Child Friendly Bolivia - Western Sydney University

Loading...

Child Friendly Bolivia Researching with children in La Paz, Bolivia

Amigo de la infancia Bolivia Investigación con los niños y las niñas en La Paz, Bolivia

Research report written by Professor Karen Malone Centre for Educational Research, University of Western Sydney, Sydney Australia Supporting UNICEF Bolivia and La Paz Minicipal Council Informe de investigación escrito por el Profesor Karen Malone Centro de Investigación Educativa, Universidad de Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia apoya UNICEF en Bolivia y La Paz Consejo Municipal I would ike to acknowledge: In Bolivia, the 80 children from the three neighbrouhoods and their families support, Mr Lindsay Hasluck in-country Senior Research Assistant, Nelson Antequera and his Municipal Council Staff, University Social Science Research Graduates. In Australia, Research Assistants, Monique Malone Multimedia Manager, Ingrid Sergovia Data Collation and Spanish Translation Cover photograph taken by Jonathan, age 9 years, Munaypata, La Paz Bolivia “A little girl smiling, my sister, she is funny and beautiful”

Table of Contents Executive Summary ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Resumen Ejecutivo .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 La Paz and the Neighbourhoods...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 La Paz y el vecindario ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Child Friendly Cities ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Una ciudad y una comunidad amiga de la niñez ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 5 Methodology..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Metodología ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Freedom and play ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 9 Libertad y derecho a jugar ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 11 Dirt and dangers............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 13 Polvo y peligros .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 16 Mountains and trees....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Árboles y Montañas ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 21 Family, friends and pets ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 23 Familia, amigos y mascotas ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 School and my city ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 27 Mi escuela y mi ciudad ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28 Dreams for a child friendly city ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30 La Sueños de una ciudad amiga de la infancia ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 30 Final discussions ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 35 Discusiones finales ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 35 Glossary of Children’s Images ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 Appendix ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 45

Executive Summary Bolivia is the poorest country in South America. About 63% of the Bolivian population lives in urban areas; of this group, 61% lives in slums. Children and youth constitute almost half of the total population in Bolivia with the corresponding national percentage living in poverty. In September 2012 during a visit to La Paz, Bolivia a small team of researchers worked with eighty children living in slum communities in La Paz. These children were as young as five and up to fifteen years. The project used a participatory multi-method design where children volunteered to research with the adults using a number of possible research tools including surveys, interviews, drawings, photography, roaming range maps and guided tours. The research design was negotiated firstly with the research staff from University of Western Sydney, Australia, staff from UNICEF Bolivia, the City of La Paz Municipal council and through the subsequent research workshop held with 30 local university social work students and staff at the council who were to be working in the field alongside the researchers from UWS and the child researchers. The research design incorporated a number of research activities that allowed children from a range of ages and abilities to participate. The research included fillling in a child friendliness survey about their nieghbourhood and city, a children’s independent mobility survey collecting data on children movements from children and their parents, children’s drawings of their neighboruhood and dream place and an interview about these two drawings to explore their ideas about their place and their desires for a future child friendly city, children were given disposable cameras so they could create a photojournal researching a week in their life and an interview was held with them about the photographs. A number of children also went on a guided tour of their neighbourhood taking photographs throughout their journey. Through these research workshops and the children’s research activities an abundance of rich, descriptive and visual data of how Bolivian children experience their place and their visions and dreams for a child friendly and sustainable future were collected. This report provides an overview of key findings organized around the key themes of freedom and play; dirt and dangers; mountains and trees; family, friends and pets; school and the city; dreams of a child friendly city. The findings revealed that children want a home that is safe and where they feel loved and they can have companionship, a place where there is green grass and flowers, a park or playground close to their home where they can play with their friends, a clean and safe neighbourhood where they can walk freely without fear and teachers at school who listen to their ideas. The final section taken from children’s dream places identified some key themes fro a child friendly city: a child friendly city has places to play sport, has people who care for you, has animals, has parks and playgrounds, is clean and safe and is green.

Resumen Ejecutivo Bolivia es el país más pobre de Sudamérica. Aproximadamente 63% de la población boliviana vive en centros urbanos; 61% de este grupo vive en barriadas. Los niños, niñas y juventud constituyen casi la mitad de la población total, con el porcentaje de juventud viviendo en la pobreza correspondiente al porcentaje nacional. En Setiembre 2012 durante una visita a La Paz, Bolivia un grupo de investigadores trabajaron con ochenta niños de cinco a quince años,de las barriadas en la Paz. El proyecto implemento un diseño participativo y multifacético, los niños y niñas como voluntarios para investigar con los adultos, usando un número de herramientas de investigación, incluyendo encuestas, entrevistas, dibujos, fotografía, mapa de cobertura de paseos y visitas guiadas. El diseño de investigación fue desarrollado y negociado con el personal de investigación de la universidad ‘University of Western Sydney’ (UWS), Australia, personal de UNICEF de Bolivia, y la Municipalidad de la Paz y talleres de investigación posteriores con 30 estudiantes de trabajo social y personal de universidades de la región, trabajando junto a los investigadores de UWS y investigadores de la niñez en el trabajo de campo. El diseño de investigación incorporó varias actividades que permitió la participación de niños y niñas de edades y capacidades variadas. La investigación incluyó completando una encuesta amiga de la infancia para la vecindad y ciudad, una encuesta movilidad independiente de la infancia recopilando datos sobre los movimientos de la infancia desde niños, niñas y sus madres y padres, dibujos de la infancia de su vecindad y lugar de sueño y una entrevista sobre los dos dibujos para explorar sus ideas de su sitio y sus deseos para una ciudad amiga de la infancia en el futuro. Se les dio una cámara fotográfica desechable a los niños y niñas para completar un fotoperiodo de investigación sobre sus vidas durante una semana y una entrevista sobre las fotos. Algunos niños y niñas también participaron en una visita guiada de su vecindario tomando fotos a lo largo de su paseo. A través de estos talleres de investigación y las actividades de investigación de la infancia una abundancia de información rica, descriptiva y visual fue recopilada sobre la vida de la infancia boliviana y su experiencia de su sitio, sus visiones y sueños para una ciudad amiga de la infancia y un futuro sustentable. Este informe provee una visión global Los resultados demostraron que los niños y niñas quieren un hogar que es seguro, donde pueden jugar y que es verde.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

2

La Paz and the Neighbourhoods Equity must be the guiding principle in efforts for all children in urban areas. The children of slums – born into and raised under some of the most challenging conditions of poverty and disadvantage – will require particular attention… the larger goal must remain in focus: fairer, more nurturing cities and societies for all people. UNICEF State of the World’s Children Report 2012, page 75 As it grows, the city of La Paz climbs the hills, resulting in varying elevations from 3,200 to 4,100 m (10,500 to 13,500 ft). Overlooking the city is towering triple-peaked Mountain Illimani which is always snow-covered and can be seen from several spots of the city, including from the neighbor city of El Alto. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 877,363. La Paz Metropolitan area, formed by the cities of La Paz, El Alto and Viacha make the most populous urban area of Bolivia, with a population of 2.3 million inhabitants. The geography of La Paz (in particular the altitude) reflects society: the lower areas of the city are the more affluent areas. While many middle-class residents live in high-rise condos near the center, the houses of the truly affluent are located in the lower neighborhoods southwest of the Prado. And looking up from the center, the surrounding hills are plastered with makeshift brick houses of those more disadvantaged communities. The very edge of the valley at its highest reaches the communities are located on such steep hillsides that they can only be accessed by stairs, these areas although have amazing views across the valley are under constant threat of landslides and flooding. The city is divided into seven main districts, called “Macro Distritos”, micro districts which at the same time st are divided into 21 small districts or zones. The children who took the photographs live in the 1 Main District, Cotahuma and in a nieghbourhood of Munaypata north of the centre. At over 4000m above sea level and around 5km from the city centre, residents of these neighburhoods can view the length of the snow-capped Cordillera Real, and La Paz city. th

Bolivia is the poorest country in South America. On the human development index Bolivia ranks 113 out of 182 countries. About 63% of the Bolivian population lives in urban areas; of this group, 61% lives in slums. The population of the La Paz metropolitan area is approximately 800,000 or 9% of the national population. In La Paz a greater percentage of people live in slum conditions (64%) than the national average. These slums are characterized by a lack of access to water, sanitation, electricity, transportation, and other basic services, as well as insecure tenure. In many cases housing is informally constructed by tenants themselves, and the units are structurally insecure. In Bolivia, a traditional misogynist culture persists where women are assigned a subordinate, traditional and dependent role, mainly the roles of reproduction and care of the family. According to the Human Development Report on Gender in Bolivia 2003 (PNUD): “Bolivia treats men better than women”. The report continues, “men receive more and better education than women, receive increased and better health assistance than women, and have the possibility to generate greater income while working less if we consider that women, as opposed to men, also have the almost exclusive responsibility for domestic work”. Children and adolescents constitute almost half of the total population in Bolivia. National poverty coincides directly on their living conditions. While progress has been achieved in the areas of health and education for children, there is still much to be done to improve living conditions for Bolivian children. According to recent census, Bolivia has 9 million inhabitants. 46 per cent are children and adolescents aged under 18. There are an estimated 1,529,689 children aged under 6, with a majority living at risk with respect to the vulnerability of their rights. In Bolivia a culture of respect for child rights does not yet exist. Daily life reflects the perception of children as being owned and their parents’ property. A large part of the population still considers it normal to smack or beat children to discipline them and make sure they respect their elders. Many children lack a birth certificate. The causes of this lack of registry are of an economic and cultural character: the cost of obtaining a birth certificate is high, and there is a lack of information on the benefits of registering children. A child whose birth is not registered does not exist in the eyes of the state and therefore does not have access to the basic services and rights guaranteed by law. An estimated 616,000 children and adolescents are engaged in some form of labour. The economic crisis, lack of employment and, definitively, low family income oblige many children and adolescents to work. These children prematurely have to assume responsibilities which do not correspond to their age, and frequently are exploited at work. Also, work impedes many children from attending school. Only 39 per cent of working children continue their schooling, while 4.3 per cent have never gone to school. The three neighbourhoods that were the focus of the research study were all disadvantaged or slum communities on the very high reaches of the valley, close to the El Alto. The nieghbourhoods were Cotahuma, Alto Tacagua and Munaypata. Cotahuma is a one of the main districts or zones of La Paz and runs from downtown up the side of the valley. This district includes the neighbourhood of Alto Taca Gua. Alto Taca Gua is on the highest reaches of the valley and is only accessible via steps either from the valley below or by driving to the El Alto parking and walking down into the neighbourhood. The community Munaypata is on the same side of the valley as Cotahuma but is much further to north west of the city. Munaypata is also on the highpoints of the valley and is bordered by the national highway that winds its way down from the Airport and the El Alto toward the central city district.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

3

La Paz y el vecindario La igualdad debe ser el principio rector en el esfuerzo para la niñez en centros urbanos. Los niños de los barrios bajos – nacidos y criados en las condiciones más difíciles de la pobreza y desventaja – requerirá atención particular… el foco principal de atención debe ser lograr la meta: alcanzar ciudades y sociedades mejores y más justas para todos. UNICEF Estado Mundial de la Infancia, reporte anual de 2012:75

El censo poblacional de 2001 indico 877,363 de habitantes en la ciudad de La Paz. La Paz, El Alto y Viacha forman el centro urbano más grande con la población de 2.3 millones de habitantes. La geografía de la Paz, en particular la altitud, refleja la sociedad: las áreas más bajas de la ciudad son las más acaudaladas. La mayoría de la clase media vive en condominio multipisos cerca del centro, las casa de los más acaudalados están situados en las áreas mas bajas. Mirando hacia arriba desde el centro se ven las laderas cubiertas de casas improvisadas de ladrillo de las comunidades más pobres. Las más altas necesitan escalas para facilitar el acceso y están constantemente en peligro de deslizamiento y inundación. La ciudad esta divida en siete "macro distritos" y estos están divididos en 21 distritos o zonas mas pequeños. Los niños y niñas que tomaron las fotos son de del primer distrito mayor, Cotahuma y en el vecindario de Munaypata que esta. A 5 km del centro y más de 4000m sobre el nivel del mar. Bolivia es el país más pobre de Sudamérica. En el índice de desarrollo humano Bolivia se clasificó 113 de 182 países. Como 63% de la población Boliviana vive en aras urbanos y 61% de este vive en barrios bajos. La población de La Paz metropolitana es aproximadamente 800,000 o 9% de la población nacional. En La Paz la mayoría de la población vive en barriadas. Las barriadas están caracterizadas por la falta de acceso a agua, sanitación, electricidad, transporte, y servicios básicos, y también tenencia insegura. La muchos casos las casas están construidas por los inquilinos y los apartamentos están mal construidos. Según el Informe sobre Desarrollo Humano 2003 (PNUD): “Bolivia trata mejor a sus hombres que a sus mujeres”. El informe continua, "Los hombres están más y mejor educados que las mujeres, más y mejor atendidos en su salud que las mujeres, y tienen la posibilidad de generar mayores ingresos, inclusive trabajando menos (…) si consideramos que las mujeres, a diferencia de los hombres, tienen además (…) la responsabilidad casi exclusiva sobre el trabajo doméstico". 1

Según un censo reciente, Bolivia tiene 9,000,000 de habitantes , 46% son niños, niñas y adolecentes menores de 18 anos. Aproximadamente 1,529,689 niños y niñas son menos de 6 anos y la mayoría vive en riesgo y vulneración de sus derechos. Muchos niños y niñas no tienen certificado de nacimiento por razones económicas y culturales: Un niño o niña que no está registrado ante el Registro Civil no existen y no tiene derechos garantizados por la ley. Aproximadamente 616,000 ninos niñas y adolecentes están en situación de trabajo. Para muchos niños y niñas el trabajo infantil no les permite ir a la escuela. Solo 39% de niños y niñas que trabajan siguen yendo a la escuela. Los tres vecindarios que fueron el foco de esta investigación fueron áreas de desventaja o barriadas ubicadas en las zonas más altas de la valle, cerca de El Alto, iincluyendo Cotahuma, Alto Tacagua y Munaypata.

1

Majority of demographic data used in this report has come form UNICEF State of the Worlds Children report and World Bank data.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

4

Child Friendly Cities A child friendly city and community is committed to the fullest implementation of the convention on the rights of the child. The aim is to improve the lives of children now by recognizing and realizing their rights – and hence transform for the better communities today and for the future. Building a child friendly city is a practical process which must engage actively with children and their real lives. Building a child friendly city can not be achieved by governments alone it must be conducted in partnership with children, their families and with all key stakeholders in the community who affect children’s lives. A child friendly city guarantees the rights of every child citizen to: • Influence decisions about their city and community; • Express their opinions on the city and community they want; • Participate in family, community and social life; • Receive basic services such as health care, education and shelter; • Drink safe water and have access to proper sanitation; • Be protected from exploitation, violence and abuse; • Walk safely in the streets on their own; • Meet friends and play; • Have green spaces for plant and animals; • Live in an unpolluted environment; • Participate in cultural and social events; and • Be an equal citizen of their city with access to every service, regardless of ethnic origin, religion, income, gender or disability.

Una ciudad y una comunidad amiga de la niñez Una ciudad y una comunidad amiga de la niñez están comprometidas con la plena implementación de la convención de los derechos del niño. El objetivo del proyecto es mejorar las vidas de las niñas y los niños a través del reconocimiento y ejercicio de sus derechos - y por lo tanto, transformar mejor a las comunidades hoy y para el futuro. La construcción de una ciudad amiga de la niñez es un proceso práctico que debe participar activamente con los niños y sus vidas reales. La construcción de una ciudad amigable para los niños no se puede lograr solamente por los gobernantes, esto debería llevarse a cabo en asociación con los niños, sus familias y con todas las partes interesadas de la comunidad quienes afectan la vida de los niños. Una ciudad amigable para la infancia y la niñez garantiza los derechos de cada niña y niño ciudadano para: • • • • • • • • • • •

Influir en las decisiones sobre su ciudad y comunidad. Expresar sus opiniones sobre la ciudad y comunidad que ellos quieren. Participar en la familia, comunidad y vida social. Recibir servicios básicos como es el cuidado de la salud, educación y vivienda. Beber agua potable y tener acceso a un apropiado servicio higiénico Transitar seguro por las calles por su cuenta; Reunirse con amigos y jugar. Tener espacios verdes para plantas y animales. Vivir en un medioambiente no contaminado. Participar en eventos culturales y sociales. Ser un ciudadano igual a los demás con el acceso a todos los servicios, independientemente del origen étnico, religión, ingresos, género o discapacidad.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

5

Methodology Collecting baseline data The concept of a child friendly city is not based on an ideal end state or standard model rather it is a framework for creating a city and community wide commitment to addressing the needs of children, investing in their future and creating a strategy to achieve the goals we set for ourselves. At the heart of being able to achieve this is the need to have key baseline data about children lives in the city – that is to understand how to best provide for children the gaps, issues, concerns, services, facilities and challenges need to be identified. Also importantly to plan well city and community officials need to know what they already do and how these activities are impacting on children’s lives. The best judge of how a city is providing for its children is the children and their families therefore a child friendly city investigation has at its heart the role of children and families as key knowledge generators and monitors of services and facilities. Key to the investigative process is training that focuses on capacity building with local government staff, key stakeholders, children and community that will allow children and the community in partnership with these organisation’s to have an ongoing role in monitoring and providing feedback to ensure that all key participants have a role in advocating and promoting children’s rights now and in the future of the city and community.

Research tools The toolkit of child friendly tools included the following: Surveys, Drawings, Photography, Guided tours, Interviews

Surveys Surveys are a valuable tool for acquiring large scale data sets on children’s lives that can quantified for use by policy makers and government departments locally, and for comparisons nationally, or internationally. Surveys can be filled in by adult researchers with young children through dialogue techniques, or for older children they may be filled in with the support of an adult or by themselves if they are confident. Surveys may be designed for children only, or different versions of surveys may be for children, child carers, community members, or government officials whose role it is to support children’s needs. Comparing differences between the different groups within a community can often be very illuminating.

Children’s drawings Participants drawings of their urban environment provide a useful tool for discussing and exploring: • • •

what they know and how they experience the urban landscape; their range of movement around the spaces their favourite and least favourite places and why

Drawings after completion should be used to support a short interview or debriefing where the key aspects of the picture/drawing are discussed and unpacked. Questions such as: why certain elements included? What is the importance? How often the young person might go to this place or use it? with whom? Who else other uses the space? Participants drawings of their dream place provide a useful tool for discussing and exploring: • • •

Children’s dreams and desires to be happy How they believe a child friendly city or community should be like; What possibilities there are for improving their neighbourhood

Drawings after completion should be used to support a short interview or debriefing where the key aspects of the picture/drawing are discussed and unpacked. Questions such as: why certain elements included? What is the importance? Do they know of places like that?

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

6

Children’s guided tours of neighbourhood Guided tours of the urban environment by young people and other community members are a valuable method for understanding their perspectives on, and use of, the environment. Viewing places first hand elicits new information and serves as a catalyst for working and provoking new ways of thinking about their project. Guided tours can act as a starting point for exploring the environment or can be utilized in partnership with some of the other activities (ie photography, drawings). Using the scenario that you are a tour guide taking tourists around the locality is an easy way to set up the activity.

