns! May I live to see you all Grown-up, sons! Traducere L. Leviţchi. 382 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1898. Oscar WILDE. The Ballad of Reading Goal. Porsenna. 714 lines. Author: Oscar WILDE (1854-1900). Text: The Ballad of Reading Goal. Translator: N. Porsenna. FrageStellung: a. Is this a real ballad? Or is it more than that? In what way? ### Then, evaluate the translation... And perhaps learn from it. b. Provide the translation of the missing stanza. The Ballad of Reading Gaol. Balada închisorii din Reading. In Memoriam C.T.W. Sometime Trooper of The Royal Horse Guards. Obiit H.M. Prison, Reading, Berkshire, July 7th, 1896 I He did not wear his scarlet coat, For blood and wine are red, And blood and wine were on his hands When they found him with the dead, The poor dead woman whom he loved, And murdered in her bed. He walked amongst the Trial Men In a suit of shabby grey; A cricket cap was on his head, And his step seemed light and gay; I N-avea veştminte stacojii Cu vin şi sânge scrise, Ci vin şi sânge doar pe mâini Avea când îl găsise Cu fata moartă ce-o iubea Şi-n patu-i o ucise. Mergea-ntre paznici, în costum Vărgat cum e paiaţa; Tichia de puşcăriaş Îi mohorâse faţa; 383 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry But I never saw a man who looked So wistfully at the day. Dar n-am văzut nicicând un om Privind mai lacom viaţa. I never saw a man who looked With such a wistful eye Upon that little tent of blue Which prisoners call the sky, And at every drifting cloud that went With sails of silver by. Nu, n-am văzut nicicând un om, Sau vreun prizonier, Holbat la peticul de-azur (Ocnaşii zic că-i cer), Şi nici la norii care trec Vopsiţi cu.argint sau fier. I walked, with other souls in pain, Within another ring, And was wondering if the man had done A great or little thing, When a voice behind me whispered low, "That fellow‘s got to swing." Păşind smerit, ca osândit, Las gândul să mă poarte: Nu ştiu de-i omul vinovat Mai mult, puţin sau foarte, Când auzii şoptind un glas: „Pe ăsta-l duc la moarte Dear Christ! the very prison walls Suddenly seemed to reel, And the sky above my head became Like a casque of scorching steel; And, though I was a soul in pain, My pain I could not feel. Isuse! Dintr-odată simt Ceva amar ca fierea; Oţel topit fu naltul cer Aşa mi-era părerea Şi însumi sufletul, în iad Nu-mi mai simţeam durerea I only knew what hunted thought Quickened his step, and why He looked upon the garish day With such a wistful eye; The man had killed the thing he loved And so he had to die. Înţelesei ce gând cumplit Privirea i-o-nfioară Şi pentru ce căta avid La lumea din afară: El ucisese ce-a iubit 384 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Yet each man kills the thing he loves By each let this be heard, Some do it with a bitter look, Some with a flattering word, The coward does it with a kiss, The brave man with a sword! Şi trebuia să moară! Căci toţi ucidem ce ni-i drag Şi-ntindem morţii prada: Omoară unii măgulind, Ori cu dojeni, cu sfada, Cei laşi ucid cu sărutări Iar cei viteji cu spada. Some kill their love when they are young, And some when they are old; Some strangle with the hands of Lust, Some with the hands of Gold: The kindest use a knife, because The dead so soon grow cold. Omoară juni, sau vlăguiţi De sevele puterii; Ucid cu aur, cu-amăgiri, Cu mâinile plăcerii; Cei blânzi deschid cu un cuţit Zăvoarele Tăcerii Some love too little, some too long, Some sell, and others buy; Some do the deed with many tears, And some without a sigh: For each man kills the thing he loves, Yet each man does not die. Iubim prea mult, sau prea puţin, Mărinimoşi sau hoţi; Ucizi plângând, ucizi tăcând, Nepăsător de poţi, Căci toţi ucidem ce ni-i drag Dar nu murim cu toţi. He does not die a death of shame On a day of dark disgrace, Nor have a noose about his neck, Nor a cloth upon his face, Nor drop feet foremost through the floor Into an empty place N-avem o moarte de ruşine, Nici vreo pedeapsă-n viaţă, Nu ni se pune ştreang de gât, Nici haine peste faţă, Nici din picioare n-atârnăm Cu vinele de gheaţă He does not sit with silent men Nu pentru toţi un paznic pus 385 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Who watch him night and day; Who watch him when he tries to weep, And when he tries to pray; Who watch him lest himself should rob The prison of its prey. Veghează-n pragul porţii, Când plângem, sau când ne rugăm Cerând iertarea sorţii; Nici ne pândesc să nu răpim Noi singuri prada morţii. He does not wake at dawn to see Dread figures throng his room, The shivering Chaplain robed in white, The Sheriff stern with gloom, And the Governor all in shiny black, With the yellow face of Doom. Nu auzim în zori de zi Intrând cu pas uşor Pe preot îmbrăcat în alb, Pe domnul Procuror, Nici pe Director dându-ţi vestea Pălind îngrozitor. He does not rise in piteous haste To put on convict-clothes, While some coarse-mouthed Doctor gloats, and notes Each new and nerve-twitched pose, Fingering a watch whose little ticks Are like horrible hammer-blows. Nu ne sculăm să ne-mbrăcăm Cu straie grosolane, Pe când un doctor ia-nsemnări (Tribut Ştiinţei vane!) Privind un ceas a cărui limbi Par ritmuri de ciocane. He does not know that sickening thirst That sands one‘s throat, before The hangman with his gardener‘s gloves Slips through the padded door, And binds one with three leathern thongs, That the throat may thirst no more. He does not bend his head to hear The Burial Office read, Nu ne simţim gâtlej-uscat De nisipoasa sete, Pe când călăul ia un laţ Din împletite bete Şi ţi-l petrece după gât, Să nu-ţi mai fie sete! Nu plecăm capul s-auzim Prohod cântat de-aproape, 386 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Nor, while the terror of his soul Tells him he is not dead, Cross his own coffin, as he moves Into the hideous shed. Nici sufletul nemuritor Cu groaza prinsă-n pleoape Nu vede propriu-i sicriu Ducându-l să-l îngroape! He does not stare upon the air Through a little roof of glass; He does not pray with lips of clay For his agony to pass; Nor feel upon his shuddering cheek The kiss of Caiaphas. Prin ferestruică nu privim Spre-acoperiş, sub scafă; Nu ne rugăm din glas de lut, Cu moartea-nfiptă-n ceafă, Şi nici pe buze nu primim Sărutul de Caiafă! II II Six weeks our guardsman walked the yard, In a suit of shabby grey: His cricket cap was on his head, And his step seemed light and gay, But I never saw a man who looked So wistfully at the day. Trei luni umblă cu păzitor, Gătit cum e paiaţa; Deşi tichia-i sta pe cap, Voioasă-i era faţa; Dar n-am văzut nicicând un om Privind mai lacom viaţa. I never saw a man who looked With such a wistful eye Upon that little tent of blue Which prisoners call the sky, And at every wandering cloud that trailed Its ravelled fleeces by. Nu, n-am văzut nicicând un om Sau vreun prizonier, Holbat la peticul de-azur (ocnaşii zic că-i cer), Şi nici la norii destrămaţi Din caiere ce pier. He did not wring his hands, as do Those witless men who dare Nu-şi frângea mâinile, cum fac Înnebuniţii care 387 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To try to rear the changeling Hope In the cave of black Despair: He only looked upon the sun, And drank the morning air. Preschimbă salbă de nădejdi În iad de disperare: Ci doar căta spre soare-n sus, Sorbind din aer, tare. He did not wring his hands nor weep, Nor did he peek or pine, But he drank the air as though it held Some healthful anodyne; With open mouth he drank the sun As though it had been wine! Nu se frângea, nu se plângea De fiorosul chin; Ci bea din aer, aşteptând Un leac din cer senin, Sorbind din soare cum ai bea Dintr-un pahar cu vin! And I and all the souls in pain, Who tramped the other ring, Forgot if we ourselves had done A great or little thing, And watched with gaze of dull amaze The man who had to swing. Şi eu şi ceilalţi chinuiţi, Uniţi de-a noastre soarte, Uităm de suntem vinovaţi Mai mult, puţin sau foarte, Ci doar privim şi ne-ngrozim De cel ursit la moarte. And strange it was to see him pass With a step so light and gay, And strange it was to see him look So wistfully at the day, And strange it was to think that he Had such a debt to pay. De-i straniu să-l priveşti trecând Uşor, cu faţa vie, Ori stranii ochii ce-i tânjesc Spre cer cu lăcomie, Mai straniu e să-l ştii dator Cu-astfel de datorie! For oak and elm have pleasant leaves That in the spring-time shoot: But grim to see is the gallows-tree, With its adder-bitten root, Stejari şi ulmi dau frunze verzi Când se dezgheaţă glodul; Doar Furca poartă mugur om Când laţul strânge nodul; 388 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And, green or dry, a man must die Before it bears its fruit! Un om ce, tânăr sau bătrân, N-apucă să-şi dea rodul. The loftiest place is that seat of grace For which all worldlings try: But who would stand in hempen band Upon a scaffold high, And through a murderer‘s collar take His last look at the sky? Un post înalt e luat cu-asalt, Ispitelor supus; Dar cine vrea înalt să stea Cu laţ de gât adus Şi ultima lucire-n ochi Cătând spre ceruri sus? It is sweet to dance to violins When Love and Life are fair: To dance to flutes, to dance to lutes Is delicate and rare: But it is not sweet with nimble feet To dance upon the air! E dulce să dansezi uşor Când plin îţi merge-n viaţă, Şi-n dans să cânţi, în joc să-ncânţi Privind iubirea-n faţă; Dar trist cuvânt s-atârni în vânt Dansând ca o paiaţă! So with curious eyes and sick surmise We watched him day by day, And wondered if each one of us Would end the self-same way, For none can tell to what red Hell His sightless soul may stray. Iscoditori, bănuitori, Cătam la el într-una, Gândind: din nou cui i-or suci De beregată struna; Croindu-i vad spre roşul iad, Şi pentru totdeauna? At last the dead man walked no more Amongst the Trial Men, And I knew that he was standing up In the black dock‘s dreadful pen, And that never would I see his face In God‘s sweet world again. Ca două nave-n uragan Ne-am întâlnit odat Dar n-am clintit, nici n-am vorbit; (Ce să vorbim!) pe dată Ne-am urmat drumul copleşiţi, Cu inima-nfricată. 389 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Like two doomed ships that pass in storm We had crossed each other‘s way: But we made no sign, we said no word, We had no word to say; For we did not meet in the holy night, But in the shameful day. La urmă omu-a fost trimis Legat la judecată; Şi-aflarăm că va fi suit În furca cocoţată Şi că nu-l vom mai întâlni În lumea luminată! A prison wall was round us both, Two outcast men were we: The world had thrust us from its heart, And God from out His care: And the iron gin that waits for Sin Had caught us in its snare. Un zid de temniţă simţeam În juru-i fiecare; Nu ne dăduse lumea foc, Nici Domnul îndurare; Ci cleştele Pedepsei, crunt, Ne ţine strâns în ghiare! III III In Debtors‘ Yard the stones are hard, And the dripping wall is high, So it was there he took the air Beneath the leaden sky, And by each side a Warder walked, For fear the man might die. În închisoare e piatra tare. Pe zid musteşte zeama. Cu mintea trează, paznicii veghează Pe osândit, de teama Ca nu cumva cu mână rea Să-şi facă singur seama. Or else he sat with those who watched His anguish night and day; Who watched him when he rose to weep, And when he crouched to pray; Who watched him lest himself should rob Their scaffold of its prey. Veghează să nu stea la sfat, Nici spaima a şi-o spune; Veghează când icneşte-n plâns Sau cade-n rugăciune, Ori viaţa când ar vrea să-şi ia A Furcii mortăciune. 390 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Governor was strong upon The Regulations Act: The Doctor said that Death was but A scientific fact: And twice a day the Chaplain called And left a little tract. ..................................... And twice a day he smoked his pipe, And drank his quart of beer: His soul was resolute, and held No hiding-place for fear; He often said that he was glad The hangman‘s hands were near. Fumează zilnic din tutun Şi zilnic îşi bea berea; E hotărât, şi nici un gând Nu-i răscoleşte fierea; Şi cheamă-ntr-una pe călău Să-i stingă-n gât durerea! But why he said so strange a thing No Warder dared to ask: For he to whom a watcher‘s doom Is given as his task, Must set a lock upon his lips, And make his face a mask. Nu ştim ciudatele grăiri De ce-i pornesc din gură, Căci un ocnaş, un ucigaş Pus sub dispreţ şi ură De buze-şi leagă un căluş Şi-o mască pe figură. Or else he might be moved, and try To comfort or console: And what should Human Pity do Pent up in Murderers‘ Hole? What word of grace in such a place Could help a brother‘s soul? Ori poate cată mângâieri, Ori vreo speranţă poate? Dar Mila cum ar izbuti În ocna lui răzbate? Cum ar putea nădejdi să-i dea O inimă de frate? With slouch and swing around the ring În mers greoi tărâm cu noi 391 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry We trod the Fool‘s Parade! We did not care: we knew we were The Devil‘s Own Brigade: And shaven head and feet of lead Make a merry masquerade. O undă de zmintire; Dar toţi ştim că e dat să fim A iadului oştire; Cu plumb în pas, cu capul ras, Ne râde-o omenire! We tore the tarry rope to shreds With blunt and bleeding nails; We rubbed the doors, and scrubbed the floors, And cleaned the shining rails: And, rank by rank, we soaped the plank, And clattered with the pails. Rupem frânghii şi mici fâşii, Cu unghii sângerate; Spălăm pe jos, frecăm vârtos La gratii ferecate: Şi rând pe rând zvârlim pe jos Găleţile-ncărcate. We sewed the sacks, we broke the stones, We turned the dusty drill: We banged the tins, and bawled the hymns, And sweated on the mill: But in the heart of every man Terror was lying still. Coseam la saci, tăiam cosaci, Cât carnea să ne roază; Trânteam căldări, urlam cântări, Înăduşam sub pază; Dar sufletul în orice ins Gemea strivit de groază. So still it lay that every day Crawled like a weed-clogged wave: And we forgot the bitter lot That waits for fool and knave, Till once, as we tramped in from work, We passed an open grave. Zile pustii se scurg târzii: La fel cu toate sunt! Uităm cu toţi, nebuni şi hoţi, Ce soartă pe pământ Ne-aşteaptă, până când un brânci Ne-mpinge spre mormânt. With yawning mouth the yellow hole Gaped for a living thing; The very mud cried out for blood Căscată, groapa cheamă-n şir Pe unul, pe cellalt; Noroiul cere sânge viu 392 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To the thirsty asphalte ring: And we knew that ere one dawn grew fair Some prisoner had to swing. Din curtea de asfalt În zori va legăna un om Belciugul cel înalt! Right in we went, with soul intent On Death and Dread and Doom: The hangman, with his little bag, Went shuffling through the gloom And each man trembled as he crept Into his numbered tomb. Cu ochi ţintiţi mergeam prostiţi Spre ţelu-ntunecat; Călăul cu un săculeţ Venea domol din sat: Şi orice om şi-avea al său Momânt numerotat. That night the empty corridors Were full of forms of Fear, And up and down the iron town Stole feet we could not hear, And through the bars that hide the stars White faces seemed to peer. În noaptea asta-n săli pustii Trec forme-ngălbenite; În faţă-n dos, în sus, în jos Curg paşi pe nesimţite: Şi-n ziduri grele, la zăbrele Ies capete-ngrozite He lay as one who lies and dreams In a pleasant meadow-land, The watcher watched him as he slept, And could not understand How one could sleep so sweet a sleep With a hangman close at hand? El doarme lin, parc-ar visa Pe veselă livadă... Paznici plătiţi socot uimiţi Că nu-i firesc să vadă În somn tihnit un osândit Dat mâine Furcii pradă. But there is no sleep when men must weep Who never yet have wept: So we—the fool, the fraud, the knave— That endless vigil kept, And through each brain on hands of pain Somnul nu strânge pleoapa când plânge Şi n-a mai plâns vreodată! Noi suntem toţi nebuni şi hoţi Sub garda înarmată 393 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Another‘s terror crept. Alas! it is a fearful thing To feel another‘s guilt! For, right within, the sword of Sin Pierced to its poisoned hilt, And as molten lead were the tears we shed For the blood we had not spilt. The Warders with their shoes of felt Crept by each padlocked door, And peeped and saw, with eyes of awe, Grey figures on the floor, And wondered why men knelt to pray Who never prayed before. All through the night we knelt and prayed, Mad mourners of a corpse! The troubled plumes of midnight were The plumes upon a hearse: And bitter wine upon a sponge Was the savour of Remorse. The cock crew, the red cock crew, But never came the day: And crooked shape of Terror crouched, In the corners where we lay: And each evil sprite that walks by night Before us seemed to play. Doar o fiinţă cu-o suferinţă De altul îndurată. E crud să simţi sub greu Păcat Alt cuget cum se stinge; În chingi de fier suflete pier Când Crima crunt le strânge; Dar plumb topit ochiu-a ţâşnit Când altul varsă sânge. Cu tălpi de pâslă pe la uşi Doi paznici se strecoară: Şi cum privesc, încremenesc Şi-n suflet se-nfioară Văzând ocnaşii-ngenunchiaţi În rugă-ntâia oară De-a lungul nopţii ne-am rugat Părând a ţese tort Din rugă şi din remuşcări; În ruşinosul port Sorbeam durerea cum a supt Oţetul, Sfântul Mort. În zori de-azur cocoşul sur Sună a zilei toacă; Dar ziua-n ocnă nu venea! A negurii bulboacă Plutea adânc, şi mici stafii Albind, păreau că joacă. 394 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry They glided past, they glided fast, Like travellers through a mist: They mocked the moon in a rigadoon Of delicate turn and twist, And with formal pace and loathsome grace The phantoms kept their tryst. Pluteau uşor în vânt de zbor În ceasul de utrenii; Ceata nebună juca-mpreună Cu-a-ntunecimii genii, Sucind vârtos în ritm hidos O horă de vedenii. With mop and mow, we saw them go, Slim shadows hand in hand: About, about, in ghostly rout They trod a saraband: And the damned grotesques made arabesques, Like the wind upon the sand! Triste figuri, cu strâmbături De un sinistru chip, Mai sus, mai sus - căci graniţi nu-s În jocuri se-nfirip, Şi-n dans grotesc fac arabesc Ca vântul pe nisip. With the pirouettes of marionettes, They tripped on pointed tread: But with flutes of Fear they filled the ear, As their grisly masque they led, And loud they sang, and loud they sang, For they sang to wake the dead. Marionete în piruete Sprinţar şi-ncurcă sportul; Geamăt de frică din glas ridică Şi fioros li-i portul, Şi cântă tare, în gura mare, Ca să deştepte mortul. "Oho!" they cried, "The world is wide, But fettered limbs go lame! And once, or twice, to throw the dice Is a gentlemanly game, But he does not win who plays with Sin In the secret House of Shame." Ţip-să se spargă: „Lumea e largă, Dar gleznele-n cătuşe Şchiopând mereu, păşesc mai greu Ca două picioruşe! Iar pe ocnaşi în lanţuri traşi Ruşinea-i înnăbuşe. No things of air these antics were Nu-i pentru cânt orice cuvânt 395 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That frolicked with such glee: To men whose lives were held in gyves, And whose feet might not go free, Ah! wounds of Christ! they were living things, Most terrible to see. Dibaci ţesut cu glume; Dar nu cutezi să te distrezi – Spectacol fără nume! – Când vezi înverigat un om: E cel mai trist din lume! Around, around, they waltzed and wound; Some wheeled in smirking pairs: With the mincing step of demirep Some sidled up the stairs: And with subtle sneer, and fawning leer, Each helped us at our prayers. Mai jos, mai jos, valsând greţos Şi chicotind din fugă, Năluci gălbii şi străvezii Din buze albe-ndrugă Şi râd smintit de osândit Când e-adâncit în rugă The morning wind began to moan, But still the night went on: Through its giant loom the web of gloom Crept till each thread was spun: And, as we prayed, we grew afraid Of the Justice of the Sun. Pornit-au adieri de zori, Dar noaptea tot se-anină; Pe când al ei pânzar cernit Se-aşterne cu o tină, Noi ne rugăm şi ne-nfricăm De-a soarelui lumină. The moaning wind went wandering round The weeping prison-wall: Till like a wheel of turning-steel We felt the minutes crawl: O moaning wind! what had we done To have such a seneschal? Un vânt flămând trece gemând Printre pereţi de piatră; Şi-n vuet tare-un câine pare La lună lung cum latră. O, vânt cumplit! Cu ce-am greşit Să-mi sufli moartea-n vatră? At last I saw the shadowed bars Like a lattice wrought in lead, Move right across the whitewashed wall Târziu, a gratiilor umbră Pe zid încet apare: Se mişcă spre-aşa zisul pat 396 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That faced my three-plank bed, And I knew that somewhere in the world God‘s dreadful dawn was red. Din scânduri de lemn tare, Şi-aflai că-n lume, undeva, Cumplita zi răsare. At six o‘clock we cleaned our cells, At seven all was still, But the sough and swing of a mighty wing The prison seemed to fill, For the Lord of Death with icy breath Had entered in to kill. Ne-am curăţat celula-n zori; La şapte, pe răcoare, Era sfârşit; dar un foşnit De-aripi dă veste mare Că-n pragul porţii Îngerul Morţii Intrase-n închisoare! He did not pass in purple pomp, Nor ride a moon-white steed. Three yards of cord and a sliding board Are all the gallows‘ need: So with rope of shame the Herald came To do the secret deed. El nu veni cu-alai măreţ, Nici pe cal alb călare: O sforicică şi-o scândurică Pentru-o spânzurătoare Sunt de ajuns; iar nodul uns Gâtleju-l strânge tare. We were as men who through a fen Of filthy darkness grope: We did not dare to breathe a prayer, Or give our anguish scope: Something was dead in each of us, And what was dead was Hope. Noi pentru lume suntem anume Cum în veşmânt e zdreanţa; Să ne rugăm, ori să sperăm, Pierdut-am cutezanţa; Tot ce-i vioi e mort în noi: E moartă-n noi Speranţa! For Man‘s grim Justice goes its way, And will not swerve aside: It slays the weak, it slays the strong, It has a deadly stride: With iron heel it slays the strong, Dreptatea oarbă calcă-ntins Pe neclintitu-i drum; Călcâi de fier striveşte crud Pe slabi, pe tari, oricum; Izbeşte-apoi cu bici de foc 397 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The monstrous parricide! Şi lasă-n urmă-i scrum. We waited for the stroke of eight: Each tongue was thick with thirst: For the stroke of eight is the stroke of Fate That makes a man accursed, And Fate will use a running noose For the best man and the worst. Opt ceasuri au sunat, precum Ciocanul pe ilău; Ci-n cruntul ceas, al Sorţii pas Sorti, în mersul său, Un laţ de sfoară ce-nfăşoară Pe bun ca şi pe rău. We had no other thing to do, Save to wait for the sign to come: So, like things of stone in a valley lone, Quiet we sat and dumb: But each man‘s heart beat thick and quick Like a madman on a drum! N-aveam ce face: aşteptam Grozavul semn să cadă: Şi împietriţi, încremeniţi, Stam muţi şi crunţi grămadă, Dar inima bătea în toţi Ca toba la paradă With sudden shock the prison-clock Smote on the shivering air, And from all the gaol rose up a wail Of impotent despair, Like the sound that frightened marshes hear From a leper in his lair. Deodată, spornic, limba-n ceasornic Izbi cu-nfiorare: Şi din piepturi vii un strigăt răzbi De neagră disperare, Ca strigăt scos de-un biet lepros Zvârlit din lumea mare. And as one sees most fearful things In the crystal of a dream, We saw the greasy hempen rope Hooked to the blackened beam, And heard the prayer the hangman‘s snare Strangled into a scream. Şi cum în vis năluci de-abis Le vezi ca printr-o brumă, În funie vedem urcând Un om născut din mumă, Iar ruga ce-o sfârşi ţipând Călăul i-o sugrumă! 398 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And all the woe that moved him so That he gave that bitter cry, And the wild regrets, and the bloody sweats, None knew so well as I: For he who live more lives than one More deaths than one must die. O! Cine ştie ce mărturie Din strigătu-i coboară! Ce regret amar, ce sudori de jar... Ca mine bunăoară Căci multe vieţi cine-a trăit Mult trebuie să şi moară. IV IV There is no chapel on the day On which they hang a man: The Chaplain‘s heart is far too sick, Or his face is far to wan, Or there is that written in his eyes Which none should look upon. Nu-i slujbă sfântă la altar În zi de spânzurare, Ci-i preotul în acea zi Bolnav de supărare: În gândul lui, în ochii lui Citeşti înfiorare. So they kept us close till nigh on noon, And then they rang the bell, And the Warders with their jingling keys Opened each listening cell, And down the iron stair we tramped, Each from his separate Hell. Închişi sub pază pân-la amiază Şedem, până ce cad Zăvoarele, iar temniceri Trag uşile de brad, Şi din celule ţâşnim toţi Ocnaşii ca din iad. Out into God‘s sweet air we went, But not in wonted way, For this man‘s face was white with fear, And that man‘s face was grey, And I never saw sad men who looked So wistfully at the day. Ieşim în aerul cel bun Ce ne mângâie faţa; Dar feţele acestor inşi Sunt sumbre cum e ceaţa, Şi oameni n-am văzut nicicând. Privind mai lacom viaţa. 399 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry I never saw sad men who looked With such a wistful eye Upon that little tent of blue We prisoners called the sky, And at every careless cloud that passed In happy freedom by. Nu, oameni n-am văzut nicicând, Sau vreun prizonier, Holbaţi la peticul de-azur (Ocnaşii zic că-i cer) Şi nici la norii ce plutesc Nepăsători şi pier. But their were those amongst us all Who walked with downcast head, And knew that, had each got his due, They should have died instead: He had but killed a thing that lived Whilst they had killed the dead. Vreo câţiva umblă dintre ei Fricoşi purtându-şi portul Căci ei urmau să urce-n laţ Dacă-şi primeau drept ortul; El omorâse ce trăia, Dar ei ucis-au mortul. For he who sins a second time Wakes a dead soul to pain, And draws it from its spotted shroud, And makes it bleed again, And makes it bleed great gouts of blood And makes it bleed in vain! Da: un făptaş de nou păcat Deşteaptă la durere Un suflet din cellalt tărâm, Din veşnica Tăcere, Şi-l face-a sângera din nou Cu sânge şi cu fiere. Like ape or clown, in monstrous garb With crooked arrows starred, Silently we went round and round The slippery asphalte yard; Silently we went round and round, And no man spoke a word. În clasicul hidos costum Un şir de clovni păream; Mergem pe-asfalt de jur în jur Şi toţi în jos priveam; Posaci călcam pe-asfalt în jur Şi unul nu vorbeam. Silently we went round and round, And through each hollow mind Umblam tăcuţi de jur în jur, Şi-n oricare din noi 400 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The memory of dreadful things Rushed like a dreadful wind, An Horror stalked before each man, And terror crept behind. Cumplit de-amare amintiri Ţâşnesc ca un şuvoi; Cu Spaima-n frunte ne târâm Şi Groaza înapoi. The Warders strutted up and down, And kept their herd of brutes, Their uniforms were spick and span, And they wore their Sunday suits, But we knew the work they had been at By the quicklime on their boots. În vino-du-te păzesc pe brute Gardişti cu pasu-ntins: Le e costumul nou-nouţ Tot cu curele-ncins, Dar cismele-s pătate alb Cu hălci de var aprins. For where a grave had opened wide, There was no grave at all: Only a stretch of mud and sand By the hideous prison-wall, And a little heap of burning lime, That the man should have his pall. Căci locul lui de îngropat Nu este loc de moarte, Ci doar noroi printre calcar, De zid nu chiar departe, Pentru ca mortu-n strat de var De giulgi să aibă parte! For he has a pall, this wretched man, Such as few men can claim: Deep down below a prison-yard, Naked for greater shame, He lies, with fetters on each foot, Wrapt in a sheet of flame! Da, răposatul şade-n giulgi Cum nu toţi au noroc: Vârât în curte sub pământ, În tot umblatul loc, Cu lanţuri zace la picior Într-un cerşaf de foc. And all the while the burning lime Eats flesh and bone away, It eats the brittle bone by night, And the soft flesh by the day, Varul nestins roade din el Os, carne, sânge, seu: Din carne muşcă peste zi, Noaptea din os, mai greu: 401 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry It eats the flesh and bones by turns, But it eats the heart alway. Carne şi os roade pe rând, Dar inima mereu! For three long years they will not sow Or root or seedling there: For three long years the unblessed spot Will sterile be and bare, And look upon the wondering sky With unreproachful stare. Trei ani în şir n-or semăna Răsad de plantă vie: Trei ani în blestematul loc N-o creşte bălărie; Ci glia lui va fi sub cer Şi stearpă şi pustie. They think a murderer‘s heart would taint Each simple seed they sow. It is not true! God‘s kindly earth Is kindlier than men know, And the red rose would but blow more red, The white rose whiter blow. O inimă de ucigaş Cred ei că spurcă huma, Dar nu! Din darnicul pământ Vor creşte-abia acuma Garoafe şi mai sângerii Şi crini mai albi ca spuma. Out of his mouth a red, red rose! Out of his heart a white! For who can say by what strange way, Christ brings his will to light, Since the barren staff the pilgrim bore Bloomed in the great Pope‘s sight? Din gură roşii maci vor da, Din ochii-i lăcrămioare: Căci cine spune prin ce minune Isus mai poate-apare, Şi cum toiagul a-nflorit L-a Papei cuvântare? But neither milk-white rose nor red May bloom in prison air; The shard, the pebble, and the flint, Are what they give us there: For flowers have been known to heal A common man‘s despair. Dar roşii flori, nici albe flori Nu cresc în puşcărie, Căci florile-ar mai alina Pe omul în urgie: Nisip şi bolovani şi var S-întreaga poezie! 402 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry So never will wine-red rose or white, Petal by petal, fall On that stretch of mud and sand that lies By the hideous prison-wall, To tell the men who tramp the yard That God‘s Son died for all. Nici maci, nici crinii nu-nfloresc Pentru nebuni şi hoţi, În lutul sterp nicicând brăzdat De-a plugurilor roţi, Spre-a spune că Divinul Fiu Murit-a pentru toţi! Yet though the hideous prison-wall Still hems him round and round, And a spirit man not walk by night That is with fetters bound, And a spirit may not weep that lies In such unholy ground, Deşi al închisorii zid Se-nalţă-ntunecat, Şi noaptea nu se plimbă duh Cu lanţuri ferecat, Nici suflet n-ar putea să plângă În locul blestemat, He is at peace—this wretched man— At peace, or will be soon: There is no thing to make him mad, Nor does Terror walk at noon, For the lampless Earth in which he lies Has neither Sun nor Moon. E-n pace mortul ucigaş, Ferit de-orice furtună: Nu-l chinuieşte-al Vieţii glas Cu Spaima dimpreună: Fiindcă-n var nu-i gând amar, Nici soare şi nici Lună. They hanged him as a beast is hanged: They did not even toll A requiem that might have brought Rest to his startled soul, But hurriedly they took him out, And hid him in a hole. Ca pe o fiară l-au ucis... Şi nici nu porunciră Clopot să sune, nici rugăciune: Ci-ndată ce sfârşiră, Pe fugă l-au dat jos din Laţ Şi-n groapă l-azvârliră. They stripped him of his canvas clothes, L-au despuiat de straie tot 403 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And gave him to the flies; They mocked the swollen purple throat And the stark and staring eyes: And with laughter loud they heaped the shroud In which their convict lies. Şi-au râs de trupu-i gol, De gât-umflat, de ochiul stat În ţeapăn rotocol; Şi tot râzând, şi var turnând I-au aşternut linţol. The Chaplain would not kneel to pray By his dishonoured grave: Nor mark it with that blessed Cross That Christ for sinners gave, Because the man was one of those Whom Christ came down to save. N-a vrut preotu-a se ruga Pe groapa fără nume, Nici sfânta cruce-a-i închina, Ca sufletu-i să-ndrume! Deşi doar pentru păcătoşi Venit-a Crist pe lume! Yet all is well; he has but passed To Life‘s appointed bourne: And alien tears will fill for him Pity‘s long-broken urn, For his mourner will be outcast men, And outcasts always mourn. Şi gata... Facla vieţii lui Fu dată să se stângă: Străine lacrimi pentru el În urmă-au să se strângă, Căci jalnicii fiind proscrişi, Proscrişii ştiu să plângă. V V I know not whether Laws be right, Or whether Laws be wrong; All that we know who lie in goal Is that the wall is strong; And that each day is like a year, A year whose days are long. Nu ştiu de-i Legea dreaptă, nici De e nedreaptă tare Dar cei din închisoare ştim Că-i zidul gros şi mare, Căci orice zi e ca un an Cu zile lungi şi-amare. But this I know, that every Law Ştiu doar că Legea ce s-a scris 404 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That men have made for Man, Since first Man took his brother‘s life, And the sad world began, But straws the wheat and saves the chaff With a most evil fan. De oameni pentru om, De când un frate-a fost ucis Sub vechiul biblic pom, Doar din durere s-a urzit În ultimu-i atom. This too I know—and wise it were If each could know the same— That every prison that men build Is built with bricks of shame, And bound with bars lest Christ should see How men their brothers maim. Un penitenciar, o ştim, Zidit e din păcate; Celule-i sunt înadins Cu gratii ferecate, Ca să nu vadă Crist pe om Cum chinuie pe-un frate. With bars they blur the gracious moon, And blind the goodly sun: And they do well to hide their Hell, For in it things are done That Son of God nor son of Man Ever should look upon! Printre zăbrele, soare sau stele Pierd raza lor cerească: Şi-astfel ascund un iad profund Cu nepătrunsă mască Încât nici Om nici Dumnezeu Să nu-l mai recunoască. The vilest deeds like poison weeds Bloom well in prison-air: It is only what is good in Man That wastes and withers there: Pale Anguish keeps the heavy gate, And the Warder is Despair Fapte cumplite – plante-otrăvite – Pot creşte-n închisoare: Şi numai ce-i mai bun în om Se scutură şi moare: Spaima nebună luptă-mpreună Cu muta disperare. For they starve the little frightened child Till it weeps both night and day: And they scourge the weak, and flog the fool, Cel slab îşi simte nervii zob Şi plânge ca nebunul; Sau chinuit, batjocorit, 405 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And gibe the old and grey, And some grow mad, and all grow bad, And none a word may say. Îi vine gărgăunul! Mulţi se zmintesc, toţi se-nrăiesc, Dar nu vorbeşte unul. Each narrow cell in which we dwell Is foul and dark latrine, And the fetid breath of living Death Chokes up each grated screen, And all, but Lust, is turned to dust In Humanity‘s machine. Celula-n care stăm fiecare E-o groaznică latrină; Duhoarea morţii prin pragul porţii De scârbe intră plină, Şi-orice, afară de Desfrâu, E rupt ca-ntr-o maşină. The brackish water that we drink Creeps with a loathsome slime, And the bitter bread they weigh in scales Is full of chalk and lime, And Sleep will not lie down, but walks Wild-eyed and cries to Time. Sălcia apa cu noroi Când bem, grumazu-l strânge; În pâinea-amară găsim var Şi clei vâscos ca sânge! Iar Somnu-n loc de-a adormi Se plimbă crunt – şi plânge. But though lean Hunger and green Thirst Like asp with adder fight, We have little care of prison fare, For what chills and kills outright Is that every stone one lifts by day Becomes one‘s heart by night. Setoşi, scrâşnim, flămânzi râvnim La otrăvita masă; Ci-n nchisoare răbdarea-i mare: De foame nu ne pasă; Doar pietrele ce le cărăm Pe inimă ne-apasă. With midnight always in one‘s heart, And twilight in one‘s cell, We turn the crank, or tear the rope, Each in his separate Hell, And the silence is more awful far Cu noaptea-n suflet, cu amurg De-a pururi în odaie Roţi învârtim, frânghii-mpletim Ce mâinile ne taie; Dar liniştea cade mai greu 406 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Than the sound of a brazen bell. C-a tunului bătaie. And never a human voice comes near To speak a gentle word: And the eye that watches through the door Is pitiless and hard: And by all forgot, we rot and rot, With soul and body marred. În nici un ceas mai blând vreun glas Nu spune-o cuvântare; Prin uşă ochi ce ne pândesc Sunt fără de-ndurare; Şi sufletul în orice chip Călcat ne e-n picioare. And thus we rust Life‘s iron chain Degraded and alone: And some men curse, and some men weep, And some men make no moan: But God‘s eternal Laws are kind And break the heart of stone. Ne înjosim şi ruginim Ca lanţuri azvârlite; Blestemă unii, alţii plâng, Ies alţii din sărite; Dar legile divine frâng Şi inimi împietrite. And every human heart that breaks, In prison-cell or yard, Is as that broken box that gave Its treasure to the Lord, And filled the unclean leper‘s house With the scent of costliest nard. Căci orice inimi omeneşti Zdrobite totuş ard, Şi imnuri Proniei cereşti Îi cântă ca un bard, Şi focul mare-l hrănesc pe-altare Cu preţiosul nard. Ah! happy day they whose hearts can break And peace of pardon win! How else may man make straight his plan And cleanse his soul from Sin? How else but through a broken heart May Lord Christ enter in? Ferice inimi ce se frâng Şi dobândesc iertarea! Doar prin păcate în plâns spălate Se-nfăptuie-Înălţarea: În răni de inimi frânte Crist Îşi picură-ndurarea. 