Children’s Photography Photographs taken by young people are a valuable tool for gathering information on their urban environment. It is important that the participants have a chance to experiment using the equipment so a number of focused tasks to give them experience is important. The use of interviews to support an analysis of the photographs is critical. Just having photographs and making adult judgements based on there content does little to provide the valuable insights that children data can provide. Photographic methods are often used to compliment or support other methods, for example interviews and stories, behaviour mapping and guided tours.

Interviews and oral histories Interviews and stories can help to bring our attention the way we come to know places through the lives of significant people, significant places or events. The stories we can tell about the local area can include ourselves or be about others. They may be the recounting of an experience we have had personally or they may be a story that has been passed down to us from their experience or passed down over many years through many others peoples retelling. Interviews are the basis for most storytelling and children display great skills in recording the stories of themselves, their friends and peers and other community members. These interviews can be audio recorded or videoed for later reference and use.

Metodología Recolección de datos de referencia El concepto de una ciudad amigable para los niños no se basa en un estado final ideal o modelo estándar más bien es un marco para la creación de un compromiso con la ciudad y en toda la comunidad para hacer frente a las necesidades de los niños, invertir en su futuro y la creación de una estrategia para alcanzar los objetivos que establecimos En el corazón de ser capaz de lograr esto es la necesidad de tener datos de referencia clave sobre la vida de los niños en la ciudad - que es para entender la mejor manera de proporcionar a los niños las lagunas, problemas, preocupaciones, servicios, instalaciones y desafíos que necesitan ser identificados . También es importante que las autoridades municipales y la comunidad planeen bien la necesidad de saber lo que ya hacen y cómo estas actividades están repercutiendo en las vidas de los niños. El mejor juez de cómo una ciudad está proporcionando a sus hijos son los niños y sus familias, por lo tanto, la investigación una ciudad amiga de la niñez tiene como centro el papel de los niños y familias como generadores de conocimiento clave y los monitores de los servicios e instalaciones. La clave para el proceso de investigación es la formación que se centra en la consolidación de capacidades entre el personal del gobierno local, los principales interesados, los niños, niñas y la comunidad. Este proceso que permita que los niños niñas y la comunidad tienen un papel fundamental en la evaluación, seguimiento y retroalimentación de las políticas municipales, de modo que todos los participantes tienen un papel en la defensa y promoción de los derechos de los niños ahora y en el futuro de la ciudad y la comunidad.

Herramientas de investigación El kit de herramientas de herramientas favorables a los niños puede incluir una selección de lo siguiente: Encuestas, Dibujos, Fotografía, Visitas guiadas, Entrevista

Encuestas Las encuestas son una herramienta valiosa para la adquisición de conjuntos de datos a gran escala en la vida de los niños que pueden cuantificarse para su utilización por los responsables políticos y los departamentos gubernamentales a nivel local, y para las comparaciones a nivel nacional, internacional o. Las encuestas pueden ser llenadas por los investigadores adultos con niños pequeños a través de técnicas de diálogo, o para los niños mayores que pueden ser llenados con el apoyo de un

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

7

adulto o por sí mismos si están seguros. Las encuestas pueden ser diseñadas sólo para niños, o las diferentes versiones de las encuestas pueden ser para los niños, cuidadores de niños, miembros de la comunidad o funcionarios del gobierno cuya función es apoyar las necesidades de los niños. Al comparar las diferencias entre los distintos grupos dentro de una comunidad a menudo puede ser muy esclarecedor.

Dibujos de los niños Dibujos de los participantes de su entorno urbano constituyen un instrumento útil para la discusión y la exploración: lo que saben y cómo experimentar el paisaje urbano; su rango de movimiento en torno a los espacios; su favorito y menos favorito lugar y por qué. Los dibujos después de la terminación deben ser utilizados para apoyar una breve entrevista o interrogatorio en los aspectos clave de la imagen / dibujo se discuten y desempaquetado. Preguntas como: ¿por qué ciertos elementos fueron incluidos? ¿Cuál es la importancia? ¿Con qué frecuencia la persona joven puede ir a este lugar, o lo utilice? ¿Con quién? ¿Quién más puede usar el espacio? Los dibujos de los participantes de su lugar de ensueño proporcionan una herramienta útil para la discusión y la exploración: Los sueños de los niños y deseos de ser feliz; ¿Cómo creen que debería ser una ciudad o comunidad amigable para los niños? ¿Qué posibilidades existen para mejorar su vecindario? Los dibujos después de ser terminados deben ser utilizados para apoyar una breve entrevista o interrogatorio en los aspectos clave de la imagen / los dibujos se discuten y desempaquetado. Preguntas como: ¿por qué ciertos elementos incluidos? ¿Cuál es la importancia? ¿Saben de lugares como ese?

Visitas guiadas de los niños del barrio Las visitas guiadas por el entorno urbano de los jóvenes y otros miembros de la comunidad son un método valioso para la comprensión de sus puntos de vista sobre, y el uso de, el medio ambiente. Viendo la mano los primeros lugares que suscita la nueva información y sirve como un catalizador para el trabajo y provocando nuevas formas de pensar acerca de su proyecto. Las visitas guiadas pueden actuar como punto de partida para explorar el medio ambiente o puede ser utilizado en asociación con algunas de las actividades de otros (es decir, la fotografía, dibujos). Usando el escenario en el cual usted es un guía turístico alrededor de la localidad es una manera fácil de configurar la actividad.

Fotografía para niños Las fotografías tomadas por los jóvenes son una herramienta valiosa para reunir información sobre su entorno urbano. Es importante que los participantes tengan la oportunidad de experimentar el uso del equipo para una serie de tareas enfocadas a darles la experiencia es importante. El uso de entrevistas para apoyar un análisis de las fotografías es crítico. El solo hecho de tener fotografías y hacer juicios maduros sobre la base del contenido no ayuda a proporcionar los conocimientos valiosos que los datos de los niños puede proporcionar. Los métodos fotográficos se utilizan a menudo para complementar o apoyar a otros, por ejemplo, entrevistas e historias, la cartografía de la conducta y visitas guiadas.

Las entrevistas y las historias orales Las entrevistas y las historias puede ayudar a traer la atención la forma en que llegamos a conocer lugares a través de las vidas de las personas importantes, lugares o eventos significativos. Las historias que podemos decir sobre el área local podemos incluir, o estar sobre los demás. Pueden ser el relato de una experiencia que hemos tenido personalmente o que puede ser una historia que se ha transmitido hasta nosotros desde su experiencia o transmitido a lo largo de muchos años a través de muchos otros pueblos recuento. Las entrevistas son la base para la mayoría de la narración y los niños muestran grandes habilidades en el registro de las historias de sí mismos, sus amigos y compañeros y otros miembros de la comunidad. Estas entrevistas pueden ser grabadas de audio o grabadas en vídeo para su posterior consulta y uso.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

8

Freedom and play This dream place was drawn by Dilan. Dilan is age 11 years old and lives in Cotahuma, La Paz. When we spoke to him about his drawing he told us it depicted his dream “to live in a place where there are flowers and grass, where there is freedom, and my parents let me play with my friends”. Dilans dream for more freedom and play are not unique, children’s capacility to move around their neighbourhood or city independently with friends while not being regulated by a parent or other adult is becoming very rare in communities in many cities around the world. Parents concerns over children’s safety are paramount yet we find that for many children growing up in slums or disadvantaged communities finding safe ways to travel to school, to the sport field, to the shops, home or to play is critical, because even if parents wanted to escort or drive children to these places they don't often have the capacity. In this section the issues of children’s capacity to move around neighbourhood freely and safely and the opportunity for play are explored using data obtained by children and their parents filling in a children’s independent mobility survey (CIM), children’s neighbourhood research including maps of their roaming range, descriptions of their travels, neighbourhood and dream drawings and photographs.

Moving around freely Walking to school is used internationally as a key indicator of children’s freedoms and parents view of safety in the neighbourhood. The results in graph 1 from the three communities show that most children walk or catch public transport to school, as did their parents when they were at the same age (graph 2). Children in Cotahuma are more likely to catch a bus or Graph 1: Children - How did you travel to train to school then any of the children from other communities and with the children from Tacgua are school this morning? more likely to spend more time getting to school then children from Munaypata. In all three ¿Cómo llegaste a la escuela esta mañana neighbourhoods most children either travel to school with either there parents or alone, children from Cotahuma are more likely to be alone. Whereas, children from Cotahuma and Tacgua are more likely to travel home from school alone then in Munaypata, with all children coming home alone in those 100.0 Cotahuma n=15 neighbourhoods with only 40 % Munaypata of children walking home alone. The children from 80.0 Cotahuma and Tacgua are also more likely to travel for up to 15 minutes or more to get to school. For 60.0 Tacagua n=15 35% children living in Munaypata school is less then 5 minutes away, another 35% less than 15 40.0 Munaypata n=29 minutes. For around 14% of children from Cotahuma travel to school takes between 31-45 minutes. 20.0 This is a significant distance for a children especially if they are walking to and from school. For Total n=59 0.0 children in Munaypata crossing main roads is a concern for parents with nearly 60% saying children Walk Bicycle Bus Train Car are not allowed to cross the road and on graph 3 it reveals 70% of parents from Munaypata say it is a real worry for them that their child may be injured crossing the road. For parents in Cotahuma and Graph 2: Parents - When you were a child 8 or 9 TacaGua it is less of a worry although it is only less than 20% of parents who are not worried at all. years, how did you get to school? Children when asked if they feel safe walking school said they mostly always or almost always feel Cuando usted tenía 8 o 9 años ¿Cómo iba a la safe. Less then 20% said they never feel safe, the majority of these children were from Munaypata or escuela? TacaGua.

100.0 80.0 60.0 40.0 20.0 0.0

Cotahuma n=6 Tacagua n=5 Munaypata n=17

When children were asked what their preferred form of travel to and from school was, it was quite diverse. This reflects probably the very diverse situation for many children depending on their geographical location to the school. Children from Cotahuma are less likely to choose walking to school then other children, this probably reflects that they are also the group who travel the furtherest to get to school.

Total n=28 Walk Bicycle Bus

Train

Car

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

9

Graph 3: Parents- How worried are you about your child being injured when crossing the road? ¿Cómo de preocupado esta usted por el riesgo de que su hijo/ hija sea herido cuando cruza una calle?

100.0 80.0 60.0 40.0 20.0 0.0

Cotahuma n=7 Tacagua n=5 Munaypata n=16 Total n=28 Graph 4: Parents- Most adults in the neighbourhood Very Quite Slightly Not Not Sure look out for others' children Worried Worried Worried Worried La mayoría de adultos que viven en el vecindario están pendiente de sus niños y otros niños de la zona

100.0

Cotahuma n=7

Children from Munaypata are more likely then other groups to want to either ride a bike (39%) or walk (36%) again this probably reflects that this group was the closest in time to their school destination. Only 24% of parents from this neighbourhood said they would allow their child to ride a bike on main roads and this is likely the reason they are not making more trips by bike but walking even though the distance is close. Children from Tacgua were more than two times likely to choose bus as preferred transport mode then the other children (40%) and the children. Unfortunately the data from parents shows that not one parent said their child was allowed to use a bus. Using trains was also only significantly a choice of children living in Cotahuma, this is relational to possibility as they would be the only group who are close to a train station. Car was choosen higher by all groups then is the actual car use in reality presently as a travel to school option. Raul, age 11 describes his personal experience moving around in his neighbourhood in Cotahuma: “My cousins live opposite and go up to the sports field to play. It’s just a sports field and it is dirt. I am no often with them, I am always alone. I have brothers but they are in El Alto. They all go to study and I just stay at home, then I go to school in the afternoon. I go to school in Colombia (in the city centre). I go to school by myself and sometimes I come back with my cousins” .

Supporting mobility

With the advent of cheaper mobile phones many parents in communities around the world have been opting to provide phones to children to endeavor to overcome concerns they may have around Tacagua n=4 50.0 children’s safety. For the children in our study parents told us this option is only available to 20% of Munaypata n=15 children in Tacagua, 30% in Munaypata but 85% for children from Cotahuma. This is a significant difference and it certainy raises questions about why parents are either more able to provide the 0.0 Total n=26 Strongly Agree Neither Disagree Strongly costs of the mobile phone to these children or again is it connected to the fact that children from Agree Disagree Cotahuma and more likely to walk to and from school alone, and they take the longest journey times to complete these activities. Therefore, presumeably increasing their risk due to exposure in the streets. Knowing neighbours will watch out for your children when they are outside in the streets helps to alleviate some parents concerns about their children’s freedoms. Graph 4 illustrates the result of asking parents whether they agreed there were adults in their neighbourhoods who would care for their children should they need support. For the majority of parents they do agree but in Cotahuma and Munaypata there is evidence of a much stronger feeling of security for their children than in Tacagua. We also asked the children if they felt safe in their neighbourhoods. Children in Taca Gua like their parents feel less safe then the only two communities. For all children when sometimes unsafe and not safe is combined over 50% children identify safety in the neighbourhood as a real concern for them.

Freedom and access to play When children were asked if they wished they had more freedom to go outside and play they unanimously said they would. When we asked parents whether adults and young people in the area made them afraid to allow their children outside to play they all agreed or strongly agreed, except for Cotahuma where over 40% disagreed they were afraid for their children’s safety. Issues of the dangers in the neighbourhood will be explored in more detail in the next section, what is clear from the evidence from the children is that it isn’t just the dangers that act as barriers to having the freedom to play. Dilan, age 11 from Cotahuma explains being in school at a different time then his friends often leaves him with no one to play with: “I can’t play with my friends because they are at school in the mornings and I don’t see them; that’s what I like the most, going to the park to play with my cousins”. Karen is aged nine and she lives in Munaypata. She told us when filling out her survey that she walked to school alone, and it is just 5 minutes away. She also walks home but her parents walk with her. On the weekend she visited friends, relatives, the shops, library, cinema, walked around and went to church. She feels very safe in her neighbourhood on her own but she does worry about strangers, getting lost and not knowing what to do if someone approaches her. She wishes she had more freedom to go outside more often. In her neighbourhood drawing she depicts a very rich and engaging environment: “I like my school, there is my little friend, there are roads and there is a policeman that help you cross roads with lots of traffic. At my house there is a tree, it's like a small forest two storeys high. My dad coming home from work and I'm greeting him. We have a sunshade at home where we eat and when it is hot. A queen lives next door live with her baby there are also flowers and trees in the area. A man that goes past on his motorbike when I get home from school and when I go out. Here is a girl smiling because of the man. There is a tree where there is a tyre swing where I go to play. There are mountains where the sunsets and I like it very much

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

10

and I finish my homework quickly so I can go and see how it sets. I have a dog, his name is Bicho and he takes care of me a lot, he protects me from other dogs. There is a girl that always goes to the park to play. There is a mountain like a ravine and I don't like it because they dump rubbish and it is ugly” .

Sports fields and playgrounds Many children value the playgrounds and sport fields that have been recently constructed or upgraded in their neighbourhoods. Over half of the children’s drawings and many of the photographs included sports fields. Maverick, aged 13, Cotahuma is very typical: “Me playing in a sports field which I like because it makes me happy”. The photograph taken by Maicol, aged 8 Munaypata: “Because they have constructed a new sports field in the Portada area. I play every day; it is a pretty sports field”. Children go to the sports field to train or participate in organized sports games, they also go with friends and parents to practice, play other games or socialise. Children commented on how pleased they were when the dusty dirty playing fields were resurfaced as artificial grass. Rodrigo, aged 6 from Munaypata tells us: “I like soccer and the sports fields. I like this one because I don’t hurt my head on the grass” Alongside sports field or close-by most neighbourhoods have parks with playground equipment that are regularly used by children use. This drawing from Alba, age 7 from Munaypata includes elements of the playground where she goes to play: “I drew a tree and flowers because there are some in the park where I go to play and I drew the slide in my neighbourhood because I play there” . Cesar, aged 9 also from Munaypata included a series of five photographs of the Munaypata park, one of them is included below. He describes his playground experience like this: “I really like going down the slide here at the Munaypata park. It is the park where all the children can have fun”. Yesonia is 11, she lives near Cesar and goes to the same park. She also took five photographs of the playground: “I like butterflies. The park is pretty and sometimes I go and play. I like parks and I like going down the slide”. Most children, wished they had more freedom to play. Even though over 90% of children said their were places to play games and sports, as many also said they wished there more spaces. Most children also noted that their were no or almost never any places where children with wheelchairs could play without problems. When asked about the cleanliness and appropriateness of play spaces children’s experiences were varied some saying their were never clean places (more likely for Alto TacaGua children) and in contrast quite a number saying their were always clean places. This reveals that location is a strong predictor for access opportunities for children. The question of consistency in clean and appropriate play throughout each of the neighbourhoods is one that should be addressed by the city. Overall though it seems children do have the freedom at a young age to move around with friends and alone, they regularly visit sportsfields and playgrounds in their neighrbouhoods. Though this does not go without concern by parents and the children as there are many significant issues around children’s safety that impact on their feelings of security, these will be discussed next.

Libertad y derecho a jugar Este sitio de sueno fue dibujado por Dilan, 11 años de Cotahuma, La Paz. Su sueño es " vivir en una parte donde hay flores y pasto, donde hay libertad, y mis padres me dejan jugar con mis amigos." La capacidad de movimiento de la infancia sin el control de los padres es muy rara en muchas ciudades del mundo. En las barriadas y comunidades de desventaja la movilidad independiente de la infancia es muy importante porque en muchos casos no hay otra opción. En esta sección se explora los asuntos de la movilidad independiente y segura de la infancia en sus vecindarios. Se usan datos recopilados por la encuesta de movilidad independiente de la infancia (CIM) que los niños, niñas sus madres y padres completaron y la investigación de los vecindarios incluyendo mapas de campo, descripciones de viaje, dibujos de vecindario y sitio de sueño y fotografías.

Libertad de movimiento Caminando a la escuela es in índice clave internacional de la libertad de la infancia y de las opiniones de los padres y madres sobre la seguridad del vecindario. La representación grafica de los resultados de las tres comunidades, gráfico

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

11

1, muestra que la mayoría de las niñas y niños caminan o toman transporte público, igual que sus madres y padres lo hicieron cuando tenían la misma edad (gráfico 2). Los niños y niñas de Cotahuma están más dispuestos a tomar el bus o el tren que los niños y niñas de las otras comunidades. Es más probable que los niños y niñas de Tacagua les tome más tiempo en llegar a la escuela que a los niños y niñas de Munaypata. En los tres vecindarios la mayoría de los niños y niñas van solos a la escuela o van con su madre o padre, es más probable que los niños y niñas de Cotahuma viajen solos. Las madres y padres de Munaypata están preocupados de que sus niños y niñas sean heridos al cruzar las calles principales. El gráfico 3 demuestra que 70% de los padres y madres de Munaypata tienen miedo de a los niños y niñas resulten heridos al cruzar la calle. 60% de los padres y madres dicen que no le dan permiso a sus niños y niñas para cruzar la calle. En Cotahuma y Tacagua están menos preocupados pero igual solo 20% de los padres y madres suelen decir que no están preocupados para nada. Cuando se les pregunto a los niños y niñas si se sienten seguros caminando a la escuela la mayoría dijeron que casi siempre se sienten seguros. Menos de 20 % dijeron que nunca se sienten seguros y la mayoría de estos niños y niñas eran de Munaypata o de Tacagua. Raúl, 11 años, Cotahuma, describe su experiencia personal moviéndose por su vecindario: “Mis primos viven Mis primos viven al frente y suben a la cancha a jugar. Es cancha no más y es de tierra. Casi no estoy con ellos, siempre estoy solo. Tengo hermanos pero en El Alto están. Todos estudian yo solo me quedo en la casa, luego voy a la escuela en la tarde. Voy a escuela en Colombia (centro de la ciudad). Solito voy a la escuela y a veces vuelvo con sus primos.