407 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And he of the swollen purple throat. And the stark and staring eyes, Waits for the holy hands that took The Thief to Paradise; And a broken and a contrite heart The Lord will not despise. Cel cu gât vânăt şi umflat, Cu ţeapăn ochi deschis, Aşteaptă Mâna care-a dus Pe hoţ în paradis: Căci pentr-un suflet pocăit Nici raiul nu stă-nchis. The man in red who reads the Law Gave him three weeks of life, Three little weeks in which to heal His soul of his soul‘s strife, And cleanse from every blot of blood The hand that held the knife. Trei săptămâni mai fu lăsat, C-aşa e-n lege ritul; Să se desprindă şi-ncet să-şi prindă În cuget ispăşitul: Şi sângele-a-l spăla pe mâna Care-a ţinut cuţitul. And with tears of blood he cleansed the hand, The hand that held the steel: For only blood can wipe out blood, And only tears can heal: And the crimson stain that was of Cain Became Christ‘s snow-white seal. Lacrimi de sânge-au curs din plin Pe mâna ce-a răpus: Cum, decât sânge-nlăcrimat Mai bune leacuri nu-s, Pata lui Cain deveni Pecetea lui Isus. VI VI In Reading gaol by Reading town There is a pit of shame, And in it lies a wretched man Eaten by teeth of flame, In burning winding-sheet he lies, And his grave has got no name. În temniţa Reading, în statul Reading – Locşor pierdut în lume – Un condamnat e sfâşiat De-a flăcărilor spume; Aprins focar de giulgi de var, În groapa fără nume. 408 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And there, till Christ call forth the dead, In silence let him lie: No need to waste the foolish tear, Or heave the windy sigh: The man had killed the thing he loved, And so he had to die. Lăsaţi-l ... Până când Cristos Veni-va-a doua oară, Nu-l plângeţi, nici păreri de rău Nu ziceţi într-o doară; Ucis-a omul ce iubea Şi-a trebuit să moară. And all men kill the thing they love, By all let this be heard, Some do it with a bitter look, Some with a flattering word, The coward does it with a kiss, The brave man with a sword! Cu toţi ucidem ce ni-i drag Şi-ntindem morţii prada; Omoară unii măgulind, Ori cu dojeni, cu sfada: Cei laşi ucid cu sărutări, Iar cei viteji cu spada! Traducere N. Porsenna. 409 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1899a. YEATS. He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven. Pillat. 8 lines. Author: William Butler YEATS (1865-1939). Text: He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: Try to explain this poem to a friend. In your own words... Or even explain it to yo urself. In plain words... He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven. Poetul doreşte hainele cerului. Had I the heavens‘ embroidered cloths, Enwrought with golden and silver light, The blue and the dim and the dark cloths Of night and light and the half-light, I would spread the cloths under your feet: But I, being poor, have only my dreams; I have spread my dreams under your feet; Tread softly because you tread on my dreams. De aş avea hainele împodobite ale cerului Cusute cu rază de soare şi de argint, Albastrele, ştersele şi negrele haine Ale nopţii, ale luminii şi ale penumbrii, Aş întinde hainele sub picioarele tale; Dar eu, săracul de mine, n-am decât vise; Mi-am întins visele sub picioarele tale. Calcă uşor, căci păşeşti peste visele mele. Traducere I. Pillat. 410 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1899b. YEATS. The Valley of the Black Pig. Pillat. 8 lines. Author: William Butler YEATS (1865-1939). Text: The Valley of the Black Pig. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: Why is Yeats so difficult to understand, do you think? The Valley of the Black Pig. Valea Porcului Negru. The dews drop slowly and dreams gather; unknown spears Suddenly hurtle before my dream-awakened eyes, And then the clash of fallen horsemen and the cries Of unknown perishing armies beat about my ears. We who still labour by the cromlech on the shore, The grey cairn on the hill, when day sinks drowned in dew, Being weary of the world‘s empires, bow down to you, Master of the still stars and of the flaming door. Roua picură încet şi visuri de adună; necunoscute paloşe Deodată se ciocnesc în faţa ochilor mei treziţi din vis. Apoi zgomotul surd de călăreţi căzuţi şi ţipetele Necunoscutelor oşti pierind, îmi loveşte auzul. Noi care arăm azi, lângă piatra druizilor, pe ţărm, Cairnul cenuşiu de pe deal când ziua cade înecată în rouă Obosiţi de împărăţiile lumii, ne închinăm ţie, Stăpâne al stelelor tăcute şi al porţii înflăcărate. Traducere I. Pillat. 411 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1900?. MACEDONSKI. Sonetul nestematelor. Duţescu. 14 lines. Author: Alexandru MACEDONSKI (1854-1920). Text: Sonetul nestematelor. Translator: D. Duţescu. FrageStellung: What is a sonnet? How many sonnets did Shakespeare write? Find the exact number... Sonetul nestematelor. The Sonnet of the gems. Aci sunt giuvaiere ce-mpart cu dărnicie. Cristalizate fost-au de mine-n focul vieţii, Şi-n apa lor răsfrânt-am minunea tinereţii, Iar de-artă şlefuite sunt azi pentru vecie. Here lavishly these jewels among all men I share; In the high fire of living I crystallised their truth, And in their depths I mirrored the miracle of youth, And Art has stroked them gently to make them shine for‘er. Făcut-am cea mai aspră şi grea ucenicie, Dar tot le-am smuls din suflet în faptul dimineţii, Mai limpezi decât ochii de vis ai frumuseţii, Şi tot le-am dat, în urmă, nespusă trăinicie. Like a devout apprentice I bent and toiled and tried Till from my soul I plucked them when daybreak is agleam, And pure were they, yeah, purer than Beauty‘s eyes of dream; Enduring , too, I made them, forever to abide. De-acuma, vârsta poate pecetea să-şi pună Pe omul de-azi şi mâine, iar moartea să-l răpună. Aceste nestemate cu apa neclintită, Now let Age set its signet upon the man that is And will be for some time yet – and then let Death set his: These gems of the first waters, profound and motionless, Sfidând a clevetirii pornire omenească, Şi stând într-o lumină mereu mai strălucită, Să piară n-au vreodată şi nici să-mbătrânească. Defying human meanness and human envious rage And standing out in ever more brilliant sacredness, Shall ne‘er be lost to ages, nor bear the stain of age. Traducere D. Duţescu. 412 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1902. BACOVIA. Plumb. Jay. 8 lines. Author: George BACOVIA (1881-1957). Text: Plumb. Translator: P. Jay. FrageStellung: Do you feel from the poem that we have entered the 20th Century? What exactly gives that feeling? Pinpoint it. (50 words) Plumb. Lead. Dormeau adânc sicriele de plumb, Şi flori de plumb şi funerar vestmânt — Stam singur în cavou... şi era vânt... Şi scârţâiau coroanele de plumb. The coffins of lead were lying sound asleep, And the lead flowers and the funeral clothes — I stood alone in the vault... and there was wind... And the wreaths of lead creaked. Dormea întors amorul meu de plumb Pe flori de plumb, şi-am început să-l strig — Stam singur lângă mort... şi era frig... Şi-i atârnau aripile de plumb. Upturned my lead belovèd lay asleep On the lead flowers... and I began to call — I stood alone by the corpse... and it was cold... And the wings of lead drooped. Traducere P. Jay. 413 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1907. JOYCE. I Hear an Army. Blaga. 12 lines. Author: James JOYCE (1882-1941). Text: I Hear an Army. Translator: L. Blaga. FrageStellung: Was James Joyce a poet? (100 words) I Hear an Army. Aud o oaste. I hear an army charging upon the land, And the thunder of horses plunging; foam about their knees: Arrogant, in black armour, behind them stand, Disdaining the reins, with fluttering whips, the Charioteers. Aud o oaste atacând pământul dinspre mare. Tunet de cai prin ape. Ei calcă spuma în picioare. Provocători, prin valuri, căruţaşii-n negre zale, Biciuri îşi fâlfâie, dispreţuind hamuri şi frâne. They cry into the night their battle name: I moan in sleep when I hear afar their whirling laughter. They cleave the gloom of dreams, a blinding flame, Clanging, clanging upon the heart as upon an anvil. Ostaşii-şi strigă-n noapte chiotul de bătălie. În somn eu gem, subt râsul lor din depărtare. Noaptea din vis ei mi-o despică. Ce văpaie orbitoare! Lovită, inima, lovită, se preface-n nicovală. They come shaking in triumph their long grey hair: They come out of the sea and run shouting by the shore. My heart, have you no wisdom thus to despair? My love, my love, my love, why have you left me alone? Îşi scutură-n triumf ostaşii părul verde. Din mare ies, gonind, pe ţărmul fără nume. Vai mie, disperez aşa fără de-un strop de-nţelepciune? Dragostea mea, dragostea mea, de ce m-ai părăsit? Traducere L. Blaga. 414 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1911. COŞBUC. Poetul. Leviţchi. 30 lines. Author: George COŞBUC (1866-1918). Text: Poetul. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Poetul. The Poet. Sunt suflet în sufletul neamului meu Şi-i cânt bucuria şi-amarul— În ranele tale durutul sunt, eu, Şi-otrava deodată cu tine o beu Când soarta-ţi întinde paharul. Şi-oricare-ar fi drumul pe care-o s-apuci, Răbda-vom pironul aceleiaşi cruci, Unindu-ne steagul şi larul, Şi-altarul speranţei oriunde-o să-l duci, Acolo-mi voi duce altarul. A soul in the soul of my people am I And sing of its sorrows and joys, For mine are your wounds and I cry Whenever you do, drinking dry That chalice of poison that‘s meant for Fate‘s toys. Whatever your pathway, together we‘ll all, We‘ll bear the same cross and we‘ll feel the same nail; Your banner and creed will be mine; The shrine of my hopes I shan‘t fail To set by the side of your shrine. Sunt inimă-n inima neamului meu Şi-i cânt şi iubirea, şi ura – Tu focul, dar vântul ce-aprinde sunt eu; Voinţa ni-e una, că-i una mereu În toate-ale noastre măsura. Izvor eşti şi ţinta a totul ce cânt – Iar dacă vrodat-aş grăi vrun cuvânt A heart of my people‘s great heart; I sing of its love and its hate; The part that you play is the fire‘s; my part Is that of the wind; you‘re mate In all that‘s decided by Fate. You‘re the source and the aim of whatever I sing. And if at times say a thing 415 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Cum nu-ţi glăsuieşte scriptura, Ai fulgere-n cer, Tu, cel mare şi sfânt, Şi-nchide-mi cu fulgerul gura! That‘s not in your Scriptures, you can, Most holy celestial King, Lock up with a lightning the mouth of a man. Ce-s unora lucruri a toate mai sus Par altora lucruri deşarte. Dar ştie Acel ce compasul şi-a pus, Pe marginea lumii-ntre viaţă şi-apus De-i alb ori e negru ce-mparte! Iar tu mi-eşti în suflet, şi-n suflet ţi-s eu, Şi secolii-nchid-ori deschidă cum vreu Eterna ursitelor carte, Din suflet eu fi-ţi-voi, tu, neamule-al meu, De-a pururi, nerupta sa parte! Some people hold dear and supreme What‘s vain in the other men‘s eye; But he who can scan both the earth and the sky And set up a bridge tween the low and the high, Will always distinguish to be‘ from to seem‘. My heart is all yours and your heart is in me Whatever your place on the chart Of forth-coming ages, whate‘er they decree, For you, mine own people, of your soul I will be For ever and ever a part. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 416 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1916. YEATS. The Magi. Pillat. 8 lines. Author: William Butler YEATS (1865-1939). Text: The Magi. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: a. Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic craft? b. Can you find one common element (technique, meaning, imagery) between this poem and T.S. Eliot‘ s Journey of the Magi? The Magi. Magii. Now as at all times I can see in the mind‘s eye, In their stiff, painted clothes, the pale unsatisfied ones Appear and disappear in the blue depth of the sky With all their ancient faces like rain-beaten stones, And all their helms of silver hovering side by side, And all their eyes still fixed, hoping to find once more, Being by Calvary‘s turbulence unsatisfied, The uncontrollable mystery on the bestial floor. Acuma, ca şi totdeauna, pot vedea cu ochii minţii, În hainele lor ţeapăne, vopsite, nemulţumiţii palizi Cum răsar şi dispar în adâncul albastru al cerului. Cu toate feţele lor bătrâne ca piatra, lovite de ploaie, Şi toate coifurile lor de argint plutind unul lângă altul, Şi toate privirile lor încă pironite, nădăjduind să mai găsească odată, Chinuiţi de tumultul Calvarului, Taina ce nu se poate desluşi pe pământ. Traducere I. Pillat. 417 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1916a. BACOVIA. Decembre. Jay. 24 lines. Author: George BACOVIA (1881-1957). Text: Decembre. Translator: P. Jay. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Decembre. December. Te uită cum ninge decembre, Spre geamuri, iubito, priveşte — Mai spune s-aducă jăratec Şi focul s-aud cum trosneşte. See how December snows... Look there by the window, my dear — Tell them to bring in more embers, Then we can hear the fire roar. Şi mână fotoliul spre sobã, La horn să ascult vijelia, Sau zilele mele — totuna — Aş vrea să le-nvăţ simfonia. Push the armchair up to the stove And then we‘ll hear, by the chimney, The storm, or my days — it‘s the same — I must learn their symphony. Mai spune s-aducă şi ceaiul, Şi vino şi tu mai aproape, — Citeşte-mi ceva de la poluri, Şi ningă... zăpada ne-ngroape. Tell them also to bring in the tea, And come closer yourself too, please, — Read me something about the poles, Let it snow... let the snow bury us. Ce cald e aicea la tine, Şi toate din casă mi-s sfinte, — Te uită cum ninge decembre... How warm it is here in your home, Which to me is totally sacred, — See how December snows... 418 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Nu râde... citeşte-nainte. Don‘t laugh... go on reading aloud. E ziuă şi ce întuneric... Mai spune s-aducă şi lampa — Te uită, zăpada-i cât gardul, Şi-a prins promoroacă şi clampa. It‘s day and what darkness there is... We need a lamp fetched, would you ask — Look, the snow is as high as the fence, And the door-handle‘s caught by the frost. Eu nu mă mai duc azi acasă... Potop e-napoi şi-nainte, Te uită cum ninge decembre, Nu râde... citeşte-nainte. I‘m not going home now today... In front and behind there‘s a flood, See how December snows... Don‘t laugh... go on reading aloud. Traducere P. Jay. 419 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1916b. BACOVIA. Lacustră. Jay. 16 lines. Author: George BACOVIA (1881-1957). Text: Lacustră. Translator: P. Jay. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Lacustră. Lacustrine De-atâtea nopţi aud plouând, Aud materia plângând... Sunt singur, şi ma duce-un gând Spre locuinţele lacustre. So many nights I‘ve heard the rain, Have heard matter weeping... I am alone, my mind is drawn Towards lacustrine dwellings. Şi parcă dorm pe scânduri ude, În spate mă izbeşte-un val — Tresar prin somn şi mi se pare Că n-am tras podul de la mal. As though I slept on wet boards, A wave will slap me in the back — I start from sleep, and it seems I haven‘t drawn the bridge from the bank. Un gol istoric se întinde, Pe-aceleaşi vremuri mă găsesc... Şi simt cum de atâta ploaie Piloţii grei se prăbuşesc. A void of history extends, I find myself in the same times... And sense how through so much rain The heavy timber stilts are tumbling. De-atâtea nopţi aud plouând, So many nights I‘ve heard the rain, 420 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Tot tresărind, tot aşteptând... Sunt singur, şi mă duce-un gând Spre locuinţele lacustre. Always starting, always waiting... I am alone, my mind is drawn Towards lacustrine dwellings... Traducere P. Jay 421 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1916c. BACOVIA. Plouă. Jay. 16 lines. Author: George BACOVIA (1881-1957). Text: Plouă. Translator: P. Jay. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Plouă. It Rains. Da, plouă cum n-am mai văzut... Şi grele tălăngi adormite, Cum sună sub şuri învechite! Cum sună în sufletu-mi mut! Yes, it rains as I have never seen... And heavy cowbells asleep, How they ring in old sheds! How they keep Ringing in my soul that‘s dumb! Oh, plânsul tălăngii când plouă! Oh, the bells‘ lamentation in rain! Şi ce enervare pe gând! Ce zi primitivă de tină! O bolnavă fată vecină Răcneşte la ploaie, râzând... How enervated is my brain! What a primitive day of mud! A sick girl in the neighbourhood Yells laughing in the rain... Oh, plânsul tălăngii când plouă! Oh, the bells‘ lamentation in rain! Da, plouă... şi sună umil Ca tot ce-i iubire şi ură — Cu-o muzică tristă, de gură, Pe-aproape s-aude-un copil. Yes, it rains... like all that is love And hate, it‘s a humble sound — A child can be heard close at hand, Sad music comes from his mouth. 422 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Oh, plânsul tălăngii când plouă! Oh, the bells‘ lamentation in rain! Ce basme tălăngile spun! Ce lume-aşa goală de vise! ... Şi cum să nu plângi în abise, Da, cum să nu mori şi nebun. What stories the cowbells relate! What a world so bereft of dreams! How can you not weep in chasms, Yes, how can you not die mad. Oh, plânsul tălăngii când plouă! Oh, the bells‘ lamentation in rain! Traducere P. Jay. 423 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1916d. BACOVIA. Poemă în oglindă. Jay. 31 lines. Author: George BACOVIA (1881-1957). Text: Poemă în oglindă. Translator: P. Jay. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Poemă în oglindă. Poem in a Mirror. În salonul plin de vise, În oglinda larg-ovală încadrată în argint, Bate toamna, Şi grădina cangrenată, În oglinda larg-ovală încadrată în argint. In the drawing-room full of dreams, In the wide-oval mirror framed in silver, Knocks autumn And the gangrened garden, In the wide-oval mirror framed in silver. În fotoliu, ostenită, în largi falduri de mătase, Pe când cade violetul, Tu citeşti nazalizând O poemă decadentă, cadaveric parfumată, Monotonă. In an armchair, tired, in wide folds of silk, While the violet falls, You read nasalizing A decadent poem, cadaverously scented, In monotone. Eu prevăd poema roză a iubirii viitoare... I foresee the rosy poem of future love... Dar pierdută, cu ochi bòlnavi, Furi, ironic, împrejurul din salonul parfumat. Şi privirea-ţi cade vagă peste apa larg-ovală, Pe grădina cangrenată, But lost, with sick eyes, You take in ironically the scented drawing-room‘s surrounds. And your glance falls vaguely over the wide-oval water, On the gangrened garden, 424 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Peste toamna din oglindă — Adormind... Over autumn in the mirror — Falling asleep... Eu prevăd poema roză a iubirii viitoare... I foresee the rosy poem of future love... Însă pal mă duc acuma în grădina devastată Şi pe masa părăsită — alba marmură sculptată — În veşmintele-mi funebre, Mă întind ca şi un mort, Peste mine punând roze, flori pălite-ntârziate Ca şi noi... But pale I walk now in the ravaged garden And on the abandoned table — white sculpted marble — In my mourning garments, I stretch out like a dead man, And place roses over myself, withered belated flowers Like ourselves... Zi, finala melodie din clavirul prăfuit, Or ajunge plânsul apei din havuzele-nnoptate. Vezi, din anticul fotoliu — Agonia violetă, Catafalcul, Şi grădina cangrenată, În oglinda larg-ovală încadrată în argint... Speak, the final melody fom the dusty piano, Or the weeping of water from benighted fountains suffices. See, from the antique armchair — The violet agony, The bier And the gangrened garden, In the wide-oval mirror framed in silver... Traducere P. Jay. 425 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1917. T.S. ELIOT. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. Doinaş. 131 lines. Author: T.S. ELIOT (1888-1965). Text: The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. Translator: St. A. Doinaş. FrageStellung: What do we do with the Italian Epigraph? Should the Translator have translated it? Can YOU do it? where is it from? The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Cântecul de dragoste al lui Alfred J. Prufrock S‘io credesse che mia risposta fosse A persona che mai tornasse al mondo, Questa fiamma staria senza piu scosse. Ma perciocche giammai di questo fondo Non torno vivo alcun, s‘i‘odo il vero, Senza tema d‘infamia ti rispondo. Let us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky Like a patient etherized upon a table; Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets, The muttering retreats Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells: Streets that follow like a tedious argument Of insidious intent To lead you to an overwhelming question... Oh, do not ask, What is it? Let us go and make our visit. S‘io credesse che mia risposta fosse A persona che mai tornasse al mondo, Questa fiamma staria senza piu scosse. Ma perciocche giammai di questo fondo Non torno vivo alcun, s‘i‘odo il vero, Senza tema d‘infamia ti rispondo. Să mergem, deci, acuma amândoi, Când seara s-a întins în zare peste noi Ca un bolnav sub masca de eter, pe masă; Să mergem pe-anumite străzi aproape goale, Pe sub clădiri cu şoapte, În albe nopţi într-un hotel cu camere de-o noapte Şi-n searbăde localuri cu resturi vechi pe dale; Străzi înşirate ca lungi vorbe plicticoase Ce urmăresc insidioase Să te aducă la copleşitoarea întrebare O, nu-ntreba... „Care anume, oare? Să mergem, deci, în vizită. 426 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry In the room the women come and go Talking of Michelangelo. Femeile-n salon, în du-te-vino monoton, Discută despre Michelangelo. The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the window-panes, The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes Licked its tongue into the corners of the evening, Lingered upon the pools that stand in drains, Let fall upon its back the soot that falls from chimneys, Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap, And seeing that it was a soft October night, Curled once about the house, and fell asleep. Ceaţa gălbuie care-şi freacă spinarea de ferestre, Fumul gălbui care îşi freacă botul de ferestre A lins cu limba colţurile serii, A zăbovit prin bălţi şi prin canale, A luat apoi pe spate funingine din hornuri, Alunecând de pe terasă, dintr-o dată a sărit, Şi observând că-i noapte dulce de Octombrie, A dat clădirii încă un ocol, şi-a adormit. And indeed there will be time For the yellow smoke that slides along the street, Rubbing its back upon the window panes; There will be time, there will be time To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet There will be time to murder and create, And time for all the works and days of hands That lift and drop a question on your plate; Time for you and time for me, And time yet for a hundred indecisions, And for a hundred visions and revisions, Before the taking of a toast and tea. Şi-ntr-adevăr, e timp destul Ca fumul galben lunecând pe stradă Să-şi frece spatele de geamuri; E timp destul, e timp destul Ca să-ţi compui o faţă pentru feţele ce-or să te vadă; E timp destul ca să omori şi să dai viaţă, Şi pentru toate muncile şi zilele acestor braţe care Ridică şi-ţi aruncă în talger o-ntrebare! Timp pentru tine, şi timp pentru mine, Timp pentru zeci de şovăieli, Zeci de vedenii şi de socoteli, Înainte de ceai şi sandviciuri fine. In the room the women come and go Talking of Michelangelo. Femeile-n salon, în du-te-vino monoton, Discută despre Michelangelo. And indeed there will be time Şi-ntr-adevăr, va fi timp destul 427 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To wonder, Do I dare? and, Do I dare? Time to turn back and descend the stair, With a bald spot in the middle of my hair – (They will say: How his hair is growing thin!) My morning coat, my collar mounting firmly to the chin, My necktie rich and modest, but asserted by a simple pin – (They will say: But how his arms and legs are thin!) Do I dare Disturb the universe? In a minute there is time For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse. Să mă-ntreb „Îndrăznesc? şi din nou „Îndrăznesc? Timp să mă-ntorc şi pe scări să pornesc, Cu o pată în creştet, deoarece chelesc – (Or să spună: „Vai ce chelie!) Cu haina, cu băţosul meu guler sub bărbie, Şi cu cravata scumpă, discretă, prinsă-n ac (Vor spune: „Ce picioare şi mâini subţiri are!) Îndrăznesc oare Să tulbur universul? E timp destul într-un minut Pentru decizii şi schimbări ce-n alt minut îşi au reversul. For I have known them all already, known them all: Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons, I have measured out my life with coffee spoons; I know the voices dying with a dying fall Beneath the music from a farther room. So how should I presume? Fiindcă le ştiu pe toate, da pe toate, Ştiu după-amiaza, seara, dimineaţa, Cu linguriţe de cafea mi-am măsurat viaţa; Ştiu vocile murind într-un final ce moare Sub muzici dintr-o altă încăpere Pot să cutez eu oare? And I have known the eyes already, known them all – The eyes that fix you in a formulated phrase, And when I am formulated, sprawling on a pin, When I am pinned and wriggling on the wall, Then how should I begin To spit out all the butt-ends of my days and ways? And how should I presume? Cunosc şi ochii, îi cunosc pe toţi, Ochi care te fixează-ntr-o frază pregătită. Şi, prins într-o formulă, mă zbat ca într-un ac, Şi când mă zbat fixat de ziduri grele Cum aş putea să fac Să scuip tot praful zilei şi-al drumurilor mele? Pot să cutez eu oare? And I have known the arms already, known them all – Arms that are braceleted and white and bare Şi braţele le ştiu, le ştiu pe toate, Purtând brăţări, şi albe, dezbrăcate 428 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry (But in the lamplight, downed with light brown hair!) Is it perfume from a dress That makes me so digress? Arms that lie along a table, or wrap about a shawl. And should I then presume? And how should I begin? (Dar în lumină estompate de puful castaniu!) Oare parfumul vreunei rochii Din vorbă mă abate? Braţe ce cad pe masă sau într-un şal se învelesc. Ar trebui atunci să îndrăznesc? Şi oare cum ar trebui să-ncep? ………………………………………………………………. .................................................................... Shall I say, I have gone at dusk through narrow streets And watched the smoke that rises from the pipes Of lonely men in shirt-sleeves, leaning out of windows? Să spun c-am mers pe străzi înguste pe-nserat, Privind la fumul ce urca din pipele unor bărbaţi Stând singuri, în cămaşă, la ferestre? I should have been a pair of ragged claws Scuttling across the doors of silent seas. ……………………………………………………………. Mai bine aş fi fost cleşte tăios Gonind pe fundul mărilor tăcute. ............................................................. And the afternoon, the evening, sleeps so peacefully! Smoothed by long fingers, Asleep... tired... or it malingers. Stretched on on the floor, here beside you and me. Should I, after tea and cakes and ices, Have the strength to force the moment to its crisis? But though I have wept and fasted, wept and prayed, Though I have seen my head (grown slightly bald) brought in upon a platter, I am no prophet – and here‘s no great matter; I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker, And I have seen the eternal Footman hold my coat, and snicker, And in short, I was afraid. Şi doarme-amurgul sub atâta pace! Mângâiat de degete lungi, Adormit... obosit... sau poate se preface, Aici, alături de noi doi, întins pe-acest covor în dungi; Voi fi destul de tare, după ceai, prăjituri, îngheţată, Să-mping momentul pân-la criză, dintr-o dată? Dar deşi am plâns şi-am postit, deşi am plâns şi m-am rugat, Deşi mi-am văzut capul(uşor chel) dus pe tavă, Nu sunt profet - problema nu-i prea gravă; Mi-am văzut grandoarea pâlpâind abia Şi-am văzut eternul Lacheu cum îmi ţinea blana şi chicotea, Şi, pe scurt, m-am speriat. 429 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And would it have been worth it, after all, After the cups, the marmalade, the tea, Among the porcelain, among some talk of you and me, Would it have been worth while, To have bitten off the matter with a smile, To have squeezed the universe into a ball To roll it toward some overwhelming question, To say: I am Lazarus, come from the dead, Come back to tell you all, I shall tell you all – If one, settling a pillow by her head, Should say: That is not what I meant at all; That is not it, at all. Dar oare-ar fi avut vreun rost, la urma urmei, Ca după ceai, dulceţuri şi porţelanuri fine, În conversaţie cu tine, Ar fi avut vreun rost ca, surâzând, Să dau pe faţă ce aveam de gând, Şi, îndesând tot universul ca într-un balot, Să-l împing spre întrebarea copleşitoare Spunând: „Sunt Lazăr cel sculat din morţi, Mă-ntorc să vă spun totul, absolut tot Când aranjându-şi perna sub cap, oricare Putea să zică: „Nu, Nu asta am dorit. And would it have been worth it, after all, Would it have been worth while, After the sunsets and the dooryards and the sprinkled streets, After the novels, after the teacups, after the skirts that trail along the floor – And this, and so much more? – It is impossible to say just what I mean! But as if a magic lantern threw the nerves in patterns on a screen: Would it have been worth while If one, settling a pillow or throwing off a shawl, And turning toward the window, should say: That is not it at all, That is not what I meant, at all. Dar oare-ar fi avut vreun rost, la urma urmei, Ar fi avut vreun rost, După amurguri, parcuri şi străzi abia stropite, După romane, ceşti de ceai şi rochii târâte pe covor Şi câte altele de genul lor? Nu, mi-este imposibil să spun tot ce gândesc! Dar, ca şi când lanterna magică ar fi zvârlit nervii-n desene pe-un ecran, Nu ar fi fost cu totul de prisos Ca una, aşezând o pernă sau aruncând un şal pe jos, Întoarsă către geam, să fi rostit: „Nu, NU asta am dorit. ………………………………………………………… ............................................................................. 430 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be; Am an attendant lord, one that will do To swell a progress, start a scene or two, Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool, Deferential, glad to be of use, Politic, cautious, and meticulous; Full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse; At times, indeed, almost ridiculous – Almost, at times, the Fool. Eu nu sunt prinţul Hamlet, nici nu urma să fiu, Sunt lordul şambelan, fac parte Din cei care împing acţiunea mai departe; Dau sfaturi prinţului, nu şovăiesc, eu unul Plin de respect, sunt gata oricând să fiu util, Ştiu să mă port, precaut şi meticulos, Rostind frumoase vorbe, dar prea puţin subtil, Iar uneori sunt chiar caraghios, Da, uneori într-adevăr, eu sunt Nebunul. I grow old... I grow old... I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled. Îmbătrânesc... îmbătrânesc... Ar trebui un pic Manşeta pantalonilor să mi-o ridic. Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach? I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each. Să muşc fructul dintr-o dată? Să port părul dat pe spate? Pe faleză-n haine albe de flanel mă voi abate. Auzit-am cum sirene cântă-n larguri depărtate. I do not think that they will sing to me. Nu cred că eu sunt cel sortit cântării. I have seen them riding seaward on the waves Combing the white hair of the waves blown back When the wind blows the water white and black. We have lingered in the chambers of the sea By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown Till human voices wake us, and we drown. Le-am văzut pe valuri călărind în larg. Pieptănând al spumei păr căzut pe spate Apa albă, neagră joacă-n vânt, se zbate. Petrecem în iatacurile mării, Lângă nimfe care poartă alege roşii-brune stăm, Până ce voci omeneşti ne trezesc, şi ne-necăm. Traducere Şt.A. Doinaş. 431 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1918a. D.H. LAWRENCE. Piano. Tartler. 12 lines. Author: David Herbert LAWRENCE (1885-1930). Text: Piano. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: What is Lawrence most famous for? (100 words) Piano. Pianul. Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me; Taking me back down the vista of years, till I see A child sitting under the piano, in the boom of the tingling strings And pressing the small, poised feet of a mother who smiles as she sings. Blând îmi cântă-n amurg o femeie – mă duce Înapoi în adânc peste anii năluce Până văd un copil sub pian, sub corzile ce se bat, Pe pedală piciorul mamei care surâde-n cântat. In spite of myself, the insidious mastery of song Betrays me back, till the heart of me weeps to belong To the old Sunday evenings at home, with winter outside And hymns in the cosy parlour, the tinkling piano our guide. Insidioasa melodie mă fură, ştiu bine că Inima-mi plânge după acele seri de duminecă De-acasă, când iarna, în plăcutul salon Călăuzea între imnuri al pianului zvon. So now it is vain for the singer to burst into clamour With the great black piano appassionato. The glamour Of childish days is upon me, my manhood is cast Down in the flood of remembrance, I weep like a child for the past. Acum în zadar cântăreaţa se-avântă în marele Negru pian, appassionato. Hotarele Copilăriei m-au năpădit, bărbatul e dus în torent De-amintiri, suspin după neprezent. Traducere G. Tartler. 432 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1918b. Wilfred OWEN. Insensibility. Leviţchi. 59 lines. Author: Wilfred OWEN (1893-1918). Text: Insensibility. Translator: L. Leviţchi. FrageStellung: Give an outline of the life and work of Wilfred Owen. (100 words) Insensibility. Ce aveţi acolo. I I Happy are men who yet before they are killed Can let their veins run cold. Whom no compassion fleers Or makes their feet Sore on the alleys cobbled with their brothers. The front line withers, But they are troops who fade, not flowers For poets‘ tearful fooling: Men, gaps for filling Losses who might have fought Longer; but no one bothers. Ferice de acei ce pân-a fi ucişi Îşi seacă vinele. De-acei Pe care campasiunea nu-i batjocoreşte Nici nu-i sileşte să-şi rănească talpa Pe-aleile pavate cu atâţia fraţi. Când nu mai face faţă linia întâi, Ei sunt ostaşi ce mor, nu flori Jelite de poeţi hilari; Spărturi ce trebuiesc umplute Şi pierderi ce-ar mai fi putut lupta; Dar nimănui nu-i pasă. II II And some cease feeling Sunt unii ce-ncetează să mai simtă 433 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Even themselves or for themselves. Dullness best solves The tease and doubt of shelling, And Chance‘s strange arithmetic Comes simpler than the reckoning of their shilling. They keep no check on Armies‘ decimation. Ori pentru ei, ori pentru alţii. Indiferenţa face mai temeinic faţă Bombardamentului sâcâitor şi fără ţintă Şi aritmetica bizară-a soartei e mai simplă Decât numărătoarea banilor ce au. Ei nu ţin contabilitatea Armatei decimate. III III Happy are these who lose imagination: They have enough to carry with ammunition. Their spirit drags no pack. Their old wounds save with cold can not more ache. Having seen all things red, Their eyes are rid Of the hurt of the colour of blood for ever. And terror‘s first constriction over, Their hearts remain small drawn. Their senses in some scorching cautery of battle Now long since ironed, Can laugh among the dying, unconcerned. Ferice de acei ce-şi pierd imaginaţia: Destul că au de dus muniţia. Poveri nu cară spiritele lor; Nu simt durerea rănilor decât la frig. Cum au văzut doar roşu peste tot, Privirea nu le va mai fi înfricoşată De-a sângelui culoare Şi după jarul primelor terori, Cu inimile strânse, Cu simţurile cauterizate Şi de-o vecie cetluite-n fier, Vor râde printre morţi hohotitor. IV IV Happy the soldier home, with not a notion How somewhere, every dawn, some men attack, And many sighs are drained. Happy the lad whose mind was never trained: His days are worth forgetting more than not. Ferice de soldatul care, stând acasă, Habar nu are dacă undeva În fiecare dimineaţă oamenii atacă Şi multe sunt suspinele curmate. Ferice de flăcăul mintea cărui 434 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry He sings along the march Which we march taciturn, because of dusk, The long, forlorn, relentless trend From larger day to huger night. N-a fost vreodată instruită; Ce zile are merită a fi uitate. În tactul marşului ce-l cântă nencetat. Noi toţi înaintăm cu gura zăvorâtă Fiindcă e amurg şi deplasarea E veche şi nemilostivă, dinspre O zi mai lungă spre o noapte dilatată. V V We wise, who with a thought besmirch Blood over all our soul, How should we see our task But through his blunt and lashless eyes? Alive, he is not vital overmuch; Dying, not mortal overmuch; Nor sad, nor proud, Nor curious at all. He cannot tell Old men‘s placidity from his. Noi, înţelepţii cari cu-un singur gând Ne umplem sufletul de sânge, Cum desluşim ce obiectiv avem De nu prin ochii lui, lipsiţi de gene? Viu, nu e trăitor, Mort, nu e muritor. Nu este trist, nici mândru, nici hain, Nici curios. Seninătatea omului bătrân E una cu a lui. VI VI But cursed are dullards whom no cannon stuns, That they should be as stones. Wretched are they, and mean With paucity that never was simplicity. By choice they made themselves immune To pity and whatever mourns in man Before the last sea and the hapless stars; Vai însă de cretinii Pe cari nu-i asurzeşte tunul! Sunt nişte bolovani, meschini Din pricina puţinătăţii Ce simplitate nu a fost nicicând. Prin opţiune s-au imunizat De milă şi de jalea ce spre oameni abate 435 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Whatever mourns when many leave these shores; Whatever shares The eternal reciprocity of tears. În faţa ultimelor mări Şi-a stelelor fără noroc; De plânsul pentru cei ce lasă-aceste ţărmuri, De ceea ce e-n stare să împărtăşească Eterna lacrimilor reciprocitate. Traducere L. Leviţchi. 436 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1919. YEATS. The Wild Swans at Coole. Pillat. 30 lines. Author: William Butler YEATS (1865-1939). Text: The Wild Swans at Coole. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: Where is Coole? Is it important to know that? The Wild Swans at Coole. Lebedele sălbatice din Coole. The trees are in their autumn beauty, The woodland paths are dry, Under the October twilight the water Mirrors a still sky; Upon the brimming water among the stones Are nine-and-fifty Swans. Copacii au căpătat frumuseţea lor de toamnă, Potecile din păduri sunt uscate. În amurgul de octombrie apa Oglindă un cer liniştit; Pe ape lucind între pietre Stau cincizeci şi nouă de lebede. The nineteenth autumn has come upon me Since I first made my count; I saw, before I had well finished, All suddenly mount And scatter wheeling in great broken rings Upon their clamorous wings. A nouăsprezecea toamnă a venit peste mine De când întâia oară le-am numărat; Le-am văzut până să fi isprăvit bine. Toate deodată suind Şi îndepărtându-se, rotind în mari cercuri sparte Cu aripile lor zgomotoase. I have looked upon those brilliant creatures, And now my heart is sore. All‘s changed since I, hearing at twilight, The first time on this shore, Am privit acele strălucitoare fiinţe, Şi acum mi-e sufletul greu. Totu-i schimbat de când, ascultând în amurg, Întâia oară, pe ţărmul de-aici, 437 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The bell-beat of their wings above my head, Trod with a lighter tread. Lovitura de clopot a aripilor deasupra capului meu, Am păşit cu pas mai uşor. Unwearied still, lover by lover, They paddle in the cold Companionable streams or climb the air; Their hearts have not grown old; Passion or conquest, wander where they will, Attend upon them still. Neobosite încă, iubit lângă iubită Vâslesc prin frig, Pe râuri prietenoase, sau urcă prin aer, Sufletele nu le-au îmbătrânit; Patimi şi cuceriri, pribegească ele oriunde, Sunt pentru ele şi azi. Dar acum stau cârd, pe apa tăcută. But now they drift on the still water, Mysterious, beautiful; Among what rushes will they build, By what lake‘s edge or pool Delight men‘s eyes when I awake some day To find they have flown away? În taină, în frumuseţe; Printre ce stufuri clădi-vor ele, Pe ţărmul cărui lac sau tău Încânta-vor ochii altora când odată mă voi trezi Să aflu că au zburat. Traducere I. Pillat. 438 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1919. BLAGA. Eu nu strivesc corola de minuni a lumii. Hastie. 20 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers 1995 for the original poem from page 33.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (18965-1961). Text: Eu nu strivesc corola de minuni a lumii. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Eu nu strivesc corola de minuni a lumii. I Do Not Crush the Petal Cup of Magic of the World. Eu nu strivesc corola de minuni a lumii şi nu ucid cu mintea tainele, ce le-ntâlnesc în calea mea în flori, în ochi, pe buze ori morminte. Lumina altora sugrumă vraja nepătrunsului ascuns în adâncimi de întuneric, dar eu, eu cu lumina mea sporesc a lumii taină — şi-ntocmai cum cu razele ei albe luna nu micşorează, ci tremurătoare măreşte şi mai tare taina nopţii, aşa îmbogăţesc şi eu întunecata zare cu largi fiori de sfânt mister I do not crush the petal cup of magic of the world nor do I kill with reason the mystery I meet on my way in flowers, in eyes, on lips, in graves. The light of others strangles the inexplicable spell hidden in the depth of darkness. But I who add with my own light to the magic of the world and as the moon‘s white rays not diminishing but trembling make even greater the mystery of night so I increase the shadowy horizon with wide shivers of holy mystery 439 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry şi tot ce-i ne-nţeles se schimbă-n ne-nţelesuri şi mai mari sub ochii mei — căci eu iubesc şi flori şi ochi şi buze şi morminte. and everything not yet understood changes into things even less understood before my eyes because I love flowers, eyes, lips and graves. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 440 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1922. T.S. ELIOT. The Waste Land. Pillat # Covaci. 433 lines. Author: T.S. ELIOT (1888-1965). Text: The Waste Land. Translator: I. Pillat # A. Covaci. FrageStellung: a. What do we do about the Epigraphs? Can you translate them? Are Eliot‘s own NOTES imperative for full understanding? b. Can this poem be translated without rhymes (when there is rhyme)? c. Can you find out the effect of rhyme and the effect of assonance in this long poem by T.S. Elio t? Their aim is very different. d. Find at least seven differences of interpretation between the two Romanian versions. Ţara pustie. The Waste Land. Nam Sibyllam quidem Cumis ego ipse oculis meis vidi in ampulla pendere, et cum illi pueri dicerent: Sibylla ti theleis; respondebat illa: apothanein thelo. For Ezra Pound il miglior fabbro I. THE BURIAL OF THE DEAD April is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain. Winter kept us warm, covering I. ÎNMORMÂNTAREA MORTULUI Prier e cea mai crudă lună, născând Flori de liliac din ţara moartă, amestecând Amintire şi dorinţă, îmboldind Rădăcini amorţite cu ploaie de primăvară. Iarna ne-a ţinul cald, acoperind Pământul în omăt de uitare, hrănind 441 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Earth in forgetful snow, feeding A little life with dried tubers. Summer surprised us, coming over the Starnbergersee With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade, And went on in sunlight, into the Hofgarten, And drank coffee, and talked for an hour. Bin gar keine Russin, stamm‘ aus Litauen, echt deutsch. And when we were children, staying at the archduke‘s, My cousin‘s, he took me out on a sled, And I was frightened. He said, Marie, Marie, hold on tight. And down we went. In the mountains, there you feel free. I read, much of the night, and go south in the winter. Un pic de viaţă cu cepe uscate. Vara ne-a surprins, sosind peste Starnbergersee What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man, You cannot say, or guess, for you know only A heap of broken images, where the sun beats, And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief, And the dry stone no sound of water. Only There is shadow under this red rock, (Come in under the shadow of this red rock), And I will show you something different from either Your shadow at morning striding behind you Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you; I will show you fear in a handful of dust. Frisch weht der Wind Der Heimat zu Mein Irisch Kind, Wo weilest du? Ce rădăcini sunt astea de se ţin încleştate, ce crengi zbucnesc Din aceste surpături de piatra? Fiu al omului, Tu nu poţi spune sau ghici, căci nu cunoşti decât Un maldăr de icoane sparte, acolo unde bate soarele. Şi copacul mort nu dă adăpost, nici greierele ajutor, Şi nici piaira uscată zgomot de apă. Numai Acolo e umbră, sub stânca roşie. (Intră sub umbra stâncii roşii.) Şi îţi voi arăta ceva deosebit, Şi de umbra ta în zori umblând cu paşi mari în urma-ţi, Şi de umbra ta seara răsărind ca să te întâmpine: Îţi voi arăta spaima într-o mână de praf. Frisch wecht der Wind Der Heimat zu, Mein irisch Kind Wo weilest du? Ca o pală de ploaie; ne-am oprit în colonadă, Şi am pornit iar la soare, în Hofgarten, Şi am băut cafea, şi am vorbit timp de un ceas. Bin gar keine Russin, stamm‘aus Litauen, echt Deutsch. Şi pe când eram copil, locuind la arhiduce, Vărul meu, el mă lua cu dânsul în săniuţă, Şi mă speriam. Spunea: „Marie, Marie, apucă-te bine. Şi devale o porneam, În munţi, acolo te simţi slobod. Citesc mai toată noaptea şi cobor către miazăzi, iarna. 442 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry You gave me hyacinths first a year ago; They called me the hyacinth girl. – Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden, Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither Living nor dead, and I knew nothing, Looking into the heart of light, the silence. Oed‘ und leer das Meer. – „Mi-am dat întâile zambile acum un an: M-au numit fata cu zambile. Totuşi, când ne-am întors târziu, din grădina zambilelor, Cu braţele tale pline şi părul tău ud, n-am putut Grăi, şi ochii mi-au lipsit, nu eram nici Viu, nici mort şi nu cunoşteam nimic, Privind în inima luminii tăcerea, Öd und leer das Meer. Madame Sosostris, famous clairvoyante, Had a bad cold, nevertheless Is known to be the wisest woman in Europe, With a wicked pack of cards. Here, said she, Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor, (Those are pearls that were his eyes. Look!) Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks, The lady of situations. Here is the man with three staves, and here the Wheel, And here is the one-eyed merchant, and this card, Which is blank, is something he carries on his back, Which I am forbidden to see. I do not find The Hanged Man. Fear death by water. I see crowds of people, walking round in a ring. Thank you. If you see dear Mrs. Equitone, Tell her I bring the horoscope myself: One must be so careful these days. Madame Sosostris, faimoasă „clarvoyantă, Avea un guturai, cu toate acestea E cunoscută drept cea mai înţeleaptă femeie din Europa Cu un afurisit pachet de cărţi. Aici, spunea ea, E cartea Matale, Marinarul Phoenician cel înecat. (Mărgelele acestea erau ochii lui. Te uită!) Aici e Belladona, Doamna Stâncilor, Doamna chiverniselilor. Aici e omul cu trei doage, şi aici Roata, Şi aici e neguţătorul chior, şi această carte, Care e albă, e ceva ce duce el în spate, Pe care n-am voie să văd. Nu pot găsi Omul Spânzurat. Să te fereşti de moartea prin apă. Văd oameni gloată, umblând jur împrejur în cerc. Mulţumesc. De vezi pe scumpa mea D-nă Equitone, Spune-i că-i aduc horoscopul chiar eu: Se cere atâta băgare de seamă astăzi. Unreal City, Under the brown fog of a winter dawn, A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many, Cetate nălucă, Sub ceaţa cafenie a unor zori de iarnă, O mulţime curgea pe Podul Londrei, atâţia, 443 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry I had not thought death had undone so many. Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled, And each man fixed his eyes before his feet. Flowed up the hill and down King William Street, To where Saint Mary Woolnoth kept the hours With a dead sound on the final stroke of nine. There I saw one I knew, and stopped him, crying Stetson! You who were with me in the ships at Mylae! That corpse you planted last year in your garden, Has it begun to sprout? Will it bloom this year? Or has the sudden frost disturbed its bed? Oh keep the Dog far hence, that‘s friend to men, Or with his nails he‘ll dig it up again! You! hypocrite lecteur! – mon semblable, - mon frère! Nu mă gândisem că moartea pierduse atâţia. Suspine, scurte şi puţine, se pierdeau. Şi fiece om îşi ţinea ochii înaintea sa. Curgea la deal şi la vale pe Strada Regelui William, Acolo unde clopotul Sfintei Mariei Woolnuth însemna orele Ca un sunet mort la ultima bătaie. Acolo zării un cunoscut, şi l-am oprit, strigând: „Stetson! Tu, care ai fost cu mine în corăbii la Mylae! Trupul pe care l-ai sădit anul trecut în grădina ta A început să dea muguri? O să înflorească anul acesta? Sau gerul neaşteptat i-a turburat odihna? Oh, ţine departe Câinele, prietenul omului, De nu, ghearele lui îl vor dezmormânta iar! Tu! hypocrite lecteur! – mon semblable – mon frère! II. A GAME OF CHESS II. O PARTIDĂ DE ŞAH The Chair she sat in, like a burnished throne, Glowed on the marble, where the glass Held up by standards wrought with fruited vines From which a golden Cupidon peeped out (Another hid his eyes behind his wing) Doubled the flames of sevenbranched candelabra Reflecting light upon the table as The glitter of her jewels rose to meet it, From satin cases poured in rich profusion; In vials of ivory and coloured glass Unstoppered, lurked her strange synthetic perfumes, Unguent, powdered, or liquid – troubled, confused Jeţul în care şedea, ca un tron lucitor, Jăruia pe marmura unde oglinda Ridicată de stindarde întreţesute cu viţe pe rod. Printre care un Cupidon de aur privea (Altul îşi ascundea ochii sub aripă), Dezdoia flăcările unui candelabru cu şapte braţe, Răsfrângând lumină pe masă când Scânteierea giuvaerelor sale s-a înălţat să-l întâmpine Din casete de mătase revărsate din belşug: În fiole de fildeş şi de sticlă colorată, Neastupate, pândeau parfumurile ei straniu sintetice. În alifii, în prafuri sau lichide – turburau, amestecau 444 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And drowned the sense in odours; stirred by the air That freshened from the window, these ascended In fattening the prolonged candle-flames, Flung their smoke into the laquearia, Stirring the pattern on the coffered ceiling. Huge sea-wood fed with copper Burned green and orange, framed by the coloured stone, In which sad light a carved dolphin swam. Above the antique mantel was displayed As though a window gave upon the sylvan scene The change of Philomel, by the barbarous king So rudely forced; yet there the nightingale Filled all the desert with inviolable voice And still she cried, and still the world pursues, Jug Jug to dirty ears. And other withered stumps of time Were told upon the walls; staring forms Leaned out, leaning, hushing the room enclosed. Footsteps shuffled on the stair. Under the firelight, under the brush, her hair Spread out in fiery points Glowed into words, then would be savagely still. Şi înecau simţurile în miresme; vânturate de adierea Răcoroasă de la fereastră, ele urcau, Îngroşând flăcările prelungite ale lumânărilor, Îşi aruncau fumul peste laquearia, Mişcând chenarele pe pătratele tavanului. Uriaşe lemne aduse de mare, împănate de aramă Ardeau verde şi portocaliu în rama pietrei colorate. Lumină tristă în care un delfin sculptat înota. Deasupra căminului antic se desfăşura, Ca şi cum o fereastră s-ar fi deschis pe păduratica scenă Metamorfoza Philomelei, de către regele barbar Atât de brutal răpită; acolo şi azi privighetoarea Umplea tot pustiul cu glas nesiluit Şi încă se tânguie ea, şi încă lumea o urmăreşte, „Iug iug pentru urechi spurcate. Şi alte trunchiuri vestejite ale vremii Erau scrise pe ziduri: vedenii zgâite Se plecau în afară, proptindu-se, făcând să tacă odaia îngrădită. Paşi foşneau pe scară. La para focului, sub perie, părul ei Se resfira în limbi de flăcări, Strălucea în cuvinte, apoi se liniştea sălbatic. My nerves are bad to-night. Yes, bad. Stay with me. Speak to me. Why do you never speak. Speak. What are you thinking of? What thinking? What? I never know what you are thinking. Think. „Nervii îmi sunt bolnavi azi-noapte. Da, bolnavi? Stai cu mine. Vorbeşte-mi. De ce nu vorbeşti niciodată? Vorbeşte. La ce te gândeşti? La ce bun gânduri? La ce? Nu ştiu niciodată la ce te gândeşti. Gândeşte. I think we are in rats‘ alley Where the dead men lost their bones. Cred că suntem în alei umblate de şobolani, Unde oamenii morţi şi-au pierdut oasele. 445 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry What is that noise? The wind under the door. What is that noise now? What is the wind doing? Nothing again nothing. Do You know nothing? Do you see nothing? Do you remember Nothing? „Ce înseamnă acest zgomot? Vântul sub uşă. „Ce înseamnă acest zgomot acum? Ce diretică vântul? Nimic faţă de nimic. Nu Ştii nimic? Nu vezi nimic? Nu-ţi aminteşti Nimic? I remember Those are pearls that were his eyes. Are you alive, or not? Is there nothing in your head? But O O O O that Shakespeherian Rag – It‘s so elegant So intelligent What shall I do now? What shall I do? I shall rush out as I am, and walk the street With my hair down, so. What shall we do to-morrow? What shall we ever do? The hot water at ten. And if it rains, a closed car at four. And we shall play a game of chess, Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door. Îmi amintesc Mărgelele acestea erau ochii lui. „Eşti viu sau nu? Nu e nimic în capul tău? Totuşi, O O O O, acest refren shakespearian E atât de elegant. Atât de inteligent! „Ce trebuie să fac de-acum? Ce trebuie să fac? Voi zbucni afară cum sunt şi voi umbla pe stradă Cu părul meu lăsat asa. Ce-o să facem mâine? Ce-o să facem mereu? Apa caldă la zece Şi dacă plouă, o maşină închisă la patru. Şi vom juca o partidă de şah. Strângând ochi fără pleoape şi aşteptând să ni se bată în uşă. When Lil‘s husband got demobbed, I said – I didn‘t mince my words, I said to her myself, HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME Now Albert‘s coming back, make yourself a bit smart. He‘ll want to know what you done with that money he gave you Când soţul lui Lili a fost demobilizat, i-am spus, „Nu mi-am îndulcit cuvintele, i-am spus eu însumi, Grăbeşte, te rog, e vremea Acuma, când Albert se reîntoarce, fă-te un pic drăguţă. O să vrea să ştie ce-ai dres cu banii pe care ţi i-a dat 446 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To get yourself some teeth. He did, I was there. You have them all out, Lil, and get a nice set, He said, I swear, I can‘t bear to look at you. And no more can‘t I, I said, and think of poor Albert, He‘s been in the army four years, he wants a good time, And if you don‘t give it him, there‘s others will, I said. Oh is there, she said. Something o‘ that, I said. Then I‘ll know who to thank, she said, and give me a straight look. HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME If you don‘t like it you can get on with it, I said. Others can pick and choose if you can‘t. But if Albert makes off, it won‘t be for lack of telling. You ought to be ashamed, I said, to look so antique. (And her only thirty-one.) I can‘t help it, she said, pulling a long face, It‘s them pills I took, to bring it off, she said. (She‘s had five already, and nearly died of young George.) The chemist said it would be all right, but I‘ve never been the same. You are a proper fool, I said. Well, if Albert won‘t leave you alone, there it is, I said, What you get married for if you don‘t want children? HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME Well, that Sunday Albert was home, they had a hot gammon, And they asked me in to dinner, to get the beauty of it hot – HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME Goonight Bill. Goonight Lou. Goonight May. Goonight. Ta ta. Goonight. Goonight. Good night, ladies, good night, sweet ladies, good night, good night. Ca să-ţi pui dinţii. A făcut-o, eram de faţă. Să ţi-i scoţi toţi, Lil, şi pune-ţi un şir frumos, A spus, ţi-o jur, nu mai pot să te privesc. Şi nu mai pot nici eu, am spus, şi gândeşte la sărmanul Albert. A fost în armată patru ani, îsi doreşte zile plăcute, Şi de nu i le dai, altele i le vor da, am spus. Oh, aşa e, a spus ea. Aşa ceva, am spus. Atunci ştiu cui să mulţumesc, a spus, şi s-a uitat drept la mine. Grăbeşte-te, te rog, e vremea. Dacă nu-ţi place, poţi s-o sfârşeşti, am spus. Altele pot culege şi alege de nu poţi tu. Dar de pleacă Albert, nu va fi din lipsă de a te fi prevenit. Ar trebui să-ţi fie ruşine, am spus, să arăţi atât de antică (Şi ea n-are decât treizeci şi unu). N-am ce face, a spus ea, strâmbând din nas, Am luat hapuri ca să scap, a spus ea. (A şi avut cinci, şi s-a prăpădit aproape la naşterea micului George.) Farmacistul a spus că totul va fi bine, dar nu mi-am revenit niciodată. Eşti într-adevăr nebună, a spus. Bine, dar dacă Albert nu te va lăsa în pace, am spus, De ce te-ai măritat dacă nu vrei copii? Grăbeşte, te rog, e vremea. Aşa, duminică Albert era acasă, aveau o şuncă încălzită. Şi m-au poftit la masă, să mă bucur de frumuseţea ei caldă. Grăbeşte, te rog, e vremea. Grăbeşte, te rog, e vremea. Bună seara Bill. Bună seara, Lu. Bună seara, May. Bună seara. Pa, pa. Bună seara. Bună seara. Bună seara, Doamnelor, bună seara, Doamnelor dulci, bună seara, bună seara. 447 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry III. THE FIRE SERMON III. PREDICA FOCULUI The river‘s tent is broken: the last fingers of leaf Clutch and sink into the wet bank. The wind Crosses the brown land, unheard. The nymphs are departed. Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song. The river bears no empty bottles, sandwich papers, Silk handkerchiefs, cardboard boxes, cigarette ends Or other testimony of summer nights. The nymphs are departed. And their friends, the loitering heirs of city directors; Departed, have left no addresses. Pânza gârlei e ruptă: cele din urmă degete de frunză Se strâng şi cad pe malul spălat. Vântul Străbate ţara pământie neauzit. Nimfele s-au depărtat Blândă Tamisă, fugi dulce până sfârşesc viersul meu. Apa nu poartă sticle goale, hârtii de sandvici, Batiste de mătase, cutii de carton, mucuri de ţigări Sau alte mărturii din nopţi de vară. Nimfele s-au depărtat, Şi amicii lor, trândavii moştenitori ai bancherilor din „City, Plecaţi de asemeni, n-au lăsat adresă. By the waters of Leman I sat down and wept... Sweet Thames, run softly till I end my song, Sweet Thames, run softly, for I speak not loud or long. But at my back in a cold blast I hear The rattle of the bones, and chuckle spread from ear to ear. La apele Lemanului noi şezum şi plânsem... Blândă Tamisă, fugi dulce, fugi dulce, până sfârşesc viersul meu. Blândă Tamisă, fugi dulce, căci tare şi mult nu vorbesc eu. Iar în spate, într-o trâmbă de vânt rece, aud Clănţăt de oase şi râs gâlgâit din auz în auz. A rat crept softly through the vegetation Dragging its slimy belly on the bank While I was fishing in the dull canal On a winter evening round behind the gashouse Musing upon the king my brother‘s wreck And on the king my father‘s death before him. White bodies naked on the low damp ground And bones cast in a little low dry garret, Rattled by the rat‘s foot only, year to year. But at my back from time to time I hear Un guzgan s-a târât moale prin vegetaţie, Târându-şi pântecul cleios de ţărm Pe când pescuiam în canalul întunecat Într-o seara de iarnă, tocmai în dosul uzinei de gaz. Meditând asupra naufragiului regelui, fratele meu, Şi asupra morţii regelui, tatăl meu, înaintea sa. Albe trupuri goale pe locul jos jilav Şi oase aruncate într-un pod jos, uscat, Zăngănite de piciorul guzganilor numai, an de an, lung Dar în spatele meu, din vreme în vreme, aud 448 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The sound of horns and motors, which shall bring Sweeney to Mrs. Porter in the spring. O the moon shone bright on Mrs. Porter And on her daughter They wash their feet in soda water Et O ces voix d‘enfants, chantant dans la coupole! Sunet de corn şi de motor, ce vor aduce iară Pe Sweeney la d-na Porter în primăvară. O, luna alunecă peste d-na Porter. Şi peste fiica sa. Ele-şi spală picioarele în apă gazoasă. Et, o, ces voix d‘enfants, chantant dans la coupole! Twit twit twit Jug jug jug jug jug jug So rudely forc‘d. Tereu Tuit tuit tuit Iug iug iug iug iug iug Aşa dă nemilos ţipate... Tereu Unreal City Under the brown fog of a winter noon Mr. Eugenides, the Smyrna merchant Unshaven, with a pocket full of currants C.i.f. London: documents at sight, Asked me in demotic French To luncheon at the Cannon Street Hotel Followed by a weekend at the Metropole. Cetate nălucă Sub ceaţa brună a amiezii de iarnă D-l Eugenides, negustorul din Smyrna, Nebârbierit, cu buzunarul plin de stafide C.i.f. London scrisori la vedere. M-a poftit într-o franţuzească demotică Să iau dejunul la Cannon Street Hotel, Urmată de un „weekend în Metropolă. At the violet hour, when the eyes and back Turn upward from the desk, when the human engine waits Like a taxi throbbing waiting, I Tiresias, though blind, throbbing between two lives, Old man with wrinkled female breasts, can see At the violet hour, the evening hour that strives Homeward, and brings the sailor home from sea, The typist home at teatime, clears her breakfast, lights Her stove, and lays out food in tins. În ceasul violet, când ochii şi umerii Se ridică de pe birou, când maşina umană adastă Ca un taxi pulsând aşteptare, Eu, Tiresias, deşi orb, palpitând între două vieţi, Moşneag cu sâni zbârciţi de femeie, pot vedea În ceasul violet, ceasul înserării care grăbeşte Spre cămin şi aduce marinarul acasă de pe mări, Duce dactilografa acasă tocmai la ora ceaiului, îi luminează cina, îi aprinde 449 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry On the divan are piled (at night her bed) Stockings, slippers, camisoles, and stays. I Tiresias, old man with wrinkled dugs Perceived the scene, and foretold the rest – I too awaited the expected guest. He, the young man carbuncular, arrives, A small house agent‘s clerk, with one bold stare, One of the low on whom assurance sits As a silk hat on a Bradford millionaire. The time is now propitious, as he guesses, The meal is ended, she is bored and tired, Endeavours to engage her in caresses Which still are unreproved, if undesired. Flushed and decided, he assaults at once; Exploring hands encounter no defence; His vanity requires no response, And makes a welcome of indifference. (And I Tiresias have foresuffered all Enacted on this same divan or bed; I who have sat by Thebes below the wall And walked among the lowest of the dead.) Bestows one final patronising kiss, And gropes his way, finding the stairs unlit... Maşina de gătit şi în cratiţe îi aşază mâncarea. De pe fereastră, primejdios stau întinse, Uscându-se, combinezoanele ei atinse de soare cu ultime raze, Se-nalţă teanc pe divan (noaptea, patul ei) Ciorapi, papuci, bluze şi corsete. Eu, Tiresias, moşneag cu mamèle zbârcite, Am zărit întâmplarea şi am prorocit sfârşitul – Şi eu am aşteptat oaspele aşteptat. El, junele furunculos, soseşte, Funcţionar la o mică agenţie, cu ce priviri cutezătoare, Un om de rând, căruia încrederea în sine i se potriveşte Ca un joben unui milionar din Bradford. Momentul e propice, îşi spune el. Masa e sfârşită, dânsa-i plictisită, obosită, El încearcă s-o câştige mângâierii, Care, deşi nedorită, nu e deloc respinsă. Aprins şi hotărât, el dă asalt de-ndată; Cercetătoare mâini nu-ntâmpină-apărate; Iar îngâmfarea lui nu cere vreun răspuns, Şi schimbă-n bunăvoie nepăsarea, (Şi eu, Tiresias dinainte îndurai tot Ce s-a săvârşit pe-acst divan sau pat: Eu, care-am stat la Teba pe sub ziduri Şi am umblat printre cei mai umili din morţi): Depune ca final un protector sărut Şi-i dibuieşte drumul, găsind neaprins pe scară... She turns and looks a moment in the glass, Hardly aware of her departed lover; Her brain allows one half-formed thought to pass: Se-ntoarce ea, priveşte o clipă în oglindă, Abia dându-şi seama de amantul plecat, I-îngăduie doar mintea un gând neisprăvit; Out of the window perilously spread Her drying combinations touched by the sun‘s last rays, 450 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Well now that‘s done: and I‘m glad it‘s over. When lovely woman stoops to folly and Paces about her room again, alone, She smoothes her hair with automatic hand, And puts a record on the gramophone. „Eh, s-a făcut, şi sunt bucuroasă că s-a isprăvit Când o femeie frumoasă înclină spre nebunie şi Tot păşeşte prin odaia ei, monoton, Îţi netezeşte părul cu mână de automat şi Mai pune un suvenir pe gramofon. This music crept by me upon the waters And along the Strand, up Queen Victoria Street. O City city, I can sometimes hear Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street, The pleasant whining of a mandoline And a clatter and a chatter from within Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the walls Of Magnus Martyr hold Inexplicable splendour of Ionian white and gold. „Această muzică alunecă până la mine pe ape Şi de-a lungul străzii Strand până în strada Reginei Victoria. O, City, City, pot câteodată să aud Lângă un bar public în strada Tamisei de Jos Plăcutul scâncet al unei mandoline Şi un clinchet şi un crâşnet dinăuntru, Unde pescarii trândăvesc la amiazi: unde zidurile Sfântului Martir Magnus păstrează Netălmăcita minune al albului şi al aurului ionian. The river sweats Oil and tar The barges drift With the turning tide Red sails Wide To leeward, swing on the heavy spar. The barges wash Drifting logs Down Greenwich reach Past the Isle of Dogs. Weialala leia Wallala leialala Râul asudă Ulei şi smoală Luntrile pornesc Cu refluxul Pânze roşii Întinse Pe sub vânt, se-nvolbură pe speteaza cea mare Luntrile-şi spală Grămezi de buşteni Până jos la Greenwich ajung Mai departe de Insula Câinilor. Weialala leia Wallala leialala 451 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Elizabeth and Leicester Beating oars The stern was formed A gilded shell Red and gold The brisk swell Rippled both shores Southwest wind Carried down stream The peal of bells White towers Weialala leia Wallala leialala Elizabeth şi Leicester Lovind din vâsle, Pupa era în chip de Scoică-aurită Roşu şi aur Valul vioi Juca pe amândouă maluri Vânt de sud-vest Ducea pe ape în jos Dangăt de clopot Din albe turle, Weilalala leia Wallala leialala Trams and dusty trees. Highbury bore me. Richmond and Kew Undid me. By Richmond I raised my knees Supine on the floor of a narrow canoe. „Tramvaie şi copaci prăfuiţi, Highbury m-a născut, Richmond şi Kew M-au ucis. Lângă Richmond mi-am înălţat genunchii Alene pe podeaua unei bărci strâmte... My feet are at Moorgate, and my heart Under my feet. After the event He wept. He promised a new start‘. I made no comment. What should I resent? Picioarele mele sunt la Margate şi inima mea Îmi stă sub picioare. După eveniment A plâns. A făgăduit – o nouă plecare – N-am replicat nimic. Ce să-mi pese oare? On Margate Sands. I can connect Nothing with nothing. The broken fingernails of dirty hands. My people humble people who expect Nothing. „Pe plaja de la Margate, Nu pot lega Nimic cu nimic. Unghiile rupte la mâini murdare. Poporul meu umil, popor ce nu aşteaptă Nimic. 452 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry la la La la To Carthage then I came La Cartagina atunci am sosit, Burning burning burning burning O Lord Thou pluckest me out O Lord Thou pluckest Arzând, arzând, arzând, arzând, O, Doamne tu m-ai scos din foc O, Doamne tu m-ai scos burning Arzând. IV. DEATH BY WATER IV. MOARTE PRIN APĂ Phlebas the Phoenician, a fortnight dead, Forgot the cry of gulls, and the deep sea swell And the profit and loss. Phlebas Phoenicianul, mort de două săptămâni A uitat ţipătul pescăruşilor şi valul mării adânci, Şi câştigul, şi pierderea. A current under sea Picked his bones in whispers. As he rose and fell He passed the stages of his age and youth Entering the whirlpool. Un şuvoi pe sub mare I-a cules oasele în şoptiri. Cum se legăna în sus şi în jos, El urca şi cobora scara vieţii, Intrând în vârtej Gentile or Jew O you who turn the wheel and look to windward, Consider Phlebas, who was once handsome and tall as you. Păgân sau ebreu. O, tu, ce stai la cârmi si te uiţi înspre vânt, Priveşte pe Pheblas care a fost odată mândru şi chipeş ca tine. V. WHAT THE THUNDER SAID V. CE- A GRĂIT TUNETUL After the torchlight red on sweaty faces După lumina faclelor roşie pe obrazul în sudori, 453 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry After the frosty silence in the gardens After the agony in stony places The shouting and the crying Prison and palace and reverberation Of thunder of spring over distant mountains He who was living is now dead We who were living are now dying With a little patience După tăcerea îngheţată din grădini, După agonia pe locuri de piatră, După ţipătul şi bocetul Temniţei şi palatului, şi reverberaţia Fulgerului de primăvară pe munţi depărtaţi, El, care trăia, e acum mort. Noi, care trăim, murim acuma Cu puţină răbdare. Here is no water but only rock Rock and no water and the sandy road The road winding above among the mountains Which are mountains of rock without water If there were water we should stop and drink Amongst the rock one cannot stop or think Sweat is dry and feet are in the sand If there were only water amongst the rock Dead mountain mouth of carious teeth that cannot spit Here one can neither stand nor lie nor sit There is not even silence in the mountains But dry sterile thunder without rain There is not even solitude in the mountains But red sullen faces sneer and snarl From doors of mudcracked houses If there were water And no rock If there were rock And also water And water A spring Aici nu e apă, dar numai stâncă. Stâncă fără apă şi drum nisipos, Drum şerpuind sus, printre munţi, Munţi de stâncă fără apa. Dacă ar fi apă, ne-am opri şi am bea. Printre stânci nu te poţi opri sau gândi, Sudoarea e uscată şi picioarele sunt în nisip. Dacă ar fi cel puţin apă printre stânci – Gură de munte mort, cu dinţi cariaţi, ce nu pot scuipa. Aici nu poţi nici să stai, nici să te culci, nici să te aşezi; Nu e măcar tăcere în munţi, Ci fulger uscat sterp fără ploaie; Nu e măcar singurătate în munţi, Ci chipuri roşii ursuze rânjesc şi mârâie Din porţile unor case de chirpici. Dacă acolo ar fi apă Şi nu stâncă, Dacă ar fi stâncă Şi apă asemeni, Şi apă, Un izvor, 454 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry A pool among the rock If there were the sound of water only Not the cicada And dry grass singing But sound of water over a rock Where the hermit-thrush sings in the pine trees Drip drop drip drop drop drop drop But there is no water Un râu printre stânci, Dacă ar fi sunetul apei măcar, Nu greierul Şi iarbă uscată cântând. Ci sunet de apă peste o stâncă Unde sturzul pustnic cântă sus printre pini, Drip Drop, drip drop drop drop Dar acolo nu e apă. Who is the third who walks always beside you? When I count, there are only you and I together But when I look ahead up the white road There is always another one walking beside you Gliding wrapt in a brown mantle, hooded I do not know whether a man or a woman – But who is that on the other side of you? Cine e al treilea care umblă mereu lângă tine? Când număr nu suntem decât tu şi eu împreună, Dar când mă uit înaintea mea pe drumul alb, Acolo e mereu altul umblând lângă tine, Alunecând învelit într-o manta cafenie, îmbrobodit, Nu-l pot cunoaşte de e bărbat sau femeie, – Dar cine e acela de partea cealaltă a ta ? What is that sound high in the air Murmur of maternal lamentation Who are those hooded hordes swarming Over endless plains, stumbling in cracked earth Ringed by the flat horizon only What is the city over the mountains Cracks and reforms and bursts in the violet air Falling towers Jerusalem Athens Alexandria Vienna London Unreal Ce e acel sunet sus în văzduh, Murmur de mamă bocitoare, Cine sunt acele hoarde îmbrobodite roind Peste nesfârşite câmpii, împleticindu-se în pământul crăpat, Încercuit numai de şesul zării. Care e cetatea aceea peste munţi, Ce-şi crapă, şi-şi schimbă, şi-şi surpă prin vânăt văzduh Turlele năruite, Ierusalim, Atena, Alexandria, Viena, Londra Năluci... A woman drew her long black hair out tight O femeie şi-a împletit strâns părul lung şi negru 455 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And fiddled whisper music on those strings And bats with baby faces in the violet light Whistled, and beat their wings And crawled head downward down a blackened wall And upside down in air were towers Tolling reminiscent bells, that kept the hours And voices singing out of empty cisterns and exhausted wells. Şi-a zis strunelor melodii în suspine, Şi lilieci cu feţe de prunc în lumina viorie Au şuierat, şi-au bătut din aripi, Şi-au lunecat cu capul în jos de-alungul unui zid înnegrit, Şi-n sus, prin vazduh, erau turle Sunând clopote de aducere aminte, care păstrează orele Şi glasurile cântând din cisterne goale şi din puţuri istovite. In this decayed hole among the mountains In the faint moonlight, the grass is singing Over the tumbled graves, about the chapel There is the empty chapel, only the wind‘s home. It has no windows, and the door swings, Dry bones can harm no one. Only a cock stood on the rooftree Co co rico co co rico In a flash of lightning. Then a damp gust Bringing rain În peştera în surpare printre munţi, În lumina slabă a lunii, iarba cântă Deasupra mormintelor căzute, în jurul capelei. Acolo e capela goală, dar casa vântului. N-are ferestre şi poarta se clatină. Oase uscate nu pot face rău nimănui. Numai un cocoş stă pe vârful acoperişului: Cu-cu-rigu, cu-cu-rigu, Într-o aprindere de lumină. Apoi o pală de vânt umed Aducând ploaie. Ganga was sunken, and the limp leaves Waited for rain, while the black clouds Gathered far distant, over Himavant. The jungle crouched, humped in silence. Then spoke the thunder DA Datta: what have we given? My friend, blood shaking my heart The awful daring of a moment‘s surrender Which an age of prudence can never retract By this, and this only, we have existed Gangele scăzuse şi frunzele mlădioase Aşteptau ploaia, pe când norii negrii Se adunau la depărtări mari, deasupra Himavantului. Jungla se pitea, cocoşată, în tăcere. Atunci grăi tunetul. DA Datta: ce am dat noi? Prietene, sânge, zguduind inima, Cutezarea grozavă a unei clipe de predare Pe care vârsta precaută n-o mai poate lua înapoi, Prin ea, prin ea numai, am trăit noi, 456 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Which is not to be found in our obituaries Or in memories draped by the beneficent spider Or under seals broken by the lean solicitor In our empty rooms DA Dayadhvam: I have heard the key Turn in the door once and turn once only We think of the key, each in his prison Thinking of the key, each confirms a prison Only at nightfall, aetherial rumours Revive for a moment a broken Coriolanus DA Damyata: The boat responded Gaily, to the hand expert with sail and oar The sea was calm, your heart would have responded Gaily, when invited, beating obedient To controlling hands Care nu se mai găsi în necroloagele noastre Sau în amintiri învestmântate de păianjenul beneficiar Sau sub peceţii rupte de portărelul jigărit În odăile noastre pustii. DA Dayadhvam: Am auzit cheia Întorcându-se o dată în uşă şi întorcându-se numai odată. Gândim la cheie, fiecare în temniţa lui, Gândim la cheie, fiecare îsi mărturiseşte temniţa Numai la căderea nopţii, şoptiri eterice Învie pentru o clipa un Coriolan înfrânt DA Damyata: Luntrea răspunse Bucuros mâinii îndemânatice la vintrele şi vâslă, Marea era liniştită, inima ta ar fi răspuns Bucuros la chemare, bătând supusă Sub mâini stâpânitoare. I sat upon the shore Fishing, with the arid plain behind me Shall I at least set my lands in order? London Bridge is falling down falling down falling down Poi s‘ascose nel foco che gli affina Quando fiam ceu chelidon – O swallow swallow Le Prince d‘Aquitaine à la tour abolie These fragments I have shored against my ruins Why then Ile fit you. Hieronymo‘s mad againe. Datta. Dayadhvam. Damyata. Shantih shantih shantih Am stat pe ţărm. Pescuind, cu câmpia stearpă în spate, Răndui-voi cel puţin ţarinile mele? Podul Londrei se surpă, se surpă, se surpă Poi s‘ascose nel foco che gli affina Quando fiam ceu chelidon. O, rândunica, rândunică, Le Prince d‘Aquitaine à la tour abolie. Aceste frânturi le-am ţărmurit împotriva năruirilor mele. De ce atunci răul te încolţeşte? Hieronimo e nebun iarăşi. Datta. Dayadhvam, Damyata. Şantih şantih şantih. Traducere I. Pillat 457 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ţară pustie. The Waste Land. Nam Sibyllam quidem Cumis ego ipse oculis meis vidi in ampulla pendere, et cum illi pueri dicerent: Sibylla ti theleis; respondebat illa: apothanein thelo. For Ezra Pound il miglior fabbro I. THE BURIAL OF THE DEAD April is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain. Winter kept us warm, covering Earth in forgetful snow, feeding A little life with dried tubers. Summer surprised us, coming over the Starnbergersee With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade, And went on in sunlight, into the Hofgarten, And drank coffee, and talked for an hour. Bin gar keine Russin, stamm‘ aus Litauen, echt deutsch. And when we were children, staying at the archduke‘s, My cousin‘s, he took me out on a sled, And I was frightened. He said, Marie, Marie, hold on tight. And down we went. In the mountains, there you feel free. I read, much of the night, and go south in the winter. I. ÎNGROPAREA MORTULUI Aprilie este luna cea mai crudă, zămislind Lilieci din pământuri sterpe, încâlcind Amintirile şi dorinţele, stârnind Rădăcini_mohorâte prin ploi de primăvară. Iarna ne-a ţinut de cald, acoperind Pământul cu zăpada uitării, hrănind O viată neînsemnată cu tuberculi uscaţi. Vara ne-a luat pe neaşteptate, năvălind peste Starnbergersee Cu răpăit de ploaie; ne-am oprit pe alee Şi am ieşit la soare tocmai în Hofgarten Şi am băut cafea şi am stat de vorbă preţ de un ceas. Bin gar keine Russin, stamm‘aus Litauen, echt deutsch. Şi pe când eram copii, locuind lajji arhiducelui, La ai verilor mei, el m-a luat cu sania Şi eu m-am speriat. Zicea, Mărie, Mărie, ţine-te bine. Şi am luat-o la vale. În munţi te simţi liber. Citesc, mare parte din noapte, şi merg spre sud, în iarnă. 