Apoyando movilidad Con el advenimiento de teléfonos celulares más baratos, muchos padres y madres alrededor del mundo están optando proporcionar a sus hijos e hijas un teléfono celular en el esfuerzo para superar las preocupaciones que tienen sobre la seguridad infantil. Como resultado de nuestro estudio los padres y madres nos dijeron que esta opción está disponible a solo 20% de niños y ninas de Tacagua, 30% de Munaypata, pero 85% de niños de Cotahuma. A algunos padres y madres les ayuda el conocimiento que los vecinos estén atentos de sus hijos e hijas cuando anden por las calles. El gráfico 4 ilustra el resultado de preguntarles a los padres y madres si había adultos en el vecindario que ayudarían a sus niños y niñas si necesitarían ayuda. La mayoría dijo que sí, pero en Cotahuma y Munaypata el sentimiento de seguridad de la infancia parecía más fuerte. Más de 50% de niño y niñas identificaron que su seguridad cuando andan por en el vecindario es una preocupación para ellos.

Libertad y acceso al juego Cuando se les pregunto a los niños y niñas si quisieran más libertad para salir a jugar, la respuesta unánime fue que si la quisieran. Cuando les preguntamos a los padres y madres si otros adultos y adolecentes del área les causaba miedo dejar que sus hijos e hijas salgan a jugar la mayoría estaba de acuerdo o completamente de acuerdo, excepto Cotahuma donde 40% no estaban de acuerdo que temían por la seguridad de sus hijos e hijas. Los asuntos sobre peligros en el vecindario y otros obstáculos para la libertad de la infancia serán explorados en más detalle en la siguiente sección. Dila, 11 años de Cotahuma explica que va a la escuela a un horario diferente a sus amigos y que entonces casi siempre queda solo sin nadie para jugar: “No puedo jugar con mis amigos porque van a la escuela por la mañana y no los veo; eso es lo que más me gusta ir al parque a jugar con mis primos”

Canchas y parques Muchos niños y niñas aprecian las canchas y parques en sus vecindarios que han sido recientemente construidas o han sido renovadas. Mas de mitad de los dibujos de los niños y niñas y las fotografías incluyeron las canchas. Maverick, 13 años, de Cotahuma es muy típico: “Yo jugando en la cancha, porque me hace feliz”. La foto tomada por Maicol, 8 años de Munaypata: “Porque han construido una cancha nueva en la Portada. Juego todos los días; es una cancha bonita”. Los niños y niñas también comentaban que estaban contentos cuando las canchas de tierra se convertían en césped artificial. Rodrigo, 6 años de Munaypata nos dice: “Me gusta futbol y la cnacha. Me gusta esta porque en el pasto no me hago daño a la cabeza”. Junto a las canchas o cerca de la mayoría de los vecindarios hay parques de juego que son usados con frecuencia por los niños y niñas. Este dibujo es de Alba, 7 años de Munaypata: “Dibuje un árbol y las flores porque hay en el parque donde voy a jugar y dibuje un resbalin del parque de mi barrio porque juego allí”. Cesar, 9 años, también de Munaypata: “Me gusta mucho resbalar, aquí en el parque de Munaypata. Es el parque donde todos los niños se pueden divertir”. Yesonia, 11 a años, vive cerca de Cesar y va al mismo parque: “Me gusta la mariposa. El parque es bonito voy a jugar algunas veces. Me gusta los parques y me gusta resbalar”. La mayoría de niños y niñas les gustaría tener más libertad para jugar, también notaron que no había o casi no había sitios donde niños y niñas en silla de rueda podrían jugar sin problemas. Cuando les preguntamos si los sitios de juego eran limpios y adecuados, las experiencias variaron desde nunca limpia a siempre limpias. La localidad predice acceso y oportunidades para la infancia. La municipalidad debe dirigirse a este asunto. En general se parece la infancia tiene la libertad para andar solos o con amigos y visitan las canchas y parques en sus barrios regularmente. Hay muchos asuntos importantes sobre la seguridad de la infancia que afectan que los niños y niñas se sientan seguros y serán debatidos en la próxima sección.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

12

Dirt and dangers “This is ravine near my house, the one that is very dangerous because many people have fallen, I think they need to close it because a lot of rubbish is dumped there and lots of people fall” – Photograph and description by Juan age 15 Male, Cotahuma, La Paz “I took this photo in El Alto and I don’t like the rubbish and it makes it look bad where they go and the dogs stop here and they can bite you” – Photograph and description by Juan age 13 Cotahuma, La Paz. In this section I will explore the darker side of living in the steep valley neighbourhoods. The data draws on a survey with children on how they viewed the child friendliness of their neighbourhoods and interviews with them on their photographs of the neighbourhood. The adults were also taken on tours with the children and they showed the researchers unsafe or dangerous places up close. From the children’s stories it is clear living in these upper steep slopes of the valley in La Paz has unique and significant dangers for children and their families. Constant landslides, fires, limited public transport, strangers, street dogs and inadequate policing all add to the daily difficulties children experience when on their own or with friend’s moving safety around the community. Children in the communities speak of many dangers in the physical environment but also other concerns about their health due to the lack of fresh water, the dust and dirt in the air, on the street and in their houses. The children when taking photographs of their life experience took many photographs of dumped rubbish in the streets and ravines, where scavenging streets dogs could be found hanging out, fighting amongst themselves and frightening the children. The fear of being taken, abducted or hurt by strangers is real and during a guided tour the children in one neighbourhood took us to a wall in the community centre where the faces of lost children hung as a reminder to them of the risks. These slum communities in La Paz with their narrow steep steps and winding laneways, children who need to make their way alone or with friends to access school, shops, playgrounds or their homes are a familiar sight in many Latin American countries. The two photographs and the commentary by the two Juan’s who live in Cotahuma depict two of very real dangers to children’s safety expressed by them. Firstly, the constant threat of landslides and the fragile terrain on the upper slopes and the second being the issues of rubbish and pollution. The third big concern many children had to their safety was the fear of strangers and subsequently being kidnapped. I will explore these three issues through data starting with the issue of strangers and then move on to the more physical dangers.

Dangers from people In the CIM survey children were asked to identify what things worried them and their friends the most when they were on their own in the neighbourhoods. The results from this question shown in graph 7 illustrate that for the majority of children their greatest worry is strangers, people in the neighbourhood they don't know who may harm them. The next greatest concern is also people oriented with many children saying being bullied when in public was a real worry for them. This bullying could be from an unknown person as well or possibility other children or youth from the neighbourhood. Gary aged 10, from Munaypata when identifying his movement through the neighbourhood on a community map identified a specific street where children have been kidnapped. He tells us he avoids this street: “The street the 31 July is dangerous because children get kidnapped, so I take the minibus for security”. Gabriel aged 12 from Alto Taca Gua also identified specific areas in his neighbourhood that were unsafe because of people and took a photograph to show this area. He told us when looking at the photograph shown on this page “I pass through here on my way to school and I would like it made prettier. Also I do not walk alone through these places, I walk with my mum because of the drunks and the dispossessed”. Yesonia aged 11 from Munaypata also worries about people getting drunk and hurting her: “I drew the park, my neighbours houses because they are good but at night they drink beer and get drunk and argue, you can hear it out here. I get scared that they will hit all of us kids”. We asked the children if they felt confident they would not be hurt by others and again there was quite a range of answers according to individual neighbourhoods. Two-thirds of children from Cotahuma stated that always or almost always they felt confident of not being hurt in contrast close to 40% of children from Taca Gua stating never or almost never feeling confident of not being hurt by

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

13

Graph 7 Children - When on your own or with friends, are you worried by any of the following? ¿Cuándo estas fuera solo con tus amigos te preocupa una de las siguientes cosas? 100.0

Cotahuma n=15

80.0

Tacagua n=15

60.0 40.0

Munaypata n=29

20.0 0.0

Total n=59 Traffic

Getting Lost

Bullying Strangers Not Old Not Enough Knowing

others. Interestingly this corresponds with data from parents where most parents’ strongly agreed or agreed that some young people and adults made them afraid to let their children outside to play. Parents in Munaypata held this view most strongly and parents from Cotahuma and Taca Gua seemed divided between agreeing and disagreeing. Again this might be quite specific to the child’s age, gender or where their house is in the neighbourhood. For children being hurt by another person was mostly identified as an adult as when we asked them did they get bullied or hurt by other children the majority said never or almost never. On the whole children said they felt most safe when walking to school, and this is probably because other children and sometimes their parents are also walking similar routes to school.

Dangers and rubbish in the physical environment

Overwhelmingly, the children when discussing their drawings and photographs looked at the positive and negatives of the physical environment. The many positives features deemed from being on the valley slopes is that it allows a city vista looking towards Mount Illimani, access to forests and rivers and then in contrast the many dangers that the physical environment presents for them, unstable hill tops, dirt, dust, dumped rubbish, wild street dogs. Nearly every child included a picture of the hilltop ravines and commented on the beauty and the danger that the ravines create for them. Gabriel aged 12 from Alto Taca Gua provided the following photograph and description: “I don’t like this place because many people have fallen from here, it is very dangerous”. In response to a similar photograph Dayana aged 12 also from Alto Taca Gua, said: “I am afraid of this place, it is dangerous, I get very scared”. Ronaldo, aged 8 from Cotahuma also commenting on the dangerous ravines: “I don’t like it here because there are ravines, people fall and it is a dangerous place, this place is ugly”. Building houses on the hilltops also causes many problems that the children are very aware of. Ricardo, aged 10 from Cotahuma took a photograph of a pile of rocks that he tells us use to be his home: “It's my house but it has fallen down, it was ill constructed”. He then shows us a photograph of the house he now lives in which is also showing signs of collapse: “It's my house, the cracks are there because it was ill constructed and all the houses in my area are also falling down, the tree roots destroy the houses”. Jonathan, aged 9 from Munaypata also includes photographs from his neighbourhood showing houses precariously hanging on the edge of the hilltop. He describes this: “These houses are hanging dangerously, one of them is collapsing, the one with the nylon hanging out the front is mine”. He includes photographs close to the hanging houses and his house where there are piles of dirt and lost of rubbish: “A pile of dirt and lots of dust nearby my house which is collapsing and there is a lot of rubbish” and “lots of rubbish below my house”. What Jonathon alludes to in his photographs and descriptions is that beyond the dangers presented by the tree roots and slopes - the ravines and the now mostly empty riverbeds have become dumping grounds for rubbish.

Juan, aged 15 from Cotahuma took a series of six photographs as he walked up the slopes towards his house from school, the one here is the second in his series. He used the photographs at the interviews as a means to describe the dangers and rubbish he encounters on his journey: “I took this photograph because this canal is dirty, it is at the start of the way to my house. I don’t like this place to be like this because it looks bad and it makes the area look bad. It is as we are getting to my house, at the lookout. I chose this photo because it is a ravine and it is dangerous, it is so dangerous they need to close it. It is the same ravine, the one that is very dangerous because many people fallen, I think they need to close it because a lot of rubbish is dumped there and lots of people fall. It is just around my house. I chose this photo because it is very dirty and the owner of the house doesn’t clean. There is lots of rubbish, but the good thing is that the steps are not dangerous. I don’t like to walk through here because it is very dirty but I still have to walk through here anyway. This is a photo of where I bring water down from; it is very dirty and very dangerous. The sports field is above too and if the ball falls I have to

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

14

go and retrieve if from the pile of rubbish” Alan aged 10 from Alto Taca Gua is also concerned about the rubbish in his neighbourhood and that the lack of rubbish bins: “There is always rubbish here, there are no rubbish bins. I would like there to be rubbish bins because the rubbish gets into the storm water”. Sebastian, aged 6 from Munaypata is also concerned about the rubbish and in his drawing (over page) of the neighbourhood we see he draws his neighbourhood streets and includes an area of open space with rubbish. He described his drawing by stating: “This is the place I like least. It is full of rubbish and they drink too much”. The next photograph from Sebastian is a view across the neighbourhood near his house, when describing this photograph he told us “This is close to my house I took it to show you that we have poor, dirty neighbourhoods and people that drink”. Yesonia aged 11 from Munaypata takes us on a tour of the neighbourhood in her photographs in one photograph she is standing in the foreground pointing at an area of disused land she tell us: “I want to show the rubbish that people dump and the dogs that go to the toilet; it’s a place that is close to the house”. While many children often talked fondly of the dogs in their neighbourhood in our survey over 80% of all children stated that dog faeces was a real concern for them. Also a number of children were also worried about the dangers of street dogs who might bite them and some recalled friends or relatives that had been bitten before. Luz is aged 12 from Alto Taca Gua she is also concerned about the rubbish in her neighbourhood and its impact on the environment. She describes her photograph this way: “The rubbish is what contaminates the environment and it is what I don't like about the area. They dump rubbish everywhere the rubbish bins are there in vain because they don't use them because they want to contaminate the environment”. Many children told us to overcome some of these issues of safety and danger in their neighbourhood their needed to be more police and policing of bad behavior by adults. Ricardo, aged 10 from Cotahuma, dreams of place to live where there is: “more police control because a thief broke into my house and because there were no police he escaped”. Gabriel, age 12 from Taca Gua supports this when he stated: “My neighbourhood is not that safe, there aren’t enough police”. Overall, most children in Cotahuma said they knew where to go or someone to help them should they need help or when in danger, Manaypata less likely and in Taca Gua more children said there was no adult support than said yes. Most parents in all neighbourhoods believed other adults would help their children. Children were asked if they felt safe travelling alone and their responses were quite varied but more likely than not to say they never felt safe. Wah this reals is a sense of real dangers for children in the public spaces, and being kidnapped or hurt by others is a significant worry for them. In Cotahuma children showed us where in the welfare department a whole wall was dedicated to photographs of lost, possibly kidnapped children. Most children could name one child they knew or had heard of that had been kidnapped. This is very frightening and while some of these may be related to domestic disputes or other family issues, children are also aware, children are taken off the streets and kept captive in child labour rings, trafficked to other places and for girls even the possibility of prostitution. The other significant dangers include the unstable slopes, the dirt and rubbish. Most children had at least one photograph in their research of rubbish or dangerous ravines close to their homes where they felt unsafe. Children in Taca Gua pariticularly noted more than others that there was rubbish near their homes. For many like Jonathon and Ricardo they fear that the houses they live in are precariously located on unstable hillsides and they worry for their safety.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

15

Polvo y peligros “Es el mismo barranco el cual es muy peligroso se caen muchas personas, pienso que tienen que cerrarlo porque botan mucha basura y se caen muchas personas”. – Foto y descripción por Juan, niño de 15 años, Cotahuma, La Paz “Esto lo tome en El Alto y no me gusta la basura y da mal aspecto a donde andan y los perros paran ahí y te pueden morder” – Foto y descripción por Juan, niño de 13 años, Cotahuma, La Paz. En esta sección exploro lo más sombrío de la vida en los barrios inclinados. En las visitas guiadas los niños y niñas les mostraron a los investigadores las partes peligrosas de primera mano. Las historias de los niños y niñas demuestran que hay peligros únicos y significativos para los niños, niñas y sus familias. Los derrumbes, incendios, transporte público limitado, las personas extrañas, perros callejeros, y insuficiente número de policías todos contribuyen a las dificultades que experimentan los niños y niñas andando solos o con amigos en sus barrios. Otros asuntos incluyen acceso a agua potable, el polvo en el aire, la calle y en las casa, la basura botada en las calles y los barrancos. Las fotos y comentario de los Juanes de Cotahuma representan dos asuntos significativos, primeramente son los derrumbes y el terreno inestable, segundamente el asunto de basura y contaminación. El tercer asunto significativo es sobre su seguridad y el miedo de ser raptados por una persona extraña.

Personas y los peligros para la infancia Los resultados del CIM, grafico 7, muestra que la preocupación más grande de la mayoría de los niños y niñas son las personas extrañas. La preocupación que sigue es el miedo de ser manoteado en público, por una persona extraña u otros niños o adolecentes en el vecindario. Gary, 10 años de Munaypata identifico una calle donde niños han sido raptados y dice que la evita: “La calle el 31 de Julio es peligroso porque se llevan a los niños, entonces yo tomo el minibús para seguridad”. Gabriel, 12 años de Tacagua: “Este lugar es donde pasó todos los días rumbo a mi escuela y me gustaría que se vuelva más bonito. Además yo no camino solo por estos lugares, camino con mi mama porque por ahí paran los borrachos y los desposeídos”. Yesonia, 11 años de Munaypata: “Dibuje el parque, las casas de mis vecinos porque son buenos, pero por las noches toman cerveza y se emborrachan y discuten se escucha hasta afuera, me da miedo que nos peguen a todos los niños”. Les preguntamos a los niños y niñas si estaban seguros que otras personas no les causen daño. Dos tercios de la infancia de Cotahuma dijo que siempre o casi siempre se sentían seguros que no les hagan daño, casi 40% de los niños y niñas de Tacagua dijeron que nunca o casi nunca se sentían seguros de que otras personas no les hagan daño. Lo interesante es que esto correspondió con los datos que la mayoría de padres y madres estaban de acuerdo de que les daba miedo dejar que sus hijos e hijas salir a jugar por algunos adolecentes y adultos en sus barrios. En Munaypata estaban completamente de acuerdo y en Cotahuma y Tacagua estaban divididos entre estar de acuerdo, y no estar de acuerdo. Los niños y niñas tenían más miedo de que un adulto les hagan daño, y la mayoría dijo que nunca o casi nuca los manoteaba otro niño o niña. Generalmente los niños y niñas se sienten más seguro caminando a la escuela, esto puede ser porque los niños, niñas y algunas veces los padres y madres también caminan por los mismos caminos.