458 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man, You cannot say, or guess, for you know only A heap of broken images, where the sun beats, And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief, And the dry stone no sound of water. Only There is shadow under this red rock, (Come in under the shadow of this red rock), And I will show you something different from either Your shadow at morning striding behind you Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you; I will show you fear in a handful of dust. Frisch weht der Wind Der Heimat zu Mein Irisch Kind, Wo weilest du? You gave me hyacinths first a year ago; They called me the hyacinth girl. – Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden, Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither Living nor dead, and I knew nothing, Looking into the heart of light, the silence. Oed‘ und leer das Meer. Ce rădăcini se caţără, ce ramuri cresc Din sfărâmăturile astea pietroase? Fiu al omului, Nu poţi să spui, sau să ghiceşti, pentru că tu cunoşti Doar un morman de imagini, frânte în lumina soarelui, Unde copacii morţii nu-ţi dăruie adăpost şi nici greierii uşurare, Iar în pietrele sterpe nu se aude un susur de apă. Umbră Afli numai sub stânca aceasta roşcată, (Vino la umbra acestei stânci roşcate), Şi am să-ţi arăt ceva deosebit faţă de oricare Din umbrele tale matinale care-ţi urmează cu paşi mari Ori faţă de umbra ta vesperală, ridicându-se să-ţi vină în întâmpinare; Am să-ţi arăt frica într-un pumn de ţărână. Frisch weht der Wind Der Heimat zu Mein Irisch Kind, Wo weilest du? „Întâia dată mi-ai dăruit hzacinţi acum un an; M-au botezat fata cu hyacinţi. — Şi când ne-am întors din grădina cu hyacinţi Tu aveai braţele pline, părul umed, iar eu nu puteam Rosti un cuvânt şi ochii mă trădau, şi nu eram Nici viu, nici mort, şi nu ştiam nimic Privind în inima luminii – tăcerea. Oed‘ und leer das Meer. Madame Sosostris, famous clairvoyante, Had a bad cold, nevertheless Is known to be the wisest woman in Europe, With a wicked pack of cards. Here, said she, Madame Sosostris, faimoasa clairvoyantă, Răcise straşnic, şi cu toate acestea Este cunoscută ca fiind cea mai înţeleaptă femeie din Europa, Cupăcătosul ei pachet de cărţi. Iată, zicea ea, 459 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor, (Those are pearls that were his eyes. Look!) Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks, The lady of situations. Here is the man with three staves, and here the Wheel, And here is the one-eyed merchant, and this card, Which is blank, is something he carries on his back, Which I am forbidden to see. I do not find The Hanged Man. Fear death by water. I see crowds of people, walking round in a ring. Thank you. If you see dear Mrs. Equitone, Tell her I bring the horoscope myself: One must be so careful these days. Cartea dumneavoastră, Marinarul Fenician înecat, (Şi ce perle erau ochii lui! Priveşte!). Iat-o pe Belladonna, Doamna Stâncilor, Doamna situaţiilor. Iată-l pe omul cu trei doage şi iată Roata Şi iată-l pe neguţătorul chior, iar cartea aceasta, Care este albă, este ceva ce poartă el în spinare, Ceva ce-mi este oprit să văd. Nu-l găsesc Pe Spânzurat. Teme-te de moartea prin apă. Văd o mulţime de oameni, mergând de-a roata unui cerc. Mulţumesc. Dacă o vezi pe scumpa Mrs. Equitone, Spune-i că am să-i aduc chiar eu horoscopul: Astăzi trebuie să fii cu atâta băgare de seamă. Unreal City, Under the brown fog of a winter dawn, A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many, I had not thought death had undone so many. Ireal City. Sub ceaţa întunecată a dimineţii de iarnă, Pe Podul Londrei se scurgeau atâţia oameni, atâţia Încât nu mi-ar fi trecut prin minte că moartea ar putea nimici atât de mulţi Suspine întretăiate şi rare – le simţeam exhalaţia Şi fiecare îşi pironea ochii înaintea picioarelor. Se scurgeau în sus şi în jos pe King William Street, Spre unde Saint Mary Woolnoth măsura ceasurile Cu un dangăt spart la bătaia finală a orelor nouă, Acolo l-am întâlnit pe unul pe care-l ştiam şi l-am oprit strigându-i: – „Stetson! Tu, care ai fost cu mine pe vapor la Mylae! Cadavrul acela pe care l-ai sădit anul trecut în grădină A lăstărit? O să dea în floare anul acesta? Sau poate că gerul neaşteptat i-a stricat culcuşul? Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled, And each man fixed his eyes before his feet. Flowed up the hill and down King William Street, To where Saint Mary Woolnoth kept the hours With a dead sound on the final stroke of nine. There I saw one I knew, and stopped him, crying Stetson! You who were with me in the ships at Mylae! That corpse you planted last year in your garden, Has it begun to sprout? Will it bloom this year? Or has the sudden frost disturbed its bed? 460 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Oh keep the Dog far hence, that‘s friend to men, Or with his nails he‘ll dig it up again! You! hypocrite lecteur! – mon semblable, – mon frère! O, ţine câinele departe de acolo, e un prieten al omului Şi o să sape cu ghearele să-l scoată afară! Tu! hypocrite lecteur! – mon semblable, – mon frère! II. A GAME OF CHESS II. O PARTIDĂ DE ŞAH The Chair she sat in, like a burnished throne, Glowed on the marble, where the glass Held up by standards wrought with fruited vines Şi scaunul pe care ea stătea Era ca tronul lustruit, încât Sclipea pe marmură, unde oglinda, De stâlpi şi vii cu struguri sprijinită, Din care se ivea un Cupidon (Căci altul capu-şi ascunde-n aripă) Dubla lumina unui candelabru Cu şapte braţe, reflectând-o pe Chiar masa noastră, ca şi cum atunci Lucirea giuvaerurilor ei S-ar fi sculat s-o-ntâmpine de prin Cutii de fin satin, în fast bogate. Din tub de fildeş şi din colorate Sticluţe, ale ei parfumuri stranii, Sintetice, stăteau mereu la pândă; Pomezi, lichide, pudre ne-ncâlceau Şi se-ncurcau, de-ţi înecau gândirea Doar în mirosuri; răscolite proaspăt De aerul ţâşnit dinspre fereastră, Se îngroşau lungi flăcări şi suiau Fum lumânările spre laquearia, Stârnind desen pe casetat tavan. Hrănite din arămuri, alge lungi From which a golden Cupidon peeped out (Another hid his eyes behind his wing) Doubled the flames of sevenbranched candelabra Reflecting light upon the table as The glitter of her jewels rose to meet it, From satin cases poured in rich profusion; In vials of ivory and coloured glass Unstoppered, lurked her strange synthetic perfumes, Unguent, powdered, or liquid – troubled, confused And drowned the sense in odours; stirred by the air That freshened from the window, these ascended In fattening the prolonged candle-flames, Flung their smoke into the laquearia, Stirring the pattern on the coffered ceiling. Huge sea-wood fed with copper 461 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Burned green and orange, framed by the coloured stone, In which sad light a carved dolphin swam. Above the antique mantel was displayed As though a window gave upon the sylvan scene The change of Philomel, by the barbarous king So rudely forced; yet there the nightingale Filled all the desert with inviolable voice And still she cried, and still the world pursues, Jug Jug to dirty ears. And other withered stumps of time Were told upon the walls; staring forms Leaned out, leaning, hushing the room enclosed. Footsteps shuffled on the stair. Under the firelight, under the brush, her hair Spread out in fiery points Glowed into words, then would be savagely still. Ardeau portocaliu şi verde-n rame De pietre colorate, în a căror Lumină tristă un delfin plutea. Ca şi cum o fereastră ar fi dat Spre undeva, spre o sylyană scenă, Pe frontispiciu, ánticul cămin Închipuia schimbarea Philomelei, Crud necinstită de barbarul rege. Privighetoarea mai umplea acolo Cu glasul ei neprihănit pustiul Şi mai jelea – de lume urmărită – „Tri, tri – cântând urechilor murdare. Se povesteau pe toţi pereţii alte Vechi şi de vreme şterse întâmplări. Stridente forme în afară încă Se aplecau, prin aplecarea lor înăbuşind odaia-nchisă parcă. Şi paşi târşiţi se auzeau pe scări. Iar în lumina focului, răsfrânt În puncte de văpaie, părul ei Ardea-n cuvinte şi apoi sălbatic Era de liniştit. My nerves are bad to-night. Yes, bad. Stay with me. Speak to me. Why do you never speak. Speak. What are you thinking of? What thinking? What? I never know what you are thinking. Think. — „În seara asta stau prost cu nervii. Da, prost. Rămâi cu mine. Vorbeşte-mi. De ce nu vorbeşti niciodată. Vorbeşte. La ce te gândeşti? Ce gândeşti? Ce? Niciodată nu ştiu la ce te gândeşti. Gândeşte-te... I think we are in rats‘ alley Where the dead men lost their bones. — „Mă gândesc că ne aflăm în fundătura şobolanilor. Unde morţii şi-au lăsat oasele. 462 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry What is that noise? The wind under the door. What is that noise now? What is the wind doing? Nothing again nothing. Do You know nothing? Do you see nothing? Do you remember Nothing? „Ce-i cu zgomotul ăsta? E vântul sub uşă. „Dar zgomotul de acum? Ce face vântul? Nimic iarăşi nimic. „Nu Ştii nimic? Nu vezi nimic? Nu-ţi aminteşti Nimic? I remember Those are pearls that were his eyes. Are you alive, or not? Is there nothing in your head? But O O O O that Shakespeherian Rag – It‘s so elegant So intelligent What shall I do now? What shall I do? I shall rush out as I am, and walk the street With my hair down, so. What shall we do to-morrow? What shall we ever do? The hot water at ten. And if it rains, a closed car at four. And we shall play a game of chess, Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door. Îmi aduc aminte Ce perle erau ochii lui. „Trăieşti, sau nu? Nu e nimic în capul tău? Dar O O O O această Zdreanţă shakespeariană – E atât de elegantă Atât de inteligentă „Acum ce-o să fac? Ce-o să fac? „Am să dau buzna afară şi am să merg pe stradă „Aşa cu părul pe umeri. Ce-o să facem mâine? „Ce-o să facem în genere totdeauna? Apa fierbinte la zece. Iar dacă plouă, o maşină închisă la patru. Şi o să jucăm o partidă de şah, Strângând ochii lipsiţi de pleoape şi aşteptând o bătaie în uşă. When Lil‘s husband got demobbed, I said – I didn‘t mince my words, I said to her myself, HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME Now Albert‘s coming back, make yourself a bit smart. He‘ll want to know what you done with that money he gave you Când soţul lui Lil a fost demobilizat, eu i-am spus – Nu m-am sfiit să-i spun, i-am spus eu însumi, GRĂBEŞTE-TE TE ROG E TIMPUL Albert se întoarce acasă, pune-te puţin la punct. O să vrea să ştie ce-ai făcut cu banii pe care ţi i-a dat 463 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry To get yourself some teeth. He did, I was there. You have them all out, Lil, and get a nice set, He said, I swear, I can‘t bear to look at you. And no more can‘t I, I said, and think of poor Albert, He‘s been in the army four years, he wants a good time, And if you don‘t give it him, there‘s others will, I said. Oh is there, she said. Something o‘ that, I said. Then I‘ll know who to thank, she said, and give me a straight look. HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME If you don‘t like it you can get on with it, I said. Others can pick and choose if you can‘t. But if Albert makes off, it won‘t be for lack of telling. You ought to be ashamed, I said, to look so antique. (And her only thirty-one.) I can‘t help it, she said, pulling a long face, It‘s them pills I took, to bring it off, she said. (She‘s had five already, and nearly died of young George.) The chemist said it would be all right, but I‘ve never been the same. You are a proper fool, I said. Well, if Albert won‘t leave you alone, there it is, I said, What you get married for if you don‘t want children? HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME Well, that Sunday Albert was home, they had a hot gammon, And they asked me in to dinner, to get the beauty of it hot – HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME Goonight Bill. Goonight Lou. Goonight May. Goonight. Ta ta. Goonight. Goonight. Ca să-ţi spui nişte dinţi. Ţi-a dat banii, am fost acolo. Eşti ştirbă de tot, Lil; fă-ţi un şirag frumos, Zicea, jur că nu suport să mă uit la tine. Şi nici eu nu mai pot, i-am zis, şi gândeşte-te la bietul Albert, A fost încorporat patru ani, vrea să se simtă bine, Şi dacă nu-l faci tu să se simtă bine mai sunt şi altele, i-am zis Vai, mi-a răspuns. Măcar ceva, am zis eu. Deci voi şti cui să-i mulţumesc, mi-a zis, şi m-a privit drept în ochi. GRĂBEŞTE-TE TE ROG E TIMPUL Dacă nu-ţi place, poţi să continui aşa, i-am zis, Altele pot ciuguli şi alege, dacă tu nu poţi. Dar dacă Albert se cară, să nu zici că nu ţi-am spus. Ar trebui să-ţi fie ruşine, i-am zis, să arăţi ca o vechitură. (Şi n-avea decât treizeci şi unu.) N-am ce să-i fac, mi-a zis, făcând o mutră lungă, De la pilule mi se trage, nu pot fără ele, mi-a zis. (Luase de pe acum cinci şi mai că murea după tânărul George.) Farmacistul mi-a spus că totul va fi în regulă, Dar eu niciodată n-am mai fost aceeaşi. Eşti curat nebună, i-am zis. Chestia e ca Albert să nu te lase singură, asta-i, i-am zis, De ce te-ai măritat dacă nu vrei copii? GRĂBEŞTE-TE TE ROG E TIMPUL Ei, în duminica aceea Albert s-a întors, s-au ciondănit în lege Şi m-au poftit la cină, ca să-mi servească şi mie, Caldă încă, frumuseţea de ciondăneală – GRĂBEŞTE-TE TE ROG E TIMPUL GRĂBEŞTE-TE TE ROG E TIMPUL B‘nă seara Bill. B‘nă seara Lou. B‘nă seara May. B‘nă seara. Ta ta. B‘nă seara. B‘nă seara 464 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Good night, ladies, good night, sweet ladies, good night, good night. Bună seara, doamnelor, bună seara, scumpele mele doamne, bună seara, bună seara. III. THE FIRE SERMON III. JURĂMÂNTUL FOCULUI The river‘s tent is broken: the last fingers of leaf Clutch and sink into the wet bank. The wind Crosses the brown land, unheard. The nymphs are departed. Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song. The river bears no empty bottles, sandwich papers, Silk handkerchiefs, cardboard boxes, cigarette ends Or other testimony of summer nights. The nymphs are departed. And their friends, the loitering heirs of city directors; Departed, have left no addresses. Cortul râului s-a spart; ultimele degete ale frunzei Se agaţă şi se îngroapă în malul umed. Vântul Străbate pământul negru, neauzit. Nimfele s-au spulberat. Tamisă dulce, goneşte domol, până-mi închei acest cânt. Râul nu duce nici o sticlă goală, nici o hârtie de sandwich, Batiste de mătase, cutii de carton, mucuri de ţigări Sau alte mărturii ale nopţilor de vară. Nimfele s-au spulberat. Iar prietenii lor, erezii pierde-vară ai directorilor din City, Plecaţi, n-au lăsat nici o adresă. By the waters of Leman I sat down and wept... Sweet Thames, run softly till I end my song, Sweet Thames, run softly, for I speak not loud or long. Lângă apele Lemanului şezui şi plânsei... Tamisă dulce, goneşte, domol până-mi închei acest cânt, Tamisă dulce, goneşte domol, căci eu nu vorbesc tare sau mult nicicând. Dar în spatele meu, într-o îngheţată rafală, Aud huruit de oase şi un râs înfundat Se răspândeşte din ureche-n ureche deodată. But at my back in a cold blast I hear The rattle of the bones, and chuckle spread from ear to ear. A rat crept softly through the vegetation Dragging its slimy belly on the bank While I was fishing in the dull canal On a winter evening round behind the gashouse Un şobolan se furişa domol, Târându-şi pântecele plin de mâl Prin buruieni, pe mal, în mohorâtul Canal, în faptul unei seri de iarnă, Cât pescuiam în jurul staţiunii De gaz, gândind la regele, naufragiul, Fratelui meu şi, înaintea lui, 465 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry White bodies naked on the low damp ground And bones cast in a little low dry garret, Rattled by the rat‘s foot only, year to year. But at my back from time to time I hear The sound of horns and motors, which shall bring Sweeney to Mrs. Porter in the spring. O the moon shone bright on Mrs. Porter And on her daughter They wash their feet in soda water Et O ces voix d‘enfants, chantant dans la coupole! La altul – moartea bunului meu tată. Pe vatra joasă, jilavă, văd albe Şi goale trupuri – oase azvârlite Într-o mansardă scundă şi uscată, Mişcate numai de soboli, oricând, În spate însă-aud, din când în când, Claxoane şi motoare care, iară Pe Sweeney l-or aduce-n primăvară La doamna Porter. Luminoasă, luna O, strălucea pe chipul doamnei Porter, Pe chipul fiicei ei – O, cu migală, Ele picioarele-n sifon îşi spală Et o ces voix d‘enfants, chantant dans la coupole! Twit twit twit Jug jug jug jug jug jug So rudely forc‘d. Tereu Cri, cri, cri Tri, tri, tri, tri, tri, tri Crud necinstită. Tereu Unreal City Under the brown fog of a winter noon Mr. Eugenides, the Smyrna merchant Unshaven, with a pocket full of currants Ireal City Sub ceaţa sură, în amiază, iarna, Domnul Eugenides, negustor Din Smyrna, ras deloc, cu buzunarul Plin de stafide, franco-Londra – şi De documente – plata la vedere, Poftindu-mă-n franceza lui pocită La prânz, tocmai la Cannon Street Hotel Urmat de un weekend la Metropole. Musing upon the king my brother‘s wreck And on the king my father‘s death before him. C.i.f. London: documents at sight, Asked me in demotic French To luncheon at the Cannon Street Hotel Followed by a weekend at the Metropole. At the violet hour, when the eyes and back La ceasul violet, când ochii şi spinarea 466 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Turn upward from the desk, when the human engine waits Like a taxi throbbing waiting, I Tiresias, though blind, throbbing between two lives, Old man with wrinkled female breasts, can see At the violet hour, the evening hour that strives Homeward, and brings the sailor home from sea, The typist home at teatime, clears her breakfast, lights Her stove, and lays out food in tins. Out of the window perilously spread Her drying combinations touched by the sun‘s last rays, On the divan are piled (at night her bed) Stockings, slippers, camisoles, and stays. I Tiresias, old man with wrinkled dugs Perceived the scene, and foretold the rest – I too awaited the expected guest. He, the young man carbuncular, arrives, A small house agent‘s clerk, with one bold stare, One of the low on whom assurance sits As a silk hat on a Bradford millionaire. The time is now propitious, as he guesses, The meal is ended, she is bored and tired, Endeavours to engage her in caresses Which still are unreproved, if undesired. Flushed and decided, he assaults at once; Exploring hands encounter no defence; His vanity requires no response, Se ridică de la masă, când maşinăria umană adastă Ca un taxi huruind în aşteptare, Eu, Tiresias, cu toate că orb, huruind între două vieţi, Bătrân cu piepţi stafidiţi de femeie, pot să văd, La ceasul violet, ceasul serii, năzuind Spre casă, aducându-l pe marinar de pe mare acasă, Aducând-o pe dactilografă acasă la ora ceaiului, Pregătindu-i micul dejun, aprinzându-i soba, Desfăcându-i cutiile de conserve. Periculos întinsă la fereastră, la uscat, Îi este rufăria, sub ultimele raze de soare; Pe canapeaua (care noaptea-i este pat) Ciorapi, papuci, furouri, la-ntâmplare. Tiresias, eu, cu uger stafidit, Văd scena, restul îl prezic: – şi eu Doritul oaspe-l aşteptam mereu, Bubos şi tânăr şi cu ochi obraznici, Slujind la mic agent drept secretar, Reprezentant al unei biete case, Pe care stă mereu asigurarea Precum o pălărie de mătase Pe creştetul unui milionar Din Bradford (Norocosul secretar Prielnic ceasul l-a ghicit, pesemne) Sătulă, ostenită, plictisită, La mângâiere cearcă s-o îndemne, Nerefuzată, chiar de-i nedorită. Decis şi roşu, brusc asalta el; O pipăie, nu-i simte apărarea; Mândria lui nu vrea răspuns de fel 467 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And makes a welcome of indifference. (And I Tiresias have foresuffered all Enacted on this same divan or bed; I who have sat by Thebes below the wall And walked among the lowest of the dead.) Bestows one final patronising kiss, And gropes his way, finding the stairs unlit... Şi bun venit îi este nepăsarea. (Şi eu, Tiresias, ca alţi consorţi, Câte-nduram pe-acest divan sau pat. Eu printre cei mai josnici dintre morţi Cândva sub zidul Thebei am fost stat). Un ultim protector sărut – şi gata: Scări, drum pe bâjbâite-n întuneric... She turns and looks a moment in the glass, Hardly aware of her departed lover; Her brain allows one half-formed thought to pass: Well now that‘s done: and I‘m glad it‘s over. When lovely woman stoops to folly and Paces about her room again, alone, She smoothes her hair with automatic hand, And puts a record on the gramophone. Se-ntoarce ea, uitându-se-n oglindă, Mult prea puţin păsându-i de iubit. Un sfert de gând prin cap dacă perindă: „Ce bine-i că şi asta s-a sfârşit. Spre nebunii frumoasa de-a-nclinat, Tot umblă prin odaia ei, buimacă, Şi părul netezindu-şi, automat, La gramofon ea pune altă placă. This music crept by me upon the waters And along the Strand, up Queen Victoria Street. O City city, I can sometimes hear Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street, The pleasant whining of a mandoline And a clatter and a chatter from within Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the walls Of Magnus Martyr hold Inexplicable splendour of Ionian white and gold. „Un cânt târât de mine peste valuri. În lung de Ştrand, pe Queen Victoria Street, Cetate City, uneori aud, Lângă vreun bar din Lower Thames Street, Plăcute tânguiri de mandolină; De trăncăneli e toată crâşma plină Când vin la prânz pescarii: unde ziduri Din al lui Magnus Martyr scump tezaur, Ascund splendori nespuse de ionie alb şi aur. The river sweats Oil and tar The barges drift Râul asudă Petrol, gudron. Trag şlepuri, lent, 468 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry With the turning tide Red sails Wide To leeward, swing on the heavy spar. The barges wash Drifting logs Down Greenwich reach Past the Isle of Dogs. Weialala leia Wallala leialala Prin vârtejit torent Ce-l sparg, Pânze roşii desfăşurate Larg, Ce-n contra vântului Se leagănă Pe verga grea. Şlepurile spală Butuci plutitori, Mai jos de Greenwich, Peste insula Câinilor. Weialala leia Wallala leialala Elizabeth and Leicester Beating oars The stern was formed A gilded shell Red and gold The brisk swell Rippled both shores Southwest wind Carried down stream The peal of bells White towers Weialala leia Wallala leialala Elisabeth şi Leicester Trăgând la vâsle Pupa era alcătuită Din scoică daurită Roşie-aurie Adierea vie Încreţea mici valuri Clipocind în maluri Vântul de sud-vest Purta în jos salbe De dangăte de clopote Clopotniţe albe Weialala leia Wallala leialala Trams and dusty trees. „Tramvaie, arbori cu praf pe trunchi. 469 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Highbury bore me. Richmond and Kew Undid me. By Richmond I raised my knees Supine on the floor of a narrow canoe. Highbury m-a născut. Richmond şi Kew M-au nimicit. La Richmond m-am ridicat în genunchi Întinsă pe fundul unui strâmt canoe. My feet are at Moorgate, and my heart Under my feet. After the event He wept. He promised a new start‘. I made no comment. What should I resent? „Picioarele-mi sunt la Moorgate, iar inima mea Sub picioarele mele. După eveniment, îndată, El a plâns. A promis „un nou început. Aşa, Eu n-am comentat. De ce să fiu supărată? On Margate Sands. I can connect Nothing with nothing. The broken fingernails of dirty hands. My people humble people who expect Nothing. la la „Pe Margate Sands. Nu pot să leg un pic Nimic cu nimic. Unghiile rupte ale mâinilor murdare. Poporul,meu umil popor în aşteptare De nimic. la la To Carthage then I came Şi atunci am venit la Carthagina Burning burning burning burning O Lord Thou pluckest me out O Lord Thou pluckest Arzând arzând arzând arzând O Doamne Tu mă culegi O Doamne tu culegi burning arzând IV. DEATH BY WATER IV. MOARTEA PRIN AP Phlebas the Phoenician, a fortnight dead, Forgot the cry of gulls, and the deep sea swell Phlebas fenicianul, mort de două săptămâni A uitat strigătul pescăruşilor iar marea adâncă i-a crescut 470 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And the profit and loss. Şi câştigul şi pierderile. A current under sea Picked his bones in whispers. As he rose and fell He passed the stages of his age and youth Entering the whirlpool. Un curent submarin I-a adunat, oasele murmurând. Cum el s-a sculat şi-a căzut Peste treptele vârstei şi tinereţii sale trecând Intrând în vârtejul de apă. Gentile or Jew O you who turn the wheel and look to windward, Consider Phlebas, who was once handsome and tall as you. Păgân sau iudeu O tu care întorci roata şi priveşti înspre vânt, Gândeşte-te la Phlebas, care a fost înalt şi frumos ca tine, mereu. V. WHAT THE THUNDER SAID V. CE A SPUS TUNETUL After the torchlight red on sweaty faces After the frosty silence in the gardens After the agony in stony places The shouting and the crying Prison and palace and reverberation Of thunder of spring over distant mountains He who was living is now dead We who were living are now dying With a little patience După roşul de torţă pe chipurile asudate După tăcerea geroasă a grădinilor După agonia de pe tărâmurile pietroase Strigătele şi plângerile Închisoarea şi palatul şi reverberaţia Tunetului primăvăratic peste munţii îndepărtaţi, Cel ce era viu acum este mort Noi care eram vii murim acum Cu un strop de răbdare. Here is no water but only rock Rock and no water and the sandy road The road winding above among the mountains Which are mountains of rock without water If there were water we should stop and drink Amongst the rock one cannot stop or think Aici nu vezi urmă de apă ci numai stânci Stânci şi nici strop de apă iar drumul nisipos Drumul şerpuind în sus printre povârnişuri Printre munţii stâncoşi şi fără strop de apă Dacă s-ar fi aflat apă ne-am fi oprit să bem Printre stânci nu te poţi opri şi nu poţi gândi 471 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sweat is dry and feet are in the sand If there were only water amongst the rock Dead mountain mouth of carious teeth that cannot spit Here one can neither stand nor lie nor sit There is not even silence in the mountains But dry sterile thunder without rain There is not even solitude in the mountains But red sullen faces sneer and snarl From doors of mudcracked houses If there were water And no rock If there were rock And also water And water A spring A pool among the rock If there were the sound of water only Not the cicada And dry grass singing But sound of water over a rock Where the hermit-thrush sings in the pine trees Drip drop drip drop drop drop drop But there is no water Who is the third who walks always beside you? When I count, there are only you and I together But when I look ahead up the white road There is always another one walking beside you Gliding wrapt in a brown mantle, hooded Sudoarea e uscată iar picioarele sunt îngropate în nisip Numai dacă s-ar găsi apă printre stânci Munte mort gură cu dinţi cariaţi care nu pot scuipa Aici nu poţi sta nici în picioare nici întins nici şezând Nici măcar tăcere nu afli în munţi Ci numai un tunet steril şi uscat fără ploaie Nici măcar singurătate nu afli în munţi Dar chipuri roşii ursuze mârâie şi rânjesc Din uşile caselor cu tencuiala crăpată de lut Dacă s-ar afla apă Şi nu stânci Dacă s-ar afla stânci Dar şi apă Şi apă Un izvor Un iezer printre stânci Dacă ar exista fie şi numai susurul apei Nu greierele Şi ţârâitul de iarbă uscată Ci susurul apei pe stâncă Unde cântă în brădet pasărea-pustnică Pic plici pic plici plici plici plici plici Dar apă nu există Cine este cel de-al treilea care umblă mereu alături de tine? Când număr suntem numai eu şi cu tine alături Dar când privesc înainte în susul drumului alb Totdeauna un altul umblă alături de tine Alunecând înfofolit într-o mantie întunecată, sub glugă 472 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry I do not know whether a man or a woman – But who is that on the other side of you? Nu ştiu dacă este un bărbat sau o femeie — Dar cine umblă de cealaltă parte a trupului tău? What is that sound high in the air Murmur of maternal lamentation Who are those hooded hordes swarming Over endless plains, stumbling in cracked earth Ringed by the flat horizon only What is the city over the mountains Cracks and reforms and bursts in the violet air Falling towers Jerusalem Athens Alexandria Vienna London Unreal Ce este sunetul acesta din înaltul văzduhului Murmur al unei lamentaţii materne Cine sunt aceste hoarde înjugate mişunând Peste întinderile nemărginite, poticnindu-se în pământul crăpat Hotărnicit numai de orizontul plat Care este cetatea de peste munţi Ce se năruie se reface se înalţă în văzduhul violet Turnuri prăbuşindu-se Ierusalimul Atena Alexandria Viena Londra Ireale A woman drew her long black hair out tight And fiddled whisper music on those strings And bats with baby faces in the violet light Whistled, and beat their wings And crawled head downward down a blackened wall And upside down in air were towers Tolling reminiscent bells, that kept the hours And voices singing out of empty cisterns and exhausted wells. O femeie îşi ţinea strâns păru! negru şi lung Înstrunând pe aceste coarde o melodie şoptită Şi lilieci cu chipuri de copii în lumina violetă Îşi băteau aripile şi fluierau Foind cu capul în jos de-a lungul unui zid înnegrit Şi cu susul în jos se arătau în văzduh turnuri Bătând din clopote pline de amintiri, care ţineau orele Şi vocile cântând din cisterne goale şi puţuri secătuite. In this decayed hole among the mountains In the faint moonlight, the grass is singing Over the tumbled graves, about the chapel There is the empty chapel, only the wind‘s home. It has no windows, and the door swings, Dry bones can harm no one. În această părăginită văgăună dintre munţi În lumina palidă a lunii, ierburile cântă Peste mormintele răscolite, în jurul capelei, Iată capela pustie, doar vântului casă, N-are ferestre şi uşa i se bate de ferestre Oasele uscate nu fac rău nimănui. 473 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Only a cock stood on the rooftree Co co rico co co rico In a flash of lightning. Then a damp gust Bringing rain Doar un cocoş stătea pe acoperiş Cu cu rigu cu cu rigu În scăpărarea unui fulger. Apoi o rafală umedă Aducând ploaie Ganga was sunken, and the limp leaves Waited for rain, while the black clouds Gathered far distant, over Himavant. The jungle crouched, humped in silence. Then spoke the thunder DA Datta: what have we given? My friend, blood shaking my heart The awful daring of a moment‘s surrender Which an age of prudence can never retract By this, and this only, we have existed Which is not to be found in our obituaries Or in memories draped by the beneficent spider Or under seals broken by the lean solicitor In our empty rooms DA Dayadhvam: I have heard the key Turn in the door once and turn once only We think of the key, each in his prison Thinking of the key, each confirms a prison Only at nightfall, aetherial rumours Revive for a moment a broken Coriolanus DA Damyata: The boat responded Gaily, to the hand expert with sail and oar Ganga se scufundase, iar frunzele mlădioase Aşteptau ploaia, în timp ce norii întunecaţi Se adunau departe în zare, peste Himavant. Jungla se ghemuia, se gârbovea în tăcere. Apoi a vorbit tunetul DA Datta: ce ni s-a dat? Prietene, sângele zgâlţâindu-mi inima îngrozitoarea cutezanţă a unei clipe de supunere Pe care o vârstă a prudenţei n-o mai poate retracta niciodată Prin aceasta, şi numai prin aceasta, am existat noi, Lucru care nu-i de găsit în anunţurile noastre mortuare Sau în amintirile drapate de păianjenul binefăcător Sau sub sigiliile rupte de avocatul descărnat În odăile noastre pustii DA Dayadhvam: Eu am auzit cheia Răsucindu-se în broască şi răsucindu-se o singură dată Noi ne gândim la cheie, fiecare în temniţa lui Gândindu-se la cheie, fiecare confirmă o închisoare Numai la căderea nopţii, o rumoare reînvie Eteric pentru o clipă un Coriolan frânt DA Damyata: Luntrea răspundea Vesela mâinilor dibace în mânuirea pânzelor şi a vâslei 474 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The sea was calm, your heart would have responded Gaily, when invited, beating obedient To controlling hands Marea era calmă, inima ta ar fi răspuns Veselă, dacă ar fi fost poftită, bătând cu supunere În mâinile călăuzitoare. I sat upon the shore Fishing, with the arid plain behind me Shall I at least set my lands in order? London Bridge is falling down falling down falling down Poi s‘ascose nel foco che gli affina Quando fiam ceu chelidon – O swallow swallow Le Prince d‘Aquitaine à la tour abolie These fragments I have shored against my ruins Why then Ile fit you. Hieronymo‘s mad againe. Datta. Dayadhvam. Damyata. Shantih shantih shantih Eu stăteam pe ţărm Pescuind, cu câmpia aridă în spatele meu Să-mi pun barem pământurile în ordine? Podul Londrei se prăbuşeşte se prăbuşeşte se prăbuşeşte Poi s‘ascose nel foco che gli affina Quando fiam uti chelidon – O rândunică rândunică Le Prince d‘Aquitaine à la tour abolie Aceste fragmente le-am ancorat la ţărmul ruinurilor mele De ce atunci Ile ti s-a potrivit, Hyeronimo e iar furios. Datta. Dayadhvam. Damyata. Shantih shantih shantih. Traducere A.Covaci. 475 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1923a. BLAGA. Semne. Hastie. 41 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers 1995 for the original poem from page 144.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: Semne. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Semne. Signs. Porumbii-prooroci îşi scaldă aripile înnegrite de funingine în ploile de sus. Eu cânt — semne, semne de plecare sunt. Prophetic doves bathe in the rain up there, wings blackened by soot. I sing — signs, they are signs of leaving. Din oraşele pământului fecioare albe vor porni cu priviri înalte către munţi. Pe urma lor vor merge tineri goi spre sori păduratici, şi tot ce e trup omenesc va purcede From the cities of the world white girls, virginal, will set out, their eyes raised to the mountains. Following them, naked young men will go towards the forest suns and everything which is human body 476 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry să mai înveţe odat‘ poveştile uitate ale sângelui. will go on to learn once more the forgotten fables of the blood. Mi-am pecetluit cu ceară casa, să nu mai întârziu unde jocuri şi răstigniri n-or mai trece pe uliţi şi nicio adiere de om din veac în veac pe subt bolţi. Poduri vor tăcea. Din clopote avântul va cădea. I have sealed my house with wax not to stay later where games and crucifixions will go no more through the streets and no breath of man will rise for centuries beneath the vaults. The bridges will be silent, excitement leave the bells. Din depărtatele sălbăticii cu stele mari doar căprioare vor pătrunde în oraşe să pască iarba rară din cenuşă. Cerbi cu ochii uriaşi şi blânzi intra-vor în bisericile vechi cu porţile deschise, uitându-se miraţi în jur. From wild lands far away under huge stars only wild deer will come down to the cities to graze the grass scattered among the ashes. Deer with big, kind eyes will go into the old churches, doors open wide, marvel as they look about. Lepădaţi-vă coarnele moarte, batrânilor cerbi, cum pomii îşi lasă frunza uscată, şi-apoi plecaţi: aci şi ţărâna înveninează, aci casele au încercat cândva să ucidă pe copiii omului. Scuturaţi-vă de pământ şi plecaţi, căci iată — aci vinul nebun al vieţii Throw away your dead horns, old deer, as the trees shed their dry leaves and then go; here even the dust is poisonous, here even the houses have tried once to kill the sons of man. Shake off the dust of the earth and leave, for look — here the mad wine of life 477 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry s-a scurs în scrum, dar orice alt drum duce în poveste, în marea, marea poveste. runs out into the ashes but every other road leads to myth and fable, to great, great fable. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 478 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1923b. BLAGA. În marea trecere. Hastie. 