Peligros y basura en el medio ambiente Casi todos los niños y niñas incluyeron una foto de los barrancos y comentaron en sus peligros y su hermosura. Gabriel, 12 años de Tacagua: “Este lugar no me gusta porque son muchas personas que se han caído de ahí y es muy peligroso”. También comento sobre una de sus fotos Dayana 12 años de Alto Tacagua: “Me da miedo ese lugar es peligroso y me da mucho miedo”. Ronaldo, 8 años de Cotahuma: “No me gusta porque hay barrancos, se caen las personas y es un lugar peligroso, es feo este lugar.” La construcción de la casas en las cuestas es otro problema de que los niños y niñas se dan cuenta. Ricardo 10 años de Cotahuma: “Es mi casa pero se ha caído, estaba mal construida”. Otra foto muestra donde vive ahora: “Es mi casa, son las rajaduras porque todo se está mal construido y todas las casas de mi zona también están cayéndose, las raíces de los arboles destruyen las casa”. Johathan 9 años de Munaypata: “Unas casas pendientes y peligrosas, una de ellas se está desmoronando, la que tiene el nylon por delante es mía.” También incluye fotos y comenta: “Un montón de tierra y mucho polvo que se está desmoronando cerca

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

16

de mi casa” y “Mucha basura debajo de mi casa”. A lo que Jonathan se refiere aquí es que encima del problema de los barrancos y los lechos del rio casi secos es que estos sitios ahora botan basura. Juan, 15 años de Cotahuma tomo una series de fotos: “Porque este canal está sucio, es al principio de llegar a mí casi, no me gusta que este lugar sea así, porque tiene mal aspecto y le da mal aspecto a la zona”;“Es casi llegando a mi casa, donde el mirador, escogí esa foto porque es barranco y es peligroso, es muy peligroso que tienen que cerrarlo”; “Es el mismo barranco el cual es muy peligroso se caen muchas personas, pienso que tienen que cerrarlo porque botan mucha basura y se caen muchas personas”; “Es de mi casa saliendo por ahí, escogí esta foto porque está muy sucio y el dueño de casa no limpia hay mucha basura, pero lo bueno es que las gradas no son peligrosas, pero no me gusta caminar por aquí porque es muy sucio pero igual de todos modos tengo que caminar por ahí”; “Esta foto es de donde traigo agua abajo, es muy sucio y peligroso, también que la cancha es ahí arriba y se cae el balón y tengo que ir a traer de esa basura”. Alan, 10 años de Alto Tacagua: “Aquí siempre hay basura, no hay contenedor de basura quisiera que haya uno porque la basura se mete a los desaguas.” Sebastian, 6 años de Munaypata describe en su dibujo: “El lugar que menos me gusta. Está lleno de basura y beben mucho”. La foto que sigue: “Esta cerca de mi casa la tome para mostrarte que tenemos barrios pobres y sucios y personas que toman” Yesonia 11 años de Munaypata: “Quiero mostrar la basura que botan y los perros que hacen sus necesidades, es un lugar cerca a mi casa”. Más de 80% de los niños y niñas hablaron sobre el asunto de heces de los perros y de ser mordido. Luz, 12 años de Alto Tacagua está preocupada por: “La basura es lo que contamina el medio ambiente y es lo que no me gusta lo de la zona botan la basura en todo lugar para en vano están los contenedor es porque no lo usan por que quieren contaminar el medio ambiente.” Muchos niños y niñas pensaban que para resolver el problema tendría que haber más policía. Ricardo, 10 años de Cotahuma, sitio de sueño: “Quisiera que haya más control policial porque un día entro en una casa que como no había policías se escapo”. Gabriel, 12 años de Tacagua también dice: “Mi barrio no es tan seguro, faltan policías”. La mayoría de niños y niñas de Cotahuma dijeron que había alguien o algún sitio donde había ayuda si la necesitan o si están en peligro, en Munaypata había menos chance y en Tacagua la mayoría dijo que no contaban con ayuda de un adulto. La mayoría de padres y madres contaban con la ayuda de otros adultos para sus hijos e hijas. Los niños y niñas casi siempre dijeron que nunca se sienten seguros. El asunto es que los niños y niñas no se sienten seguros en sitios públicos. Con miedo de ser raptados o heridos eran preocupaciones significativas. En Cotahuma los niños y niñas nos mostraron la muralla en el departamento dedicada a las fotos de los niños desaparecidos. Otros asuntos significativos eran las cuestas inestables, el polvo y la basura.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

17

Mountains and trees “I like the view on this photo; I took it from El Alto. The Illimani is very beautiful and cold”. – Luis age 14, Cotahuma, La Paz “My favourite walk is through the forest with trees, shade and mountain views”. – Maverick, age 13 Cotahuma, La Paz. Ask any child, to draw or photograph a place where children want or like to be they will inevitably include many elements of the natural environment. Children in Bolivia did just this. They took photographs of trees, the mountains, the rivers, the ravines, and the sun shining through the laneways. In this section of the report we follow children as they play throughout the upper reaches of the valley, out of sight often of their homes and neighbourhoods, they take us to the quiet hidden places where they seek refuge. They tell us of the games they play, the stories they share and how the environment has changed over time. The river that flowed but after the bulldozers demolished the forest and the houses were built, it stopped. They show us the artificial grass on the playing fields and how they long for real green grass so they could do cart wheels and not skin their knees. This section draws on drawings, photographs and interviews with children where they share the imposing figure of the Illimani mountain as back drop to their lives, the ravines, forests and natural nooks where they play with their friends. They share with us what they learn in school about the environment and their views on how to make the city green. Many children have significant encounters with the environment close to their homes. In the earlier section it was discussed how children identify the issues of the danger these areas present for them but in this section the children will speak of the beauty of the encounters they have with the natural world.

Mountain encounters The children in the neighbourhoods high on the El Alto have tremendous views across the valley all the way to Mount Illimani. Mount Illimani is the highest mountain in the Cordillera Real, a sub range of the Andes and stands at 6438 metres above sea level. It lays south of La Paz at the eastern edge of the Altiplano. With its snowed capped summit visible from across the city of La Paz it acts as a significant landmark and its connection to the lives of the inhabitants of the city and the surrounding countryside is deeply entrenched in Bolivian heritage and culture. Luis whose quote and photograph begun this section on mountains and trees, provided a series of photographs in his research about his encounters with the natural world and how he locates himself within this. Like many children the sun, the moon, the sky, the mountain, the trees, the rocks all feature in his photographs and his stories and relations with place. Even when on a shopping trip outside of the neighbourhood Luis still notices the mountain in his photograph: “On Sunday we went on a trip to El Alto, I liked the visit, you can see the Illimani. We went shopping. I like the rocks, when I was a little boy I would play with the rocks a lot, I built houses”. And when asked to describe his dream place he describes his favourite place as the country side just out of La Paz where he can look across the country and see everything including the hills: “My favourite place is the country because it is peaceful and open, the places are beautiful there. The view from the hills, you can see everything. I like animals. This is a house where I can live in the country. This place is in La Paz in the Aroma province, it's the Calacota baja community on the way to Oruro. This house was my grandfather’s house, I like that place. I like it because there are many rivers and fish, they are catfish with long whiskers”. (Dream drawing by Luis on this page) The next two drawings are from Fernando a young boy aged 11 from Munaypata. He draws a picture of his neighbourhood, as a street of high-rise buildings and in the background looming is Mount Illimani. He also draws a picture of his dream place, this picture has two mountains one with the houses in small lines on the top of the mountain but all around this mountain are many trees. The second mountain is all trees and no city, a rainbow illuminates the sky and connects the mountains and looping road much like the national highway running through his neighbourhood can also been seen.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

18

He describes his drawings this way: “ I like to see my area green. I am inside because I don’t go our by myself, I go out on weekends. I like to walk I don’t like cars. I like everything that is natural. I like rainbows, when I went to Copacabana I liked seeing rainbows. I like going through the woods because it is like the jungle. Mount Illimani is the hill that I most like. I would like there to be less houses and more parks and flowers. In my dream there are no people because they are all in their houses. I don’t want people to fight among themselves and I don’t want there to be thieves”. The final dream drawing is from Adda, he is aged 12 and lives in Munaypata, he describes his picture like this: “I would like to live like this. I think it would be lovely to live near Mount Illimani”. He includes a photograph in his research that his has taken while in his neighbourhood. This is his viewing point where he can identify himself in the everyday world of growing up in La Paz: “You can see all of Munaypata and Mount Illimani from here”. La Vista, the view, “The view is the most beautiful in the region; even foreigners come to take photos of the landscape” states Luz, she is 12 and lives in Alto Taca Gua. “My photograph is of Mount Illimani, Illimani cannot only be seen from this area, it can be seen in lots of places around the world, in all the countries. I like Mount Illimani”. Victor is aged 8 and lives in Munaypata. Victor lives in the Alto Munaypata this is the highest zone of the neighbourhood. The next photograph is from Victor where he captures with great intensity the enchantment and brilliance of the mountain from his valley top home. Like Luz and Adda, Victor also talked of his ‘viewing point’ He describes his photograph this way: “The Illimani mountain is in this photo and a view over the city of La Paz, I can see Illimani from my house and I like the photo”. The final photograph is from Norah who is nine years old. She lives in Alto Taca Gua; she was one of only a few girls wit Luz who participated from this valley top neighbourhood. Unlike her brother she has much less freedom to move around her neighbourhood so her photographs and drawings are more intimately connected to the area close to her home. She describes her neighbourhood and her photograph of her area this way: “I like it when my house is surrounded by flowers and with the mountains, when the sheep are in their coral and the sky is blue and when it is colourful. I like all types of animals”. Her photograph provides us with a unique view of the mountain and La Paz from her backyard These are just a small sample of the drawings and photographs where children in the neighbourhoods feature the mountain in their research. La Vista, the view of the mountain features as a constant reminder of where they are and who they are in the complex world of their city. And when they are not in their neighbourhood is acts as beacon drawing them back to where their roots lie. These encounters of the everyday lived experience with Mount Illimani are very unique, only shared by a small number of children also living in high altitude cities around the world.

Climbing trees and tending gardens Raul, age 11 from Cotahuma was interviewed about his encounters with the environment in his neighbourhood. This is what he said, “We have various friends in the neighbourhood, we call, whistle or yell for them and then we all go up to the sports field together. We stand there, we sit there. It is more fun in the rain. We slip, we get dirty, it’s funny, we fall over and in this place it’s like a jungle with trees, with mountains. We go to play in this place we fall out of the trees and nothing happens, we climb to the top. You can see my house from the sports field, where we go to play. Where we go and play in the trees we climb to the top of the mountain and we can see everything. Here are some tuna to eat, the small ones are sweet, we take sticks and we catch them. We go by walking. I know it all, I know everything about it”. Has your neighbourhood changed much from when you can remember? “Yes, before this place didn’t have walls, the house where we lived, was all downhill slope, and everything here was forest, it was like a jungle, full of trees and all the tractors went in and they made it all disappear now there are only houses and they are putting more there. I liked it better before it was more fun for us we played hide and seek in the forest areas with trees we could get there quickly and easily find places to hide. Now we have to go higher up because that’s the only place with trees”.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

19

Norah aged 9, from Alto Taca Gua drew her picture of the neighbourhood with many trees and other features of the natural world, she described her life this way: “I like it when my house is surrounded by flowers and with the mountains, when the sheep are in their coral and the sky is blue and when it is colourful. I like all types of animals. I like the trees that are in my neighbourhood, what I don’t like is that people throw their rubbish in the street. I like to play with my friends in my neighbourhood. Sometimes I am afraid to be in my neighbourhood because there are thefts. I like to watch the airplanes fly over my neighbourhood”. She also goes on to state in response to her photographs of the gardens around her house: “I like this photo because it has a garden and many trees. I like flowers of all colours, red, yellow, white and pink. They are also flowers that have fruit and they have prickly pear and soon they will be able to be picked, but these flowers have wire fences this is so they can't be pulled”. “I like it because the sun is very beautiful when it hits the trees, there are birds’ nests, I can see the baby birds hatch. This is the tree outside my house,” says Luis aged 14, from Cotahuma describing why he took the photograph of this tree we see below. Eduin, aged 11 years Taca Gua also shows us a number of photographs with trees and flowers. These are more structured gardens close to his house as shown in the final photograph: “I took this photo because I like the garden, I like the flowers and it is near my house”. Diego aged 10, from Taca Gua aIso identifies how much he likes the trees close to his house: “I like the tracks, the trees, and the landscape that can be seen”. But Diego is also concerned about the trees being damaged: “I worry about the destruction of the trees, because there aren’t many trees in the world” Overall, the children’s research reveals encounters and relations with the physical environment significantly influence the children’s experiences of living in their neighbourhoods. At least two thirds of the children believed there were places in their city where they could be surrounded by nature. For the boys especially, adventures into the hilltop forests are an important part of their play activities even though it can be dangerous and very dirty and dusty. Maverick aged 13 from Cotahuma summed it up well when he stated: “I like the forest, the river too. The river is dangerous, but I go there with my friends”. Girls have less freedom and tend to be limited to engaging with the trees and gardens close to their homes. The encounters with Mount Illimani and its impact on their sense of connection to place are very unique and meaningful. As a significant landmark for the city of La Paz for children in this research often tok photographs or talked about its significance in their lives. Most children had aviewing point a place where they would go to look at the mountain and especially at sunset. Most children when asked said they would like a greener city with less car fumes and cleaner air. It was also noted that most children said they learnt about environmental protection at school as part of their formal curriculum and they were pleased about that. Children’s dream drawings reinforced their desire to be in a safer and cleaner environment but definitely a place where they could still connect to the mountains.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

20

Árboles y Montañas “Me gusta la vista de esta foto, la saque desde El Alto. El Illimani es muy bonito y frio”. – Luis 14 años, Cotahuma, La Paz “Mi camino favorito es por el bosque con árboles, sombra y vista a las montañas”. – Maverick, age 13 Cotahuma, La Paz. En esta sección del informe se demuestra como los niños y niñas juegan a lo largo de las áreas mas altas de la valle, en muchos casos fuera de la vista de sus barrios y sus casas. A través de sus fotos, dibujos, entrevistas los niños y niñas los llevan a las partes tranquilas y ocultas donde buscan refugio. Los cuentan de lo que juegan, sus historias, y como ha cambiado el medio ambiente con el tiempo. El rio que corría pero que seco después que la maquinas botaron los arboles para construir casas. Los muestra la césped artificial y como desean tener pasto de veras para no rasparse la rodilla y para poder hacer ruedas de carro. Comparten lo que aprenden en la escuela sobre el medio ambiente y sus ideas en cómo hacer la ciudad más verde. En esta sección los niños y niñas comparten sus experiencias significativas y la belleza de la naturaleza.

Encuentros en las Montañas Los niños y niñas de los barrios más altos de El Alto tienen vista atreves el valle hasta el Illimani. El Illimani es 6438 m sobre el nivel del mar. Es un punto de referencia importante y su conexión a las vidas de los ciudadanos y es arraigado a las tradiciones y la cultura boliviana. Luis que citamos al principio de esta sección y incluimos su foto, describe con sus fotos e historias como se ubica en su medio ambiente y la naturaleza. Como muchos niños el sol, la luna, el cielo, la montaña, los arboles, las rocas se presentan en sus fotos. Su relación con el sitio se demuestra cuando esta fuera de su barrio: “El día domingo fuimos de paseo al Alto, me gusta la visita, se ve el Illimani. Fuimos a comprar. Me gustan las piedras, cuando era niño jugaba mucho con las piedras, construía casas”. Su sitio de sueño: “Mi lugar preferido es el campo porque es más tranquilo y muy abierto, los lugares son bonitos ahí. La vista desde los cerros, se puede ver todo. Me gustan los animales. Esta es una casa en la cual pueda vivir en el campo. Este lugar es en La Paz en la provincia Aroma, es la Comunidad Calacota Baja, es camino a Oruro. Esta casa era casa de mi abuelo, me gusta ese lugar. Me gusta porque hay muchos ríos y peces, son peces gatos con bigotes largos”. Los siguentes dibujos son de Fernando, un nino de 11 años de Munaypata. Dibuja su vecindario, una calle de edificios multipisos y al fondo está El Illimani. Su dibujo de su sitio de sueno tiene dos montañas una con montaña tiene unas lineas de casas en el tope de la montaña. La otra montaña llena de arboles, no hay una ciudad,mun arco iris ilumina el cielo y conecta la montaña a la calle que serpentea la montaña como la carretera que pasa por su barrio. Describe lo que ve: “Me gusta ver mi zona verde. Yo estoy adentro porque no salgo solo, salgo los fines de semana. Me gusta caminar, no me gustan los autos. Me gusta todo lo que es de natural. Me gustan los arcoíris, cuando iba a Copacabana me gustaba ver el arcoíris. Me gusta ir por el bosquecillo porque parece la selva. El Illimani es el cerro que más me gusta. Quiero que haya menos casas y más flores y parques. En mi sueño no hay personas porque están dentro de sus casas. No quiero que la gente pelee entre ellos y que hayan ladrones”. El ultimo dibujo de Adda, 12 años vive en Munaypata, describe su dibujo: “Me gustaría vivir así porque me parece bonito vivir cerca del Illimani”. Incluye una foto en su estudio que tomo en su barrio y dice: “De aquí puedes ver toda Munaypata y el Illimani. La Vista: La vista es la más linda que hay en la zona hasta vienen gringos a sacar foto del paisaje”. Luz, 12 años y vive en Alto Tacagua. “El Illimani. El Illimani no solo se ve en esta zona sino en todos los lugares del mundo de todos los países a mí me gusta el Illimani". Victor, 8 años de Munaypata, vive en Alto Munaypata es la zona más alta del barrio. En la siguente foto Victor capta con intensidad el replendor de la montaña de su casa. Igual que Luz y Adda, Victor habla ‘punto de vista’. Lo describe así: “El Illimani está en esta foto y la vista por la ciudad de La Paz, yo puedo ver el Illimani de mi casa y me gusta la foto". La última foto es de Norah. Ella tiene 9 años y vive en Alto Tacagua; y con Luz fueron unas de las pocas niñas que participaron en el estudio de este barrio. Tiene menos libertad que su hermano para andar por su barrio y sus dibujos y fotos son del alrededor de su casa. Ella describe su barrio con una foto y dice: “Me gusta mi casa con muchas flores y con montañas, cuando las ovejas están en su corral y que el cielo este celeste y cuando tiene muchos colores. Me gustan los animales de muchas razas”. Estas son una muestra pequena dode ninos y ninas de los barrios que incluye la montaña en sus estudios y la vista. Esto encuentros con El Illimani en sus vida diaria y con su idetidad es muy especial y la comparten co ninos y ninas de las partes altas del mundo.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

21

Escalando arboles y jardineo Raul, 11 años de Cotahuma dijo sobre sus experiencias con el medio ambiente: “Tenemos varios amigos en el barrio les llamamos, subimos a la cancha les silbamos le gritamos y subimos a la cancha todos. Subimos a la cancha en aquí hay maderita ahí nos paramos nos sentamos ahí, en la lluvia es más divertido. Porque nos resbalamos nos ensuciamos, chistoso es, nos caemos, y en este lugar es medio selvita con árboles, con montañas. En este lugar vamos a jugar nos caemos de los arboles no nos pasa nada, subimos a la punta. De la cancha se puede ver mi casa. La cancha donde vamos a jugar. Los arboles donde vamos a jugar, subimos a la punta de la montaña a ver todo eso. Ahí hay tunas para comer, hay pequeñitas esas son dulces, nos llevamos palitos y nos sacamos.” ¿Tu barrio ha cambiado mucho desde que te acuerdes? "Si, antes esto no era amurallado, la casa donde vivían, todo esto era bajada, y todo esto era selva así jungla parecía, lleno de arboles y todos los tractores ya también entraban, todito lo hacían desaparecer ahora casas no mas ya están poniendo. Mas antes me gustaba más porque nos era más divertido nos jugábamos pesca oculta en estos lugares donde era medio selvita con árboles en ahí no se podía encontrar más divertido era rapidito nomas se encuentra para ocultarnos ahora nos tenemos que subir porque en ahí no mas ya hay árboles". Norah 9 años de Alto Tacagua dibujo su barrio con muchos árboles y otras cosas de la naturaleza y dice: “Me gusta mi casa con muchas flores y con montañas, cuando las ovejas están en su corral y que el cielo este celeste y cuando tiene muchos colores. Me gustan los animales de muchas razas. Me gustan los arboles que hay en mi barrio, no me gusta lo que echan basura las personas en la calle, me gusta jugar en mi barrio con mis amiguitas a veces me da miedo estar en mi barrio porque hay robos, en mi barrio veo pasar los aviones y me gusta". Sobre los jardines se su casa dice también: “Me gusta la foto porque tiene jardín y muchos árboles. Me gustan las flores de todos colores Rojas, amarillas, blancas y rosadas. También son flores que tienen frutas y tienen tuna y luego pueden sacar papa, pero estas flores tienen rejas esto es para que no la arranquen". "Me gusta porque el sol es muy bonito cuando choca con los arboles, hay nidos de aves, de pájaros, veo como nacen los pajaritos. Este es el árbol que está afuera de mi casa,” dice Luis de 14 años de, Cotahuma por la foto que tomo del árbol que sigue aquí. Eduin, 11 años de Tacagua también tomo algunas fotos con de arboles y flores: “Saque la foto porque me gusta el jardín, me gustan las flores y es por donde mi casa”. Diego de 10 años, de Tacagua le gusta los arboles en su barrio: “Me gusta el camino, los arboles el paisaje que se ve”. Pero Diego está preocupado del daño que se hace a los arboles: “La destrucción de los árboles, porque no quedan muchos árboles en el mudo”. En general, los estudios de los niños y niñas revelan su relación con su sitio y el medio ambiente y cómo influye la experiencia de la vida en los barrios. La mayoría de niños y niñas creían que había una parte de su sitio donde podían estar en la naturaleza. Las aventuras en las montanas y en el bosque era una parte de sus juegos. Maverick 13, de Cotahuma nos dice: “El bosque me gusta, el rio también. El rio es peligroso, pero voy con mis amigos”. Las ninas tienen menos libertad de movimiento y se quedan cerca de la casa. Las experiencias con El Illimani afecta su conexión a su sitio. La mayoría de niños y niñas dijeron que quisieran una ciudad mas verde con menos contaminación y aire limpio. La mayoría de niños y niñas dijeron que aprendieron sobre el medio ambiente y su protección en la escuela y que les gustaba. Lo dibujos de sitio de sueno demuestran que desean un sito mas seguro, mas limpio per un sitio donde pueden seguir conectando a la montañas.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

22

Family, friends and pets Parents, siblings, extended family members, friends, neighbours and pets all play an important role in children’s lives. Children provide rich insights of the challenges families have to overcome, fathers who work long hours and are rarely around, mothers who have to take care of lots of children on their own and who often also have to work to make ends meet. This extension of the child’s neighbourhood support is often central in providing the safe guards they need to feel able to move around in their neighbourhoods. Another key group in a child’s social network are their friends. Many of the children’s photograph while in their neighbourhood playing, have adventures or travelling to and from school include their friends. These children who they spend most of their free time with, are discussed with joy and great affection. The final groups within this section that will be discussed are the animals in children’s lives that they have great relations with. Some of the animals are pets or the pets of family members, friends or neighbours but many are also local strays that have become a special entity in their lives. In this section of the report the role of family, friends and pets is investigated through the children research activities, interviews, drawings, photographs, and surveys.

My home and family Looking inside the family homes is a rare privilege; the photography research activity is unique in that it provides the opportunity for us to have a glimpse inside the homes of the children. Children will often take photographs of their bed, their toys, their pets, family members, around the yard, maybe the family car if they have one. These three photographs are from Christian, aged 11 from Alto Taca Gua. Although he wasn't interviewed about his photographs he provides an opportunity for us to see inside his house where he is in the sleeping area with his brother and sister. Jhon is from Munaypata and is seven years old. For his research he drew a picture of his street including his house, his dad’s car, the buildings close to his house and the shop next to his house where his mum sends him to buy bread. He also takes a photograph of the same aspect of his street including again the building, house and shop. He then takes us inside his house; “This is my house, my room, I feel warm and sheltered, I feel safe in my house”, there is also a photograph atken of his mum and his little sister: “I like to play with my sister and love my mother”. Juan is 15 years old and his house is in Cotahuma. He has taken many pictures of his life in and around his house with his family. One photograph shows him carring large water containers with his brother; “We are bringing water and it is very far” . He also takes photographs of his mum and dad: “I like taking photos of them and it is the only photo I have of my dad, he is very good and it is at the Uruguay sports field. My mum is also there and I love her very much too. I get along really well with them”. Nelson, aged 8 years, is from Munaypata and also enjoys the company of his family, especially his brother. He takes many photographs with his brother including one where he states: “I get on well with my brother. I feel good with my brother because he helps me do my homework and we are booked into the same course, and we are here with my friend in my class. It's our area, my brother's and mine, here is the park and we live higher up and every Saturday I go to the park with my brother”. Alejandro is 11 years old and from Munaypata, he also has a special relationship with his brothers. “My younger brother because he is very nice and because I have to care for him like my older brother takes care of me. I have to teach my younger brother what my older brother teaches me. I like to go to the parks that are especially for children, I feel my brother is alone and that I have to protect him”. Except for the occasion story of a cranky parent who couldn't sleep, the majority of children in all neighbourhoods said they felt safe at home and most said they could talk to parents about any problems they had. But not all children tell us that family life is easy, other due to parents working long hours. Raul for instance tells us his parents are very busy working and therefore he has to rely on his brother and relatives to help him out when he feels alone: “Always alone, with my cousins, sometimes I go down with my brothers and play, with my cousins, my parents always work and never have time, even now, my dad is working in Africa, my mum is working in the government. Sometimes when they plan it my uncle and my dad teach my cousins and I to build go carts. We take them up to the top and we ride down”. Or Juan, 11 years from Cotahuma who states: “There is motorbike noise and it upsets my dad, he gets stressed and swears. That makes me feel bad, I wish those noises didn't exist and that my dad didn't say bad words. My streets are cobbled”

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

23

Relatives, friends and neighbours Through the research the children introduce other significant people in their life, aunties, uncles, grandparents and neighbours. Extended family and friends have an important role in the lives of children in the neighbourhoods. Rodrigo is six years old and lives in Munaypata. In nearly all his photographs he includes a person important to him. The first photograph here we see him and his cousin. He also includes two pictures of his Aunt Patty: “I like Aunt Patty because she is very pretty like my mum”. Then we see in the second photograph he has assembled all his friends: “These are my friends. This street is a bit dangerous because children fall”. The third photograph was from Eduin, age 11 from Alto Taca Gua. His photograph is of his aunties who are collecting potatoes to cook for for him: “These are my aunts and they are cooking, I took it because I like meat and potatoes”. Eduin also took a photograph of his neighbour: “I took this photo because he is my neighbour and I like him very much because I play with him”. Alba is aged 7 and lives in Munaypata. She also tells us about the special relationship she has with with her aunts and counsins when looking at the photograph she has taken of them: “They are my aunts and my cousins, they pick me up from school every day, they are good to me. They give me things, toys, clothes, materials for school and they also take me on trips. They also enrolled me in the school I am going to. It is my aunt and my cousin where we go to eat because my mum doesn’t have time to cook, but I like the food the way they cook it and the attention from the people”. She includes a photograph in the playground with one of her friends: “It is my friend, I share a lot of things with her, we play and then we start to look at everything around us at the sports field, She is a good friend”. Having friendly neighbours seem to varied according to neighbours. Most children in Cotahuma said they always had friendly neighbours, in Munaypata around half felt this way and in Taca Gua less than 40%. Although friendly or not 80% of children did say that if something happened they felt someone from the nieghbourhood would come to their aid.

Pets, Dogs and Cats Children in the all neighbourhoods expressed their great connection and affection for their pets, dogs and cats, and also stray animals in the streets. While occasionally children did speak of being bitten or caught up in dog fights, mostly children felt a desire to help and protect those animals who might be badly treated by others or go hungry. Alejandro, aged 11 from Munaypata through his photographs and conversations introduces us to Marmotas his cat: “A cat on the bed, took the photo because it is funny and beautiful, and I care for it because it could die, my cat Marmotas is special because it is my friend”. This photograph he shares with us is of Marmotas with his brother. Danny also 11 and from Munaypata took three pictures of himself and his cat: “I really like cats”. The next photograph is from Fernando, again 11 years form Munayptata:. “My little dog, ReginaIt is the only animal that I have, because she is my best friend and keeps me company when I am alone”. “My dogs name is Black” says Ricardo, age 10 from Cotahuma,”he is beautiful and every time we bath him he gets dirty again”. Raul, age 11 also likes his cousins dogs: “I like little dogs. My cousin has three dogs, sometimes they get out, and one is really small and beats the other two dogs” . Besides the pets children have in their homes children also took photographs and spoke of other animals they worried about. “This is my house, it is on an incline” says Juan age 11 from Taca Gua “It is peaceful where I live, there is not much noise, and we can see a street dog called Max, but we don't have any food for him. My dog which is what I like most in my home. There are lots of street dogs. I don't like the dogs breaking things everything gets dirty, there are many dogs”. Diego, aged 12 from Cotahuma, took a number of photographs of the stray street dogs and told us: “This photograph is of a dog that I take care of because it doesn’t eat. The dogs are badly treated and the people beat them for no reason”. Overall, the children’s research data illustrates that family, friends, neighbours and animals in their neighbourhoods play and important role in children’s lives. While some neighbourhoods or areas within neighbourhoods seem safer and the community trust and connectedness seems to be thriving, all children acknowledged the significance of their love for their family members, the role of extended family to care for them, neighbours who were mostly friendly and could be trusted and the significant companionship that pets or streets animals played in their daily lives and the custodian role many children felt towards protecting these animals.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

24

Familia, amigos y mascotas Madres, padres, hermanos, hermanas, parientes, vecinos y mascotas, todos tienen un papel importante en la vida de los niños y niñas del barrio. Los niños proveen una perspectiva muy rica de los retos familiares, padres que trabajan horarios largos y que casi no están en casa, madres que sola cuidan muchos niños y que en muchos casos tiene que trabajar para sobrevivir. El apoyo vecindario para el cuidado de niños y niñas del barrio es crítico para proveer la seguridad que necesitan para poder andar solos por sus barrios. Otro grupo clave en la red social de la infancia son los amigos y amigas. Muchas de las fotos son de niños y niñas jugando y divirtiéndose o viajando a la escuela. Los niños y niñas con quien pasan su tiempo libre son descritos con alegría y cariño. El último grupo que discutimos en esta sección son los animales que comparten las vidas de los niños y niñas. Algunos animales son mascotas o mascotas de parientes, amigos, amigas o vecinos pero muchos son perros callejeros que han formado lazos de amistad con los niños y niñas. Esta sección del informe investiga el papel que juega la familia, amistades y mascotas por las experiencias de los niños y niñas ilustradas en sus dibujos, fotos, entrevistas, encuestas, y las actividades de investigación.

Mi hogar y mi familia Mirando dentro del hogar es muy raro y un privilegio. La actividad fotográfica en que participaron los niños y niñas nos da esa oportunidad. En general toman fotos de sus camas, sus juguetes, sus mascotas, la familia, el patio, y el auto si tienen uno. Estas fotos son de Christian, 11 años de Alto Tacagua. No fue entrevistado pero sus fotos nos proveen la oportunidad de ver dentro de su casa en el dormitorio que comparte con su hermano y hermana. Jhon, 7 años, de Munaypata dibujo su calle y su casa, el auto de su papá, los edificios cerca de su casa y la tienda al lado de su casa donde su mamá lo manda a comprar pan. También los lleva dentro de su casa; “Esta es mi casa, mi cuarto, me siento calentito y abrigado, me siento seguro en mi casa.”, de las fotos de su mamá y hermanita dice: “Me gusta jugar con mi hermana y quiero a mi mamá”. Juan tiene 15 años y su casa está en Cotahuma. En Una de sus fotos esta acarreando contenedores grandes con su hermano; “Estamos trayendo agua y es muy lejos”. También saca fotos de su papá y mamá: “Me gusta sacarle fotos y es la única foto que tengo de mi papá, es muy bueno es en la cancha Uruguay. También está mi mamá quien también la quiero mucho. Me llevo súper bien con ellos.”. Nelson, 8 años, de Munaypata le gusta estar con su familia, especialmente con su hermano: “Porque mi hermano siempre me deja sacarme la foto, después más o menos juntos y después se va a su centro, me siento bien con mi hermano porque me ayuda hacer mi tarea y que estemos inscritos en el mismo curso, y aquí estamos con mi amiguito en mi curso y me ayuda hacer mis explicaciones y cancha. Es nuestra zona de mi hermano y yo, aquí es el parque y arriba vivimos y cada sábado vamos al parque con mi hermano”. Alejandro de 11 años, también de Munaypata, dice de su hermano: “Mi hermano menor porque tengo que cuidarlo como me cuida mi hermano mayor. Yo tengo que ensenarle lo que me ensena mi hermano mayor. Me gusta ir a los parques especialmente a los de niños, siento que mi hermano está solo y tengo que protegerlo”. Salvo aquellas pocas historias de madres y padres de mal humor, la mayoría de los niños y niñas en todos los barrios dijeron que se sentían seguras en su hogar y que podían hablar de cualquier problema con su mamá o papá. Para algunos niños y niñas la vida familiar no era tan fácil, sintiéndose solos porque madres y padres trabajan largos horas. Por ejemplo: “Solito siempre, con mis primos, con mis hermanos a veces cuando bajamos vamos a jugar también, con mis primos, mis papás siempre trabajan nunca tenían tiempo, igual ahora, mi papá está en África está trabajando, mi mamá está trabajando en la gobernación. A veces no mas cuando saben tener tiempo a mí y a mis primos mi papá y mi tío nos lo saben construir carros así, sabemos subir hasta allá arriba sabemos bajar. El carro se de fierro a mi primo de madera se lo ha hecho para que este más seguro a mí de fierro, desde ahí hacemos carreras hasta abajo”. O Juan, 11 años de Cotahuma que dice: “Hay bulla de motos, y eso altera a mi papá, se pone estresado y dice malas palabras. Eso me hace sentir mal, no quisiera que hayan esos ruidos y que mi papá hable malas palabras. Mis calles están empedradas”.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

25

Parientes, amigos y vecinos A través del estudio los niños y niñas introducen otras personas significativas en sus vidas, tías, tíos, abuelos, abuelas y vecinos. Los parientes y amigos juegan un papel importante en la vida de los niños y niñas en los barrios. Rodrigo tiene 6 años y vive en Munaypata. En casi todas sus fotos hay alguien importante de su vida. En la primera foto esta con su primo. Hay dos fotos con su tía Patty: “Me gusta la tía Patty porque es bien bonita igual que mi mamá.”. Hay una foto con todos sus amigos: “Son mis amigos. Más o menos es peligroso porque los niños se caen”. La tercera foto es de Eduin, 11 años de Alto Tacagua. La foto es de sus tías cocinando: “Son mis tías y están cocinando y saque porque me gusta la carne y papá”. Eduin tambien tomo una foto de vecino: “Saque esta foto porque él es mi vecino y lo quiero mucho porque juego con él”. Alba tiene 7 años y vive en Munaypata tiene una relación especial con sus tías y primos: “Son mis tías y primas ellas me recogen de mi escuela todos los días, son buenas me regalan cosas como juguetes, ropas, materiales para mi escuela y también me llevan a pasear. También me inscribieron a la escuela que estoy. Es mi tía y mi prima donde vamos a almorzar porque mi mamá no tiene tiempo para cocinar pero me gusta la comida como cocinan y la atención de las personas”. Otra foto con su amiga: “Es mi amiga con quien comparto muchas cosas, jugamos y luego nos ponemos a mirar todo lo que hay alrededor de nosotros en esta cancha. Es buena amiga”. La mayoría de los niños y niñas de Cotahuma dijeron que tenían buenos vecinos comparado a 50% en Manaypata y menos de 40% en Tacagua pero igual 80% de niños y niñas que estaban seguros de que alguien los ayudaría si lo necesitarían.

Mascotas, perros y gatos En todos los barrios los niños y niñas sienten cariño por sus mascotas, perro, gatos y animales callejeros. Hubieron algunas ocasiones cuando los niños y niñas hablan de set mordidos la mayoría quería protegerlos del mal tratamiento y de la hambre. Alejandro, 11 años, de Munaypata nos muestra Marmotas su gato: “Un gato en la cama, tome la foto porque es graciosa y bonita y yo lo cuido o puede morir, mi gato Marmotas es especial porque es mi amigo”. La foto es de Marmotas con su hermano. Danny, 11 años de Munaypata tomo tres fotos de él y su: “Me gustan mucho los gatos, saco las fotos a la plaza.”. La foto que sigue es de Fernando, también 11 años y de Munayptata: “Mi perrita, Regina. Es el único animalito que tengo, porque es mi mejor amiga y me acompaña cuando estoy solo”. “Mi perrito se llama Black, es bonito y cada vez que lo bañamos se ensucia de nuevo” dice Ricardo, 10 años de Cotahuma”. Raul, 11 años dice: “Me gustan los perritos. Mi primo tiene 3 perritos, a veces ellos se escapan, uno es bien pequeñito le pega a los otros dos.”. Otros niños hablaron de su preocupación por otros animales Juan 11 años der Taca Gua “Esta es mi casa, está en una subida. Donde vivo es tranquilo, no hay mucha bulla, podemos ver a un perro callejero llamando Max, pero no tenemos comida para darle. Hay arto perro callejero”. Diego, 12, años de Cotahuma, dice de los perros callejeros: “Un perro que yo cuido porque no come. Los perros están mal tratados y la gente les pega por ninguna razón.” En general, los niños y niñas del estudio demuestran lo importante que es la familia, amigos, vecinos y animales en sus vidas. Todos los niños y niñas, no importa el barrio hablan del amor de sus familias, los parientes que los cuidan y los vecinos que en muchas casos era amigables y que tenían u confianza y la compañía que les dan los mascotas y los animales callejeros y se sienten responsables por ellos.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

26

School and my city This section looks at schools and the city as two important environments influencing children’s quality of life. The children’s research explores ‘schooling’ – how it influences children’s lives, what they learn, how teachers support them, how safe they feel and what role they would they like to play in its organization. Similarly, the city and the city council are a significant landscape framing children lives. Most of this data was obtained through the two surveys given to the children, particularly the child friendliness survey which includes two particulay relevant sections called my school and my city.

My School The photograph is of ‘my school’ by 7 year old Jose from Munaypata. Children in all the neighbourhoods who participated in the study go to school regularly. They do either morning or afternoon school, which means they do have a significant amount of time in the day when they aren’t in school. Children tells us having friends or siblings attending school at different times can have consequences for them and one of these seems to be the high incidence of children walking alone to and from school as compared to other country data (such as Japan) where high numbers of children walk to school but normally walk in peer groups. This research was done with children during their non-school time in the community. Children identified in the surveys that mostly children are treated equally at school in lessons and when playing games and sports and receive adequate attention from teachers (the sample was predominantly boys so it may be different from a gender perspective, unfortunately due to many girls unable to attend the interviewing activities in the community due to commitments to domestic duties). Children mostly agree that teachers listen to their ideas though children from Cotahuma seem less in agreement with this and may have had different experiences in their local school. Marco, for example, aged 10 from Munaypata states very strongly he doesn't feel treated well at school: “I don’t like the school because when I don’t do my work they yell at me lots and they tell me to stand at the director’s door. I feel bad when they yell at me “you lazy boys what do you do at home, you don’t do anything, where are you going”. Most children though agree to always feeling safe at school and having enough free time to play and talk to friends. “I like my school, there is my little friend, there are roads and there is a policeman that helps you cross roads with lots of traffic” (Karen age 9, Munaypata). In terms of sanitation most children report that their schools have safe drinking water, sufficient water for washing hands and mostly have clean toilets. Children from Taca Gua are more likely to disagree with there being clean toilets. Children from Taca Gua were also had the highest number of children who said they never use the school library, children from Munaypata are more likely to than others but still over 40% said they never used the library and in Cotahuma 60% said they never or almost never use a school library. This is interesting and whether this is connected to the issues of facilities or access it may need to be followed up further. Children on the whole believe children of different nationalities and those who wear different dress are respected in the school, although with the question on whether children are bullied in school the answer is very varied. Across the range of possible answers always, almost always, often through to almost never and never, just over 20% of children have located their response to children hitting each other at school in each of these responses. This seems to indicate the experience is quite wide spread with unfortunately slightly more children on the almost always and always end of the scale. This could be a real concern for teachers and school authorities. Interestingly, also the question of whether children thought there was an adult they could approach to talk to about their problem’s was polarized between yes and no, around 55% said yes and 45% said no. This corresponds also with the question of whether children were aware of what role school counseling might have, most children said no. Do children have a chance to be asked their opinion or have in input into decision making in school? Responses showed no strong indicator responses were spread between always through to never, essentially illustrating that children have very individual experiences of this, showing what is available is not mainstream. In contrast children did very strongly indicate (90%) that they learnt about their rights at school.