25 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers, Bucharest 1995, for the original poem from page 120.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: În marea trecere. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? În marea trecere. The Great Transition. Soarele-n zenit ţine cântarul zilei. Cerul se dăruieşte apelor de jos. Cu ochi cuminţi dobitoace în trecere îşi privesc fără de spaimă umbra în albii. Frunzare se boltesc adânci peste o-ntreagă poveste. The sun at noo holds high the balance of the day. The sky gives itself to the waters down below. With soft eyes, the cattle passing look fearless at their shadows in pools. Branches vault a huge roof tell the whole story of the world. Nimic nu vrea să fie altfel decât este. Numai sângele meu strigă prin păduri după îndepărtata-i copilărie, ca un cerb batrân după ciuta lui pierdută în moarte. Everything is happy to be what it is. Only my blood shouts through the forest in search of its lost youth like an old stag in search of the mate death stole from him. Poate a pierit subt stânci. Perhaps she lies under some rocks somewhere. 479 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Poate s-a cufundat în pământ. În zadar i-aştept veştile, numai peşteri răsună, pâraie se cer în adânc. Perhaps the earth has swallowed her up. I wait in vain for news but only caves resound and springs ask to go deeper. Sânge fără răspuns, o, de-ar fi linişte, cât de bine s-ar auzi ciuta călcând prin moarte. Blood without answer, if the earth were filled with silence you would hear the death run of the deer. Tot mai departe şovăi pe drum — şi, ca un ucigaş ce-astupă cu năframa o gură învinsă, închid cu pumnul toate izvoarele, pentru totdeauna să tacă, să tacă. On and on, swaying on the road — like a killer who gags with a handkerchief I try to stop the mouth of springs forevere, forever, with my fist. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 480 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1924a. BLAGA. Fiu al faptei nu sunt. Hastie. 22 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers, Bucharest 1995, for the original poem from page 140.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: Fiu al faptei nu sunt. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Fiu al faptei nu sunt. I Am Not a Man Who Does Things. Fără de număr sunteţi fii ai faptei pretutindeni pe drumuri, subt cer şi prin case. Numai eu stau aici fără folos, nemernic, bun doar de-nnecat în ape. There are so many of you, men who do things, everywhere in the streets, under the sky, roofs. Only I am here purposeless, infamous. only good for drowning in water. Totuşi aştept, de mult tot aştept vreun trecător atotbun şi-atotdrept ca să-i spun: O, nu-ţi întoarce privirea, O, nu-mi osândi nemişcarea. Cresc între voi, ci umbrit de mâinile mele misticul rod se rotunjeşte în altă parte. Nu mă blestemaţi, nu mă blestemaţi! But I am waiting, have been waiting for a long time for some wholly good, wholly honest passerby to say to him: Oh, don‘t turn and look at me, Oh, don‘t condemn my immobility. I grow among you, but shaded by my hands the mystic fruit ripens in another place. Don‘t curse me, don‘t curse me! Prieten al adâncului, Friend of deep things, 481 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry tovarăş al liniştei, joc peste fapte. Câteodată prin fluier de os strămoşesc mă trimit în chip de cântec spre moarte. companion of silence, I play above the doing. Sometimes with a flute of ancestral bone I sens myself to death as a song. Întrebător fratele mă priveşte, mirată mă-ntâmpină sora, dar încolăcit la picioarele mele m-ascultă şi mă pricepe prea bine şarpele cel cu ochii de-a pururi deschişi spre-nţelepciunea de dincolo. Questioning, my brother looks at me, astonished, my sister meets me, but wrapped aroud my feet the snake listens to me and understands me better, the snake with its eyes open forever to wisdom far away. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 482 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1924b. BLAGA. Psalm. Hastie. 30 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers, Bucharest 1995, for the original poem from page 118.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: Psalm. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Psalm. Psalm. O durere totdeauna mi-a fost singurătatea ta ascunsă Dumnezeule, dar ce era să fac? Când eram copil mă jucam cu tine şi-n închipuire te desfăceam cum desfaci o jucărie. Apoi sălbăticia mi-a crescut, cântările mi-au pierit, şi fără să-mi fi fost vreodată aproape te-am pierdut pentru totdeauna în ţărână, în foc, în văzduh şi pe ape. Your hidden solitude always made me sad, but what could I do, God? When I was a child, I played with you and in imagination took you to pieces like a toy. Then my wildness grew and my songs died, and without your being with me I lost you forever in earth, in air, in fire, in water. Între răsăritul de soare şi-apusul de soare sunt numai tină şi rană. În cer te-ai închis ca-ntr-un coșciug. O, de n-ai fi mai înrudit cu moartea From sunrise to sunset I am plague and mud. You have shut yourself always in the sky as in a coffin and if you were not closer kin to death than to life 483 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry decât cu vieaţa, mi-ai vorbi. De-acolo unde eşti, din pământ ori din poveste mi-ai vorbi. you would speak to me from where you are you would speak to me from within the earth, within the tale. În spinii de-aci arată-te Doamne, să ştiu ce-aştepţi de la mine. Să prind din văzduh suliţa veninoasă din adânc azvârlită de altul să te rănească subt àripi? Ori nu doreşti nimic? Eşti muta, neclintita identitate (rotunjit în sine a este a), nu ceri nimic. Nici măcar rugăciunea mea. Show me, God, here among the thorns what is it you want of me. To catch in the air the poisoned spear others threw from the depths to wound you beneath your wings? Or do you want nothing of me? You are still, mute identity, (alpha round itself is alpha), and you ask me for nothing, not even for my prayers. Iată, stelele intră în lume deodată cu întrebătoarele mele tristeţi. Iată, e noapte fără ferestre-nafară. Dumnezeule, de-acum ce mă fac? În mijlocul tău mă dezbrac. Mă dezbrac de trup ca de-o haină pe care-o laşi în drum. Look at the stars coming into the world with my own questioning griefs. It is night, and there are no windows in it. What am I to do from now on, God? In you I take off my body as if it were an old suit left in the middle of the road. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 484 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1924c. BLAGA. Tristeţe metafizică. Hastie. 32 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers, Bucharest 1995, for the original poem from page 169.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: Tristeţe metafizică. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie FrageStellung: a. Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic craft? b. Why do you think the translation into English does not mention the dedication of the poem? Tristeţe metafizică. Metaphysical Sorrow. Lui Nichifor Crainic În porturi deschise spre taina marilor ape am cântat cu pescarii, umbre înalte pe maluri, visând corăbii încărcate de miracol străin. Alături de lucrătorii încinşi în zale cănite am ridicat poduri de oţel peste râuri albe, peste zborul pasărei curate, peste păduri adânci, şi orice pod se arcuia trecându-se parcă pe un tărâm de legendă cu el. In harbours open to the mystery of great waters, I have sung with fishermen, shadows high upon the shore, dreaming of ships laden with a strange miracle. Near workmen in hot shirts of mail I have raised steel bridges, over white rivers higher than the flight of the pure bird above the deep woods, and every bridge arched opening, it seemed, a way to myth. 485 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Am zăbovit îndelung între stânci lângă sfinţi bătrâni ca ghicitorile ţării, şi-am aşteptat să se deschidă o fereastră de scăpare prin puternice spaţii de seară. Cu toţi şi cu toate m-am zvârcolit pe drumuri, pe ţărmuri, între maşini şi biserici. Lângă fântâni fără fund mi-am deschis ochiul cunoaşterii. I have lingered late among the rocks, shrines of old saints, like village seers, and I have waited to open a window to escape into the strong spaces of the evening. Spoken with every man and thing tossed on the shore, on the paths between machinery and churches. Near bottomless wells, I have opened the eyes of my conscience. M-am rugat cu muncitorii în zdrenţe, am visat lângă oi cu ciobanii şi-am aşteptat în prăpăstii cu sfinţii. Acum mă aplec în lumină şi plâng în târziile rămăşiţe ale stelei pe care umblăm. I have prayed with workmen in their ragged clothes, I have dreamed by sheep with shepherds, and I have waited by the chasms with the saints. Now I bow towards the light and weep in the late ruins of the star on which we walk. Cu toată creatura mi-am ridicat în vânturi rănile şi-am aşteptat: oh, nicio misiune nu se-mplineşte. Nu se-mplineşte, nu se-mplineşte! Şi totuşi cu cuvinte simple ca ale noastre s-au făcut lumea, stihiile, ziua şi focul. Cu picioare ca ale noastre Isus a umblat peste ape. With every creature I have lifted wounds up to the wind and I have waited: Oh, no miracle comes true! No miracle! No miracle! And yet with simple words like ours the world was made, and fire, and nature, with feet just like ours, He walked upon the waters. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 486 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1926a. BACOVIA. Ninge. Jay. 8 lines. Author: George BACOVIA (1881-1957). Text: Ninge. Translator: P. Jay. FrageStellung: Is Bacovia an easy poet to understand? Does he, in your opinion, deserve internatio nal status? Ninge. Snow. Când iar începe-a ninge Mă simt de-un dor cuprins. Mă văd, pe-un drum, departe, Mergând, încet, şi nins. When it starts snowing again I feel caught by a longing. Far off I see myself, on a road, Snowed on, slowly, walking. Sub streşină, cerdacul Se-ntunecă mâhnit; Stă rezemată-o fată De stâlpu-nzăpădit. Wistfully, the balcony grows Darker under the eaves; Against the pillar piled With snow, a girl leans. Traducere P. Jay. 487 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1926b. BACOVIA. Vals de toamnă. Jay. 12 lines. Author: George BACOVIA (1881-1957). Text: Vals de toamnă. Translator: P. Jay. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Vals de toamnă. Autumn Waltz. La geamuri, toamna cântă funerar Un vals îndoliat, şi monoton... — Hai să valsăm, iubito, prin salon, După al toamnei bocet mortuar. At windows , autumn plays a funeral march In monotone, a waltz of mourning... — Come, Let‘s waltz, my darling, through the drawing-room To the tune of autumn‘s mortuary dirge. Auzi, cum muzica răsună clar În parcul falnic, antic, şi solemn, — Din instrumente jalnice, de lemn, La geamuri, toamna cântă funerar. Listen, as the music clearly sounds Across the stately, antique, solemn park, — From sorrow-laden wooden instruments At windows, autumn plays a funeral march. Acum, suspină valsul, şi mai rar, O, lasă-mă acum să te cuprind... — Hai, să valsăm, iubito, hohotind, După al toamnei bocet mortuar. Now as the waltz sighs, softly whispering, O let me clasp you to me now... — And come, Let‘s waltz, my darling, shrieking as we turn To the tune of autumn‘s mortuary dirge. Traducere P. Jay. 488 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1927. T.S. ELIOT. Journey of the Magi. Blaga # Pillat. 69 lines. Author: T.S. ELIOT (1888-1965). Text: Journey of the Magi. Translator: L. Blaga # I. Pillat. FrageStellung: Is the story taken from the Bible? Where from exactly? Was Eliot a religious man? I s that a significant point to take up? Journey of the Magi. Călătoria magilor. A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For the journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter. And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory, Lying down in the melting snow. „Am umblat prin vreme rece, Nimerind pentru călătorie timpul cel mai rău din an. Şi ce călătorie lungă: Drumuri desfundate, aspră vremuire chiar în miez de iarnă. Erau mohorâte cămilele, cu răni pe copite, Încruntate zăceau în zăpada ce se topea. There were times we regretted The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, And the silken girls bringing sherbet. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling And running away, and wanting their liquor and women, And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it. At the end we preferred to travel all night, Au fost şi clipe când regretam Palatele de vară de pe clinuri, terasele, Şi fetele de mătasă aducând şerbet. Apoi oamenii, călăuzind cămilele, cum înjurau cârtind! Ne părăseau, Tânjind după femei şi băuturi. Şi focuri de noapte ce se stingeau, lipsa de-adăposturi. Apoi cetăţile ostile, oraşele neprietenoase, Şi satele murdare, hanuri – preţuri mari socotind. Zile de cumpănă, grele răscruci avurăm. 489 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sleeping in snatches, With the voices singing in our ears, saying That this was all folly. La urmă preferarăm să călătorim toată noaptea, Dormind pe-apucate. Voci cântând în urechile noastre, spuneau că asta-i o nebunie. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation; With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, În zori am coborât într-o vale mai temperată, Subt linia zăpezii, mirosind umed a verdeaţă. Un râu repejor era pe-acolo, o moară de apă Bătea întunericul. Şi trei arbori la tivul de jos al cerului. Un cal bălan se depărta-n galop pe-o luncă. La o tavernă ajuns-am apoi, cu frunze de viţă La fruntea ferestrei. Şase mâni în prag aruncau zaruri pentru arginţi, Picioare loveau în burdufuri de piele golite de vin. Dar aici nu găsirăm doritele veşti. Şi astfel drumul ni l-am urmat. Seara-am ajuns. Nicio clipă prea curând Găsind locul. A fost (veţi zice) mulţumitor. And three trees on the low sky, And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel, Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver, And feet kicking the empty wine-skins, But there was no information, and so we continued And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory. All this was a long time ago, I remember, And I would do it again, but set down This set down This: were we led all that way for Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death, But had thought they were different; this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death, Îmi amintesc. Toate acestea s-au petrecut foarte de mult. Aş face-o din nou, dar înseamnă-ţi, Aceasta să ţi-o însemni: Am fost călăuziţi noi tot drumul pentru Naştere sau Moarte? A fost o Naştere desigur. Învederată ochilor, nu-ncape-ndoială. Văzurăm naştere şi moarte. Dar credeam că sunt altfel. Această Naştere A fost grea şi-amară pentru noi ca Moartea, Ca moartea noastră. 490 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, With an alien people clutching their gods. I should be glad of another death. Ne-am întors la locurile noastre-n aceste regate. Dar n-am mai găsit tihnă aici în vechea orânduire, Cu un popor străin, ce-atât de strâns La zeii săi ţine. Aş fi bucuros de-o altă moarte. Traducere L. Blaga 491 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Journey of the Magi. Drumul magilor. A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For the journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter. And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory, Lying down in the melting snow. Ne-a întâmpinat cu frig mare Tocmai cea mai rea vreme a anului Pentru un drum aşa de lung: Căile desfundate şi aerul tăios, Chiar miezul mort al iernii. Şi cămilele rănite, betege de picioare, răzvrătite, Culcându-se în omătul care se topea. There were times we regretted The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, And the silken girls bringing sherbet. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling And running away, and wanting their liquor and women, And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it. At the end we preferred to travel all night, Sleeping in snatches, With the voices singing in our ears, saying That this was all folly. Au fost vremuri când am plâns Palatele de vară pe povârnişuri, terasele Și fetele în mătăsuri aducând şerbet. Apoi călăuzele cămilelor înjurând şi bombănind, Luând-o la fugă şi cerând rachiul, şi muierile lor, Şi focurile de noapte stinse, şi lipsa de adăposturi, Şi cetăţile duşmănoase, şi târgurile neprietene, Şi satele murdare, socotind preţuri mari: Ce zile grele am avut! La sfârşit ne-a părut mai bine să călătorim toată noaptea Aţipind pe apucate, Cu glasuri cântându-ne în ureche, spunând Că aceasta era doar o nebunie. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation; With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, And three trees on the low sky, Apoi, în zori, am coborât într-o vale mai caldă, Umedă, mai jos de hotarul zăpezii, mirosind a iarbă; Cu un pârâu repede şi o moară de apă lovind întunericul Și trei copaci pe zare, 492 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel, Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver, And feet kicking the empty wine-skins, But there was no information, and so we continued And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory Și un cal bătrân, bălan, galopând pe pajişte. Apoi am sosit la un han cu frunze de viţă pe tâmpla porţii, Șase mâini la o uşă deschisă aruncau zarul pentru arginţi, Și picioare băteau burdufele goale de vin, Dar acolo n-am putut afla nimic, şi aşa am mers mai departe, Şi am ajuns în amurg, nicio clipă prea devreme, Găsind locul; era (ai putea spune) mulţumitor. All this was a long time ago, I remember, And I would do it again, but set down This set down This: were we led all that way for Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death, But had thought they were different; this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death, We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, With an alien people clutching their gods. I should be glad of another death. Toate s-au petrecut demult, mi-aduc aminte, Şi aş porni din nou, dar, ia seama, Acest lucru, ia seama bine; Am făcut noi tot drumul acela pentru Naştere sau Moarte? S-a întâmplat o Naştere, desigur, Am avut mărturie şi nu e îndoială. Am văzut naştere și moarte, Dar socotim că erau deosebite; această naştere a fost Grea şi amară agonie pentru noi, ca Moartea, moartea noastră. Ne-am întors în ţările noastre, aceste împărăţii, Dar de-acum fără linişte aici, în vechea rânduială, Cu un popor străin, îndrăgindu-şi zeii. Aş fi bucuros de altă moarte. Traducere I. Pillat. 493 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1928. T.S. ELIOT. Animula. Pillat. 37 lines. Author: T.S. ELIOT (1888-1965). Text: Animula. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: a. Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic craft? b. Is religion a theme or a technique with T.S. Eliot? Animula. Animula. Issues from the hand of God, the simple soul, To a flat world of changing lights and noise, To light, dark, dry, damp, chilly or warm, Moving between the legs of tables and of chairs Rising or falling, Grasping at kisses and toys, Advancing boldly, sudden to take alarm, Retreating to the corner of arm and knee, Eager to be reassured, taking pleasure In the fragrant brilliance of the Christmas tree Pleasure in the wind, the sunlight and the sea‘ Studies the sunlit pattern on the floor. And running stays around a silver tag: Confounds the actual and the fanciful, Content with playing cards and kings and queens, What the fairies do and what the servants say. The heavy burden of the growing soul Iese din mâinile Domnului sufletul simplu Într-o lume searbădă de lumini schimbătoare şi de zgomote, În lumină, întuneric, uscat sau umezeală, răcoare sau căldură; Mişcând printre picioare de mese sau de scaune, Ridicându-se sau căzând, apucând săruturi şi jucării, Înaintând îndrăzneţ, iute căpătând teamă, Retrăgându-se în adăpostul braţului şi al genunchiului, Dornic de a fi liniştit, gustând plăcere În mireasma strălucitoare a pomului de Crăciun, Bucurându-se de vânt, de razele soarelui şi de mare; Studiază chenarul aprins de soare al duşumelii Şi cerbii gonind în jurul unei tipsii de argint; Încurcă adevărul cu basmul, Mulţumit cu jocul de cărţi şi de regi şi regine, Cu ce fac zânele şi cu ce spun slugile. Greaua povară a sufletului în creştere 494 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Te nedumireşte şi te înfruntă mai mult, zi de zi Săptămână de săptămână, te înfruntă şi te nedumireşte mai mult Perplexes and offends more, day by day, Week by week, offends and perplexes more. With the imperatives of "so it seems" And may and may not, desire and control. The pain of living and the drug of dreams Curl up the small soul in the window seat Behind the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Issues from the hand of time, the simple soul, Irresolute and sefish, misshapen, lame Unable to fare forward or retreat, Fearing the warm reality, the offered good, Denying the importunity of the blot, Shadow of its own shadow, spectre of its own gloom, Leaving disordered papers in a dusty room; Living first in silence after the viaticum, Cu imperativele de „este şi pare Şi se poate şi nu se poate, dorinţă şi înfrânare, Durerea de a trăi în leacul viselor Pe micul suflet îl fac covrig în jeţul de la fereastră În spatele Enciclopediei Britanice. Ieşit din mâinile timpului sufletul simplu Nehotărât şi egoist, slut şi şchiop, Nefiind în stare să meargă înainte sau înapoi, Temându-se de realitatea caldă, de binele oferit, Tăgăduind insistenţele sângelui, Umbră a propriei sale umbre, nălucă a propriului său întuneric, Lăsând hârtii răvăşite într-o odaie prăfoasă; Trăind întâia oară în tăcerea de după împărtăşanie. Pray for Guiterriez, avid of speed and power For Boudin, blown to pieces, For this one, who made a great fortune And that one who went his own way. Pray for Floret by the boorhound slain between the yew trees, Pray for us now and at the hour of our birth. Roagă-te pentru Guiterriez, flămând de faimă și de putere Pentru Boudin, rupt în bucăţi, Pentru cel ce a adunat mari bogăţii, Și pentru cel ce şi-a urmat propria cale. Roagă-te pentru Floret, ucis de mistreţ sub ienuperi, Roagă-te pentru noi acuma şi în ceasul naşterii noastre. Traducere I. Pillat. 495 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1929. T.S. ELIOT. Marina. Pillat. 35 lines. Author: T.S. ELIOT (1888-1965). Text: Marina. Translator: I. Pillat. FrageStellung: Name and analyse a handful of literary devices you discover in this text. Is epigra ph a figure of speech? Marina. Marina. Quis hic locus, quae regio, quae mundi plaga? Quis hic locus, quae regio, quae mundi plaga? What seas what shores what grey rocks and what islands What water lapping the bow And scent of pine and the woodthrush singing through the fog What images return O my daughter. Ce mări, ce ţărm, ce sure stânci, ce insule, Ce apă lingând prora Și miros de brad, şi sturz de pădure cântând prin ceaţă, Ce chipuri ne revin, O, fiica mea. Those who sharpen the tooth of the dog, meaning Death Those who glitter with the glory of the hummingbird, meaning Death Those who sit in the sty of contentment, meaning Death Those who suffer the ecstasy of the animals, meaning Death Acei ce ascut colţii câinelui, însemnând Moarte Acei ce strălucesc cu mândria păsării-muscă, însemnând Moarte Acei ce stau în cocina mulţimii, însemnând Moarte Acei ce sufăr extazul dobitoacelor, însemnând Moarte 496 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Are become insubstantial, reduced by a wind, A breath of pine, and the woodsong fog By this grace dissolved in place S-au dezlegat de materie, reduşi de vânt, O răsuflare a brazilor, şi ceaţa cu cântec de codru Prin acest har s-au topit pe loc. What is this face, less clear and clearer The pulse in the arm, less strong and stronger— Given or lent? more distant than stars and nearer than the eye Care e fata asta, mai puţin clară şi mai clară, Pulsul în braţ, mai puţin tare şi mai tare – Dat sau împrumutat? mai departe ca stelele şi mai aproape ca ochiul, Whispers and small laughter between leaves and hurrying feet Under sleep, where all the waters meet. Şoapte şi râset uşor printre frunze şi paşi prea grăbiţi Sub somn adânc, unde apele toate se strâng. Bowsprit cracked with ice and paint cracked with heat. I made this, I have forgotten And remember. The rigging weak and the canvas rotten Between one June and another September. Made this unknowing, half conscious, unknown, my own. The garboard strake leaks, the seams need caulking. This form, this face, this life Living to live in a world of time beyond me; let me Resign my life for this life, my speech for that unspoken, The awakened, lips parted, the hope, the new ships. Vârf de catarg crăpat de gheaţă şi vopsea crăpată de foc. Eu le-am făcut, eu le-am uitat Și-mi amintesc Catargul cel slab şi putreda pânză Între o lună iunie şi un alt septembre. Le-am făcut neștiind, treaz şi beat, pe neştiute, ale mele. Carina prinde apă, încheieturile se cer călăfătuite. Forma asta, faţa asta, viaţa asta, Trăind spre a trăi într-o lume de timp dincolo de mine lasă-mă Să-mi dau viaţa pentru viaţa asta, vorba pentru cea negrăită, Deşteptarea, buze despărţite, nădejdea, corăbiile noi. What seas what shores what granite islands towards my timbers And woodthrush calling through the fog My daughter. Ce mări, ce ţărm, ce insule de granit către cheresteaua mea Şi sturz de pădure chemând prin ceaţă, Fiica mea. Traducere I. Pillat. 497 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1933. YEATS. After Long Silence. Blaga. 8 lines. Author: William Butler YEATS (1865-1939). Text: After Long Silence. Translator: L. Blaga. FrageStellung: a. Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic craft? b. Can you explain why T.S. Eliot called W.B. Yeats pre-eminently the poet of middle age? Does thi s translation manage to convey this? After Long Silence. După o lungă tăcere. Speech after long silence; it is right, All other lovers being estranged or dead, Unfriendly lamplight hid under its shade, The curtains drawn upon unfriendly night, That we descant and yet again descant Upon the supreme theme of Art and Song: Bodily decrepitude is wisdom; young We loved each other and were ignorant. A vorbi dup-o lungă tăcere, e bine. Cei ce dragi ieri ne-au fost, ne sunt morţi sau străini Perdelele-s trase spre noaptea vecină. Abajurul alină-n odaie lumini. Discutăm despre Artă şi Cântec, o temă socotită supremă-ntre oameni savanţi. Destrămare trupească e înţelepciunea. Tineri, noi ne iubeam, şi eram ignoranţi. Traducere L. Blaga. 498 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1933. BLAGA. La cumpăna apelor. Hastie. 16 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers, Bucharest 1995, for the original poem from page 196.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: La umpăna apelor. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? La cumpăna apelor. At the Watershed. Tu eşti în vară, eu sunt în vară. În vară pornită către sfârşit, pe muche-amândoi la cumpăna apelor, cu gând jucăuş — mângâi părul pamântului. Ne-aplecăm peste stânci, subt albastrul neîmplinit. You are in summer, I am in summer. In summer moving towards its end, both of us at the watershed. Full of playful thoughts, I stroke the earth‘s hair, we lean over the rocks, under the unfulfilled blue. Priveşte în jos! Priveşte-ndelung, dar să nu vorbim. S-ar putea întâmpla să ne tremure glasul. Din poarta-nălţimei şi până-n vale îmbătrâneşte, ah, cât de repede, apa. Şi ceasul. Look down! Look down for a long time but do not speak. Our voices might tremble. From the gate of the heights as far as the valley how fast the water grows old. And time. E mult înapoi? Atâta e şi de-acum înainte cu toate că mult mai puţin o să pară. Ne-ascundem — stins arzând — după năluca de vară. Ne-nchidem inima după nespuse cuvinte. Is it as much backwards? It is as much as it is forwards, though it will seem much less. We hide ourselves — smouldering still —after the summer ghost. We close our hearts after the unspoken word. 499 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Poteca de-acum coboară ca fumul din jertfa ce nu s-a primit. De-aici luăm iarăşi drumul spre ţărna şi valea trădate-nmiit pentr-un cer chiemător şi necucerit. The path of now goes down like smoke from the unaccepted sacrifice. From here we take again the road towards the earth and the valley, betrayed a thousand times for a sky appealing and unconquered. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 500 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1935. Louis MacNEICE. Snow. Tartler. 12 lines. Author: Louis MacNEICE (1907-1963). Text: Snow. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: Give an outline of the life and work of this particular poet. How important is he? Snow. Zăpadă. The room was suddenly rich and the great bay-window was Spawning snow and pink roses against it Soundlessly collateral and incompatible: World is suddener than we fancy it. Odaia deodată bogată - pe marele geam în pervaz Zăpada şi trandafiriile roze se lasă Colaterale-n tăcere şi incompatibile: Lumea e mai subită decât ne închipuim. World is crazier and more of it than we think, Incorrigibly plural. I peel and portion A tangerine and spit the pips and feel The drunkenness of things being various. Lumea e mai nebună şi mai mult decât credem, Incorijibil plurală. Cojesc şi desfac O mandarină scuip sâmburii simt din plin Beţia lucrurilor care sunt diferite. And the fire flames with a bubbling sound for world Is more spiteful and gay than one supposes – On the tongue on the eyes on the ears in the palms of one‘s hands – There is more than glass between the snow and the huge roses. Iar focul pocneşte învăpăindu-se fiindcă lumea E mai contradictorie şi mai veselă cât am spune – Pe limbă pe ochi în urechi în căuşele palmelor – E mai mult decât geam între nea şi imensele roze. Traducere G. Tartler. 501 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1937. Robert GRAVES. At First Sight. Tartler. 6 lines. Author: Robert GRAVES (1895-1985). Text: At First Sight. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: Is Robert Graves famous as a poet? What other books did he write? At First Sight. La prima vedere. Love at first sight,‘ some say, misnaming Discovery of twinned helplessness Against the huge tug of procreation. Iubire la prima vedere, spun unii, Numind astfel greşit geamăna neputinţă În faţa curentului plin de forţă al procreaţiei. But friendship at first sight? This also Catches fiercely at the surprised heart So that the cheek blanches and then blushes. Dar prietenie la prima vedere? Şi ea Grozav înşfacă inima uluită Încât obrazul păleşte şi-apoi deodată-i ca focul. Traducere G. Tartler. 502 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1938a. YEATS. Politics. Tartler. 12 lines. Author: William Butler YEATS (1865-1939). Text: Politics. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: A rare title, a most unusual epigraph, authored by a more than unusual novelist... Why all that? Is this great poetry? Politics. Politică. In our time the destiny of man presents its meanings in political terms. Thomas Mann How can I, that girl standing there, My attention fix On Roman or on Russian Or on Spanish politics? Yet here‘s a travelled man that knows What he talks about, And there‘s a politician That has both read and thought, And maybe what they say is true Of war and war‘s alarms, But O that I were young again And held her in my arms. În vremurile noastre soarta îşi dezvăluie sensurile în termeni politici. Thomas Mann Cum oare să mai fiu atent Privind această fată La Roma, Spania, Rusia şi Politica lor toată? Dar colo-i un bărbat umblat, El ştie ce vorbeşte, Dincoace-un politician Ce gândeşte şi citeşte, Şi poate-aşa-i cum ne-alarmează, Războaie prevestind Dar o! dac-aş fi tânăr iar Pe Ea la piept s-o prind! Traducere G. Tartler. 503 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1938b. AUDEN. Musée des Beaux Arts. Tartler. 21 lines. Author: Wystan Hugh AUDEN (1907-1973). Text: Musée des Beaux Arts. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: This text is a paragon of celebrity: explain why. (100 words) Musée des Beaux Arts. Musée des Beaux Arts. About suffering they were never wrong, The Old Masters; how well, they understood Its human position; how it takes place While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along; How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting For the miraculous birth, there always must be Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating On a pond at the edge of the wood: They never forgot Despre suferinţă nu greşeau niciodată, Ei, Vechii Maeştri: ce bine înţelegeau Rostul ei omenesc; cum are loc În timp ce altul mănâncă, deschide fereastra sau doar merge apter înainte; Cum, în vreme ce bătrânii aşteaptă respectuoşi, pasionaţi Naşterea miraculoasă, trebuie să fie prin preajmă Şi nişte copii care n-ar fi vrut să se-ntâmple, patinând Pe baltă la margine de pădure: Ei n-au uitat niciodată 504 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer‘s horse Scratches its innocent behind on a tree. In Breughel‘s Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry, But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green Water; and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky, Had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on. Că martiriul cel mai cumplit trebuie dus pân‘ la capăt Chiar şi-ntr-un colţ, în ungherul necurăţat Unde câinii îşi continuă viaţa câinească şi calul călăului Îşi scarpină nevinovatul dos de-un copac. În Icarul lui Breughel, de pildă: cum întorc toate spatele Destul de lesne nenorocirii; ţăranul ce ară poate c-a auzit Un clipocit, strigătul deznădejdii, Dar pentru el n-a fost un eşec important; soarele lumina Cum se cuvine picioarele albe dispărând în apa cea verde; Iar delicata, costisitoarea corabie care desigur o fi văzut ea Ceva uimitor, un băiat care cade din cer, Avea de ajuns undeva şi-a navigat, calm, înainte. Traducere G. Tartler. 505 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1938c. BLAGA. La curţile dorului. Hastie. 18 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers, Bucharest 1995, for the original poem from page 207.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: La curţile dorului. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie. FrageStellung: a. Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic craft? b. Is your experience in translating Eminescu‘s poetry of any use while you translate L. Blaga? En umerate three reasons why, or why not. La curţile dorului. In the Courtyard of Our Desires. Prin vegherile noastre — site de in — vremea se cerne, şi-o pulbere albă pe tâmple s-aşază. Aurorele încă se mai aprind, şi-aşteptăm. Aşteptăm o singură oră să ne-mpărtăşim din verde imperiu, din raiul sorin. Strained through our waking hours — linen sieves —time passes, and a white dust settles on our temples. Auroras still gleam, and we are waiting. Waiting to share one hour of green empire, of the sun‘s heaven. Cu linguri de lemn zăbovim lângă blide lungi zile pierduţi şi străini. Oaspeţi suntem în tinda noii lumini la curţile dorului. Cu cerul vecini. With wooden spoons we linger near platters long days lost and strangers. We wait in the courtyard of our desires, guests on the verandah of new light, neighbours of heaven. Aşteptăm să vedem prin columne de aur We wait to see through golden columns 506 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Evul de foc cu steaguri păşind, şi fiicele noastre ieşind să pună pe frunţile porţilor laur. the century of fire, flags flying as our daughters run to decorate the lintel and the arch with laurel. Din când în când câte-o lacrimă-apare şi fără durere se-ngroaşă pe geană. Hrănim cu ea nu ştim ce firavă stea. From time to time a tear comes swelling below our lashes. With it we feed some fragile unimportant star. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 507 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1942. BLAGA. Poetul. Hastie. 53 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers, Bucharest 1995, for the original poem from page 247.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: Poetul. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie. FrageStellung: Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic cra ft? Poetul . The Poet. Întru pomenirea lui Rainer Maria Rilke Prietenă, să nu mai rostim zădarnicul sunet cu care-l chemau muritorii! Astăzi, vorbind pentru toţi el nu are chip şi nu are nume — poetul! Viaţa lui mult ne-a mirat, ca un cântec cu tulbure tâlc, ca un straniu eres. În ani de demult poetul, cuvântul strivindu-şi, a îndurat năpastele toate cu bărbăţie şi cele mai mari, cele mai crunte dureri, şi le-a stins în muntele singurătăţii, ce şi-a ales. Când la un semn In memory of Rainer Maria Rilke Let‘s not say again, my Friend, that useless word mortal men spoke of him. Today, speaking for us all the poet has neither face nor name. His life astonished us like a song beyond all understanding like a strange heresy. In years gone by the poet, stifling his own voice bore like a man the greatest, fiercest, sorrows suppressed on the mountain of loneliness he chose. When at a sign the blue quiet of the skies gave in 508 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry s-au surpat albăstrimile cerului, şi minutarele vremii treceau ca tăişuri prin toată făptura, în anii aceia, poetul voi să uite de semeni şi vatră. În anii cumplitelor pâcle când pământenii cu sfânta lor omenie şi carne s-au destrămat fără număr, şi viaţa — atâta s-a stins de-ar fi fost, vai, tocmai deajuns ca duhul să prindă trup pe pământ. Poetul, cu numele şters şi pierdut, s-a retras sub pavăza muntelui, făcându-se prieten înaltelor piscuri de piatră. Şi neajuns, neclintit, a rămas în jurul destinului flancat de albe şi negre solstiţii mare şi singur. Nu l-a ucis amarnica grijă din vale, nici gândul că Dumnezeu răpitu-şi-a singur putinţa-ntrupării. Nu l-au răzbit nici tunetul din depărtări, nici tenebrele. Şi nu l-a schimbat în cenuşă fulgerul care i-a fost pentr-o clipă oaspete-n prag. Mereu îşi dă sieşi cuvântul şi pasul său era legământ. Îngăduie, Prietenă, să-ţi amintesc că Poetul murì numai mult mai târziu. Mult mai târziu, ucis de-un ghimpe muiat în azur ca de-un spine cu foc de albină. and the hands of the clock pierced him like knives in those years the poet wanted to forget his fellow men. In the years of terrifying mists when those who lived on earth with their holy humanity and flesh perished numberless alas so much life perished it would have been just enough for the spirit to come down to us as flesh. The poet, nameless, lost, retreated under the shield of the mountains and made himself a friend of the high stone peaks. He was still there, unreached, a plaything of destiny side by side with black and white solstices great and alone. He was not killed by bitter worries from the valley nor by the thought that God had lost His own strength to become man. He was not conquered by the distant thunder nor by the shadow. He was not turned to ashes by the lightning which for a moment was his guest. He always gave his word every step swore an oath. Let me remind you, my Friend, that the Poet died only later. Much later, killed by a thorn dipped in blue like a thorn with the fire of bees. 509 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Muri poetul ucis sub soare de-un trandafir, de-un ghimpe muiat în simplu albastru, în simplă lumină. De-atunci, în frunzare-aplecate privighetoarele toate-amuţiră uimite de cele-ntâmplate. Privighetorile ceasului, din rarele noastre grădini, amuţiră-n lumina ce-apare-n zadar şi fără de semne, de-atunci. Şi nu ştiu nimic pe pământ ce-ar putea să le-ndemne să cânte iar. The poet died, killed under the sun by a rose, by a thorn dipped in simple blue. From that moment, in the bent branches the nightingales stopped singing astonished by the event. The nightingales in our rare gardens, of that hour, stopped singing in the vain light without signs from that moment. And I know on this earth that could persuade them to sing again. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 510 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1951. Dylan THOMAS. Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night. 19 lines. Author: Dylan THOMAS (1914-1953). Text: Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night. Translator: C. Abăluţă and Şt. Stoenescu. FrageStellung: What part of the United Kingdom is Thomas representative of? What is the title of h is only radio play? Explain his work. (100w) Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night. Lin în noaptea asta bună nu te-ndepărta. Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Lin în noaptea asta bună nu te-ndepărta, În groapa zilei vârsta veche delirează. Scrâşneşte-n amurgul luminii, turbează. Though wise men at their end know dark is right, Because their words had forked no lightning they Do not go gentle into that good night. Sfârşind ştiu înţelepţii că n-au tăiat vreo rază Cu vorba lor şi bezna pe drept le revenea, Dar lin în noaptea asta nu se îndepărtează. Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Cei buni faptelor lor firave în amiază Sperând prin golfuri verzi c-ar fi putut dansa, Scrâşnesc în amurgul luminii, turbează. Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, Do not go gentle into that good night. Sălbaticii ce-au prins soarele şi-l mimează În zbor, deprind târzii mâhniri în calea sa, Şi lin în noaptea asta nu se îndepărtează. Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Cei gravi, cu nervu-nvins demult, halucinează 511 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Ochii cei orbi ce-ar fi zglobii frânturi de stea; Scrâşnesc în amurgul luminii, turbează. And you, my father, there on the sad height, Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray, Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Cu fioroase lacrimi din înălţimea ta, Blesteamă-mă părinte şi binecuvântează. Lin în noaptea asta bună nu te-ndepărta, Scrâşneşte-n amurgul luminii, turbează. Traducere C. Abăluţă şi Şt. Stoenescu. 512 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1960. BLAGA. Mirabila sămânţă. Hastie. 52 lines. (Acknowledgments are due to Humanitas Publishers, Bucharest 1995, for the original poem from page 517.) Author: Lucian BLAGA (1895-1961). Text: Mirabila sămânţă. Translator: R. MacGregor-Hastie. FrageStellung: a. Are the parallel texts of any help in learning both the language and the poetic craft? b. This is one of the few poems L. Blaga wrote under communism. Can you translate this text withou t a knowledge of the time when it was written? c. Can you find one word in Blaga‘s poem that reminds you of C. Noica? How would you translate it into English? Knowing that C. Noica also wrote under communism, and probably faced the same necessity for self-censorhip... Mirabila sămânţă. Marvellous Seeds. Ma rogi cu-n surâs şi cu dulce cuvânt rost să fac de seminţe, de rarele, pentru Eutopia, mândra grădină, în preajma căreia fulgere rodnice joacă să-nalţe tăcutele seve-n lumină. You ask me sweetly, and with smile, to bring you rare seeds for Eutopia, the proud garden where the fertile lightnings play to raise the silent saps to light. Neapărat, mai mult decât prin oraşul rumorilor, c-o stăruinţă mai mare decât sub arcade cu flori, voi umbla primăvara întreagă prin târguri căutând vânzători de sămânţă. Of course, I‘ll stroll about the markets a whole Spring looking for seedmen more eagerly than sitting in flowered arcades. You guessed my natural learnings towards seeds, 513 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Mi-ai dibuit aplecarea firească şi gustul ce-l am pentru tot ce devine în patrie, pentru tot ce sporeşte şi creşte-n izvòrniţă. Mi-ai ghicit încântarea ce mă cuprinde în faţa puterilor, în ipostaze de boabe, în faţa mărunţilor zei, cari aşteaptă să fie zvârliţi prin brazde tăiate în zile de martie. my taste for things growing, for everything inspired, increasing in my own country. You guessed the enchantment of my mind by powers which appear to us as seeds, by little gods waiting to be scattered in the March ploughed furrows. Am văzut nu o dată sămânţa mirabilă ce-nchide în sine supreme puteri. Neînsemnate la chip, deşi după spiţă alese, îmi par seminţele ce mi le ceri. Culori luminate, doar ele destăinuie trepte şi har. În rânduri de saci cu gura deschisă — boabele să ţi le-nchipui: gălbii, sau roşii, verzi, sinilii, aurii, când pure, când pestriţe. More than once I have seen marvellous seeds which contain supreme powers. They seem unimportant, though taking into account their origin they look to me to be the seeds for which you asked. Colours lit up only they seem to reveal different ranks and talents. You should imagine seeds in open sacks yellowish or red, blueish, golden, plain or speckled. Asemenea proaspete, vii şi păstoase şi lucii culori se mai văd doar în stemele ţărilor, sau la ouă de păsări. Seminţele-n palme de le ridici, răcoroase, un sunet auzi precum ni l-ar da pe-un ţărmure-al Mării de Est mătăsoase nisipuri. The only other place you can see such vivid colours is on the coats of arms of states or on the eggs of birds. Seeds in the palm of the hand feel cool and you can hear them, hear a sound like silky sand on an Eastern Sea shore. Copil, îmi plăcea, despuiat de veşminte, să intru-n picioare în cadă cu grâu, cufundat pân la gură în boabe de aur. Pe umeri simţeam o povară de râu. As a child I used to love to get naked into the wheat barrel, plunging up to my neck in golden grain. On my shoulders I felt a load like a river. 514 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Şi-acuma, în timpuri târzii, când mai văd câteodată grămezi de seminţe pe arii, anevoie pun capăt fierbintei dorinţi de-a le atinge cu faţa. And even now, in my late days, sometimes seeing mounds of grain on the threshin floor, I have to make a great effort to surpress a hot desire to touch them with my cheek. De-alintarea aceasta mă ţine departe doar teama de-a nu trezi zeii, solarii, visătorii de visuri tenace, cuminţi. I suppress the desire to fondle them only through fear of solar gods with their firm, reasonable dreams. Laudă seminţelor, celor de faţă şi-n veci tuturor! Un gând de puternică vară, un cer de înaltă lumină, se-ascunde în fieştecare din ele, când dorm. Palpită în visul seminţelor un foşnet de câmp şi amiezi de grădină, un veac pădureţ, popoare de frunze şi-un murmur de neam cântăreţ. Glory to seeds, past, present and forever! A thought of strong summer, a great heaven of light is hidden in all of them as they sleep. Throbbing in the dreams of seeds there are fields sighing and gardens at noon, wild woods of centuries nations of leaves and the murmur of a people of singers. Traducere R. MacGregor-Hastie. 515 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ro1964. Nichita STNESCU. Poveste sentimentală. Carlson-Poenaru. 18 lines. Author: Nichita STNESCU (1933-1983). Text: Poveste sentimentală. Translator: Th. Carlson and V. Poenaru. FrageStellung: Nichita was a friend of mine; we were born at the same time & entered university to gether. Was he at Nobel Prize level? Poveste sentimentală. Sentimental story. Pe urmă ne vedeam din ce în ce mai des. Eu stăteam la o margine-a orei, tu – la cealaltă, ca două toarte de amforă. Numai cuvintele zburau între noi, înainte şi înapoi. Vârtejul lor putea fi aproape zărit, şi deodată, îmi lăsam un genunchi, iar cotul mi-l înfigeam în pământ, numai ca să privesc iarba-nclinată de căderea vreunui cuvânt, ca pe sub laba unui leu alergând. Then we met more often. I stood at one side of the hour, you at the other, like two handles of an amphora. Only the words flew between us, back and forth. You could almost see their swirling, and suddenly, I would lower a knee, and touch my elbow to the ground to look at the grass, bent by the falling of some word, as though by the paw of a lion in flight. 516 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Cuvintele se roteau, se roteau între noi, înainte şi înapoi, şi cu cât te iubeam mai mult, cu atât repetau, într-un vârtej aproape văzut structura materiei, de la-nceput. The words spun between us, back and forth, and the more I loved you, the more they continued, this whirl almost seen, the structure of matter, the beginnings of things. Traducere Th Carlson şi V. Poenaru. 517 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1966. Seamus HEANEY. The Barn. Tartler. 20 lines. Author: Seamus HEANEY (b. 1966). Text: The Barn. Translator: G. Tartler. FrageStellung: Who is Seamus Heaney? (50 words) How did he translate Beowulf? The Barn. Hambarul. Threshed corn lay piled like grit of ivory Or solid as cement in two-lugged sacks. The musty dark hoarded an armoury Of farmyard implements, harness, plough-socks. Grâu treierat, grămezi ca ivoriul, Sau solidul ciment în saci dubli şi grei. În iz vechi de beznă ascuns un armoriu Cu scule de ţară, plug, frâie, şei. The floor was mouse-grey, smooth, chilly concrete. There were no windows, just two narrow shafts Of gilded motes, crossing, from air-holes slit High in each gable. The one door meant no draughts Podea gri ca şoarecul, netedă, rece. Fără geamuri, doar două raze subţiri Cu praf auriu cum o cruce ar trece Sus, între aerisiri. Pe singura uşă nici fir All summer when the zinc burned like an oven. A scythe‘s edge, a clean spade, a pitch-fork‘s prongs: Slowly bright objects formed when you went in. Then you felt cobwebs clogging up your lungs De curent când vara tabla sta-ncinsă. Un tăiş de seceră, o furcă, o sapă Când intrai prindeau formă-n lumina cea stinsă. Apoi pânze simţeai, de paing, cât să-ncapă 518 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry And scuttled fast into the sunlit yard – And into nights when bats were on the wing Over the rafters of sleep, where bright eyes stared From piles of grain in corners, fierce, unblinking. În plămâni – fugeai iute în curte, sub soare. Iar în nopţi ce-aripau liliecii cu jind Peste bârne de somn, unde ochii de jaruri Te fixau de prin colţuri, ostili, neclipind, The dark gulfed like a roof-space. I was chaff To be pecked up when birds shot through the air-slits. I lay face-down to shun the fear above. The two-lugged sacks moved in like great blind rats. Intunericul se aduna ca un golf. Eram pleavă, pus Pentru păsări săgetând prin guri din tavan. Stam cu faţa în jos să alung frica-n sus. Sacii dubli intrau ca mari orbi şobolani. Traducere G. Tartler. The BarnThe Barn (1966) 519 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Research LEXICON: A Listing of Literary Devices discussed in Rhetoric. Elizabethan Rhetoric. Fundamental References: Venerable Bede. circa 701 AD. Book of Schemes & Tropes. ERASMUS. ?. De Copia rerum ac verborum.(tr. D.B.KING & H.D.RIX as On Copia of Words and Ideas, 1963.) John HOSKINS. 1599. Directions for Speech and Style. (ed. H.HUDSON, 1935). 520 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry W.S.HOWELL. 1956. Logic & Rhetoric in England, 1500-1700. Henry PEACHAM. 1577, expanded 1593. The Garden of Eloquence. (ed. W.G. CRANE, 1954). George PUTTENHAM. circa 1589. The Arte of English Poesie. (ed. G. WILLCOCK & A.WALKER, 1936 / 1970) V.L. RUBEL. 1941. Poetic Diction in the English Renaissance. J.E. SEIGEL. 1968. Rhetoric and Philosophy in Renaissance Humanism. L.A. SONNINO. 1968. A Handbook to 16C Rhetoric. C. VASOLI. 1968. La Dialettica e la retorica dell‘Umanesimo. B.W. VICKERS. 1968. Francis Bacon & Renaissance Prose. 1968. The Artistry of Shakespeare‘s Prose. 1970. Classical Rhetoric in English Poetry. B.WEINBERG. 1961. A History of Literary Criticism in the Italian Renaissance. Thomas WILSON. 1553,revised 1560. Arte of Rhetorique (ed. by G.H.MAIR, 1909). 521 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry This is The Shipley LISTING. You can find them all in the following book, which remains one of the best references for General Rhetoric: Dictionary of World Literature, edited by Joseph T. Shipley. The Philosophical Library, New York. 1953. 453 pages. (The numbers next to certain entries indicate the pages in tha t book.) A: 72 items. Abominatio 1.Ecphonesis. Addition 3. (1)[Rh.] (ProsThesis | MesoGoge(EpenThesis) | ParaGoge.) (2) Riddle. Adynaton 3. Ætiology 12. (1) Rh: ... (2) In Philosophy, Dicailology(science of Causation). Agnification. Agnomination.(1)Paronomasia.(2)Alliteration. Aischrologia.Cacophony. Allegory. 522 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Alliteration. Ambiguity. Amblysia. Amphibolog-y/-ism. Amphilog-y/-ism.Ambiguity. Amplification. An- :36 items: Anabasis. Anacephaloeosis. Anachinosis. Anachoresis. Anachorism. Anachronism. Anacoenosis. Anacoluthia. Anacoluthon. Anadiplosis.Repetition. Anagnorisis. Anagram. Analogia. Anamnesis. Ananym. 523 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Anaphonema. Anaphora. Anomoiosis. Antanaclasis. Antanagoge. Anteposition. Antropopathia. Anthypophora 25.ProCatalepsis. Erotesis. AntiClimax. Antilogy. AntiMetabole.Repetition. AntiMetaThesis. AntiPhrasis. AntiPtosis.Enallaxis. AntiStasis.Repetition. AntiStoichon.Oxymoron. AntiStrophon. ProCatalepsis. AntiSyzygy.Oxymoron. AntiThesis. Antonomasia 26.( : : Latin: Pronominatio). Antonym. (1) (2)Rh. 524 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry [An- ends here!] Aparithmesis.Asthrœsmus. Apeuche.Ecphonesis. Aphæresis,Aphesis,Aphetism.Hyphæresis. APHORISM. Apocope 27. Apod(e)ixis. Dicaiology. Divisions of a Speech. Apodiabolosis. Apodioxis.ProCatalepsis. Apodosis.Omoiosis. Apophasis. APOPHTHEGM. Aporia. Aposiopesis. Apostrophe. Apotheosis. Archaism. Aside. Asteism(us). Asyndeton. Asyntactic, Atactic. Athrœ(i)smus, Athrismus.Enumeration, Aparithmesis. 525 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Attic salt(sal Atticum‘) v acetum Italicum. Autoclesis. Auxesis 33.Amplification. *AXIOLOGY.Value. B: 10 items. BackFormation.WordCreation. Balanced Sentence.Oxymoron. Barbarism. Bathos. Battology.Repetition. Bianon 39.ProCatalepsis. Blending 41.WordCreation. Bomphilog-y / -ia 41. Bouts-rimés. Brachilogy. C: 70 items. Cacemphaton 46. *QUOTATION Johnson! Cacophemism. 526 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Cacophony. CacoSyntheton.Anastrophe. Cacozelia, Cacozelon, Cacozeal. Cadence 46. *Caricature 48. Burlesque. CataBasis. Climax. Catachresis. *Catalogue ... verse 49d. CataStasis. *Catastrophe. Character. Characterization. Action. Character,The. Characterism. Charade 52.Riddle. Charientism. Irony. *Charm v Beauty. Cheville. Chiasm(us). Chironomy. Chleuasm(us) 54.Irony. Chreia. CircumAmbages 57. CircumLocution. 527 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry *CIRCUMSTANCE. Clarity 57. } Clearness 64. } Clerihew. Climax. Clou. Cockney Rhymes. Coherence 66. *COINCIDENCE. Coinotes.Synecdoche. Colon.Period. *COLOUR 66. Comma 71. Period. CommonPlace. *COMMUNICATION. Compar.Oxymoron. Comparatio.Débat. Comparison.Amplification. *Conceit 74. Concession.SynChoresis. Concetto, Italian. Conceit. Concinnity. Conclusion. 528 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry *CONCRETE UNIVERSAL 74. Congeries.Amplification. *CONNOTATION. Consonance. Contentio 77.AntiThesis. Débat. Contraction.HyphAEresis.Addition. Contradictio. Débat. Contrast. Conundrum. Riddle. *CONVENTION. Conversion 78. WordCreation. Coq-à-l‘âne. *CORRECTNESS. (mlbBook on Political Correctness‘,qv!) CounterThesis 79. Oxymoron. CounterTurn. (1)Rh. (2) Crambe 80. Crasis.HyphAEresis. Cretinism. {!!!!! cf Dublin‘s Dunce...Plaque...} Crisis. ChronoGraphia 89.HypoTyposis. CrossOrder. D: 46 items. 529 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Dead Metaphor 90. Débat. Decorum. Decrementum 92. Climax. Deesis. Ecphonesis. Definition. Deliberative Oratory. Rhetoric, Species of. Demonstrative Oratory. Rhetoric, Species of. # Inventio. Denotation. Language. Dénoument. [StoryStructure] Derivation.[WordCreation] Deus ex machina 95. Diacope. Hyperbation. Diallage.[Rh.] Dialogism.[Rh.] Dialogue. [StoryStructure] Dialysis.[Rh.] ((Putt:) The Dismemberer) {SYN: Hyperbaton.} Dialyton.[Rh.] Asyndeton. Dianoia.[StoryStructure] Tragedy. Diaphora.[Rh.] Omoiosis. Diaporesis.[Rh.] Aporia. Diasyrm(us).[Rh.] Ridicule. Irony.Diatribe.[Rh.] DiaTyposis. HypoTyposis. 530 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Dicaiolog-y/-ia.[Rh.] Dichalogia.[Rh.] Dictamen.[Rh.] *DICTION. *Diction, Poetic 99. Diegesis 103. Speech. Voice. Diexodos.[Rh.] Ecbasis. Dignity. Elocutio. Style. Digression. [Rh.](Greek : ParekBasis.) Dilemma.[Rh.] Dilogy.[Rh.] Dinumeration.[Rh.] {SYN: Aparithmesis.} #Arthrœsmus. Dispositio.[Rh.] # Speech, Divisions of a. Dissimilitudo.[Rh.] Omoiosis. Dissonance 104. #Consonance. Distance. Psychic Distance. Distances, The Three. Dramatic Irony. Irony. Dramatic Monologue. Monologue. Dream (as a LiteraryDevice) 107. Dyslogism.[Rh.] {Antonym of Eulogism.} Dysphemism.[Rh.] {Antonym of Euphemism.} 531 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry E: 86 items. Ecbasis 109.[Rh.] Ecbole. Eclipsis.[Rh.] Ecphonema, Ecphonesis.[Rh.] (Putt: The Outcry ). Exclamation ~... 1. Pænism(us), in joy. 2. Anaphonema, in grief. 3. Thaumasm(us), in wonder. 4. Euche, for desired good. 5. Votum, with promise made. 6. Ara, with evil wished. 7. Misos,only more emphatically so. 8. Apeuche, beyond life. 9. Execratio(n), with piled abuse. 10. Deesis, with entreaty. 11. Obsecratio, with prayer of evil upon one‘s enemies. 12. Abominatio,to avert evil for oneself. Ecphrasis. Exegesis. Einfühlung. Empathy. 532 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Elaboration 110.[Rh.] Elegant Variation. Fowler,passim, esp. King‘s English. Elegantia. Elevation.WordCreation. Elision. [Prosody ????] Ellipsis 112. Variant of Eclipsis. Elocutio(n). Eloquence. Empathy. # Synaesthesis.Beauty. Emphasis 113. (Putt: The Reenforcer‘) {Enallage.[Rh.] Enallaxis. } {Enallaxis.[Rh.] }#Poetic License: Exchange of: 1. Antimeria: one part of speech for another: no buts.‘ 2. AntiPtosis: of case: Whence all but he had fled.‘ Enantiosis.[Rh.]Oxymoron. Enargia (Etymon: sweetness to the ear‘). HypoTyposis. Enigma 139.(Putt: The Riddle),q.v. EpanaClesis. EcBasis. NB: This is a RESEARCH Lexicon!!!!!! EpanaDiplosis,EpanaLepsis,EpanaPhora,EpanaStrophe. But me 533 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry [Rh.] Repetition. Epanodos.[Rh.] (1) {+gsMonologue,end of book...} (2) Repetition. EpanOrthosis.[Rh.] (Book of Job: In six troubles, yea, in seven‘) Frequent in PROVERBS... Epauxesis.[Rh.] Climax. EpenThesis.[Rh.] Addition 3. EperoTesis.[Rh.] EroTesis. Epexegesis. Exegesis. Epexergasia.[Rh.] Repetition. Epic Simile 140. Simile. EpiChoresis. SynChoresis. EpiDeictic.# Rhetoric, Species of. Epigram. Epilogue. EpiMerismus. Merismus. EpiMone.[Rh.] (????: The Love Burden...) Repetition. EpiMyth(ium).# Fable. EpiPhonema. Epiphora.[Rh.] Repetition. EpiPlexis. EpiPloce. (1) (2)[Rh.] qvqvqvqv... 534 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry EpiStrophe 143. EpiTasis 143d. [Th.] EpiThesis : : ParaGoge. Addition. Epithet. Epitimesis. EpiPlexis. EpiTrope 144.[Rh.] SynChoresis. EpiZeuxis.[Rh.] Repetition. Equivocation. Ambiguity. {Erotema. Erotesis. {Erotesis. 1. Eperotesis: 2. Anthypophora: 3.Erotema: With the Answer obvious: A Statement put in interrogative form for Emphasis. 4. Pusma: 5. Anacœnosis: 6. Symbouleusis: ETYMOLOGY 146. # WordCreation. Euche + Eulogism. + Euphemism. + Euphony. + Euphuism. + 535 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Exargasia. Excursus. Execratio. Exegesis. Exergasia. Exordium. Expeditio(n). Extenuation. + + + + + + + + F: 7 items. 153. Figura causae.[Rh.] + FIGURE, Figure of Speech. #Medieval Criticism.Imagery. Flyting.Débat. Formation of Words.WordCreation. Frame. Freytag‘s Pyramid. Frigidity.[Rh.] G: 7 items. 191. Ghost Word 199. 536 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Gloss. {Õ Coleridge:Ancient Mariner...} Gnome. God from the machine. Deus ex machina. Gongorism. *GRACE. Gradatio(n). + H: 30 items. 206. Haplology.[Rh.] Hyphæresis. Hendiad-ys/-es. (Putt: The Figure of Twins‘). HeteroPhemy 208. (1) (2) Hiatus. +Spelling & Phonetics... Hirmos.[Rh.] Athrœsmus. Historical Present. HoloPhrasis 211.[Rh.] NB: in fact,precisely My Idea of a KeyWord ! Hominem, Argumentum ad. HomœoArchy. HomœoPhony. HomœoSemant.[Rh.] Repetition. HomœoPtoton.[Rh.] # Synonymy. HomœOsis.[Rh.] Omoiosis. 537 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry HomœoTeleuton. HomœoTopy.[Rh.] HUMOUR 213. Hypallage. [Rh.] HyperBaton.[Rh.](Putt : The Transgressor‘). HyperBole. Hyphæresis 217. HypoBole.[Rh.] ProCatalepsis. HypoCorism(a).[Rh.] HypoPhora.[Rh.] ProCatalepsis. HypoStatization.[Rh.] Akin to Personification. HypoStrophe.[Rh.] HypoTaxis.[Rh.] HypoTyposis,PotTyposis.[ ?Elizabethan Rh. ? ] HypoZeugma.[Rh.] #Zeugma. HypoZeuxis.[Rh.] Repetition. Hysterology, Hysteron Proteron. HyperBaton. I: 19 items. 218. Icasm.[Rh.] Icon,Eicon. 538 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry *Illusion. +Coleridge... Image, Imagery. Imagination. Imitation. Incrementum.[Rh.] Climax. Amplification. In medias res. Innuendo. Interior Monologue. Interpreter. (1)[Rh.] A Synonym. (2) Signs, General Theory of. IntroJection. Inventio(n). Inversion. Invocation. Irmus.[Rh.] IRONY. IsaGoge. IsoColon. OxyMoron. J: 2 items. 242. Joke. Humour. Judicial Oratory. Rhetoric, Species of. 539 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry K: 1 item. 245. Kenning. L: 11y. 246. LeitMotif. License 251. Poetic License. Limerick. Linguistic Gap. Periphrasis. Lipogram. Litotes. Livre à clef. Local Colour. Logismus.[Rh.] Aporia. LogoDædalus. 257. [Rh.] Joyce knew this term, for sure !! Logopœia. M: 31 items. 258. Macaronic. Macrolog-ia / -y. 540 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Malaprop, Malapropism. Matæology. Meiosis 266.[Rh.](Putt: The Disabler‘). #Amplification. Litotes. Irony. Merismus. [Rh.] #EpiMerismus. Mesarchia.[Rh.] Repetition. MesoThesis. MesoZeugma. MetaBasis.[Rh.] Transition, qv. qv qv qv MetaChronism. AnaChronism. MetaGoge. Repetition. MetaGrammatism. AnaGram. MetaLepsis.[Rh.](1)(Putt: The Far-fetched‘). (2) #Metonymy. MetaMorphic Word. Metanoia. [Rh.](Putt: The Penitent‘). Metaphor. MetaPhrase. MetaPlasm.[Rh.] Inversion, qv qv qv qv MetaStasis.[Rh.] (Putt: The Figure of Remove‘). # ApoPhasis. ProCatalepsis. MetaThesis. (1)[Rh.] (2) #Spoonerism,qv qv qv Metonymy.(Putt: The MisNamer‘). #MetaLepsis. AntonoMasia. 541 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry MezzoZeugma 272. Mimesis. (1) Misos.[Rh.] EcPhonesis. Monologue,Soliloquy. Morology. Mot. Motif. Motive 275. (1) Mycterism(us). #Irony. N: 4 items. (2)[Rh.] #Irony,III. (2) 278. Negation 281. [Rh.] Noema.[Rh.] NonceWord. NonSense. O: 10 items. 289. Obsecratio(n).[Rh.] EcPhonesis. Occam‘s Razor. » The Principle of Parsimony. Omoiosis, Homœosis.[Rh.] » Comparison. #... + OmoioTeleton 293.[Rh.] ( Putt : ?? ) » HomœoTeleuton. 542 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Onomatopœia, Onomatopoesis.(1)[.( Philol.] (2)[Rh.]‘S... fortifies S...‘ Oratory. Rhetoric.GreekCriticism. Orismology.[Rh.] Orismus.[Rh.P.] Orthography, Figures of. Addition.HyPhæresis. Oxymoron. P: 90? items. 296. » » » » Pæanism(us).[Rh.] EcPhonesis. Palil(l)ogy.[Rh.] Repetition. Palimpsest. Palindrome. Parable. Parabola.(Putt : Resemblance Mystical‘). Omoiosis. Parabole.[Rh.] (1) (2) ParaChronism. ParaDiaStole.[Rh.] (1) (Putt : The Curry-favour‘). (2)Repetition. Paradigm(a).[Rh.] #Omoiosis. Par(æ/e)nesis. [Rh.] » Hortatory discourse. ParaGoge 297. Addition. 543 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ParaGram. ParaGraph. Paral(-e-/-ei-)(i)psis.[Rh.] ApoPhasis. Parallage.[Rh.] Anastrophe. Paramoion. Repetition. Paramologia. SynChoresis. ParaPhrase. Parasieopesis.[Rh.] Apophasis. ParaTaxis. ParaThesis.[Rh.] Repetition. Parecbasis.[Rh.] EcBasis.Speech, Divisions of. {Parec| or Pare|?} ||??? Paregmenon.[Rh.] Repetition. Parembole,Paremptosis.[Rh.] Parenesis.[Rh.] ParenThesis.[Rh.] Hyperbaton. Parenthurson.[Rh.] Def: ....thyrsis.... Parimia,Parœmia.[Rh.] A Proverb. Parimion,Paromion.[Rh.] Alliteration. Parisia 298. [Rh.] Begging pardon in advance, lest offence be taken. Parisology.[Rh.] Deliberate AMBIGUITY in use of words. Parison, Parisosis.[Rh.] Even balance in the parts of a sentence. Parallelism. Parody. Parœmia. A wise saying‘. + + 544 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Paromoion, Paromoiosis 299.[Rh.] Repetition. Parrhesia. [Rh.] Parsimony, Principle of. Occam‘s Razor. Partitio(n).[Rh.] Speech, Divisions of a. *Passus {Latin: step‘}.(1) A chapter or other division of a story.(2) Canto of a poem... Pathetic Fallacy. ... a type of Personification... Pathopœia 301. [Rh.] PATTERN. Periegia. [Rh.] (Putt: OverLabour). PERIOD. PeriPhrasis. Perissolog( -ia / -y ) 304.[Rh.] PeriPhrasis. Persona (Latin : ....). [Theatre:] Mask, qv.. qv qv qv Personification (Greek: Prosopopeia).[Rh.] *Phanopœia. Logopœia.Ezra Pound... Pithanology 310. [Rh.] PLAIN STYLE. Ploce,Ploche. [Rh.] Repetition. PLOT. POINT OF VIEW. ViewPoint. POINT, turning. Climax. POISED EXPECTANCY. Suspense,qv. qv qv qv ... PolyPtoton.[Rh.] Repetition. 545 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry PolySyndeton.[Rh.] Asyndeton PortmanteauWord. Pottyposis. [Rh. Elizabethan] HypoTyposis,qv. qv Præmunitio(n).[Rh.] ProCatalepsis. Préciosité, La. Preterition, Pretermission.[Rh.] #ApoPhasis. ProapoPhenon.[Rh.] (Putt: The ForeDenier). Negation, qv. ProCatalepsis. + ProLepsis. + Prolixity. + Pronunciatio. Elocution. Would it change the status of Phanatics? ProPortion. + *PROPOSITION... *Propriety. ProsApodosis. + *PROSE RHYTHM. Prosonomasia.[Rh.] (Putt: The NickNamer). ProsopoGraphia. + ProsopoPœia. + ProsThesis 327. Addition. PROTAGONIST. PROTATIC CHARACTER. qv qv + + + + + + + + + 546 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ProThetical. ProtoZeugma. ProTreptic.[Rh.] Proverb. ProZeugma. Zeugma. Psychic DISTANCE. Pun. Puzzle. Riddle. Q: 2 items. 333 Question, rhetorical. Erotesis. Quod semper quod ubique, PRINCIPLE. R: 20 items. Rabbate. Ratiocination. Rebus. Riddle. Recapitulation. Anacephalœosis. Redouble. Repetition. Redundancy. Periphrasis. Refrán. #Proverb. Rejection. ProCatalepsis. 335 }????misSpell???? } } } } 547 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry REPETITION. } Resumption.[Rh.] Anacephalœsis. } Retorsion, Retortion. [Rh.] ProCatalepsis. Rhetoric. Rhetoric, Figures of. Rhetoric, The Parts of. Rhetoric, The Species of. Rhetorical Question. Erotesis. RhyParoGraphy.[Rh.] sordid/low individuals/subjects. Ricochet Word. Reduplicate word,qv. qv qv qv RIDDLE. Rule. S: 60 items. 358 Sarcasm.[Rh.] (Putt: The Bitter Taunt. #Irony. Scheme.[Rh.] Figure, qv. qv qv qv Schesis.[Rh.] Mimicry. {+ Def} Sej.[Rh.] ...Turkish prose... SelfCorrection. Epanorthosis, qv. qv qv qv SEMANTICS. Sermocinatio.[Rh.] HypoTyposis. SIGNS. 548 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sillepsis. Zeugma. Simile. Similitude. A Simile, in Middle English... Simplicity. (Greek: Aphelia.) Slide. SlipSlop.ludicrous use of one word for another. Fielding: Joseph Andrews...#Malaprop. Solecism. Soliloqu( -y / -ium ). Monologue. Soraismus.[Rh.] (Putt : MingleMangle.) Sotadean, Sotadic. (1) (2) A Palindrome. Speech, Divisions of a. Spoonerism. Squinter, Squinting Construction.[Kw:] ...PivotWords... Stasis. Status. cf ≠ Joyce: Portrait... Status, Stasis. StichoMyth ( -ia / -y ), StichoMuthia: Dialogue, usually disputatious... Story within a Story. Stream of Consciousness. Consciousness [ha ! ]. STRUCTURE. STYLE. 549 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Superlatio. [Rh.] HyperBole, qv. qv qv qv SuperNatural. SurPlus. [Rh.] Addition, qv. qv qv qv Surprise. (Greek : ParaProsDokian.) Switching 404. Syllepsis. [Rh.] Zeugma. Symbol. Meaning, Change of. Symbolism. SymBouleusis 410. [Rh.] Erotesis. Symmetry. Symploc(h)e 410.[Rh.] (Putt : The Figure of Reply.) Synæresis. Hyphæresis. Synaesthesia. (Greek: feeling together‘) x #Correspondence. Synæsthesis. #Cf.≠ Oxymoron. SynAthr(-i- / -œ-)smus.[Rh.] Athrismus. SynChoresis.[Rh.] SynChronism. (1) (2) SynChysis.[Rh.] HyperBaton. SynCopation, SynCope. (1)[Rh.] #HyphÆresis. x (2)[Prosody]... SynCrisis. Omoiosis. Parallelism. Repetition. 550 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry SynEcDoche. (Greek: understood together‘)[Rh.] #Cf.=Metonymy. Syn( -e- / -œ- )ciosis.[Rh.] OxyMoron. SynEcPhonesis.[Rh.] HyphÆresis. Synesis. SyneZeugMenon.[Rh.] Zeugma. ???Synizesis. (1)[Prosody] (2) [this numbering missing !!!!] ERROR! Synonym. Synonymy. #Repetition. SynTomia. Qualities. Syrmos. Athrismos. Systrophe.[Rh.] Syzygy.(Greek: yoke‘).{gs.Comment: Hendiadys?} T: 25 items. 412 Tap(e)inosis.[Rh.] #HyperBole. TautoLogy,TautoPhony,TautoTes. Repetition. TeleScope. *Tempo; Time. Tenor. MetaPhor. *Term. 551 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry *TERMINOLOGY, Technical. {gsComment:LSP Theory.} {Kw!} Thaumasm(us). EcPhonesis. Thematology. Comparative Literature. Thesis. (1)[Prosody] (2)[Rh.]OxyMoron.(3)[ ¿Logic ? ] Thlipsis. HyphÆresis. *Time. Tmesis. HyperBaton. Topic.[Rh.] TopoGraphia.[Rh.] HypoTyposis. *Tragic Flaw. Trajection 423. [Rh.] MetaThesis, qv qv qv qv Transferred Epithet. #CataChresis. Transition. (1)[Rh.] (2) *TRANSLATION. Transumption. [Renaissance Rhetoric] A Metaphor. Trope 426. (Greek: Turning‘.) (1)[Rh.] (2)[Theatre] Tropus. Qualities. *Turning Point. Climax. Interest, Point of highest. *Type. U: 1 item. 430 *Unities 431. 552 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry V: 8 items. 435 VALUE and Criticism. Variation.Elegant Variation. Vehicle.MetaPhor. Verbiage, Verbosity.PeriPhrasis. ViewPoint. Visio(n).HypoTyposis.Imagination.Dream. *Vocabulary.Diction. Votum.EcPhonesis. W: 4 items. 445 WordAnalysis. WordCreation. WordOrder. WordPlay. Pun. Z: 1y. 453. Zeugma, SyneZeugMenon. [Rh.] ends 553 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ENGLISH LITERATURE along the Ages up to 1901. ¬1368. ¬1502. ¬1577. ¬1586. ¬1589. ¬1589. ¬1597. ¬1604. ¬1609. ¬1618. ¬1633. ¬1645. Geoffrey CHAUCER. Sir Thomas More. Edmund SPENSER. Sir Francis BACON. Christopher MARLOWE(29y). William SHAKESPEARE. John DONNE. John FLETCHER. Sir Francis BEAUMONT. Izaak WALTON. John MILTON. John EVELYN. b 1343. b 1477. b c1552. b 1561. b 1564. b 1564.(fp1591: H6) b 1572. b 1579. b 1584. b 1593.(1653:cAngler) b 1608. b 1620.(Diary fp 1818) d 1400. d 1535. d 1599. d 1626. d 1593. d 1616. d 1631. d 1625. d 1616. d 1683. d 1674. d 1706. 554 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ¬1646. ¬1658. ¬1685. ¬1692. ¬1697. ¬1697. ¬1732. ¬1734. ¬1738. ¬1746. ¬1756. ¬1762. ¬1765. ¬1776. ¬1784. ¬1797. ¬1800. ¬1800. ¬1803. ¬1810. Andrew MARVELL. Samuel PEPYS.(70y) Daniel DEFOE. Jonathan SWIFT(78y). Joseph ADDISON. Richard STEELE. Henry FIELDING. Dr (Samuel) JOHNSON. Laurence STERNE. Tobias SMOLLETT. William COWPER. Edward GIBBON. James BOSWELL. Brindsley SHERIDAN. William BECKFORD. Samuel T.COLERIDGE. Jane AUSTEN(42y). Charles LAMB(59y). William HAZLITT. Thomas DE QUINCEY. ¬1813. ¬1817. George Gordon, Lord BYRON. Percy Bysshe SHELLEY(30y). b 1621. b 1633. b 1660. b 1667.(fp b 1672. b 1672. b 1707. b 1709.(Dict: ?) b 1713. b 1721. b 1731. b 1737. b 1740. b 1751. b 1737. b 1772. b 1775. b 1775. b 1778. b 1785. d 1678. d 1703. d 1731. d 1745. d 1719. d 1729. d 1754. d 1784. d 1768. d 1771. d 1800. d 1794. d 1795. d 1816. d 1844. d 1834. d 1817. d 1834. d 1830. d 1859. b 1788. b 1792. d 1824. d 1822. 555 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ¬1820. Thomas CARLYLE. ¬1828.amer. Ralph W. EMERSON(79y). ¬1828. Edward BULWER-LYTTON. ¬1829. DISRAELI. Lord Beaconsfield. ¬1831. E. BARRETT-BROWNING(55y). ¬1834. Alfred, Lord TENNYSON. ¬1836. W.M.THACKERAY. ¬1837. Charles DICKENS(58y). ¬1837. Robert BROWNING(77y). txt1838-49 The Mabinogion. ¬1840. Anthony TROLLOPE. ¬1841. Charlotte BRONTE. ¬1842.amer. H.D. THOREAU(45y). ¬1843. Emily BRONTE. ¬1843. George ELIOT. ¬1844. John RUSKIN. ¬1860. Samuel BUTLER. ¬1860.amer. Mark TWAIN(pseudo) ¬1862. Algernon SWINBURNE. ¬1865. Thomas HARDY. ¬1869. G.M. HOPKINS. b 1795. d 1881. b 1803. d 1882. b 1803. d 1873. b 1804. d 1881. b 1806. d 1861. b 1809. d. 1892 b 1811.(fp d 1863. b 1812.(fp1836: Boz) d 1870. b 1812.(fp? lp?) d 1889. ¬1875. b 1850. R.L.STEVENSON. b 1815. d 1882. b 1816. d 1855. b 1817. d 1862. b 1818. d 1848. b 1818. d 1880. b 1819. d 1900. b 1835 (Erewhon 1872) d 1902. b 1835. d 1910. b 1837. d 1909. b 1840. d 1928. b 1844. d 1889. d 1894. 556 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry ¬1879. ¬1884. ¬1891. ¬1899. ¬1907. ¬1910. Oscar WILDE. Conan DOYLE. H.G. WELLS(80y). G.K. CHESTERTON(60y). V. WOOLF(59y). D.H. LAWRENCE(45y). b 1854 (Earnest‘95). b 1859. b 1866. b 1874. b 1882. b 1885. d 1900. d 1930. d 1946. d 1936. d 1941. d 1930. ends 557 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Romanian AUTHOR CHRONOLOGY. THE PLUS-25 ROMANIAN-AUTHOR CHRONOLOGY. Listing: my long-term wish. I have always wanted to know, exactly and precisely, how long an author had lived, and his likely company when he had barely completed his formative years. Now I have found a device by means of which my lifelong dream has been fulfilled. Certain half-dec ades, ie: batches of five years, eg: 1840-45, are ever so rich in famous names… 558 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry This Chronology starts from 1830(with Author at 25), and ends in 1930 (with implied dates of Death of Author in the sixties or seventies..). (First date records Year when Author was25; the second the number of years he lived.) Afterwards most other dates can be more easily extracted,eg: (1833-25=1808) (1808+60=1868) ,ie: The Negruzzi full Cartouche is: 1833-25=1808,date of birth; then,1808+60=1868, which is the date o f death.) 559 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1830 1833. Negruzzi:60y. 1835 1839. Alexandrescu:71y. 1840 1841. Ghica:81y. 1842. Kogălniceanu:74y. 1844. Bălcescu:33y. 1844. Bolintineanu:53y. 1844. Filimon:46y. 1844. Russo:40y. 1845 1846. Alecsandri:69y. . zero 1855 1859. Odobescu:61y. 1850 zero zero 560 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry . Creangă: 52y. 1863. Haşdeu: 69y. 1865 1865. Maiorescu: 77y. . 1872. Hogaş: 70y. 1873. Slavici: 77y. 1875 1875. Eminescu: 39y. 1878. Caragiale: 59y. 1879. Macedonski: 66y. . 1883. Vlahuţă: 61y. 1883. Delavrancea: 60y. 1883. D. Zamfirescu: 64y. 1885 1886. Mille: 66y. 1887.Davila: 67y. . 1891. Coşbuc: 52y. 1893. BVoineşti: 78y. 1895 1860 1870 1880 1890 561 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1896. Iorga: 69y. 1896. Ibrăileanu: 65y. 1897. Anghel: 42y. . 1900. Zarifopol: 59y. 1901. PapadatB: 79y. 1904. Galaction: 82y. 1905 1905. Arghezi: 87y. 1905. Cocea: 69y. 1905. Sadoveanu: 81y. 1906. Bacovia: 76y. 1906. Goga: 59y. 1906. Minulescu: 63y. 1906. Lovinescu: 62y. 1907. Agârbiceanu: 72y. 1909. Voiculescu: 79y. . 1910. MateiCaragiale: 51y. 1910. Rebreanu : 59y. 1913. AlKiriţescu: 73y. 1914. Crainic:??? 1900 1910 562 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 1915 1916. IonPillat: 54y. 1916. AManiu: 77y. 1917. CezarPetrescu: 69y. 1919. Cazimir: 73y. . 1920. Barbu: 66y. 1920. Blaga: 66y. 1920. Popa: 51y. 1922.i. Teodoreanu: 57y. 1923. GMZamfirescu: 41y. 1924. Călinescu: 66y. 1925 1926. Liviu Rusu : 84 y. . 1931. Sebastian: 38y. 1932. Eliade: 79y. 1934. Noica: 78y. 1936. Cioran: 84y. 1937. Ionesco: 82y. 1935 zero 1940 1920 1930 zero zero 563 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry 22 June 1941. General Antonescu: Vă ordon treceţi Prutul >>>>> THE WAR ! 23 August 1944:

in reverse! 6 March 1945: All Generals go ! 30 December1947: The King is ousted: Sadoveanu is one of the five Republic-Praesidium members; he might well have co-signed death sente nces of rebel peasants: then he writes (1949) Mitrea Cocor. The rest is Silence. ends 564 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry The Thomas PERCY Glossary. Thomas Percy (1729-1811) was the author of the first of the great Ballad collections, Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (1765). A poetic Bit of Language History... The following Theoretical Constructs are involved in the detailed study of this Glossary: Paronymy. Graphemics. Graphotactics. (Paronymic) Semantics. Diachronic Grammar. 565 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Diachronic Dialect Research. Folklore Study. Versification. Rhetoric. What are they ? Each of them, taken separately ? Do you happen to know? If not, try to find out, before starting work on the GLOSSARY... Paronymy. is merely approximative HOMONYMY... Graphemics. is the study of LETTERS (as distinct from PHONEMICS, which is the study of sounds.) Graphotactics. is the study of possible LETTER ARRANGEMENTS 566 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry (as distinct from GRAPHEMICS, which is the study of letters.) (Paronymic) Semantics. is a sort of... remote synonyms ... Diachronic Grammar. is Grammar across time. The Popular Ballad is the best place to look at Early Modern English, which starts in 1500. (Remember that Geoffrey Chaucer wrote in Middle English! And before that, there was Old English ! Diachronic Dialect Research. is to study how a Dialect changes over time... Folklore Study. all Great Poets used to pay a lot of attention to Folk Verse, good or bad, considering it a far more profitable study Versification. or Prosody. Useful Reading: Roger FRY, The Ode Less Travelled. Rhetoric. SEE Separate Appendix. 567 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry If you want more details than that, you must go to the WIKIPEDIA! (contains 60 solid pages.) GLOSSARY: A: A‘, au: all. A deid of nicht: in dead of night. A Twyde: of Tweed. Abacke: back. Abone, aboon: above. Aboven ous: above us. Abowght: about. Abraide: abroad. Abye: suffer, to pay for. Acton: a kind of armour made of taffaty, or leather quilted. Fr. Hacqueton.‘ Advoutry, advouterous: adultery,adulterous. 568 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Aff: off. Afore: before. Aft: oft. Agayne: against. Agoe: gone. Ahte: ought. Aik: oak. Ain, awin, awne: own. Aith: oath. Al: albeit, although Alate: of late. Alemaigne: Germany. Alyes: probable corruption of algates, always. Al gife: although. An: and. Ancient, ancyent: flag, standard. Ane, one: an, a. Angel: gold coin worth 10s. Ann, if: even, if. Ant: and. Percy‘s Reliques -786Aplyght, aplyht, al aplyht: quite complete. 569 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Aquoy: coy, shy. Aras, arros: arrows. Arcir: archer. Argabushe: harquebusse, musket. Ase: as. Assinde: assigned. Assoyl‘d, assoyled: absolved. Astate: estate; a great portion. Astonied: astonished, stunned Astound: confounded, stunned. Ath, athe, o‘th‘: of the. Attowre: out over, over and above. Auld: old. Aureat: golden. Austerne: stern, austere. Avoyd: void, vacate. Avowe: vow. Awa‘: away. Axed: asked. Ayance: against. Aye: ever; also, ah! alas! Azein, agein: against. Azont: beyond; azont the ingle: beyond the fire.[1] 570 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry B: Ba‘: ball. Bacheleere: knight. Bairn, bairne child. Baith: bathe, both. Baile, bale: evil, hurt, mischief, misery. Bairded: bearded. Bairn, bearn: child Balow: hush! lullaby! Balys bete: better our bales, i.e. remedy our evils. Ban: curse, banning, cursing. Percy‘s Reliques -787Band: bond, covenant. Banderolls: streamers, little flags. Bane: bone. Bar: bare. Bar hed: bare-head, or perhaps bared. Barn, (A-Sax. Beorn): chief, man. Barrow-hog: Gelded hog. 571 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Base court: the lower court of a castle. Basnete, basnite, basnyte, basso-net, bassonette: helmet. Battes: heavy sticks, clubs. Baud: bold. Bauzen‘s skinne: dressed sheep or badger leather. Bauzon mittens. Bayard: a noted blind horse in the old romances. Be, by; be that, by that time. Bearn: see Bairn. Bearing arow: an arrow that carries well. Perhaps bearing, or birring, i, e. whizzing. Bed: bade. Bede: offer, engage. Bedeene: immediately, continuously? Bedone: wrought, made up. Bedight: bedecked. Bedyls: beadles. Beere: bier. Beette: did beat. Befall: befallen. Befoir: before. Beforn: before. Begylde: beguiled, deceived. Beheard: heard. Behests: commands, injunctions. 572 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Behove: behoof. Belive: immediately, presently Belyfe: See belive. Ben: bene: been; be, are; Ben: within doors, the inner room. Percy‘s Reliques -788Bende-bow: bent bow. Bene, bean: an expression of contempt. Benison: blessing. Bent: long grass, wild fields. Benyngne, benigne: benign, kind. Beoth: be, are. Bereth: beareth. Ber the prys: bear the prize. Berys: beareth. Berne: See Barne Bernes: barns. Beseeme: become. Beshradde: cut into shreds. Beshrewe me! a weak imprecation. Besmirche: to soil, discolour. Besprent: besprinkled. Beste: beest: art. Bested: abode. 573 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Bestis: beasts. Bet: better. Bett: did beat. Beth: be, are. Bewray: to discover, betray. Bi mi leautè: by my loyalty. Bickarte, bicker‘d: skirmished.[2] Bille: promise in writing, confirmed by an oath. Birk: birch-tree. Blan, blanne, did blin: linger, stop. Blaw: blow. Blaze: emblazon, display. Blee: complexion, colour. Bleid, blede: bleed. Blent: ceased; blended. Blink: glimpse of light. Blinkan, blinkand: twinkling. Blinking: squinting. Blinks: twinkles, sparkles. Percy‘s Reliques -789Blinne: cease, give over. Blist: blessed. 574 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Blive: belive, immediately. Bloomed: beset with bloom. Blude: blood. Bluid, bluidy: blood, bloody. Blyth, blithe: sprightly, joyous. Blyth: joy, sprightliness. Blyve: See Belive. Boare: bare. Bode: abode, stayed. Boist: boisteris: boast, boasters. Boke: book. Bollys: bowls. Boltes: shafts, arrows. Bomen: bowmen. Bonnie, bonny: bonnye, comely. Bookesman: clerk, secretary. Boon, boone: favour, request, petition. Boot, boote: gain, advantage, help. Bore: born. Borowe: to redeem by a pledge. Borowed: warranted, pledged. Borrowe, borowe: pledge, surety. Bot, but: both, besides,moreover. 575 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Bot: without; Bot dreid: i.e. certainly. Bote: See Boote. Bougil, bougill: bugle, horn. Bounde, bowynd, bowned: prepared, got ready. also: went. Bowndes: bounds. Bower, bowre: arched room, dwelling. Bowre woman: chamber maid. Bowre window: chamber window. Bowys: bows. Brade: braid: broad. Percy‘s Reliques -790Brae: the brow or side of a hill. Braes of Yarrow: hilly banks of the Yarrow. Braid: broad. Braifly: bravely. Brakes: tufts of fern. Brand: sword. Brast: burst. Braw: brave. Brayd: arose, hastened. Brayd attowre the bent: hastened over the field. Brayde: drew out, unsheathed. Bred, brede: broad. 576 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Breech: breeches. Breeden bale: breed mischief. Breere, brere: briar. Breng, bryng: bring. Brenn: to burn. Brenand drake: the fire-drake, burning embers. Brether: brethren. Bridal, bride-ale: nuptial feast. Brigue, brigg: bridge. Brimme: public, universally known. Britled: carved. Broad arrow: a broad-headed arrow. Brocht: brought. Brodinge: pricking. Brooche: a spit, bodkin, ornamental trinket, clasp. Brook: enjoy Brooke: bear, endure. Brouche: See Brooche. Brouke her with winne: enjoy her with pleasure. Browd: broad. Brozt: brought. Bryttlynge, brytlyng: cutting up, quartering, carving. Buen, bueth: been, be, are. Bugle: hunting horn. 577 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Buik: book. Percy‘s Reliques -791Burgens: buds, young shoots. Burn: bourne, brook. Bushment: ambush, snare. Busk: dress, deck. Busk and bown: make yourselves ready and go. Buske: Idem. Busket, buskt: dressed. But: without. Butt.[3] But if: unless. But let: without hindrance. Buttes: buts to shoot at. By thre: of three. Bydys, bides: abides. Bye: buy, pay for; also, abye: suffer for. Byears: biers. Byll, bill: ancient battle-axe, halbert. Byn, bine, bin: been, be, are. Byrcke: birch-tree, or wood. Byre: a cow-house. Byste, beest: art. 578 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry C: Ca‘: call Cadgilly: merrily, cheerfully. Cale: callyd, called. Caliver: a kind of musket. Caitiff: a slave. Camscho: stern, grim. Can, gan, began: began to cry. Can curtesye: understand good manners. Canna: cannot. Cannes: wooden cups, bowls. Cantabanqui: ballad-singers. Cantles: pieces, corners. Canty: cheerful, chatty. Capul, capull: a poor horse. Care-bed: bed of care. Percy‘s Reliques -792Carle: a churl, clown. Also: old man. Carline: the feminine of Carle. Carlish: churlish, discourteous. Carpe: to speak, recite, censure. 579 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Carpe off care: complain thro’ care. Carping: reciting. Cast: mean, intend. Cau: call. Cauld: cold. Cawte and kene: cautious and active. Caytiffe: caitif, slave, wretch Certes: certainly. Cetiwall: the herb valerian. Chanteclere: the cock. Chap: knock. Chayme: Cain. Chays: chase. Che (Somerset): I. Check: to rate at. Check: to stop. Cheis: choose. Chevaliers: knights Cheveran: upper part of the scutcheon in heraldry. Chield: fellow. Child: knight. Chill (Som.): I will. Chould (Som.), I would. 580 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Christentie, Christentye, Christiantè: Christendom. Church-ale: a wake; feast in commemoration of the dedication of a Church. Churl: clown, villain, vassal. Chyf, chyfe: chief. Chylded: was delivered. Chylder: children. Claiths: clothes. Clattered: beat so as to rattle. Percy‘s Reliques -793Clawde: clawed, tore, scratched. Clead: clothed. Cleading: clothing. Cleaped: called, named. Cled: clad. Clepe: call. Clerke: scholar, clergymen. Cliding: clothing. Clim: contraction of Clement. Clough: a broken cliff. Clowch: clutch, grasp. Coate: cot, cottage. Cockers: short boots worn by shepherds. 581 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Cog: to lye, to cheat. Cokeney: cook, Lat. coquinator, Cold: could, knew. Cold be: was. Cold rost: nothing to the purpose. Coleyne, Collayne: Cologne steel. Com: came. Comen, commyn: come. Con: can, ‘gan, began. Con fare: went, passed. Con thanks: with thanks. Con springe: sprung. Confetered: confederated. Coote: coat. Cop: head, the top of anything. Cordiwin, cordwayne: Cordovan leather. Corsiare: courser, steed. Cost: coast, side. Cote: cot, cottage; coat. Cotydyallye: daily, every day. Coulde, could, cold: could. Could bare: bare. Percy‘s Reliques 582 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry -794Could creep: crept. Could his good: knew what was good for him; could live upon his own. Could say: said. Could weip: wept. Counsail: secret. Countie: count, earl. Coupe, coup: pen for poultry. Courtnalls: courtiers. Couth: could. Couthen: knew. Covetise: covetousness. Coyntrie: Coventry. Cramasie: crimson. Crancky: merry, exulting. Cranion: skull. Crech: crutches. Credence: belief. Crevis: crevice, chink. Crinkle: run in and out, wrinkle; Cristes corse: Christ’s curse. Croft: inclosure near a house. Croiz: cross. 583 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Crompling: twisted, knotty. Crook: twist, distort; make lame. Crouneth: crown ye. Crowch: crutch. Crowt: pucker up. Cryance: belief; fear. Cule: cool. Cure: care, heed, regard. D: Dale: deal. Bot give I deal: unless I deal. Dampned: damned, condemned. Dan: ancient title of respect. Dank: moist, damp. Percy‘s Reliques -795Danske: Denmark. Darh: there. Darr‘d: hit. Dart: hit. Daukin: diminutive of David. Daunger hault: coyness holdeth. 584 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Dawes: days. Dealan, deland: dealing. Deare day: pleasant day. Deas, deis: the high table in a hall De, dy, dey, die. Dede is do: deed is done. Dee: die. Deed: dead. Deemed: doomed, judged. Deepe-fette: deep fetched. Deere: hurt, mischief. Deerly: preciously, richly. Deerly dight: richly dressed. Deid: dead. Deid-bell: passing-bell. Deill: dally? Deimpt: deemed, esteemed. Deip, depe: deep. Deir, dear: hurt, trouble, disturb. Dele: deal. Dell: narrow valley. Dell: part, deal. Delt: dealt. 585 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Demains, demesnes: estates. Deme: judge. Denay: deny. Dent: a dint, blow. Deol, dole: grief. Depured: purified, run clear. Percy‘s Reliques -796Deray: ruin, confusion. Dere, dear: hurt. Derked: darkened. Dern: secret. I‘ dern: in secret. Descreeve, descrive, descrye: describe. Devyz: devise, bequeathment by will. Deze, deye: die. Dight, dicht: decked, dressed out, done. Dill: still, calm, mitigate. Dill, dole: grief, pain. Dill I drye: pain I suffer. Dill was dight: grief was upon him. Din, dinne: noise, bustle. Dine: dinner. Ding: knock, beat. Dint: stroke, blow. Dis: this. 586 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Discust: discussed. Disna: does not. Distrere: horse rode by a knight in the turnament. Dites: ditties. Dochter: daughter. Dois, doys: does. Dol, dole: grief. Dolefulle dumps: heaviness of heart. Dolorus: dolorous. Don: down. Dosend: dosing, drowsy. Doth, dothe: doeth, do. Doublet: inner garment. Doubt: fear. Doubteous: doubtful. Doughte, dougheti, doughetie, dowghtye: doughty, formidable. Doughtiness of dent: sturdiness of blows. Dounae: am not able; cannot take the trouble. Doute: doubt; fear. Doutted: doubted; feared. Percy‘s Reliques -797Douzty: doughty. 587 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Dozter: daughter. Doz-trogh: dough-trough. Drake: See Brenand Drake. Drap, drapping: drop, dropping. Dre: suffer. Dreid, dreede, drede: dread. Dreips: drips, drops. Dreiry: dreary. Drovyers: drovers, cattle-drivers. Drowe: drew. Drye: suffer. Dryghnes: dryness. Dryng: drink. Dryvars: See Drovyers. Duble dyse: double (false) dice. Dude, dudest: did, didst. Dughtie: doughty. Dule, duel, dol, dole: grief, sorrow. Dwellan, dwelland: dwelling. Dyan, dyand: dying. Dyce, dice: chequer-work. Dyd, dyde: did. Dyght, diht, dreesed: put on, put. 588 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Dyht: to dispose, order. Dyne: dinner. Dynte: dint, blow, stroke. Dysgysynge: disguising, masking. Dystrayne: distress. Dyzt: See Dight. E: Eame: uncle. Eard: earth. Earn: to curdle, make cheese. Eathe: easy. Percy‘s Reliques -798Eather: either. Ech, eche, eiche, elke: each. Ee, eie: eye. Een: eyes. Een: evening. Effund: pour forth. Eftsoon: in a short time. Egge: to urge on. 589 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Eike: each. Eiked: added, enlarged. Ein: even. Eir, evir: e’er, ever. Eke: also. Eldern: elder. Ellumynynge: embellishing. Eldridge: wild, hideous, ghostly; lonesome, inhabited by spectres.[4] Elvish: peevish, fantastical. Elke: each. Eme: kinsman, uncle. Endyed: dyed. Enharpid: hooked, or edged with mortal dread. Enkankered: cankered. Enouch: enough. Ensue: follow. Entendement: understanding. Ententifly: to the intent, purposely. Envye: malice, ill-will, injury. Er, ere: before; are. Ere: ear. Erst: heretofore. Etermynable: interminable, unlimited. 590 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ettled: aimed. Evanished: vanished. Everiche: every, each. Everych-one: every one. Percy‘s Reliques -799Evir-alake: ever alack!. Ew-bughts: pens for milch-ewes. Eyn, eyne: eye, eyes. Ezar: azure. F Fa‘: fall. Fach: feche, fetch. Fader, fatheris: father, father’s. Fadge: a thick loaf of bread; a coarse heap of stuf; a clumsy woman. Fae: foe. Fain: glad, pleased, fond. Faine of feir: of a fair and healthy look; perhaps, free from fear. Falds: thou foldest. Fallan, falland: falling. Fals: false; falleth. Falser: deceiver, hypocrite. Falsing: dealing in falsehood. 591 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Fang: seize, carry off. Fannes: instruments for winnowing corn. Farden: fared, flashed. Fare: pass, go, travel. Fare: the price of a passage; shot, reckoning. Farley: wonder. Fa‘s: thou fallest. Faulcone, fawkon: falcon. Fauzt, faucht: fought. Faw‘n: fallen. Fay, faye: faith. Fayere: fair. Faytors: deceivers, cheats. Fe: reward, bribe, property. Feare, fere, feire: mate. Feat: nice, neat. Featously: neatly, dextrously. Feere, fere: mate, companion. Percy‘s Reliques -800Feil, fele: many. Feir, fere: fear; also demeanour. Feiztyng: fighting. 592 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Feire: mate. See Feare. Felay, felawe, feloy: fellow. Fell: hide. Fell, fele: furious. Fend: defend. Fendys pray: from being the prey of the fiends. Fere, fear: companion, wife. Ferliet: wondered, marvelled. Ferly: wonder, wondrously. Fersly: fiercely. Fesante, fesaunt: pheasant. Fet, fette: fetched. Fetteled: prepared, addressed. Fey: predestined to some fatality. Fie: beasts, cattle. Filde: field. Fillan‘, filland: filling. Find frost: find mischance, or disaster. Firth, frith: a wood, an arm of the sea. Fit: foot, feet. Fit, fitt, fyt, fytte: a part or division of a song.[5] Flayne: flayed. Fles: fleece. 593 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Fleyke: a large kind of hurdle: a hovel made of fleyks where cows are milked. Flindars: pieces, splinters. Flowan: flowing. Flyte: contend with words, scold. Fond, fonde: contrive, endeavour. Fonde: found Foo: foes. For: on account of. Forbode: commandment. Percy‘s Reliques -801Force: No force, no matter. Forced: regarded, heeded. Forefend: prevent, defend, avert. For-foght: over-fought. Foregoe: quit, give up. For-wearied: over wearied. Formare: former. Fors. I do not fors: I don’t care. Forsede: regarded, heeded. Forst: heeded, regarded. Forst: forced, compelled. Forthy: therefore. 594 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Forthynketh: repenteth, vexeth, troubleth. Forwatcht: over-watched, kept awake. Fosters of the fe: foresters of the king’s demesnes. Fou, fow: full, drunk. Fowarde, vawarde: the van. Fowkin: cant word for a fart. Fox‘t: drunk. Frae: from. Fro Frae thay begin: from the beginning. Freake, freke, freeke, freyke: man, human being; also: whim, maggot. Fre-bore: free-born. Freckys: persons. Freers, fryars: friars, monks. Freits: ill omens, ill luck. Terror. Freyke, humour, freak, caprice. Freyned: asked. Frie, fre, free: noble. Fruward: forward. Furth: forth. Fuyson, foyson: plenty; substance. Fyers: fierce. Fykill: fickle. Fyled, fyling: defiled, defiling. 595 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Percy‘s Reliques -802Fyll: fell. Fyr: fire. Fyzt: fight. G: Ga, gais: go, goes. Gae, gaes: go, goes. Gaed, gade: went. Gaberlunzie, gaberlunze: wallet. Gaberlunzie-man: a wallet-man, beggar. Gadlings, gadelyngs: idlers. Gadryng: gathering. Gae: gave. Gair, geer: dress. Gair: grass. Galliard: a sprightly dance. Gane, gan: began. Gane: gone. Gang: go. 596 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ganyde: gained. Gap: entrance to the lists. Gar: to make, cause, &c. Garde, gart, garred: made; also Garde. Garre, garr: See Gar. Gargeyld: the spout of a gutter. Garland: the ring within which the mark was set to be shot at. Gayed: made gay their clothes. Gear, geere, gair, geir, geire: See Gair. Gederede ys host: gathered his host. Geere will sway: this matter will turn out; affair will terminate. Gef, gere: give. Geid: gave. Gerte: pierced. Gest: act, feat, story, history. Getinge, getting: plunder, booty. Geve, gevend: give, given. Percy‘s Reliques -803Gi, gie, gien: give, given. Gibed: jeered. Gie: give. Giff, Gife: if. 597 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Gillore: plenty. Gimp, jimp: neat, slender. Gin, an: if. Gin, gyn: engine, contrivance. Gins: begins. Gip: an interjection of contempt. Girt: pierced. Give: See Giff. Give owre: surrender. Glave, glaive: sword. Glede: a red-hot coal. Glen: narrow valley. Glent: glanced, slipped. Glie, glee: joy. Glist: glistered. Glose: set a false gloss. Glowr: stare, or frown. Gloze: canting, dissimulation. God before: God be thy guide[6]. Goddes: goddess. Gode, godness: good, goodness. Gone: go. Good: a good deal. 598 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Good-e‘ens: good evenings. Gorget: the dress of the neck. Gowd, gould: gold. Gorreled-bellyed: pot-bellied. Gowan: the yellow crowfoot. Graine: scarlet. Graithed, (gowden): was caparisoned with gold. Gramercye: I thank you. Fr. Grand mercie. Percy‘s Reliques -804Graunge: granary, a lone house. Graythed: decked, put on. Grea-hondes: grey-hounds. Grece: a step, flight of steps. Gree, gre: prize, victory. Greece: fat. Fr. graisse. Greened: grew green. Greet: weep. Grennyng: grinning. Gresse: grass. Gret, grat: great; grieved, swoln. Greves: groves, bushes. Grippel: griping, miserly. 599 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Groundwa: groundwall. Growende, growynd: ground. Grownes: grounds. Growte: small beer, or ale.[7] Grype: griffin. Grysely groned: dreadfully groaned. Gude, guid, geud: good. Guerdon: reward. Gule: red. Gybe: jest, joke. Gyle: guile. Gyn: engine, contrivance. Gyrd: girded, lashed; gyrdyl: girdle. Gyse, guise: form, fashion. H: Ha, hae: have. Ha‘: hall. Habbe ase he brew: have as he brews. Habergeon: lesser coat of mail. Hable: able. Haggis: sheep’s stomach stuffed. 600 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Hail, hale: whole, altogether. Percy‘s Reliques -805Halched, halsed: saluted, embraced. Halesome: wholesome, healthy. Halt: holdeth. Halyde, Haylde: hauled. Hame, hamward: home, homeward. Handbow: the long bow. Hare . . . swerdes: their swords. Haried, harried, haryed, harowed: robbed, pillaged, plundered. Harlocke, charlocke: wild rape. Harnisine: harness, armour. Hartly lust: hearty desire. Harwos: harrows. Hastarddis: rash fellows, upstarts. Hauld: to hold. Hauss-bane: the neck-bone. Hav: have. Haves: effects, substance, riches. Haviour: behaviour. Hawberk: coat of mail. Hawkin: diminutive of Harry. 601 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Haylle: advantage, profit. He, hee, hye: high. He, hye: to hye, hasten. Heal: hail. Hear, heare: here. Heare, heares: hair, hairs. Heathenness: the heathen part of the world. Hech, hach, hatch: small door; also, Hach-borde: side of a ship. Hecht to lay thee law: promised, engaged to lay thee low. Hed, hede: head. Hede: he would; heed. Hee‘s: he shall; he has. Heere: hear. Heicht: height. Heiding-hill: place of execution. Percy‘s Reliques -806Heil, hele: health. Heir, here: hear. Helen: heal. Helpeth: help ye. Hem: them. Hend: kind, gentle. 602 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Henne: hence. Hent, hente: held, pulled, received. Heo: they. Hepps and Haws: fruits of the briar, and the hawthorn. Her, hare: their. Here: their; hear; hair. Herkneth: hearken ye. Hert, hertis: heart, hearts. Hes: has. Hest: hast. Hest: command, injunction. Het: hot. Hether: hither. Hett, hight: bid, call, command. Hench: rock, or steep hill. Hevede, hevedest: had, hadst. Heveriche, hevenriche: heavenly. Hewkes: heralds’ coats. Hewyne in two: hewn in two. Hewyng, hewynge: hewing, hacking. Hey-day guise: frolic; sportive. Heynd, hend: gentle, obliging. Heyze: high. 603 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Heyd: hied. Hi, hie: he. Hicht, a-hicht: on height. Hie, hye, he, hee: high. Hie dames to wail: hasten ladies to wail. Hight: promised, engaged; named. Percy‘s Reliques -807Hillys: hills. Hilt: taken off, flayed. Hinch-boys: pages of honour. Hinde, hend: gentle. Hinde, hind: behind. Hings: hangs. Hinney: honey. Hip, hep: berries of the dog-rose. Hir: her. Hirsel: herself. Hit: it; Hit be write: it be written. Hode: hood, cap. Holden: hold. Hole, holl whole. Hollen: holly. Holtes: woods, groves. Holtis hair: hoar hills. 604 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Holy: wholly. Holy-roode: holy cross. Hom, hem: them. Honde: hand. Honden wrynge: hands wring. Hondridth, hondred: hundred. Honge: hang, hung. Hontyng: hunting. Hoo, ho: interjection of stopping. Hooly: slowly. Hop-halt: limping; halting. Hose: stockings. Hount: hunt. Houzle: give the sacrament. Hoved: heaved, hovered, tarried. Howeres, howers: hours. Huerte: heart. Huggle: hug, clasp. Hye, hyest: high, highest. Hyghte: on high, aloud. Hynd attowre: behind, over, about. Percy‘s Reliques -808Hip-halt: lame in the hip. 605 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Hys: his; is. Hyt, hytt: it. Hyznes: highness. I: I-fere: together. I-feth: in faith. I-lore: lost. I-strike: stricken. I-trowe: verily. I ween: verily. I wisse: verily. I wot: verily. I-wys, I-wis: verily. I clipped: called. Ich: I. Ich biqueth: I bequeath. Iff: if Ild: I would. Ile: I will. Ilfardly: ill-favouredly, uglily. Ilk, this ilk: this same. Ilka: each, every one. 606 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ilke, every ilke: every one. Ilk one: each one. Im: him. Impe: a demon. In fere, I fere: together. Ingle: fire. Inogh: enough. Into: in. Intres: entrance, admittance. Io forth: halloo! Ireful: angry, furious. Is: his. Percy‘s Reliques -809Ise: I shall. Its ne‘er: it shall never. I-tuned: tuned. Iye: eye. J: Janglers: telltales; wranglers. Jenkin: diminutive of John. 607 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Jimp: slender. Jo: sweetheart, friend. Jogelers: jugglers. Jow, joll: jowl. Juncates: a sweet-meat. Jupe: upper garment; petticoat. K: Kall: call. Kame: comb. Kameing: combing. Kan: can. Kantle: piece, corner. Karls: churls; karlis of kynde: churls by nature. Kauk: chalk. Kauld: called. Keel: saddle. Keepe: care, heed. Keipand: keeping. Kempe: soldier, warrior. Kemperye man: fighting-man.[8] Kempt: combed. Kems: combs. 608 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Ken: know. Kenst, kend: know, knew. Kene: keen. Kepers: those that watch by the corpse. Kever-cheves: handkerchiefs. Kexis: dried stalks of hemlocks. Kid, kyd, kithed: made known. Percy‘s Reliques -810Kilted: tucked up. Kind: nature. Kynde. Kirk: church. Kirk-wa: church-wall. Kirm, kirn: churn. Kirtle: a petticoat, woman’s gown.[9] Kists: chests. Kit: cut. Kith (kithe) and kin: acquaintance and kindred. Knave: servant. Knellan, knelland: kneeling. Knicht: knight. Knight‘s fee: such a portion of land as required the possessor to serve with man and horse. Knowles: little hills. 609 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Knyled: knelt. Kowarde: coward. Kowe: cow. Kuntrey: country. Kurteis: courteous. Kyne, kine: cows. Kyrtel, kyrtill, kyrtell: See kirtle. Kythe: appear, make appear, show. Kythed: appeared. L: Lacke: want. Laide unto her: imputed to her. Laith: loth. Laithly: loathsome, hideous. Lamb‘s wool: cant phrase for ale and roasted apples. Lane, lain: lone; her lane: by herself. Lang: long. Langsome: tedious. Lap: leaped. Largesse: gift, liberality. Percy‘s Reliques -811610 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Lasse: less. Latte: let, hinder. Lauch: laugh. Launde: lawn. Layden: laid. Laye: low. Lay-land: land not ploughed. Lay-lands: lands in general. Layne: lien; laid. Layne: lain. See Leane. Leal, leel, leil: loyal, honest, true. Leane: conceal, hide; lye?. Leanyde: leaned. Learnd: learned, taught. Lease: lying, falsehood. Wythouten lease: verily. Leasynge: lying, falsehood. Leaute: loyalty. Lee, lea: the field, pasture. Lee: lie. Leech, leeche, physician. Leechinge: doctoring, medicinal care. Leeke: phrase of contempt. Leer: look. 611 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Leese: lose. Leeve London: dear London. Leeveth: believeth. Lefe, leve, leeve, leffe: dear. Leid: lyed. Leir, lere: learn. Leive: leave. Leman, lemman, leiman, leaman: lover, mistress. Lenger: longer. Lengeth in: resideth in. Lere: face, complexion. Lerned: learned. Percy‘s Reliques -812Lesynge: lying, falsehood. Let, lett, latte, hinder: slacken. Lettest: hinderest, detainest. Lettyng: hindrance, without delay. Leuch, leugh: laughed. Lugh. Lever: rather. Leves and bowes: leaves and boughs. Lewd: ignorant, scandalous. Leyke: like, play. 612 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Leyre, lere: learning, lore. Libbard: leopard. Libbard‘s bane: an herb. Lichtly: lightly, easily, nimbly; also: to undervalue. Lie, lee: field. Liege-men: vassals, subjects. Lig, ligge: lie. Lightly: easily. Lightsome: cheerful, sprightly. Liked: pleased. Limitacioune: a certain precinct allowed to a limitour. Limitours: friars licensed to beg within certain limits. Linde: lime tree; trees in general. Lingell: hempen thread rubbed with rosin, for mending shoes. Lire: flesh, complexion. Lith, lithe, lythe: attend, listen. Lither: idle, worthless, wicked. Liver: deliver. Liverance: deliverance (money, or a pledge for delivering you up). Lodlye: loathsome. Lo‘e, Loed: love, loved. Logeying: lodging. Loke: lock of wool. 613 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Longes: belongs. Loo: halloo! Looset, losed: loosed. Percy‘s Reliques -813Lope: leaped. Lore: lesson, doctrine, learning. Lore: lost. Lorrel: a sorry, worthless person. Losel: idem. Lothly: See Lodlye.[10] Loud and still: at all times. Lought, lowe, lugh: laughed. Loun, loon: rascal. Lounge: lung. Lourd, lour: See Lever. Louted, lowtede: bowed. Lowe: little hill. Lowns: blazes. Lowte, lout: bow, do obeisance. Lude, luid, luivt: loved. Luef: love. Lues, luve: loves, love. 614 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Luiks: looks. Lurden, lurdeyne: sluggard, drone. Lyan, lyand: lying. Lyard: grey; a grey horse. Lynde: See Linde. Lys: lies. Lystenyth: listen. Lyth, lythe: easy, gentle, pliant. Lyven na more: live no more. Lyzt, lizt: light. M: Maden: made. Mahound, Mahowne: Mahomet. Mair: more, most. Mait: might. Majeste, maist, mayeste: may’st. Making: verses, versifying. Percy‘s Reliques -814Makys, maks: mates.[11] Manchet: fine bread. Male: coat of mail. 615 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Mane: man. Mane, maining: moan, moaning. Mangonel: an engine used for discharging great stones, arrows, &c. March-perti: in the parts lying upon the Marches. March-pine, march-pane: a kind of biscuit. Margarite: a pearl, Mark: a coin, in value 13s. 4d. Mark him to the Trinité, commit himself to God, by making the sign of the cross. Marrow: equal, mate, husband. Mart: marred, hurt, damaged. Mast, maste: may’st. Masterye, mayestry: trial of skill. Mauger, maugre: spite of; ill-will. Maun, mun: must. Mavis: a thrush. Mawt: malt. Mayd, mayde: maid. Maye, may: idem. Mayne: force, strength; mane. Maze: a labyrinth.[12] Me: men. Me con: men began. Me-thunch, thuncketh: methinks. Mean: moderate, middle-sized. 616 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Meany: retinue, train, company. Mease: soften, reduce, mitigate. Meaten, mete: measured. Meed, meede: reward, mood. Meit, meet: fit, proper. Mell: honey; also: meddle, mingle. Menivere: a species of fur. Mense the faugh: measure the battle. Menzie, meaney: See Meaney. Percy‘s Reliques -815Merches: marches. Messager: messenger. Met, meit: See Mete. Meynè: See Meany. Micht: might. Mickle: much, great. Mykel. Midge: a small insect. Minged: mentioned. Minny: mother. Minstral: minstrel. Minstrelsie: music. Mirke, mirkie: dark, black. 617 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Mirry, meri: merry. Miscreants: unbelievers. Misdoubt: suspect, doubt. Miskaryed: miscarried. Misken: mistake; let a thing alone. Mister: to need. Mither: mother. Mo, moe: more. Mode: mood. Moiening: by means of. Mold: mould, ground. Mome: a dull, stupid fellow. Monand: moaning, bemoaning. Mone: moon. Mounyn day: Monday. More, mure: moor, heath, also, wild hill; Morne: to mourn; to-morrow, in the morning. Mornyng: mourning. Morrownynges: mornings. Mort: death of the deer. Mosses: swampy grounds. Most: must. Mote, mought: might. 618 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Percy‘s Reliques -816Mote I thee: might I thrive. Mou: mouth. Mought, mot: See Mote. Mowe: may; mouth. Muchele bost: great boast. Mude: mood. Mulne: mill. Mun, maun: must. Mure: See Muir Murne, murnt, murning: mourn, etc. Muse: amuse; wonder. Musis: muses. Myghtte: mighty. Mycull, mekyl: See Mickle. Myne-ye-ple: many plies, or folds. Myrry: merry. Mysuryd: misused, applied badly. N: Na, nae: no, none. 619 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Naithing: nothing. Nams: names. Nane: none. Nappy: strong (of ale). Nar, nare: nor, than. Natheless: nevertheless. Nat: not. Ne, nee: nigh. Near, ner, nere: never. Neat: oxen, cows, large cattle. Neatherd: keeper of cattle. Neatresse: female ditto. Neigh him neare: approach him near. Neir, nere: never. Neir, nere: near. Nere: we were; were it not for. Percy‘s Reliques -817Nest, nyest: next, nearest. Newfangle: fond of novelty. Nicht: night. Nicked him of naye: refused him. Nipt: pinched. 620 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Noble: a coin, in value 6s. 8d. Noblès, nobless: nobleness. Nollys, noddles: heads. Nom: took. Nome: name. Non: none. None: noon. Nonce: purpose; Nonys. For the nonce: for the occasion. Norland: northern. Norse: Norway. North-Gales, North Wales. Nou: now. Nourice: nurse. Nout, nocht: nought; not. Nowght: nought. Nowls: noddles, heads. Noye: annoy? Nozt, nought. Nurtured: educated, bred up. Nye, ny: nigh. Nyzt: night. 621 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry O: O gin: O if. Obraid: upbraid. Ocht: ought. Oferlyng: superior, paramount. On: one, an. One: on. Onloft: aloft. Ony: any. Percy‘s Reliques -818Onys: once. Onfowghten, unfoughten: un-fought. Or, ere: before, even. Or, eir: before, ever. Orisons: prayers. Ost, aste, oast: host. Ou, oure: you, your; our. Out alas!: exclamation of grief. Out-brayde: drew out, unsheathed. Out-horn: summoning to arms. Out ower: quite over; over. Outowre: out over. 622 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Outrake: an out ride, or expedition. Oware off none: hour of noon. Owches: bosses, or buttons of gold. Owene, awen, oune, ain: own. Owre, owr: over. Owre-word: last word; burden of a song. Owt, owte: out. P: Pa: the river Po. Packing: false-dealing. Pall, Palle: kind of rich cloth; robe of state. Palmer: a pilgrim. Paramour: lover, mistress. Pardè, perde, perdie: verily; Par Dieu. Paregall: equal. Partake: participate, assign to. Parti: party, a part. Pattering: murmuring, mumbling. Pauky: shrewd, cunning; insolent. Paves, pavice: a large shield. Pavilliane: tent, pavillion. 623 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Pay: liking, satisfaction. Paynim: pagan. Percy‘s Reliques -819Pearlins: coarse sort of bone-lace. Pece: piece, sc. of cannon. Peere, pere: peer, equal. Peering: peeping, looking narrowly. Peerless: without equal. Pees, pese, peysse: peace. Pele: a baker’s peel. Penon: lance-banner. Pentarchye of tenses: five tenses. Perchmine: parchment. Perelous, parlous: perilous. Perfay: verily. Perfight: perfect. Perill: danger. Perkin: diminutive of Peter. Perlese: peerless. Persit, pearced: pierced. Perte: part. Pertyd: parted. 624 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Petye: pity. Peyn: pain. Philomene: the nightingale. Pibrocks: Highland war-tunes. Piece: a little. Plaine: complain. Plaining: complaining. Play-feres: play fellows. Playand: playing. Pleasance: pleasure. Plein, playn: complain. Plett: platted. Plowmell: wooden hammer fixed to the plough. Plyzt: plight. Poll-cat: cant word for whore. Pollys, powlls, polls: head. Percy‘s Reliques -820Pompal: pompous. Popingay: parrot. Porcupig: porcupine. Portres: porteress. Posset: drink. 625 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Poterner: pocket, pouch. Poudered: sprinkled over (heraldic). Pow, pou, pow‘d: pull, pulled. Powlls: See Pollys. Pownes: pounds. Preas, prese: press. Prece: idem. Preced, presed: pressed. Prest: ready. Prestly, prestlye: readily, quickly. Pricked: spurred on, hasted. Prickes: the mark to shoot at. Pricke-wand: wand to shoot at. Priefe: prove. Priving: proving, testing. Prove: proof. Prowès: prowess, valour. Prude: pride; proud. Prycke: the mark. Pryme: day-break. Puing: pulling. Puissant: strong, powerful. Pulde: pulled. Purchased: procured. 626 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Purfel: ornament of embroidery. Purfelled: embroidered Purvayed: provided. Pyght, pight: pitched. Q: Quadrant: four-square. Quail: shrink. Percy‘s Reliques -821Quat: quitted. Quaint: cunning; fantastical. Quarry: slaughtered game. Quay, quhey: young heifer. Quean: sorry, base woman. Quel: cruel, murderous. Quelch: a blow. Quell: subdue; kill. Quere, quire: choir. Quirister: chorister. Quest: inquest. Quha: who. Quhair: where 627 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Quhan, whan: when. Quhaneer: whenever. Quahar: where. Quhat: what. Quhatten: what. Quhen: when. Quhy: why. Quick: alive, living. Quillets: quibbles. Quitt: requite. Quyle: while. Quyt: quite. Quyte: requited. Qwyknit: quickened, restored to life. R: Rade: rode. Rae: roe. Raik: to go apace. Raik on raw: go fast in a row. Raine: reign. Raise: rose. Ranted: were merry. 628 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Rashing: the stroke made by a wild boar with his fangs. Raught: reached, gained, obtained. Percy‘s Reliques -822Rayne, reane: rain. Raysse: race. Razt, raught, bereft. Reachles: careless. Reade, rede: advise; guess. Rea‘me, reame: realm. Reas: raise. Reave: bereave. Reckt: regarded. Rede, redde: read. Rede: advise, advice; guess. Redresse: care, labour. Reke, smoke. Refe, reve, reeve: bailiff. Reft: bereft. Register: officer of the public register. Reid: See Rede. Reid, rede: reed, red. Reid-roan: red-roan. 629 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Reius: deprive of. Rekeles, recklesse: regardless, rash. Remeid: remedy. Renisht: shining? Renn: to run. Renyed: refused. Rescous: rescues. Reve: See Reeve. Revers: robbers, pirates, rovers. Rew, rewe: take pity, regret. Rue. Rewth: ruth. Riall, ryall: royal. Richt: right. Ride: make an inroad. Riddle: to advise? Rin, renn: run. Percy‘s Reliques -823Rise: shoot, bush, shrub. Rive: rife, abounding. Roche: rock. Roke, reek: steam. Ronne: ran. Roone: run. 630 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Roo: roe. Rood, Roode: cross, crucifix. Rood-loft: place in the church where the images are set up. Roast: roost. Roufe: roof. Route: go about, travel. Routhe, ruth: pity. Row, rowd: roll, rolled. Rowght, rout: strife. Rowned, rownyd: whispered. Rowyndd: round. Rudd: red, ruddy; complexion. Rude, rood: cross. Ruell-bones: coloured rings of bone. Rues, ruethe: pitieth; regretteth. Rugged: pulled with violence. Rushy: covered with rushes. Ruthe, ruth: pity, woe. Ruthfull: rueful, woeful. Ryde: See Ride. Rydere: ranger. Rynde: rent. Ryschys: rushes. 631 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Rywe: rue. Ryzt: right. S: Sa, sae: so. Safer: sapphire. Saft: soft. Saif: safe; save. Savely: safely. Percy‘s Reliques -824Saim: same. Sair: sore. Saisede: seized. Sall: shall. Sap: essay, attempt. Sair: sore. Sar: See Sair. Sark, sarke: shirt. Sat, sete: set. Saut: salt. Savyde: saved. Saw, say: speech, discourse. 632 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Say: essay, attempt. Say us no harme: say no ill of us. Sayne: say. Scant: scarce; scantiness. Scath, scathe: hurt, injury. Schall: shall. Schapped: swapped? Schatered: shattered. Schaw: show. Schene: sheen, shining; brightness. Schip: ship. Schiples: shiftless. Scho, sche: she. Schone: shone. Schoote: shot, let go. Schowte, schowtte: shout. Schrill: shrill. Schuke: shook. Sclab: table-book of slates to write on. Scomfit: discomfit. Scot: tax, revenue; shot, reckoning. Se: sea. Se, sene, seying: see, seen, seeing. 633 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Percy‘s Reliques -825Sed: said. Seely: silly, simple. Seething: boiling. Seik, seke: seek. Sek: sack. Sel, sell: self. Selven: self. Selver, siller: silver. Sely: silly. Sen: since. Sene: seen. Seneschall: steward. Senvy: mustard-seed. Sertayne, sertenlye: certain, certainly. Setywall: See Cetywall. Seve: seven. Sey: a kind of woollen stuff. Sey yow: say to, tell you. Seyd: saw. Shaw: show. Shaws: little woods. 634 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Shave: been shaven. Shear: entirely. Shee‘s: she shall. Sheeld-bone: the blade-bone. Sheele: she’ll, she will. Sheene, shene: shining. Sheeve, shive: a great slice of bread. Sheip: sheep. Sheits, shetes: sheets. Shent: shamed, disgraced, abused. Shepenes, shipens: cow or sheep pens. Shimmered: glittered. Sho, scho: she. Shoen, shone: shoes. Percy‘s Reliques -826Shoke: shookest. Shold, sholde: should. Shope: shaped; betook. Shorte: shorten. Shote: shot. Shread: cut into small pieces. Shreeven, shriven: confessed her sins. 635 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Shreward: a male shrew. Shrift: confession. Shrive: confess; hear confession. Shroggs: shrubs, thorns, briars. Shulde: should. Shullen: shall. Shunted: shunned. Shurtyng: recreation, diversion. Shyars: shires. Shynand: shining. Sib, kin; akin, related. Sic, sich, sick: such. Sich: sigh. Sick-like: such-like. Side: long. Sied: saw. Sigh-clout: a clout to strain milk through. Sighan, sighand: sighing. Sik, sike: such. Siker: surely, certainly. Siller: silver. Sindle: seldom. Sith, sithe: since. 636 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Sitteth: sit ye. Skaith, scath: harm, mischief. Skalk: malicious? squinting?. Skinker: one that serves drink. Skinkled: glittered. Percy‘s Reliques -827Skomfit: discomfit. Skott: shot, reckoning. Slade: a breadth of greensward between plow-lands or woods. Slaited: whetted; wiped. Slattered: slit, broke into splinters. Slaw: slew. Sle, slea, slee: slay. Slean, slone: slain. Sleip, slepe: sleep. Slo, sloe: slay. Slode, slit: split. Slone: slain. Sloughe: slew. Smithers: smothers. Sna‘, snaw: snow. Soldain, soldan, sowdan: sultan. 637 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Soll, soulle, sowle: soul. Sond: a present, a sending. Sone, soan: soon. Sonn: son, sun. Sooth: truth, true. Soothly: truly. Sort: company. Soth, soth, south, soothe: See sooth. Soth-Ynglonde: South England. Sould, schuld: should. Souling: victualling. Sowdan: See Soldain. Sowden, sowdain: idem. Sowne: sound. Sowre, soare: sour, sore. Sowter: shoemaker. Soy: silk. Spack, spak, spaik: spake. Spec: idem. Percy‘s Reliques -828Speered, sparred, i.e. fastened, shut.[13] Speik: speak. 638 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Speir: spear. Speer Speir, speer, speere, spere, speare, spire: ask, inquire.[14] Spence, spens: expense. Spendyd: grasped. Spere, speere: spear. Spill, spille: spoil, destroy, harm. Spillan, spilland: spilling. Spilt: spoilt. Spindles and whorles: instrument used for spinning in Scotland.[15] Spole: shoulder; armpit. Sporeles: spurless, without spurs. Sprent, sprente: spurted, sprung out. Spurging: froth that purges out. Spurn, spurne: a kick. Spyde: spied. Spylt: spoiled, destroyed. Spyt, spyte: spite. Squelsh: a blow or bang. Stabille: establish? Stalwart, stalworth: stout. Stalworthlye: stoutly. Stane, stean: stone. Stark: stiff; entirely. 639 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Startopes: buskins, or half-boots. Stead, stede: place. Stean: stone. Steedye: steady. Steid, stede: steed. Steir: stir. Stel, stele, steill: steel. Sterne: stern; stars. Sterris: stars. Stert, sterte: start. Percy‘s Reliques -829Steven: time, voice. Still: quiet, silent. Stint: stop, stopped. Stonders, stonderes: standers-by. Stonde, stound, stounde, stownde: time, space, hour, moment; while. Stoup of weir: a pillar of war. Stour, stower, stowre: fight, stir, disturbance. Stown: stolen. Stowre: strong, robust, fierce. Stra, strae: straw. Streight: straight. 640 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Strekene: stricken, struck. Stret: street. Strick: strict. Strife: strain, or measure. Strike: stricken. Stroke: struck. Stude, stuid: stood. Styntyde, stinted: stayed, stopped. Styrande stagge: many a stirring, travelling journey. Styrt: start. Suar: sure. Sum: some. Summere: a sumpter horse. Sumpters: horses that carry burdens. Sune: soon. Suore bi ys chin: swore by his chin. Surcease: cease. Suthe, swith: soon, quickly. Swa, sa: so. Swaird: greensward. Swapte, swapped, swopede: struck violently; exchanged blows. Swarvde, swarved: climbed, Swat, swatte, swotte: did sweat. 641 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Swear, sware, sweare: swear; oath. Percy‘s Reliques -830Sweard, swearde, swerd: sword. Sweare, swearing, oath. Sweaven: a dream. Sweere, swire: neck. Sweit, swete: sweet. Swepyl: the swinging part of a flail. Sweven: See Sweaven. Swith: quickly, instantly. Swyke: sigh. Swynkers: labourers. Swyppyng: striking fast. Swyving: whoring. Sych: such. Syd: side. Syde shear, sydis shear: on all sides. Syn, Syne: then, afterwards. Syns: since. Syshemell: Ishmael. Syth: since. Syzt: sight. 642 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry T: Taiken: token, sign. Taine, tane: taken. Take: taken. Talents: golden head ornaments? Tane: one. Tarbox: liniment box carried by shepherds. Targe: target, shield. Te: to; te make: to make. Te he!: interjection of laughing. Teene, tene: sorrow, grief, wrath. Teir, tere: tear. Teenefu‘: indignant, wrathful, furious. Tent: heed. Percy‘s Reliques -831Termagaunt: the god of Sarazens.[16] Terry: diminutive of Thierry, Theodoricus, Didericus, Terence. Tester: a coin. Tha: them. Thah: though. 643 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Thair: their. Thame: them. Than: then. Thare, thair, theire, ther, thore: there. The: thee. The: they. The wear: they were. The, thee: thrive; So mote I thee: so may I thrive. See Chaucer, Canterb. Tales,‘ i. 308. The God: i.e. The high God. Thend: the end. Ther: their. Ther-for: therefore. Therto: thereto. Thes: these. Thewes: manners; limbs. Theyther-ward: thitherward. Thie: thy. Thowe: thou. Thi sone: thy son. Thii: they. Thilke: this. Thir: this, these. Thir towmonds: these twelve months. Thirtti thousant: thirty thousand. Tho: then, those, the. 644 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Thocht: thought. Thole, tholed: suffer, suffered. Thouse: thou art. Thoust: thou shalt, or shouldest. Thrall: captive; captivity. Thrang: throng, close. Thrawis: throes. Percy‘s Reliques -832Thre, thrie: three. Threape: to argue, assert positively. Thrie, thre: three. Thrif, threven: thrive. Thrilled: twirled, turned round. Thrittè: thirty. Thronge: hastened. Thropes: villages. Thruch, throuch: through. Thud: noise of a fall. Tibbe: diminutive of Isabel (Scottish) Tift: puff of wind. Tild down: pitched. Till: to; when. 645 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Till: unto, entice. Timkin: diminutive of Timothy. Tine: lose. Tint: lost. Tirl: twirl, turn around. Tirl at the pin: unlatch the door. To: too; two. Ton, tone: the one. Too-fall: twilight.[17] Tor: a tower; pointed rock on hill. Toun, toune: town. Tow: to let down with a rope. Tow, towe, twa: two. Towmoond: twelve-month, year. Towyn: town. Traiterye: treason: treachery. Trenchant: cutting. Tres hardie: thrice-hardy. Treytory, traitory: treachery. Trichard: treacherous. Tricthen, trick, deceive. Percy‘s Reliques -833646 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Tride: tried. Trie, tre: tree. Triest furth: draw forth to an assignation. Trifulcate: three forked, three-pointed. Trim: exact. Trichard: treacherousr. Troth: truth, faith, fidelity. Trough, trouth: troth. Trow: think, believe, trust, conceive, also: verily. Trowthe: troth. Tru: true. Trumped: boasted, told lies. Trumps: wooden trumpets. Tuik, tuke: took. Tuke gude keip: kept a close eye upon her. Tul: till, to. Turn: an occasion. Turnes a crab, at the fire: roasts a crab. Tush: interjection of contempt, or impatience. Twa: two. Twatling: small, piddling. Twayne: two. Twin‘d: parted, separated. 647 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Twirtle twist: thoroughly twisted. U: Uch: each. Ugsome: shocking, horrible. Unbethought: for bethought. Unctuous: fat, clammy, oily. Undermeles: afternoons. Undight: undecked, undressed. Unkempt: uncombed. Unmacklye: mis-shapen. Unmufit: undisturbed, unconfounded Unseeled: opened; a term in falconry. Percy‘s Reliques -834Unsett steven: unappointed time, unexpectedly. Unsonsie: unlucky, unfortutnate. Untyll: unto, against. Ure: use. Uthers: others. 648 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry V: Vair, (Somerset): fair. Valzient: valiant. Vaporing: hectoring. Vazen, (Somerset): faiths. Venu: approach, coming. Vices: devices; screws; turning pins; swivels; spindle of a press? Vilane: rascally. Vive, (Somerset): five. Voyded: quitted, left. Vriers, (Somerset): friars; "Vicars". W: Wa‘: way, wall. Wad, walde, wold: would. Wadded: of a light blue colour?[18] Wae, waefu‘: woe, woeful. Wae worth: woe betide. Waine: waggon. Walker: a fuller of cloth. Wallowit: faded, withered. Walter: roll along; wallow. 649 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Walter: welter. Waly: interjection of grief. Wame, wem: womb. Wan: gone; came; deficient; black, gloomy. Wan neir: drew near. Wane: one. Wanrufe: uneasy. War, wae: aware. War ant wys: wary and wise. Percy‘s Reliques -835Ward: watch, sentinel. Warde: advise, forewarn. Warke: work. Warld, warldis: world, worlds. Waryd: accursed. Waryson: reward. Wassel: drinking, good cheer. Wat: wet; knew. Wat, wot: know, am aware. Wate, weete, wete, witte, wot, wote, wotte: know. Wate: blamed. Wax: to grow, become. 650 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Wayde: waved. Wayward: froward, perverse. Weal: wail. Wea1e: welfare. Weale, weel, weil, wele: well. Weare-in: drive in gently. Wearifu‘: wearisome, tiresome. Weazon: the throat Wedous: widows. Weede: clothing, dress. Weel: well; we will. Weene: think. Weet: wet. Weet: See Wate. Weid, wede, weed, See Weede. Weil, wepe: weep. Weinde, wende, went, weende, weened: thought. Weïrd: wizard, witch. Wel-away: interjection of grief. Wel of pitè: source of pity. Weldynge: ruling. Welkin: the sky. Well-away: exclamation of pity. 651 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Percy‘s Reliques -836Wem: hurt. Weme: womb, belly; hollow. Wend, wende, wenden: go. Wende: thought. Wene, ween: think. Wer: were. Wereth: defendeth. Werke: work. Werre, weir, warris: war, wars. Werryed: worried. Wes: was. Westlin, westlings, western: whistling. Wha: who. Whair: where. Whan: when. Whang: a large slice. Wheder: whither. Wheelyng: wheeling. Whig: sour whey, butter-milk. While: until. Whilk: which. 652 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Whit: jot. Whittles: knives. Whoard: hoard. Whorles: See Spindles. Whos: whose. Whyllys: whilst. Wi‘: with. Wight: human being, man or woman. Wight: strong, lusty. Wightlye: vigorously. Wightye, wighty: strong, active. Wield-worm: serpent. Wildings: wild apples. Wilfulle: wandering, erring. Percy‘s Reliques -837Will: shall. Win: get, gain. Windar: a kind of hawk. Windling: winding. Winnae: will not. Winsome: agreeable, engaging. Wiss, wis: know; wist: knew. 653 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Wit, weet: know, understand. Withouten, withoughten: without. Wo, woo: woe. Wobster, webster: weaver. Wode, wod: mad, furious. Wode-ward: towards the wood. Woe: woeful, sorrowful. Woe-begone: lost in grief. Woe-man: a sorrowful man. Woe-worth: woe be to thee. Wolde: would. Woll: wool. Won: wont, usage. Won‘d, wonn‘d: dwelt. Wonde, wound: winded. Wonders: wonderous. Wondersly, wonderly: wondrously. Wone: one. Wonne: dwell. Wood, wode: mad, furious. Woodweele, wodewale: the golden ouzle, a bird of the thrush-kind. Wood-wroth: furiously enraged. 654 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Worshipfully friended: of worshipful friends. Worthe: worthy. Wot, wote: know, think. Wouche: mischief, evil. Wow: vow; woe! Percy‘s Reliques -838Wracke: ruin, destruction. Wrang: wrung. Wreake: pursue revengefully. Wreke: wreak, revenge. Wrench: wretchedness. Wright: write. Wringe: contended with violence. Writhe: writhed, twisted. Wroken: revenged. Wronge: wrong. Wrouzt: wrought. Wull: will. Wyld: wild deer. Wyght: strong, lusty. Wyghtye, ditto. Wynde, wende: go. 655 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Wynne, win: joy. Wynnen: win, gain. Wyste: knew. Wyt, wit, weet: know. Wyte: blame. Y: Y: I. Y singe: I sing. Y-beare: bear. Y-boren: borne. Y-built: built. Y-cleped: named, called. Y-con‘d: taught, instructed. Y-core: chosen. Y-fere: together. Y-founde: found. Y-mad, made. Y-picking, picking, culling. Y-slaw, slain. Y-wonne: won. Y-were: were. 656 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Y-wis: verily. Y-wrought, wrought. Y-wys: truly, verily. Y-zote: molten, melted. Percy‘s Reliques -839Yae: each. Yalping: yelping. Yaned: yawned. Yate: gate. Yave: gave. Ych, ycha: yche: ilka: each. Ycholde, yef: I should, if. Ychon, ychone: each one. Ychulle: I shall. Ychyseled: cut with the chisel. Ydle: idle. Ye feth, y-feth: in faith. Yearded: buried. Yebent, y-bent: bent. Yede, yode: went. Yee: eye. Yeldyde: yielded. 657 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Yenoughe, ynoughe: enough. Yerrarchy: hierarchy. Yere, yeere: year, years. Yerle, yerlle: earl. Yerly: early. Yese: ye shall. Yestreen: yester-evening. Yf: if. Yfere: together. Ygnoraunce: ignorance. Ylke, ilk: same. Yll: ill. Ylythe: listen. Yn: in; Yn-house, at home. Yngglishe, Ynglysshe: English. Ynglonde: England. Yode: went. Youe: you. Ys: is; his; in his. Ystonge: stung. Yt: it. Yth: in the. 658 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry Z: Z: y, g, and s. Zacring bell, (Somerset): Sacring bell, a little bell rung to give notice of the elevation of the host. ze: you, ye, thee; zee‘re: ye are. zede: yede: went. Zee, zeene: see, seen. zees: ye shall. Percy‘s Reliques -840zef: yef: if. zeir: year. zellow: yellow. zeme: take care of. zent: through. zestrene: yester-e’en. zit, zet: yet. zonder: yonder. zang: young. Zonne: son. zou: you; zour: your. 659 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană compendium of translated poetry zoud: you would. zour-lane, your-lane: alone, by yoursef. zouth: youth. zule, yule: Christmas. zung, zonge: young. 660 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE PRESS Editura pentru Literatură Contemporană