My City Ariel, aged 7 from Munaypata, provided a series of photographs taken on an excursion into the city. He shows the city centre plaza, Presidential offices, the statues, pidgeons and the high rise buildings. For many children visiting the city happens regularly, to attend school, sport and cultural activities, visiting parks and playgrounds. Most children commented on the car pollution and traffic in the city as being a real worry for them: “I like to see my city, but there is always smoke in the city and I don’t like that”, Gabriel, 12 years Alto Taca Gua. Most children said they never or almost never feel safe from traffic and due to their fear of other adults who might harm them most said they generally always feel unsafe in the city. They particularly identified riding bikes in the city as being unsafe as was accessing public toilets. Juan, aged 11 from Cotahuma draw a picture of his dream city and describes it this way: “I drew a fountain because I like the city clean. The cars in the street so they don’t

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

27

contaminate the environment. Bitumen streets because I don’t like dirt roads. Green area for the people to enjoy. Nobody dirtying the city. A main street that connects places. This is my dream city. A clean city so that more tourists visit. The city should be like this because in the city people are rude; there is theft, rubbish and disorganisation”. Nearly all children like Juan said they wanted a greener city. “I dream of a green city with lots of grass with big houses in good condition and with parks and slides everywhere. With a blue sky and full of flowers”, Bryan, aged 8, Munaypata. Children were very divided in their knowledge about someone who works in the city to make it a better place for children and most said they were never or almost never asked their opinion by the city council about relevant issues that affect them. When asked if they would like to be asked about relevant issues they strongly supported wanting an opportunity to express their views. Children’s experience of being active in making the city a better place was varied with a least half saying often or always and half saying never or almost never. Overall, children seem to have a positive experience of their school and the teachers. The schools are clean and provide them with opportunities to be respected, valued and to engage and play with other children. They learn about their rights and equality alhtough they do have concerns about children being bullied and hurt by others. The city as a ‘place’ in children’s lives is significant, many children have photographs and drawings with the city represented. For most though their experience of the city is that it is polluted, dirty and unsafe. Their relationship with the city council is very limited and most say they would like to have an opportunity tell those in authority about their worries and concerns.

Mi escuela y mi ciudad Esta sección enfoca dos ambientes importantes para la calidad de vida de los niños y niñas, la escuela y la ciudad. La investigación de la infancia analiza la "educación" - como influye la vida de los niños y niñas, que aprenden, el apoyo de los profesores y profesoras, como se sienten de seguros y el papel que quieren jugar en su organización. La municipalidad y la ciudad son dos aspectos significativos en la formación de la infancia. Los datos fueron obtenidos a través las encuestas para la infancia, especialmente la encuesta amiga de la infancia que tiene dos secciones, mi escuela y mi ciudad.

Mi Escuela La foto es de 'mi escuela' por Jose de Munaypata, de 7 años. Los niños y niñas que participaron van a la escuela regularmente. Van a la escuela en la mañana o en la tarde y significa que hay mucho tiempo en que no asisten a la escuela. Una de las consecuencias para los niños y niñas es que muchos niños y niñas caminan solos de ida y vuelta a la escuela y comparado con datos de otros países (por ejemplo Japón) donde muchos niños y niñas caminan a la escuela en grupos. La encuesta de la infancia encontró que los niños fueron tratados por igual en las clases y cuando participaban en deportes y recibían atención adecuada de los profesores (el grupo de muestra fue principalmente niños varones entonces puede ser que el resultado sea diferente desde el perspectivo del genio. Muchas niñas no pudieron asistir las actividades por sus compromisos domésticos). La mayoría de niños y niñas estaban de acuerdo que los profesores les escuchaban las ideas excepto en Cotahuma donde no estaban mucho de acuerdo. Por ejemplo, Marco, 10 años de Munaypata no se siente bien en la escuela: “No me gusta la escuela porque cuando no hago mis deberes me gritan mucho y me dicen que me pare en la puerta de la dirección. Me siento mal cuando me grita ‘flojos que hacen en sus casas, no hacen nada, donde van’”. La mayoría de niños se sienten seguros en la escuela y tiene tiempo de más para jugar y conversar con sus amigos. “Me gusta mi escuela ahí está mi amiguita hay calles por ahí y un policía que hace pasar las calles donde hay movilidades mucho”. (Karen 9, Munaypata). Casi todos Los niños y niñas dijeron que había agua potable en la escuela, agua para lavarse las manos y que los baños estaban limpios. En Tacagua muchos niños y niñas dijeron que los baños no estaban limpios. La mayoría de los niños y niñas de Tacagua también no asistían a la biblioteca escolar. Munaypata tenía el máximo número de niños y niñas que asistían, pero igual 40% dijo que nunca iban a la biblioteca. En Cotahuma 60% de niños y niñas no asistían a la biblioteca. Es interesante y se tendría que analizar la conexión con problemas de instalaciones o acceso. Niños y niñas de otras nacionalidades y los que usaban diferente vestimenta eran respetados en el colegio. La pregunta si había abuso de niños y niñas en la escuela, la respuesta fue muy variada. De la respuestas posibles de siempre, casi siempre, algunas veces, casi nunca, y nunca, como 20% de niños y niñas indicaron cada una de las respuestas demostrando que los niños y niñas se pelean en la escuela y que es extendido con más de la mitad diciendo que siempre y casi siempre. Pudiera ser un problema para los profesores y autoridades escolares. A la pregunta si había algún adulto con quien podrían

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

28

hablar de algún problema, la respuesta fue dividida, 55% dijo que si y 45% dijo que no. También, la mayoría de niños no estaban enterados del papel que la escuela juega en el consejo de sus estudiantes. Cuando se les pregunto si tenían chance de dar su opinión o participar en la toma de decisiones de la escuela, la respuesta fue muy variada demostrando que la experiencia depende del individuo. Pero 90% de niños y niñas indicaron que aprendieron sobre sus derechos en la escuela.

Mi Ciudad   Ariel, 7 de Munaypata, muestra la plaza central, la oficina presidencial, las estatuas, los edificios y las palomas en sus fotos. Las visitas a la ciudad son frecuentes y muchos comentaron que estaban muy preocupados por la contaminación de los autos y el trafico: “Es el paisaje que saque de mi casa y me gusta ver a mi ciudad, pero lo que no me gusta es que siempre hay humo en la ciudad”. Gabriel, 12 años Alto Tacagua. La mayoría de los niños y niñas dijeron que no se sentían seguros en la ciudad, por el tráfico, y miedo que algún adulto les haga daño. En particular andando en bicicleta o usando baños públicos. Juan, 11 años de Cotahuma dibujo su ciudad de sueño y dijo: “Dibuje una fuente porque me gusta la ciudad limpia. Los autos en la calle para que no contaminen el medio ambiente. Calles asfaltadas porque no me gustan las calles de tierra. Partes verdes para que la gente disfruta. Nadie ensuciando la ciudad. Una carretera que conecta partes. Esta es mi ciudad de sueño. Una ciudad limpia para que visite más turista. La ciudad debe ser así porque en la ciudad la gente es maleducada: hay robos, basura y desorganización”. Como Juan casi todos los niños dijeron que querían una ciudad más verde. “Sueño con una ciudad verde con mucho pasto con casas grandes y en buen estado y con parques y resbalin es por todo lugar. Con el cielo azul y llena de flores”, Bryan, 8, de Munaypata. La mayoría de niños y niñas dijeron que la municipalidad nunca o casi nunca les preguntan su opinión sobre asuntos que les afectan, pero quisieran la oportunidad par expresar sus ideas. La experiencia de los niños y niñas en participar activamente en crear una ciudad mejor es variada, mitad dijeron casi siempre o siempre y mitad dijeron nunca o casi nunca. En general, los niños y niñas tienen una experiencia positiva de su escuela y sus profesores. Las escuelas son limpias y le dan oportunidades para sentirse respetados, valorados y involucrarse y jugar con otros niños. Aprenden de sus derechos y la igualdad pero están preocupados de ser manoteados por otros niños o que alguien les haga daño. La ciudad es un sitio importante y figura en muchas fotos y dibujos. Pero para la mayoría la ciudad es contaminada, sucia y insegura. Su relación con la municipalidad es limitada y le gustaría la oportunidad de contarles sus preocupaciones a la autoridades.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

29

Dreams for a child friendly city If you could dream of place where children would have all the things they needed to be happy what would it look like? This is the question the children were posed and from this they drew their dream of a child friendly city. Once completed these drawings each children had the chance to share their dream drawing with the group and explain what it is they wanted for their future and how they would change the city to be a better place for them and other children. This really is the heart of the child friendly cities program that is to provide the opportunity for children to identify what it is they need to have a quality of life in their city. Unfortunately, as stated in the earlier section most children wanted the council to ask them directly about things that would effect their lives and they felt it was their right to be part of the decision making, yet mostly in the past the council did not ask them for their ideas and opinions. This project therefore has initiated an important precedence by supporting children to do research about their city and to inform the council and UNICEF about their ideas and opinions.

La Sueños de una ciudad amiga de la infancia La pregunta que se les hico a los niños y niñas para dibujar su sitio de sueno fue: Si pudieras tener el sitio de sueño, donde los niños y niñas tendrían todo lo que necesitan para jugar y ser feliz ¿Cómo se vería? Cada niño y niña compartió su dibujo y le explico al grupo lo que ellos querían para su futuro y como cambiarían la ciudad para que sería una ciudad amiga de la infancia. Al corazón del programa es la oportunidad que se les da a los niños y niñas para decir lo que necesitarían para una calidad de vida mejor en su ciudad. La mayoría de niños y niñas querían que la municipalidad les pregunte directamente sobre las cosas que les afectan y que tienen el derecho de participar en la toma de decisiones, pero hasta el momento la municipalidad no les había pedido sus ideas u opiniones. Este proyecto ha iniciado un precedente por apoyar la infancia en el estudio de la ciudad y informar la municipalidad y UNICEF de sus ideas y opiniones.

A child friendly city has places to play sport Sports fields, places to play games and sport was an important element of children’s dream child friendly neighbourhood. The first two dream drawings shown here are from from David and Alan, who like many children in the neighbourhoods want to have access to sports fields where they can play and meet with their friends. “My dream place is to have a sports field and a road with asphalt and to have a bus stop for the minibus so I can go to school quickly”. David, age 11, Cotahuma. “My dream place is to have a very big sports field where you can play without having to pay”, Alan, aged 10, Cotahuma. Alan tells us that even though sports fields exist sometimes they have to pay to get in. Note also in Alans drawing his he has empahsised the grass and trees at the sports field and his house. The two Diego’s like Alan also want sports fields and places to play. Diego, age 12 years, from Cotahuma tells us “I want more sports fields and parks and places to play” and second Diego aged 10, from Taca Gua, “I would like more sports fields, a cable railway. I would like more green landscape with grass and many more parks” Juan also dreams of sports fields: “It is my dream place because there is no sports field like this in my area but you shouldn’t have to pay, it should be free. There should also be a park because there are parks but they are all destroyed. I want there to be two sports fields on of a court material and one with grass. If these sports fields existed I would always go and play” Juan, aged 15 years Cotahuma. Sport plays an important role in the children’s lives, especially the boys, the newly constructed sports field in the two neighbourhoods (Cotahuma and Munaypata) are highly valued by all the children and their families. Making sure these fields are mainatained and made available to children for formal and informal play opportunities is critical work the council should continue to do to support the children.

En una ciudad amiga de la infancia hay sitios para jugar deportes Las canchas, sitios de juegos y deporte fueron un aspecto importante de un barrio amigo de la infancia. Los dos primeros dibujos mostrados aquí de David y Alan, muestran que, como muchos niños y niñas, quieren acceso a canchas donde pueden jugar y juntarse con sus amigos. “Mi lugar de sueño es que tenga una cancha deportiva y la calle asfaltado y que tenga una parada de minibús para ir a mi colegio rápido”. David, 11 años, de

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

30

Cotahuma “Mi lugar sonado es tener una cancha muy grande donde puedas jugar sin pagar”, Alan, 10 años, de Cotahuma nos dice que aunque haiga canchas algunas veces hay que pagar entrada. Diego, 12 años, de Cotahuma nos dice “Quisiera más canchas, un teleférico, quisiera más paisaje verdes que tenga pasto y mucho más parques”. Juan también suena de canchas: “Es mi lugar de sueño porque no hay cancha así en mi zona pero que no se pague que sea gratis, también que haiga parque porque hay parques pero destruidos. Quiero que exista dos canchas una de sala y una de césped, si existieran estas canchas iría a jugar siempre”. Juan, 15 años de Cotahuma. El deporte es un aspecto muy importante de la vida de la infancia, especialmente los niños. Las canchas recién construidas en los barrios de Cotahuma y Munaypata son muy apreciadas por todos los niños y niñas y sus familias. Asegurando que estas canchas son mantenidas y que están disponibles para los juegos organizados e informales es muy importante en el trabajo que la municipalidad debe seguir haciendo para seguir apoyando la infancia.

A child friendly city is a green city A child friendly city is a green city. Over 90% said they would like a greener city. What is a green city then? The children provided lots of information about their dream of a green city. Bryan aged 8 years, from Munaypata shows us his drawing of his green city and describes it for us this way: “I dream of a green city with lots of grass with big houses in good condition and with parks and slides everywhere. With a blue sky and full of flowers”. “I would also like that this whole place was green with grass. The sports field. Real grass would be better” states Raul, age 11, of Cotahuma in response to his dream drawing. When we asked Salavdor (aged 12, Munaypata) what do you dream of? He drew and wrote: “La Paz Verde - A green La Paz”. While Alan is very specific: “I would like all types of flowers growing around my home, roses, sunflowers and fruit trees and I would like a park. There is no park near my house in Alto Tacagua. Now everything is dry, the sports field is ruined; it has no grass, no trees, no roses nor daisies” (aged 10, Cotahuma). Dilan also dreams of a place with flowers and grass: “I would like to live in a place where there are flowers and grass, where there is freedom, and my parents let me play with my friends” (age 11, Cotahuma). Ricardo, 10 years old, Cotahuma, what does he dreams of?: “I would like there to be more green spaces”.

Una ciudad amiga de la infancia es una ciudad verde Más de 90% de los niños y niñas dijeron que querían una ciudad más verde. Entonces ¿Qué es una ciudad verde? Los niños y niñas nos dieron mucha información sobre su ciudad de sueño, su ciudad. En sus dibujos Bryan 8 años, de Munaypata nos muestra y describe su ciudad verde: “Sueño con una ciudad verde con mucho pasto con casas grandes y en buen estado y con parques y resbalin es por todo lugar. Con el cielo azul y llena de flores”. “También quisiera que esto sea verdecito de pastito. La cancha. Pasto de verdad sería mejor”, dice Raul, 11 años de, Cotahuma. En respuesta a la pregunta ¿De qué suenas? Salvador (de12 años, Munaypata) dibujo y escribió: “La Paz Verde”. Alan describe en detalle: “Por mi casa quería que hayan toda clase de flores, rosas, girasoles y árboles frutales y quisiera tener un parque. No hay parque cerca a mi casa en Alto Tacahua. Ahora todo es seco, la cancha de mi barrio está destruida, no tiene pasto, ni arboles, ni rosas, ni margaritas”. (10 años, Cotahuma). Dilan también suena de un sitio con flores y pasto: “Me gustaría vivir en una parte donde haiga flores y pasto, donde hay libertad, y mis padres me dejen jugar con mis amigos” (11 años, Cotahuma). Ricardo, tiene 10 años, de Cotahuma, y suena: “que hayan cosas más verdes”.

A child friendly city has people who care for you Having caring and supportive people, especially your family were all on the children’s wish list for a child friendly city. Children’s immediate families and other significant people all play an important role in creating a caring and supportive network within the neighbourhood. Many children illustrated through the maps how they live close to many counsins, aunties and uncles and grandparents who all play a significant role in caring for them. The photograph from Karen (age 9 from Munaypata) provides some insight into these relationships: “Ah, these are my little cousins they are lots of fun, they make me laugh they are like my little brothers and I like being with them, they also grumble at me” as does this comment from Nelson showing us his photograph of his house: “Because I like my house, it's my grandmother's house, I feel good there, I can rest, they help me with my homework, I help them.”. Jose aged 11, Munaypata took a photograph of his immediate and extended family and told us how much he loved them: “My parents, I took it because I don’t see my dad, he works from 5 to 10 and I don’t see him, at least I can see him in the photo. It is my aunt and my sister, my aunt is a teacher and helps me with my homework, she is very good to me. It is my older sister and my younger sister, I get on well with

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

31

them, I love them very much and I get on well with them”. Gerson (8 years, Cotahuma) with a similar sentiment “I like being in my house with my parents, they are good to me” In this dream drawing Caesar (aged 9 Munaypata) assembled all the things important to him in child friendly city, he explained his drawing this way:“In my dream place there is the hill, my house, my cat, Pica my dog, Peque, me, dad, mum, Yesi. Because it has a healthy environment”.

Una ciudad Amiga de la infancia tiene personas que te cuiden Todos los niños y niñas dijeron que para crear una ciudad amiga de la infancia, es importante tener personas que te apoyen, especialmente tu familia es. La familia y otras personas significativas son importantes en crear una red social de cuidado y apoyo para la infancia en el barrio. Muchos de los mapas mostraron que los niños y niñas vivían cerca de primos, primas, tías, tíos y abuelos y que ellos tomaban un papel significativo en su cuidado. Karen (9 años de Munaypata) describe sus relaciones: “Ah, ellos son mis primitos son muy divertidos, me hacen reír ellos son como mis hermanitos y me gusta estar con ellos y también me hacen reniegas". Nelson comenta mostrando una foto de su casa: “Porque me gusta mi casa, es la casa de mi abuela, ahí me siento bien, puedo descansar, me ayudan en mis tareas, los ayudo”. Jose 11 años, de Munaypata tomo una foto de su familia y parientes y nos cuenta: “Mis papas, la saque porque no veo mucho a mi papa, el trabaja de 5 a 10 y no lo veo y al menos en foto lo veo. Es mi hermana mayor y mi hermana menor me llevo bien con ellas, las quiero mucho y me llevo bien con ellas. Es mi tía y mi hermana, mi tía es maestra y me ayuda con mis tareas es muy buena con migo.” Gerson (8 años, de Cotahuma) tambien dice “Me gusta estar en mi casa con mis papas son buenos conmigo también me gusta ir a pasear en mi auto es el auto de mi papa, es negro. En su dibujo de sueño Caesar (9 años, de Munaypata) junto todas las cosas que son importantes para en una ciudad amiga de la infancia, y dice: “Mi lugar de sueño”."En mi sitio de sueno esta el cerro, mi casa. Mi gatita, Pica. Mi perrito, Peque. Yo, papa, mama, Yesi. Porque tiene un ambiente sano”.