Loading...

compendium of translated poetry - poetry - doczz

Search... compendium of translated poetry compiled by Bilingual C. George Sandulescu and Lidia Vianu 700 pages for the express purpose of teaching th...

1MB Sizes 20 Downloads 46 Views

Recommend Documents

Poetry
In both 'Dulce et Decorum Est' and 'Mental Cases' he writes with intense focus ... Owen uses ironic subversion in the op

Poetry Test
Feb 25, 2014 - Richard Bone. Merrits/Karr (HO) ... Edwin Arlington Robinson 664. Richard Cory ... Rhyme/Rhyme Scheme 657

Poetry Anthology
Not a red rose or a satin heart. I give you an onion. It is a moon .... My Last Duchess. Ferrara. That's my last duchess

faithful translation in sapardi djoko damono's poetry translated by
Those turbulent times saw Sapardi finding his own voice in brief, limpid poems with simple yet pregnant imagery from eve

Chemistry in poetry and poetry in chemistry
résulte du mélange des corps', ou seja, “Coleção de experiências e observações sobre a luta que é resultado da

poetry project newsletter - The Poetry Project
Jul 15, 2010 - BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Greg Fuchs (President), Rosemary Carroll ... Morrill, Elinor Nauen, Evelyn Reilly, Ch

The Poetry of Advent.pptx
Mary Oliver. Dear Lord, I have swept and I have washed but s=ll nothing is as shining as it should be for you. Under the

Poetry of Sappho
jjj. The Poetry of. Sappho jjj. Translation and Notes by. Jim Powell. 1. 2007 .... May storm winds and worries bear off

Metaphysical Poetry
Qualities of Metaphysical Poetry: ○ concerned with the whole ... metaphysical conceit. ○ an extended metaphor that o

Defining Poetry and Characteristics of Poetry - teaching support
lyric. • Narrative. • dramatic. Classifications of this kind are not exclusive. Poems in each of these categories ma

Dogman (2018) | WEBrip Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher | weiter...