A child friendly city has animals A child friendly city has animals. Animals were central to the stories of children’s lives in the neighbourhoods just by the sheer number of photographs and personal accounts children shared with us about their relationships and encounters with them. Some of these animals were pets and they cared for them as special companions in their homes and others who they also cared for or where connected to lived in the streets around their homes. “It's my cat, I love him very much” states Limber Diego, aged 12, from Taca Gua showing us a number of photographs she took of her cat “His name is Piter and he always keeps me company and sleeps with me”. Nelson, age 8 from Munaypata has a more unusal pet, unlike the majority of children who have dogs or cats nelson owns a parrot: “Because he is good, I like my parrot, my parrot is always eating, he goes out in the trees and then comes back to his cage, when we wash his cage he moves and then he comes back to my house. My parrot is in my house when everybody leaves I feel good with parrot”. Nelson’s story of his reliance on his parrot tas a companion reflects the views of many children who due to only being at school for half day often spend significant amounts of time at home alone, or alone I the neighbourhood. Many children told us they take their dogs with them when they go to the parks and playgrounds or even when walking into the high reaches of the valley to the ravines and river. Dogs in this companion role take on the added task of being a protector, as illustrated in the relationship between Karen and her dog: “I have a dog, his name is Bicho and he takes care of me a lot, he protects me from other dogs” (Karen, age 9 of Munaypata). This comment by Karen alludes to one of the tensions with animals in the neighbourhood, that is those street animals that are friendly and those who might bite you or hurt your pet. Many children looked after or fed the street animals whe they could and felt distressed when animals were treated badly by people. The importance of animals in their dream place was always central: “In my dream place I would like to have a tree near my house and the climate I like is warm and I would like to have more animals” Josue, aged 8, Munaypata.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

32

Una ciudad amiga de la infancia tiene animales El gran número de fotos e historias de animales demuestra que animales fueron centrales en las vidas de los niños y niñas en los barrios. Algunos de los animales eran mascotas que cuidaban y trataban como compañeros en sus casa, otros que cuidaban que vivian en las calles alrededor de su casa. “Es mi gatito que se llama Piter y siempre me acompaña y duerme con migo Es mi gato lo quiero mucho.” Dice Limber Diego, 12 años, de Tacagua de las fotos que tomo de su gato. Nelson, 8 de Munaypata tiene un mascota diferente, un loro: “Porque es bien educado, me gusta el lorito, mi lorito siempre come, sale a los arboles, después regresa a su jaula y cuando lavamos su jaula se mueve, y después se vuela a mi casa, mi lorito está en mi casa cuando se van, todos se van yo me siento bien con mi lorito”. La historia de Nelson y la compañía de un loro reflejan la vida de muchos niños y niñas que pasan solos mucho tiempo en casa o en su barrio porque asisten a la escuela solo mitad del día. Muchos niños y niñas nos dijeron que llevan a sus perros cuando van al parque y hasta cuando andan caminando por los sitios altos, los barrancos y el rio. Los perros también toman el rol de protector, por ejemplo, Karen y su perro: “Tengo un perrito que se llama Bicho y me cuida mucho y me defiende de otros perros.(9 años de Munaypata). Aquí habla Karen del problema que hay perros callejeros que son amigables y los que muerden o pelearse con tu mascota. Muchos niños cuidaban o les daba de comer a los perros de la calle cuando podían y se sentían mal cuando la gente mal trataba los animales. La importancia de animales en el sitio de sueno siempre fue clave: “Quisiera tener un árbol cerca de mi casa y el clima que me gusta es cálido y quisiera tener más animales”. Josue, 8 años, de Munaypata.

A child friendly city is safe and clean Many children in their discussion of the neighbourhood were concerned about the rubbish and how dirty and unsafe the environment was. Juan (aged 10 Munaypata ) is very straight forward about his concern: “I don’t like the rubbish because it hurts the animals and there are plastic bags”. In response to this a section in the report was dedicated to the dangers children encountered and the dirt and rubbish. So in identifying there dream place many children responded by clearly identifying that to be in a place that supports children it should be safe and clean. Jonathan, aged 9. Munaypata, provides a very typical response when he tells us in his dream place he wants a cleaner environment, and actually he wants the river back that has now been diverted due to the development: “I want my river to be back and longer and that there were ducks and trout to eat and that it was cleaner”. Luz aged 12, Alto Taca Gua also commented on the state of the rivers edge when he wrote: “They burn things at the river edge, they burn clothes, rubbish and other things that contaminate the environment”. In his drawing of the neighbourhood Luis identified the things he would like changed in order to make it a better place for him and other children. Explaning his drawing he states: “I drew what I don’t like. A person dumping rubbish in any place and making the streets dirty, I drew a car that is emitting a lot of smoke and polluting our city. I also drew a boy destroying a tree and I don’t like that” ( Luis age 10 Munaypata). As well as dangerous elements of environment, children were also very concerned about crime and criminal activities that might cause them harm and make their places unsafe. This comment from Ricardo (10 years) about his dream place makes reference to the impact of crime on his life in Cotahuma: “I would like more fun places, and more police control because a thief broke into my house and because there were no police he escaped”. Yesonia (11 years Munaypata) also talked about being safe and stated: “At night they drink beer and get drunk and argue, you can hear it out here. I get scared that they will hit all of us kids”. To summarise the dreams of the children a dream drawing from Rodrigo aged 10 from Munaypata who has designed his own Rodrigo city: “I wish to have a city that is clean, safe and happy. Rodrigo’s city”.

Una ciudad amiga de la infancia es limpia y segura Mucho niños y niñas estaban preocupados de la basura y que su medio ambiente estaba sucio y inseguro. Juan (10, de Munaypata ) dice: “Lo que no me gusta: La basura porque hace daño a los animales y hay bolsas de plástico”. Entonces los niños respondieron a esta preocupación y identificaron un sitio de apoyo de la infancia debe ser limpio y seguro. Jonathan, 9 años de Munaypata, nos muestra una respuesta típica cuando nos dice que su sitio de sueno tiene un medio ambiente más limpio, y quiere que le devuelvan el rio que fue desviada durante construcción: “Quiero que mi rio sea más largo y que hayan patitos y truchas para comer y que sea más limpio”. Luz 12 años, de Alto Tacagua también comento en el estado de la orilla del rio: “Queman cosas en el canto del rio queman ropas, basura, cosas que contaminan el medio ambiente”. Luis identifico cosas que le gustaría cambiar en su barrio para crear un sitio mejor para él y los otros niños y niñas: “Dibuje también lo

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

33

que no me gusta, a una persona que esta botando basura en cualquier lugar y ensuciando la calle, dibuje un auto que bota bastante humo y contamina nuestra ciudad. También dibuje a un niño (dibujando) destrozando el árbol y no me gusta eso” (Luis 10 años, Munaypata). Ademas de los peligros del medio ambient los niños y niñas estaban preocupados de crimen y las actividades criminales que le hacen sentirse inseguro en su sitio. Ricardo (10 años) describe el impacto que tuvo crimen en su vida en Cotahuma: “Quisiera que haya más lugares para divertirnos, que haya más control policial porque un día entro en una casa que como no había policías se escapo”. Yesonia (11 años de Munaypata) también hable de la necesidad de sentirse segura: “Dibuje el parque, las casas de mis vecinos porque son buenos pero por las noches toman cerveza y se emborrachan y discuten se escucha hasta afuera, me da miedo que nos peguen a todos los niños”. El dibujo y descripción de Rodrigo (10 años de Munaypata) es un buen resumen los sueños de los niños y niñas: “Desearía tener una ciudad limpia, segura y feliz. Ciudad de Rodrigo”.

A child friendly city has parks and playgrounds Parks and playgrounds are important places in the neighbourhood where children can play and socialize with other children. Because the physical environment outside of the neighrbouhoods can be dangerous these small refuges within the neighrbouhood become very important havens. Yesonia draws her dream neighbourhood and includes a park and playground: “I drew the park, my neighbours houses because they are good. I like butterflies. The park is pretty and sometimes I go and play”. She then includes a number of photogarphs of playgrounds where she plays: “I like parks and I like going down the slide”, Yesonia. 11 years, Munaypata. Diego, age 10, Taca Gua, alos includes a drawing with a park and states: ”I would like more green landscape with grass and many more parks”. Dayana, 12 years from Taca Gua, like Yesonia also dreams of a park close to her house: “I want a park to exist very close to my house because I like going to the park”. Alejandro (age 11, Munaypata) took a number of photographs of parks and playgrounds and identifies some of the larger parks that are in the city that have been provided for children. Discussing one photograph he states: “My brother in the Florida children’s park, south of La Paz. I like to go to the parks that are especially for children, I feel my brother is alone and that I have to protect him”. Although this park is some distance from his home it is still acts an important indicator of the cities commitment to provide green, colouful and interesting play spaces for children in the city. The city needs to provide a variety of parks and playgrounds that are accessible for children regardless of where they live. For children in the neighbouhoods high on the Alto having clean and safe playgrounds close to their home that they could access easily was identified as essential to their dream of living in a child friendly city.

Una ciudad amiga de la infancia tiene parques y juegos Parques y juegos son sitios importantes en el barrio donde niños y niñas pueden jugar y socializar con otros niños y niñas. Estos refugios en los barrios son muy importantes cuando se considera los peligros que se encuentran fuera de sus barrios. Yesonia dibujo su barrio de sueño y incluye un parque y juegos: “Dibuje el parque, las casas de mis vecinos porque son buenos. Me gusta la mariposa El parque es bonito voy a jugar algunas veces”. Incluye también algunas fotos de los parques donde juega: “Porque me gusta los parques y me gusta resbalar.”, Yesonia. 11 años, Munaypata. Diego, 10 años, Tacagua, también incluye un dibujo de un bien sueña con tener un parque cerca de su casa: “Quiero que exista un parque muy cerca de mi casa, porque donde juega me gusta ir al parque”. Alejandro (11 años, Munaypata) tomo fotos de parques y juegos y nombra algunos de los parques más grandes que hay en la ciudad y dice: “Mi hermano and el parque de niños Florida, sur de La Paz. Me gusta ir a los parques especialmente a los de niños, siento que mi hermano está solo y tengo que protegerlo”. Aunque sea lejos de su casa este parque es una indicación del compromiso que hay para proveer sitios verdes, y sitios de juego de color e interesantes para la infancia. Lo importante es proveer una variedad de parques que sean accesibles para la infancia no importa donde vive. Para los niños y niñas del Alto parques de juegos que son limpios y seguros cerca de sus casas es esencial para su sueño de vivir en una ciudad amiga de la infancia.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

34

Final discussions Children in this neighbourhood as explicated through the children’s drawings and stories have many of the same aspirations, desires and dreams as other children from across the globe. They want a home that is safe and where they feel loved and they can have companionship, a place where there is green grass and flowers, a park or playground close to their home where they can play with their friends, a clean and safe neighbourhood where they can walk freely without fear and teachers at school who listen to their ideas. And while the children acknowledge they are living in difficult and challenging conditions, they also recognize all children should have these things not just them. The beautiful drawing and comment from Diego, aged 12 years, from Cotahuma is a wonderful example of the generousity of the children to think beyond their own situation: “I want the world to be a better place, so that there is not so much poverty”. In this report it has been important to not romanticize the experiences of children in the slums as a nostalgic view of childhood and all the while being wary of not exoticising their life, by over emphasising the danger and drama of their lives for effect. For children their life is their life. They live in the moment, in the present, the dangers they experience whether it be the fear of being kidnapped or the worry their house is ill-constructed and might fall down, is often expressed in a very matter of fact way – this is the way life is for these children in these neighbourhoods. This is not to over look the great potential by the city council and other agencies like UNICEF to recognize these dangers and consider ways to limit there impact on children’s well being. For many children it is the small things that count, their sadness that their dads are working in another country or long hours driving taxi’s so they don't get to see them or their joy at finishing their homework quickly so they can watch the sunset over their beloved Mount Illamani. Children as researchers is an important position taken up by the children in this study and the report. While there were certainly times where adults were clearly in charge of the research, by providing children with the opportunity to be researchers of their own lives it meant the emphasis was not on the adults analysis of data, whether it be a drawing or a photograph, but on why and how children chose to represent their lives in their neighbourhood and what they viewed as important for then at that time. For this reason the content of the photographs and drawings, the conversations and stories are very individual and consequently quite diverse. While one child might focus all their data collection on their home and family another might have used the opportunity to document their engagement with friends playing up in the outer ravines and forest. Even though there are similarities in their experiences as the themes of each section of the report relay, there are tremendous differences as well according to where they live, their age and gender. While representing that diversity was difficult and a limitation on the overall results because of our inability to access many of the young girls who didn't come to the sports field where the study team were located – the silence of the girls voices in this report is important to acknowledge and needs to be addressed in further research with the children. There was also a sense that some children had come to know how to manage themselves in these challenging spaces better then others. Some children showed great sensitivity to the animals and people around them and wanted to acknowledge their role in their life through very initimate stories and images. Other children were much more focused on their own adventures with friends and through their research took us on many journey’s far beyond their homes and neighbourhoods.

Discusiones finales Encontramos, a través de sus dibujos e historias, que los niños y niñas de los barrios tienen muchas de los mismos sueños que los niños y niñas de todas partes del mundo. Quieren un hogar seguro donde hay amor y compañía, un sitio verde con flores, un parque o juegos cerca de la casa donde pueden jugar con sus amigos y amigas, un vecindario limpio y seguro donde pueden caminar libremente sin miedo, y profesores y profesoras que escuchan sus ideas. Los niños y niñas reconocen que viven en condiciones difíciles pero al mismo tiempo se dan cuenta que todos los niños y niñas necesitan estas cosas. El dibujo lindo y comentario de Diego, 12 años, de Cotahuma es un ejemplo de la generosidad de los niños y niñas que piensan mas allá de su situación: “Quiero que el mundo sea mejor para que haiga tanta pobreza. Quiero más canchas y parques y partes para jugar”. Ha sido importante no romantizar ni exagerar las dificultades y peligros de su vida. Niños aceptan su vida como es, viven en el momento. Esto no es decir que se debe pasar por alto el gran potencial de la municipalidad y otras agencias como UNICEF de reconocer esos

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

35

peligros y identificar métodos para minimizar el impacto en el bienestar de los niños y niñas. Para muchos niños y niñas son las pequeñas cosas de la vida que importan, su tristeza porque su papa trabaja en otro país o trabaja largas horas no  lo  ve,  le  alegría  de  terminar  las  tareas  para  ver  la  puesta  del  sol  en  El  Illimani. El papel que tomaron los niños y niñas de investigadores en este estudio fue muy importante. Mientras habían situaciones cuando los adultos estaban en control, fue una oportunidad para que los niños y niñas fueran investigadores de sus propias vidas, entonces el énfasis no fue en el análisis de los datos (dibujo o foto) por adultos. Si no fue el cómo y el porqué los niños y niñas eligieron representar sus vidas en los barrios y lo que era importante para ellos en ese momento. Por esta razón las fotos, dibujos y conversaciones son individuales y muy diferentes. Hay temas y similitudes de experiencias que se presentan en el informe, pero hay grandes diferencias dependiente de donde viven, el género y la edad. Es difícil representar la diversidad , pero una limitación fue el acceso limitado a la contribución de las niñas en los barrios. Es muy importante reconocer el silencio de las niñas y que necesita atención en el futuro a través de una investigación. Había también un sentido de que algunos niños y niñas, más que otros, habían llegado a entender su situación y sabían llevarse en los sitios peligrosos. Algunos niños y niñas demostraron sensibilidad a los animales y personas a su alrededor, a través de sus historias y fotos, y reconocían el papel que juegan en sus vidas. Otros estaban más centrados en sus aventuras con sus amigos y a traves de sus investigaciones nos llevaron en viajes más allá de sus hogares y barrios.

Photo credit: @Monique Malone Sports facility, Munaypata, La Paz, Bolivia. Children as Researchers on Child Friendly Bolivia research project.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

36

Glossary of Children’s Images Images

Child details Jonathan Munaypata 9 years old Male MUN/M/09/052

Spanish Una niña sonriendo, mu hermana, es chistosa y bonita.

Deyvid Munaypata 8 years old Male MUN/M/08/049

Nil photograph descriptions

Rodrigo Munaypata 6 years old Male MUN/M/06/079

Me gusta verle a mi amigo Maicol. Para ver donde me he caído y me lastime en la cancha.

English A little girl smiling, my sister, she is funny and beautiful.

Me gusta verle a mi amigo Maicol. Para ver donde me he caído y me lastime en la cancha.

Image take by research team

Image taken by research team

Dilan Cotahuma 11 years old Male COT/M/11/014

Me gustaría vivir en una parte donde haiga flores y pasto, donde hay libertad, y mis padres me dejen jugar con mis amigos

My dream place I would like to live in a place where there are flowers and grass, where there is freedom, and my parents let me play with my friends.

Karen Munaypata 9 years old Female MUN/F/09/051

Me gusta mi escuela ahí está mi amiguita hay calles por ahí y un policía que hace pasar las calles donde hay movilidades mucho. En mi casa hay un arbolito es como un bosquecillo de dos pisos, mi papa llegando de su trabajo y yo le saludo a mi papa. En mi casa tengo una sombrilla donde comemos y también cuando hace calor. Al lado de mi casa vive una reina con su bebe también hay flores y arboles por la zona, un señor que pasa en su moto

I like my school, there is my little friend, there are roads and there is a policeman that helps you cross rods with lots of traffic. At my house there is a tree, it's like a small forest two storeys high. My dad coming home from work and I'm greeting him. We have a sunshade at home where we eat and when it is hot. A queen lives next door live with her baby there are also flowers and trees in the area. A man that goes past on his motorbike when I get home from school and when I go out.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

37

todos los días cuando llego de la escuela y cuando salgo, acá la niña sonriendo por lo del señor. Existe un árbol donde hay un columpio con una llanta donde voy a jugar. Hay montanas donde se oculta el sol y me gusta mucho y acabo mis tareas rápido para ir a ver como se oculta. Tengo un perrito que se llama Bicho y me cuida mucho y me defiende de toros perros. Hay una niña que siempre va al parque a jugar. Hay una montana como barranco y no me gusta porque echan basura y es veo.

Here is a girl smiling because of the man. There is a tree where there is a tyre swing where I go to play. There are mountains where the sun sets and I like it very much and I finish my homework quickly so I can go and see how it sets. I have a dog, his name is Bicho and he takes care of me a lot, he protects me from other dogs. There is a girl that always goes to the park to play. There is a mountain like a ravine and I don't like it because they dump rubbish and it is ugly.

Maicol Munaypata 8 years old Male MUN/M/08/073

Porque han construido una nueva cancha en la zona Portada. Todos los días juego, es bonita la cancha.

Because they have constructed a new sports field in the Portada area. I play every day; it is a pretty sports field.

Alba Munaypata 7 Years old Female MUN/F/07/044

Nubes me gustan porque forman figuras, dibuje también el sol porque me gusta el calor. Dibuje también algunos animales, el perro y el gato los veo en calle porque no tengo y me gustan mucho. Dibuje un árbol y las flores porque hay en el parque donde voy a jugar y dibuje un resbalin del parque de mi barrio porque juego allí.

I like clouds because they make shapes, I also drew the sun because I like the heat. I also drew some animals, a dog and a cat. I see them on the street because I don’t have any and I like them very much. I drew a tree and flowers because there are some in the park where I go to play and I drew the slide in my neighbourhood because I play there.

Cesar Munaypata 9 years old Male MUN/M/09/074

Me gusta mucho resbalar, aquí en el parque de Munaypata. También está mi amiga. Es el parque donde todos los niños se pueden divertir.

I really like going down the slide here at the Munaypata park. A friend is there too. It is the park where all the children can have fun.

Juan Cotahuma 15 years old Male COT/M/15/012

Es el mismo barranco el cual es muy peligroso se caen muchas personas, pienso que tienen que cerrarlo porque botan mucha basura y se caen muchas personas.

It is the same ravine, the one that is very dangerous because many people fallen, I think they need to close it because a lot of rubbish is dumped there and lots of people fall.

Juan Cotahuma 13 years old Male COT/M/13/015

Esto lo tome en El Alto y no me gusta la basura y da mal aspecto a donde andan y los perros paran ahí.

I took this photo in El Alto and I don't like the rubbish and it makes it look bad where they go and the dogs stop here.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

38

Gabriel Alto Tacagua 12 years old Male TAC/M/12/033

Este lugar es donde pasó todos los días rumbo a mi escuela y me gustaría que se vuelva más bonito. Además yo no camino solo por estos lugares, camino con mi mama porque por ahí paran los borrachos y los desposeídos.

I pass through here on my way to school and I would like it made prettier. Also I do not walk alone through these places, I walk with my mum because the drunks and the dispossessed.

Gabriel Alto Tacagua 12 years old Male TAC/M/12/033 Jonathan Munaypata 9 years old Male MUN/M/09/052

Este lugar no me gusta porque son muchas personas que se han caído de ahí y es muy peligroso.

I don’t like this place because many people have fallen from here, it is very dangerous.

Unas casas pendientes y peligrosas, una de ellas se está desmoronando, la que tiene el nylon por delante es mía.

Houses hanging dangerously, one of them is collapsing, the one with the nylon hanging out the front mine.

Juan Cotahuma 15 years old Male COT/M/15/012

Es casi llegando a mi casa, donde el mirador, escogí esa foto porque es barranco y es peligroso, es muy peligroso que tienen que cerrarlo.

It is as we are getting to my house, at the lookout. I chose this photo because it is a ravine and it is dangerous, it is so dangerous they need to close it.

Luz Alto Tacagua 12 years old Female TAC/F/12/034

La basura es lo que contamina el medio ambiente y es lo que no me gusta lo de la zona botan la basura en todo lugar para en vano estan los contenedor es porque no lo usan por que quieren contaminar el medio ambiente.

The rubbish is what contaminates the environment and it is what I don't like about the area. They dump rubbish everywhere the rubbish bins are there in vain because they don't use them because they want to contaminate the environment.

Sebastian Munaypata 6 years odl Male MUN/M/06/041

El lugar que menos me gusta. Está lleno de basura y beben mucho. Mi lugar favorito. Parroquia Apóstol Santiago. Mi parroquia con mis amigos.

The place I like least. It is full of rubbish and they drink too much. My favourite place. The Apostle Santiago Parish. My parish with my friends.

Sebastian Munaypata 6 years old Male MUN/M/06/041

Esta cerca de mi casa la tome para mostrarte que tenemos barrios pobres y sucios y personas que toman.

It is close to my house I took it to show you that we have poor, dirty neighbourhoods and people that drink.

Luis Cotahuma 14 years old Male

I like the view on this photo; I took it from El Alto. The Illimani is very beautiful and cold.

I like the view on this photo; I took it from El Alto. The Illimani is very beautiful and cold.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

39

COT/M/14/017 Maverick Cotahuma 13 years old Male COT/M/13/010

Mi camino favorito es por el bosque con árboles, sombra y vista a las montanas.

Luis Cotahuma 14 years old Male COT/M/14/017

Mi lugar preferido es el campo porque es más tranquilo y muy abierto, los lugares son bonitos ahí. La vista desde los cerros, se puede ver todo. Me gustan los animales. Esta es una casa en la cual pueda vivir en el campo. Este lugar es en La Paz en la provincia Aroma, es la Comunidad Calacota Baja, es camino a Oruro. Esta casa era casa de mi abuelo, me gusta ese lugar. Me gusta porque hay muchos ríos y peces, son peces gatos con bigotes largos.

Fernando Munaypata 11 years old Male MUN/M/11/063

El Illimani es el cerro que más me gusta. Quiero que haya menos casas y más flores y parques. En mi sueño no hay personas porque están dentro de sus casas. No quiero que la gente pelee entre ellos y que hayan ladrones

Adda Munaypata 12 years old Female MUN/F/12/068

Me gustaría vivir así porque me parece bonito vivir cerca del Illimani

Luz Alto Tacagua 12 years old Female TAC/F/12/034

La Vista La vista es la más linda que hay en la zona hasta vienen gringos a sacar foto del

Victor Munaypata 8 years old Male MUN/M/08/046 Nora Alto Tacagua 9 years old Female TAC/F/09/019

El IllimaniEl Illimani no solo se ve en esta zona sino en todos los lugares del mundo de todos los países a mí me gusta el Illimani. El Illimani está en esta foto y la vista por la ciudad de La Paz, yo puedo ver el Illimani de mi casa y me gusta la foto.

Esta foto es mi barrio y ahí está mi casa, esta es grande, vivo con mi papá, mamá y mi hermana. Mi casa tiene muchos cuartos, mi perrito vive en la calle y me cuida mucho

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

My favourite walk is through the forest with trees, shade and mountain views.

My favourite place is the country because it is peaceful and open, the places are beautiful there. The view from the hills, you can see everything. I like animals. This is a house where I can live in the country. This place is in La Paz in the Aroma province, it's the Calacota baja community on the way to Oruro. This house was my grandfather’s house, I like that place. I like it because there are many rivers and fish, they are cat fish with long whiskers. Mount Illimani is the hill that I most like. I would like there to be less houses and more parks and flowers. In my dream there are no people because they are all in their houses. I don’t want people to fight among themselves and I don’t want there to be thieves. I would like to live like this. I think it would be lovely to live near Mount Illimani.

The view- The view is the most beautiful in the region; even foreigners come to take photos of the landscape. Mount Illimani- Illimani cannot only be seen from this area, it can be seen in lots of all the places around the world in all the countries I like Mount Illimani. The Illimani mountain is in this photo and a view over the city of La Paz, I can see Illimani from my house and I like the photo.

This photo is of my neighbourhood and that is where my house is, it is big and I live with my dad my mum and my sister. My house has many rooms, my dog lives on the street and takes care of me a lot.

40

Nora Alto Tacagua 9 years old Female TAC/F/09/019

Me gusta mi casa con muchas flores y con montanas, cuando las ovejas están en su corral y que el cielo este celeste y cuando tiene muchos colores. Me gustan los animales de muchas razas.

I like it when my house is surrounded by flowers and with the mountains, when the sheep are in their coral and the sky is blue and when it is colourful. I like all types of animals.

Nora Alto Tacagua 9 years old Female TAC/F/09/019

Me gusta la foto porque tiene jardín y muchos arboles. Me gustan las flores de todos colores rojas, amarillas, blancas y rosadas. Está bien que tenga clavos y rejas para que no la arranquen. También son flores que tienen frutas y tienen tuna y luego pueden sacar papa, pero estas flores tienen rejas esto es para que no la arranquen. Me gusta porque el sol es muy bonito cuando choca con los arboles, hay nidos de aves, de pájaros, veo como nacen los pajaritos. Este es el árbol que está afuera de mi casa

I like this photo because it has a garden and many trees. I like flowers of all colours, red, yellow, white and pink. It is right that they have barbed wire fencing so they can’t be pulled up. They are also flowers that have fruit and they have prickly pear and soon they will be able to be picked, but these flowers have wire fences this is so they can't be pulled up.

Saque la foto porque me gusta el jardín, me gustan las flores y es por donde mi casa.

I took this photo because I like the garden, I like the flowers and it is near my house.

Luis Kenny Nina Mamani Cotahuma 14 years old Male COT/M/14/017 Eduin Huanca Mendoza Alto Tacagua 11 years old Male TAC/M/11/027 Christian Alto Tacagua 11 years old Male TAC/M/11/031

I like it because the sun is very beautiful when it hits the trees, there are birds’ nests, I can see the baby birds hatch. This is the tree outside my house.

Nil photograph descriptions

Christian Alto Tacagua 11 years old Male TAC/M/11/031

Nil photograph descriptions

Christian Alto Tacagua 11 years old Male TAC/M/11/031

Nil photograph descriptions

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

41

Rodrigo Munaypata 6 years old Male MUN/M/06/079

Mi primo y yo.

Rodrigo Munaypata 6 years old Male MUN/M/06/079

Son mis amigos. Más o menos es peligroso porque los niños se caen

These are my friends. It is a bit dangerous because children fall.

Eduin Alto Tacagua 11 years old Male TAC/M/11/027

Son mis tías y están cocinando y saque porque me gusta la carne y papa.

These are my aunts and they are cooking, I took it because I like meat and potatoes.

Alejandro Munaypata 11 years old Male MUN/M/11/061

Un gato en la cama, tome la foto porque es graciosa y bonita y yo lo cuido o puede morir, mi gato Marmotas es especial porque es mi amigo. El gato y mi hermano menor. La tome porque mi hermanito me lo pidió

A cat on the bed, took the photo because it is funny and beautiful, and I care for it because it could die, my cat Marmotas is special because it is my friend. The cat and my younger brother. I took it because my younger brother asked me to.

Fernando Munaypata 11 years old Male MUN/M/11/063

Mi perrita, Regina Es el único animalito que tengo, porque es mi mejor amiga y me acompaña cuando estoy solo

Ricardo Cotahuma 10 years old Male COT/M/10/002

Mi perrito se llama Black, es bonito y cada vez que lo bañamos se ensucia de nuevo.

Diego Cotahuma 12 years old Male COT/M/12/006

Un perro que yo cuido porque no come. Los perros están mal tratados y la gente les pega por ninguna razón.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

My cousin and I

My little dog, Regina.It is the only animal that I have, because she is my best friend and keeps me company when I am alone.

My dogs name is Black, he is beautiful and every time we bath him he gets dirty again

A dog that I take care of because it doesn’t eat. The dogs are badly treated and the people beat them for no reason.

42

Jose Munaypata 7 years old Male MUN/M/07/045

Ahí yo estudio hay tinglado

Ariel Munaypata 7 years old Male MUN/M/07/075

Es importante porque aquí está el presidente.

Ariel Munaypata 7 years old Male MUN/M/07/075

Me gusta este lugar porque tiene palomas.

David Cotahuma 11 years old Male COT/M/11/019

Mi lugar de sueño es que tenga una cancha deportiva y la calle asfaltado y que tenga una parada de minibús para ir a mi colegio rápido.

My dream place is to have a sports field and a road with asphalt and to have a bus stop for the minibus so I can go to school quickly.

Alan Alto Tacagua 10 years old Male COT/M/10/003

Mi lugar sonado es tener una cancha muy grande donde puedas jugar sin pagar. Por mi casa quería que hayan toda clase de flores, rosas, girasoles y árboles frutales y quisiera tener un parque. No hay parque cerca a mi casa en Alto Tacahua. Ahora todo es seco, la cancha de mi barrio está destruida, no tiene pasto, ni arboles, ni rosas, ni margaritas

My dream place is to have a very big sports field where you can play without having to pay. I would like all types of flowers growing around my home, roses, sunflowers and fruit trees and I would like A park. There is no park near my house in Alto Tacagua. Now everything is dry, the sports field is ruined; it has no grass, no trees, no roses nor daisies.

Salvador Munaypata 12 years old Male MUN/M/12/067

La Paz verde

A green La Paz.

Karen Munaypata 9 years old Female MUN/F/09/051

Ah, ellos son mis primitos son muy divertidos, me hacen reír ellos son como mis hermanitos y me gusta estar con ellos y también me hacen reniegas.

Ah, these are my little cousins they are lots of fun, they make me laugh they are like my little brothers and I like being with them, they also grumble at me.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

That where I study there is a platform.

This is important because here is the President.

I like this place because it has pigeons.

43

Cesar Munaypata 9 years old Male MUN/M/09/074

El cerro, mi casa, mi gatita, Pica mi perrito, Peque, Yo, papa, mama,Yesi. Porque tiene un ambiente sano.

The hill, My house, My cat, Pica My dog, Peque. Me, dad, mum, Yesi Because it has a healthy environment

Limber Tacagua 12 years old Male TAC/M/12/037

Es mi gato, lo quiero mucho.

It's my cat, I love him very much. This is my cat, his name is Piter and he always keeps me company and sleeps with me.

Nelson Munaypata 8 years old Male MUN/M/08/050

“Lorito” Porque es bien educado, me gusta el lorito, mi lorito siempre come, sale a los arboles, después regresa a su jaula y cuando lavamos su jaula se mueve, y después se vuela a mi casa, mi lorito está en mi casa cuando se van, todos se van yo me siento bien con mi lorito.

"The parrot" Because he is good, I like my parrot, my parrot is always eating, he goes out in the trees and then comes back to his cage, when we wash his cage he moves and then he comes back to my house. My parrot is in my house when everybody leaves I feel good with parrot.

Rodrigo Munaypata 10 years old Male MUN/M/10/058

Desearía tener una ciudad limpia, segura y feliz. Ciudad de Rodrigo.

I wish to have a city that is clean, safe and happy. Rodrigo’s city.

Yesonia Munaypata 11 years old Female MUN/F/11/078

Me gusta la mariposa. El parque es bonito voy a jugar algunas veces.

I like butterflies. The park is pretty and sometimes I go and play.

Yesonia Munaypata 11 years old Female MUN/F/11/078

Porque me gusta los parques y me gusta resbalar.

Because I like parks and I like going down the slide.

Diego Cotahuma 12 years old Male COT/M/12/006

Quiero que el mundo sea mejor para que haiga tanta pobreza. Quiero más canchas y parques y partes para jugar.

I want the world to be a better place, so that there is not so much poverty. I want more sports fields and parks and places to play.

Es mi gatito que se llama Piter y siempre me acompaña y duerme con migo.

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

44

Appendix Information for the “Child Friendly Cities” Pilot Research Project The Main Office of Human Development for the Local Government of La Paz implements the “Child Friendly Cities” pilot research project and aims to improve the lives of children now by recognising and realising their rights - and hence transforming for the better communities today and for the future. To achieve this aim two townships have been selected from the city of La Paz, the Cotahuma Township and the Munaypata Township. Children attending Figaro Sports School and Munaypata Sports School will participate in research workshops where the children will provide information through their drawings, photographs, detailed maps and guided tours of their towns. They will collect information for the “Child Friendly Cities” pilot research project and will evaluate and express their opinions about the safety of the town, access to green spaces, parks and places that they find acceptable to children and those they consider unsafe. This way the Council will be able to acknowledge the needs and demands of the child and make decisions in favour of children. The research will be undertaken on Friday 3 and Friday the 10 of this month in the morning between the hours of 09:00 - 11:30 (Figaro sports field) and in the afternoon between the hours of 15:00 - 17:30 (Alto Tacagua and Munaypata). Your child’s participation in this activity is very important and we ask for parental support in authorising and encouraging children to attend the workshops. A certificate of participation will be provided to each child that attends the workshops. Yours faithfully Nelson Antequera D. Main Office of Human Development for the Local Government of La Paz

INFORMACION SOBRE EL PROYECTO DE INVESTIGACIÓN PILOTO “CIUDAD AMIGA DE LA NIÑEZ” La Oficialía Mayor de Desarrollo Humano del Gobierno Autónomo Municipal de La Paz desarrolla el Proyecto de investigación piloto “Ciudad amiga de la niñez” con el objetivo de mejorar la vida de las niñas y los niños a través del reconocimiento y ejercicio de sus derechos y así transformar mejor hoy a las comunidades para el futuro. Para cumplir ese objetivo se selecciono a dos barrios de la ciudad de La Paz, la zona de Cotahuma y la de Munaypata, a dos poblaciones una es la de los niños asistentes a la Escuela Deportiva Municipal de Fígaro y la otra la de los niños y niñas asistentes a la Escuela Deportiva Municipal de Munaypata donde ellos serán los investigadores a través de dibujos, fotografías, trazado de mapas y visitas guiadas en sus barrios, ellos serán quienes den a conocer su percepción sobre la seguridad del barrio, las áreas verdes, parques y lugares que ellos perciben como favorables o de riesgo. De esta forma el municipio podrá reconocer las demandas y necesidades de los niños y niñas para así tomar decisiones a favor de ellos. Los días que se implementa la investigación son el viernes 3 y el viernes 10 del mes en curso en la mañana en los horarios de 09:00 – 11:30 (en cancha Fígaro) y en la tarde en los horarios 15:00 – 17:30 (Alto Tacagua y Munaypata). La participación de su hijo(a) en esta actividad es muy importante por lo cual se solicita a los padres autoricen y colaboren con la asistencia del niño. Se entregará certificados de participación. ATENTAMENTE, Nelson Antequera D. OMDH GAMLP

Child Friendly Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia

45

“Mount Illimani can not only be seen from this area, it can be seen in lots of places all round the world. I like Mount Illimani.” Photograph taken by Luz, aged 12 from Alto Taca Gua (TAC/F/12/034) “El Illimani no solo se ve en esta zona sino en todos los lugares del mundo de todos los países a mí me gusta el Illimani.” Foto tomada por Luz, 12 años de Alto Tacagua

Loading...

Child Friendly Bolivia - Western Sydney University

Child Friendly Bolivia Researching with children in La Paz, Bolivia Amigo de la infancia Bolivia Investigación con los niños y las niñas en La Paz, ...

2MB Sizes 7 Downloads 8 Views

Recommend Documents

HIE | Publications - Western Sydney University
Ellsworth DS, Anderson IC, Crous KY, Cooke J, Drake JE, Gherlenda AN, Gimeno TE, Macdonald CA, Medlyn BE, Powell JR, Tjo

Mail Merge - Western Sydney University
Mail Merge .....Rather than typing the same information repeatedly you can set up a mail merge between the Student Acade

Reclaiming Australian Multiculturalism - Western Sydney University
Sep 8, 2016 - 'Reclaiming Australian Multiculturalism: policy and practice in a .... The initial concept of multicultura

OLT_LaTS summary_Criterion Wkshop - Western Sydney University
University), A/Prof Ian Solomonides (Macquarie University), Prof Suzi Vaughan (Queensland. University of Technology). St

Yiye LU - ResearchDirect - University of Western Sydney
May 27, 2014 - materials for Chinese learning, specifically for the English-speaking leaners. The. Character films could

ASEARC Proceedings - University of Western Sydney
These proceedings contain the papers of the Fourth Applied Statistics Education and Research Col- laboration (ASEARC) Co

Aesthetics, Government, Freedom - University of Western Sydney
The journal Key Words: A Journal of Cultural Materialism is available online: ..... In this way, in these terms, he inve

Download full program - Western Sydney University
Nov 15, 2017 - Palacio del Vino – Seafood/South American/Wine bar. Avenida Brasil #75. Concha y Toro 42 - Chilean/Sout

child-friendly schools - Unicef
3. 1 .1. Barriers to E ducation in E astern and Southern Africa. 4. 1.2. C hild-Friendly School D evelopment Model. 5. 2

Child Friendly Schools Manual - Unicef
breakthrough to literacy in Uganda. Retrieved. 21 October 2008 from http://www.unicef.org/ evaldatabase/files/2002_Ugand

Die Eisknigin: Zauber der Polarlichter (3) | Mohamed Al Daradji | Cardfight!! Vanguard G : Stride Gate-hen